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People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

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Unilever’s Keith Weed has been named president by The Advertising Association. Weed has spent most of his career at Unilever, first joining in 1983, and holding roles including marketing director and UK chairman.

 

 

 

 

Ewen Sturgeon has resigned as chief operating officer at Publicis.Sapient International to pursue opportunities outside the marketing industry after 26 years of agency life.

 

 

 

 

 

Facebook has named Mark D’Arcy as vice president of global business marketing and chief creative officer. In this role, he will oversee all marketing functions for the global business marketing organization.

 

 

 

 

Advertising industry veteran Bunker Sessions has been hired by Extreme Reach as vice president of Sell-Side Solutions. Sessions will be spearheading the development and deployment of Extreme Reach’s new sell-side solutions, addressing the creative sourcing needs of programmers and publishers.

 

 

 

 

Republica announced the promotion of Melissa Richter Bartolini to senior vice president and chief strategy officer. Before Republica, Bartolini worked at Razorfish and McCann Worldgroup.

 

 

 

 

 

Anheuser Busch In-Bev has appointed Pedro Earp as their new global CMO. Earp will now not only be the company’s global CMO but he will also be ZX Ventures officer.

 

 

 

 

 

Katharine Newby-Grant has been promoted to marketing director by Procter & Gamble. She will now oversee marketing for P&G in Northern Europe. Katharine joined the company in 2000.

 

 

 

 

Michael Murray has joined Wunderman as president and chief product officer. His mission will be to drive Wunderman’s data strategy. Murray comes from ItemMaster where he served as chief executive.

 

 

 

 

 

Mitú has laid off their CEO Herb Scannell, a television industry veteran who once ran Nickelodeon and BBC Worldwide North America, as well as Mitú president and co-founder, Beatriz Acevedo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tonia O’Connor has resigned as chief revenue officer for Univision. O’Connor joined Univision in January 2008 and she had spent 13 years at Gemstar-TV Guide before joining Univision.

 

 

 

 

 

What: Mitú has carved out a niche in the social space, helping brands leverage the World Cup to engage millennial Latinos.
Why it matters: The example set by Mitú at World Cup can serve as a template or at least a starting point for brands to connect with Hispanics through grand-scale sporting events.

Mexico fans at World Cup 2018 Credit: Soccer.ru

When the final goal is scored and the trophy awarded for this World Cup (@FIFAWorldCup), what will marketers and brands look back on as a measure for success in North America, especially with the U.S. and Canada not qualifying, and even some of the biggest Latino countries expected to deliver going out as late as the quarterfinals?

One thing we believe marketers will point to is the bounce gotten from the Latino audience, one which continues to grow and have a larger share of voice, be it in English or Spanish in the U.S. We saw the leverage Soccer United Marketing exploited through Mexico’s run, finding ways for brands to engage fans both of El Tri (@miseleccionmxENand those following the event in general, and media partners covering the games fully recognized the growth of engagement across all platforms with a targeted Latino audience that has been hard to quantify by risk averse media buyers before.

What they have done with platforms like Netflix they can do even more effectively with sports, and the World Cup represents a great best practice that can now spill over into the NFL, MLB, MLS and others like NASCAR

Another area that has seen growth has been the social space, and that is where another company has been able to show brands the way to effectively and successfully engage with the Latino demo during the games, and set a path for success going forward not just in soccer, but in all areas of sport.

The company is Mitú (@wearemitu), and its focus on delivering Latino millennials to brands exclusively through social continues to see a payoff as the games in Russia reach their end. The philosophy is a simple one: create branded content that is authentic and very targeted to the interests and engagement habits of young Latinos and open a window for those companies to create brand loyalty and a conversation on social just for that audience.

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The results for companies like Fox (@FOXSports), Toyota (@Toyota), Wendy’s (@Wendysand Jack in the Box (@JackBox ‏) have been very promising, with millions of impressions and sharing across Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and other social media platforms that could and should lead to more success down the road when World Cup is just a memory.

Mitú engages its audience through a Latino POV, representing the “200 percent” of youth who identify themselves as 100% American and 100% Latino. Mitú elevates and celebrates Latino stories, audiences and talent, putting them front and center in American pop culture. What they have done with platforms like Netflix they can do even more effectively with sports, and the World Cup represents a great best practice that can now spill over into the NFL, MLB, MLS and others like NASCAR, all major properties that crave a young audience, have had challenges engaging and retaining millennials, and need and want to show their brand partners even more of an ROI than ever before.

Herb Scannell

“Mitu represents the fastest growing and most influential demo in the U.S. today in Latino Millennials. With the U.S. not in this World Cup, smart brands like Toyota, Wendy’s, Jack in the Box, and obviously Fox Sports, realized they needed to reach our audience and engage them with content that is authentic and in-culture,” said CEO Herb Scannell (@herbscannelllast week. “They turned to us to create it for them. By engaging Latinos, these brands will be rewarded long after the tournament is over.”

While there was great angst from those looking toward the World Cup when the U.S. failed to qualify, the reality that settled in was pretty clear; now is the time to attach to and grow the Latino sports fan, be he or she a parent or an engaged digital savvy teen, and do it in the format that he or she is used to consuming. Even though it is still a work in progress it is clear that the takeaway from the past few weeks is that Latinos are engaged and brand loyal, and now there are quantifiable results with content that can be used for best practices for brands going forward. Maybe it would have been a bigger bonanza if 2018 was the coming out for young American stars on the field, but the real stars, the engaged consumer, especially the Latino ones, are starting to shine more, and companies like Mitu have really started to light that path for the future.

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Cover image: Wikimedia/Fadesga

What: The PGA Tour is continuing its partnership with social media network mitú, which reaches a massive, cross-cultural audience.
Why it matters: Hispanics aren’t traditionally huge golf consumers, but some specific strategies by the PGA Tour can help it market its Latino stars and build that fan base.

Lee Trevino, known as the “Merry Mex,” and “Chi-Chi” Rodriguez made their respective marks on the PGA Tour in decades past. And while most true golf fans will instantly recognize the names of those two golfing greats, they may be hard-pressed to identify a current player of Hispanic descent (hint: Mexican-American Pat Perez is the highest ranked at No. 25, and Jhonattan Vegas (@JhonattanVegasand Camilo Villegas (@CamiloVillegasRwere all part of a social media effort last year).

The personalities that Trevino and Rodriguez brought to the sport elevated their fandom across many generations, and among Hispanics and non-Hispanics alike. Vegas’s unlikely route from Maturín, Venezuela—a city and country not known for producing golf talent—and Villegas’s outsized personality—the female contingent following the Medellín, Colombia, native compares favorably with just about anyone on Tour—give Hispanic fans an easy pair to root for among a growing crop.

Trevino, Rodriguez and the current pros aside, golf has quite a task attracting a fan base considerably more familiar with the soccer pitch than the fairway.

The PGA Tour made a splash last year when it teamed with mitú (@wearemitu), a top content creator for young Latinos, for the aforementioned program with Vegas and Villegas (Spain’s Jon Rahm was also featured). The next phase is a series of videos, which according to SportsBusiness Journal’s John Lombardo won’t involve the players but instead follows young Latino fans as they learn about the game and its appeal.

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Camilo Villegas (credit: Steven Newton)

With others like youngsters Sebastián Muñoz (also of Colombia) and Emiliano Grillo of Argentina, both just 25, on the rise, courting the Hispanic fan base is a smart move for the Tour, which operates a series of events known as PGA Tour Latinoamérica (@PGATOURLA), in Mexico, Argentina, South Florida USA, Ecuador, the Dominican Republic and other countries, helping to boost the game there and serving as a feeder tour to develop new talent.

“We’re focused on showing how much fun golf, its stars and events can be to an audience that is seeking new and authentic experiences,” said Nelson Silverio, Senior Director of Marketing for the TOUR in a statement. “Our mitú partnership gives us the opportunity to show the PGA TOUR and its stars in a voice that is relevant to this audience.”

Trevino, Rodriguez and the current pros aside, golf has quite a task attracting a fan base considerably more familiar with the soccer pitch than the fairway. The effectiveness of the efforts with Vegas and Villegas last year is unclear, but any dent the Tour can put in bringing the growing Latino audience into the sport would be welcomed.

cover image: Jhonattan Vegas (courtesy PGA Tour)

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations announced that Daniel Alvarez has been named Vice President of Digital Product Management and Design. Alvarez will be responsible for leading the division’s product and designs teams and creating innovative digital products for English and Spanish-speaking local audiences.

 

 

 

 

Digital Remedy has announced that Keith “Kappy” Kaplan has been appointed to the company’s Board of Directors. His appointment follows the acquisition of CrowdHere and the elevation of its former CEO Nick Pahade to COO and President of Digital Remedy.

 

 

 

 

Dataxu has appointed technology industry veteran Benjamin Katz as SVP of Engineering and CIO. In his role, he will support dataxu’s engineering team and make sure that dataxu’s platforms deliver reliability, scale and AI while ensuring consumer data privacy and security capabilities.

 

 

 

 

Telemundo Station Group, part of the NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations division, announced that Luis Roldan and Roberto Vizcon, two seasoned broadcast professionals, will lead WTMO Telemundo.

 

 

 

 

Luis Roldan has been appointed President and General Manager of WTMO. He will oversee all operations of the station including news, sales, marketing and promotions, technology, digital and community affairs.

 

 

 

 

Roberto Vizcon will lead WTMO’s newsroom as Vice President of News. He will be responsible for the overall performance of WTMO’s news department and any other local productions across multiple media platforms. Vizcon will report to Roldan.

 

 

 

 

 

Motista, a predictive emotional connection intelligence solution provider, has expanded its Sales and Marketing teams with the hiring of Tom O’Sullivan as Executive Vice President of Sales, and Linda Vetter as VP of Marketing.

 

 

Based in its newly established New York Office, Tom O’Sullivan will be responsible for managing and developing a team of seasoned customer-focused sales professionals helping establish new client relationships with brand leaders looking to tap into consumer emotionally connected decision-making process driving top-line revenue growth.

 

 

 

 

Linda Vetter brings almost 20 years of B-to-B marketing experience to Motista. She is charged with building recognition and defining the unique business value of Predictive Emotional Connection Intelligence.

 

 

 

 

Mitú, the Latino-themed digital media company aimed at millenials, announced the addition of three executives who will oversee marketing, development of scripted film and television content, and premium digital content.

 

 

 

Zadi Díaz has been named vice president of digital studio for premium content. Diaz previously worked as executive producer at AwesomenessTV.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gina Reyes is the new vice president of scripted development for television and film. Reyes comes from Story House Entertainment at Univision, where she served as director of content development for English and Spanish-language scripted series. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rachel García has been named vice president of marketing and brand strategy. Garcia most recently served as vice president for marketing and social media for BBC America.

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

LUNA United, the modern content production agency within the communications group UNITED COLLECTIVE, announced that Adrian Castagna has joined as Head of Integrated Production. In this role, Castagna will propel in-house production to create content with cutting-edge design in response to the needs of today’s client and cultural demands.

 

 

 

 

Nancy Dubuc has been named CEO of Vice Media. Vice co-founder Shane Smith will take a new role as executive chairman. The news was announced a day after Dubuc stepped down from her position at A+E Networks.

 

 

 

 

 

Walt Disney Co. is reorganizing to create a direct-to-consumer and international unit. Kevin Mayer, Disney’s chief strategy officer since 2015, was named chairman of the new unit. The reorganization leaves Disney with four segments. In addition to the new unit, there are Media Networks; Studio Entertainment and a segment that combines Parks, Experiences, and Consumer Products.

 

 

 

 

MediaCom has promoted Kate Rowlinson to new managing director, Worldwide Hubs. She was previously joint managing director of EMEA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

BBC has named Kerris Bright as chief customer officer. In this newly-created role, she’ll be responsible for developing a “closer, more personal relationship” between the organization and consumers, namely license fee payers and those signing in to BBC services, the corporation said.

 

 

 

 

Jesús Chávez has been promoted from SVP of Operations to Chief Operating Officer at Latino digital media company mitú. Based in the company’s Los Angeles headquarters, he reports to CEO Herb Scannell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gastón Tourn is the new chief marketing officer of Badoo. He had previously worked at Google for almost 5 years.

 

 

 

 

 

Ogilvy Miami has announced the incorporation of two new creatives that will help expand the firm’s reach in the United States Hispanic market. Uriel Sanchez will take the role of Art Creative Director and Carlos Cervantes Perk will be Copy Creative Director. Both creatives have experience working at Ogilvy Mexico.

 

 

J. Walter Thompson Co. has announced it is eliminating the position of worldwide chief creative officer. Matt Eastwood, who has held that position since July 2014, will leave to “pursue other interests.”

 

 

 

 

 

Dawn Hudson announced plans to step down from her role as chief marketing officer of the National Football League.

 

 

 

 

What: Former President of Nickelodeon and President of BBC Worldwide North America Herb Scannell has been named CEO of mitú, the leading digital media brand for Latino millennials.
Why it matters: Scannell will assume his position immediately, and will be based at mitu’s headquarters in downtown Los Angeles.

Herb Scannell, formerly President of Nickelodeon, CEO and co-founder of Next New Networks – which was sold to YouTube – and President of BBC Worldwide North America, has been named CEO of mitú, the leading digital media brand for Latino millennials.

Scannell brings to the company a track record of successfully launching and scaling some of the most enduring franchises and innovative platforms in youth entertainment.  During his tenure at Nickelodeon, Scannell oversaw the launch of iconic properties, including Dora the Explorer, SpongeBob SquarePants and Rugrats. In addition to his role at Nickelodeon, Scannell was the Vice Chairman of MTV networks and oversaw adult brands Spike and TV Land, among other businesses.

After leaving Nickelodeon, Scannell served as founding CEO of Next New Networks, a pioneer in the online video network space, partnering with independent web creators to produce and package innovative original web content. Next New Networks was acquired by YouTube in 2011. Scannell subsequently joined BBC Worldwide as President, North America, where he oversaw a portfolio that included the flagship cable channel BBC America, as well as sales of the vast BBC library and original shows via its LA-based original production group.

The Latino youth market, today 25% of American youth, is the fastest growing U.S. population

“As the son of a proud Puerto Rican mom, mitú’s promise speaks to me professionally and personally,” Scannell said. “I have long advocated that the Latino market is underserved. Within a generation, Latinos are projected to represent the majority of youth in the U.S., and the most influential and sought-after audience in entertainment. So when the chance to run the fastest growing digital media company in the sector came up, I was very excited to join Beatriz and the team.”

“It’s rare to find somebody who was at the top of industry in traditional media, and has also run a successful Internet startup that was sold to YouTube,” said Mark Suster, Managing Partner of Upfront Ventures. “Herb is a genius at leading the creation of new content formats. The fact that he’s also Latino was just incredible.”

Beatriz Acevedo, Founder & President of mitú, remains at the company and will take on an expanded role to lead all content, production, talent development and social impact efforts.

Acevedo said: “I have so much respect for Herb and for the legendary brands and franchises he built, so I am incredibly excited to now have the opportunity to partner and work alongside him, and build our mitú brand as the voice of this generation.”

The Latino youth market, today 25% of American youth, is the fastest growing U.S. population, contributing US$2.1 trillion in goods and services (GDP) every year in the U.S. There are 58 million Latinos in the United States. If U.S. Latinos were their own country, they would have the 7th largest GDP in the world.This powerful group also carries tremendous economic influence in media and pop culture, over-indexing vs. non-Latinos on movie ticket sales, mobile phone usage, online video consumption, social media usage and social media sharing (26% more than non-Latinos). There are 414 million people in the world whose primary language is Spanish, while only 335 million have their primary language as English.

Scannell is a board member of the Latino Donor Collaborative (LDC), a group of U.S. Latino business leaders and CEOs, whose mission is to redefine the Latino brand in media and marketing. He also served as Chairman of the Board of NY Public Radio, and is on the Board of Ballet Hispanico, a leading Hispanic dance and cultural institution based in New York City.

Scannell will assume his position immediately, and will be based at mitu’s headquarters in downtown Los Angeles.

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What: WPP has made a strategic investment in 88rising, a US-based producer of digital content catering to the Asian millennial market.
Why it matters: The investment completes WPP’s other multicultural investment in companies such as Woven Digital, which creates content for the millennial male market in the US, and Mitú, the digital media company focused on developing content for Latino youth.

WPP announced that it has made a strategic investment in 88rising, Inc. (“88rising”), a US-based producer of digital content catering to the Asian millennial market.  Terms of the investment were not disclosed.

88rising has branded and sponsored content deals with companies such as adidas, Maybelline and Revolve, an online fashion and cosmetics retailer. It employs approximately 15 people. It is based in New York with an office in Los Angeles, with plans to open an office in Shanghai. It was founded in 2015.

88rising is a multi-platform digital media company that focuses on content about Asia and Asian culture. To date, 88rising has produced over 500 hours of original content that has generated over 80 million total video views on Facebook and YouTube. More than half of 88rising’s 16-34-year-old viewers are in the Asia Pacific region.

The investment continues WPP’s strategy of focusing on three key areas that differentiate the Group’s offering to clients: technology, data and content. The Group has invested in multiple specialized digital content companies like Russell Simmons’ All Def Digital, a leader in producing and distributing music and digital content for the important-to-reach, urban-centric youth culture, and Refinery29, a fashion and lifestyle media company that provides content, shopping solutions and social networking opportunities in the fashion, shopping and beauty categories targeted towards millennial women.

WPP has also invested in Woven Digital, which creates content for the millennial male market in the US, and Mitú, the digital media company focused on developing content for Latino youth in the US and worldwide. The Group has also strategic investments in Fullscreen, Indigenous Media, Imagina (a content rights and media company based in Spain), MRC and VICE.

WPP’s digital assets also include companies such as Acceleration (marketing technology consultancy), Cognifide (content management technology), Conexance (data cooperative), Salmon (e-commerce), and Hogarth (digital production technology). WPP also has investments in innovative technology services companies such as Globant and Mutual Mobile, as well as ad technology companies such as AppNexus, comScore (data investment management), Domo, mySupermarket, Percolate and ScrollMotion.

WPP’s roster of wholly owned digital agencies include AKQA, Blue State Digital, Essence, F.biz, Mirum, POSSIBLE, Triad Retail Media, VML and Wunderman.

WPP’s digital revenues were over US$7.5 billion in 2016, representing 39% of the Group’s total revenues of US$19.4 billion. WPP has set a target of 40-45% of revenue to be derived from digital in the next four to five years. In North America, WPP companies (including associates) collectively generate revenues of US$7.5 billion and employ almost 29,000 people.

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A summary of the most exciting recent news in online video and ad-tech in the US, US-Hispanic and Latin American markets. If you’re trying to keep up, consider this your one-stop shop.

US/US HISPANIC MARKET

In mid-December Facebook broadcast its first ever live 360 video. The time of the broadcast was synchronized with the emergence of unnamed scientists who were in pods at Utah’s Mars Landscape for the last 80 days. Facebook said,“Today, we are excited to announce a new way to go live on Facebook: live 360.” The live 360 video technology  is built to allow the viewers to watch the events in real-time around the world. The feature of live 360 video was available later in December on Facebook live’s API. Similarly Twitter introduced a 360 live streaming feature in lat December.

Sometime later this year the subscription TV service Hulu, which currently offers a big catalog of on-demand TV shows from major networks, will roll out live TV. The live version of Hulu will cost less than US $40 per month for live channels from ABC/Disney, CBS and Fox as well as a bunch of cable channels (Note: CBS owns CNET). In some cities it will provide local broadcast feeds. It streams over the Internet, lets subscribers cancel and re-up anytime, and doesn’t require any contracts. With YouTube expected to launch live TV later this year, 2017 will bring more alternatives to cable TV than ever.

Portada interviewed key executives from Hulu and Pongalo and VidaPrimo about their OTT monetization plans in 2017.

Mitú, a digital network for Latino youth, announced the launch of its channel on Snapchat Discover. The new partnership will help Snap become a leader in delivering English language content with a Latino lens on Snapchat Discover. “As the leading voice of Latino youth in America, we’re excited that Snap acknowledges and understands the importance of connecting with what is the most strategic demo in American youth today,” Danny Johnson, Chief Marketing Officer of mitu.

Portada estimates that the Hispanic Online Video Ad market volume will climb to US $450 million by 2020. Particularly high growth is to be expected by branded content videos. Among video ad-tipes, in-stream will continue to have the largest share, although out-stream will grow at a higher rate.

LiveIntent and Rubicon Project announced a partnership which automates access to LiveIntent’s email inventory for Rubicon Project’s clients. Rubicon Project will establish a new private marketplace through its Orders technology accessible through its ad platform.

Smartycontent, a company providing advanced digital video solutions that integrates audiences, content, and advertising across the publishing and advertising value chain, and RedMas, a Cisneros Interactive company, announced a joint venture to launch Smartycontent America in Latin America and the United States.
The alliance brings together the technology of Smartycontent – which provides publishers access to a digital video platform for the content management publishing and monetization of their online video content via a variety of video advertising formats – and the scope of RedMas, one of the leading digital advertising networks in the Americas.. The platform, called smartyCenter, integrates the entire process in a 360° format, which provides a full stack video cloud incorporating CMS, CDN (Amazon web services), Hosting, Video Players, DMP, SSP, and a Content Market Place connected to major news agencies for the syndication of content; all without any fixed costs for Publishers,” stated German Herebia, CEO of RedMas. “RedMas, with the support of Cisneros Interactive, has made a significant investment in video, which is the fastest growing category in digital media,” added Gonzalo Alonso, General Director of Smartycontent America.

Taco Bell is working on a substantial branded long-form video content investment that began in early December and will continue with at least 40 pieces of content during 2017. The fast-food restaurant chain is launching “Taco Tales” on YouTube —a six-episode web series that features re-enactments of people’s adventures in retrieving Taco Bell with comedians and YouTube personalities in the starring roles. The series was created in partnership with L.A.-based content studio Madison + Vine, and will be followed up with another six-episode run of a Taco Bell clip show that uses the content that already existed from Bell enthusiasts, with the participation of the creators, in a The Soup or Tosh.O-style format.

Audience-technology firm YuMe launched what it’s calling an “immersive 360-degree video ad format.” The unit aims to offer consumers the ability to control their interactions with ads by simply swiping or moving their mobile device.Among the benefits of YuMe’s 360-degree video ad unit are immersive ad experiences at scale without the need for a dedicated app to view the ad. acustomizable format that enables advertisers to add their own animated introduction, branded overlays, click to action, and image galleries. New reporting metrics on how customers interact with a brand’s creative. For example, marketers can track the area of the video a consumer viewed throughout the duration of an ad, such as tracking engagement based on where a consumer is looking in the panoramic field of view. YuMe said the auto, entertainment travel, and retail verticals have strong potential to create stronger bonds with their customers by using the new format.

Portada‘s 2017 Online Marketing Guide is out! Download it for free and get the latest in opportunities and challenges in the industry, video ad market forecasts and video audience development.

LATAM MARKET

The French mobile programmatic platform S4M announced the end of their Brazilian operations, just after completing one year with local offices in Sao Paulo and two years of local business. The Latin American operations are being transferred to Miami, whereas FTPI/Boobox will begin charge of representing S4M in Brazil. S4M is creating a hub in Miami that will join their business efforts from the New York offices and develop further contracts focusing on Mexico, Colombia and Panama — betting on the potential of the Caribbean market. S4m also intends to offer the Latin American inventory to the U.S. Hispanic market.

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Planeta Digital, part of Brazilian publisher Grupo Estado in Brazil, closed a deal with American company ReachLocal, which is part of Gannett Group. The agreement brings Reach Local’s digital marketing solution to Planeta Digital’s portfolio and vice-versa. One of the goals is to grow the companies’ combined client base, currently reaching 6,000 small and medium businesses, by 30% in the first year. “Accessing these services is a great development for the Brazilian market. Thirty years ago we started by offering marketing services to smb. Now, there are many other opportunities”, said Francisco Mesquita, director and president, Grupo Estado, in a statement published on their main media website, Estadão.

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Major Multi Channel Networks (MCN’s), or Multiplatform Networks (MPN’s) like some want to be called, are expanding into Latin America. Latin America is a region which is almost a natural extension for those who are already present in the U.S. Hispanic market. MiTú Network is one of the main platforms entering the Latin American market. Portada talked to Adeline Cassin, Head of International Revenue at MiTú Network, about the platform’s expansion into Latin America.

cassinAdeline Cassin’s  (photo) professional growth reflects the evolution from linear TV to digital TV. Formerly an executive at Discovery Communications, where she was Head of Commercial Strategy & Sales for Digital Platforms & TV, Cassin now heads International Revenue for MiTú Network out of Miami.
Cassin notes that in her previous role at Discovery, just as importantly as her TV roles, she “was responsible for leading the strategy and revenue growth across Latin America and US Hispanic for all of the digital platforms.”
Cassin explains that “Mitú is the leading MPN (Multiplatform Network) of Latin Talent, Social Influence, & Content Creation. Latin America is a key region for us, and we have a strong team strategically focused on continuing to expand our footprint of talent, production, partnerships and client services.” Ultimately Mitú’s mission is to lead Latin social influence on a global scale.

From MCN to MPN…

Asked on whether MCNs now want to be called MPN (Multi platform networks), because they want to depend less on Youtube, Cassin answers that MiTú’s network of talent and original productions lives wherever the audience is. “MPN is a more accurate way of describing who we are, as our talent and our content live everywhere from YouTube to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, Vine, platforms that are just emerging, and even TV. At the end of the day we are about great content and great talent. And when you have a great story, people will tune in, no matter what screen or platform they access from.”

Collaborative Integrations

MituberoOne of the main trends currently in the Online Video World is the emergence of branded entertainment as one of the main vehicles to monetize audiences. Asked on how important branded entertainment, compared to pre-roll video advertisin is in Mitú’s LatAm offering, Cassin states that branded entertainment, “or as we refer to as collaborative integration, is key to capturing the audience’s attention, engagement, and perspective of a product or brand. It allows the brand to tell their story beyond the scope of a 30 second commercial, and connect with the hearts and minds of their consumers in true collaboration with talent and content creation that already has high affinity, engagement, and loyalty with the audience.”

Collaborative Integration allows the brand to tell their story beyond the scope of a 30 second commercial, and connect with consumers in true collaboration with talent and content creation that already has high affinity, engagement, and loyalty with the audience.

Lack of Online Video Ad Inventory

Major industry observers have noted that Online Video Inventory Scarcity is one of the major challenges to the growth of the Latin American online video sector. Cassin notes that, “there is certainly some pressure on key segments for in stream ad inventory, but at Mitú, not only do we have a solid capacity of in stream inventory available, additionally, and perhaps more importantly, we have standardized content and influencer marketing which affords our partner brands the opportunity to maximize their reach across the LatAm social ecosystem.”

No Geographic Barriers…

The digital world has brought down geographic barriers, markets are now much more a function of common language and culture. “The beauty of digital is, social talent and leading content is present wherever the audience can access the internet, from the enormous cities of Mexico D.F. and São Paulo to the most remote town in Patagonia,” says Cassin.  As an example she notes that her network includes “leading talent from the U.S. Hispanic market, and we see audience tuning into them from Latin America”

…for the new Celebrities.

“Today’s social talent are from all over the world. Social influencers are no longer the alternative to celebrities, they are the new celebrities. When they have a story to tell, and are passionate about how they tell that story, they can gain worldwide renown regardless of their country of origin. In fact, some of the leading talent in the Mitú network are top ranked globally.”

More articles about Latin MPNs targeting the Latin World:
One more Latin MCN: FAV Network launches with Emiliano Saccone
Spain based MCN conquers the Latin World
Newfronts: Liquidthread and Condé Nast Bet on Millennial Latinos

Last week our Digital Media Correspondent Susan Kuchinskas reported about the maturing Newfronts Marketplace, the digital upfronts that are finishing today in New York City after two very hectic weeks. Now let’s look at the most important Multicultural related news that came out of the 2015 NewFronts.

Starcom MediaVest partners with MiTu and Maker to reach Hispanics

iab-events-header-newfronts (1)Starcom MediaVest Group’s Global Creative Practice LiquidThread, signed a deal to invest more than US $10 million to reach Hispanic audiences around the world through a new partnership between Maker Studios and Hispanic-focused online video network MiTu that will have the companies developing original series for that audience, says Juan Davila, LiquidThread’s global head of business development and SVP. LiquidThread services clients globally including US Hispanic and Latin America.
Davila tells Portada that “When you sum the totality of this group, both native and of Hispanic origin, it becomes an imperative to keep a pulse of their cultural evolution. Maker Studios and MiTu are leading the way in the cultural media evolution.” Davila adds that the partnership will be about “seamless, organic integration of branded entertainment in order to respect the integrity and authenticity of the influencer and its programming.

The partnership will be about seamless, organic integration of branded entertainment.

The target audience for this new LiquidThread/MiTu/Maker Studios partnership is, according to Davila, a wide spectrum of product categories, but it may be skewed towards Millennial and generation Z but that is also changing with the addition of new influencers and the rapid proliferation of internet entertainment engagement. “Some of these influencers have more fans than traditional Hollywood celebrities, ” Davila concludes.

Condé Nast introduces Vida Belleza Latina

CNECondé Nast Entertainment (CNÉ), Condé Nast’s video production arm announced ‘Vida Belleza’–a new lifestyle channel targeting Hispanic millennials. Vida y Belleza is Conde Nast’s 19th channel, Vida Belleza and features programming for and by influential female Latino Millennial. Launching later this year, Vida Belleza will bring together the authenticity of a new generation of Latino storytellers with the access and reach of CNÉ’s network. Vida Belleza will offer a full spectrum of programming covering beauty, food, lifestyle, celebrity, culture and docuseries.
Dawn Ostroff, President, CNÉ commented: “Like cable in the early days, the economics of premium digital video are maturing and enabling the industry to up its game. CNÉ started out with a mandate to launch digital video channels for Condé Nast and, in just a few short years, has become a major player in the production, distribution and innovation of digital video. At last year’s NewFronts, we put our stake in the ground and announced the launch of The Scene, the first-ever platform for premium digital video. This year, we’re taking our business to the next level. Our rapid growth confirms what we have always believed: digital video is a strong and valuable business with an exciting future.”

CNÉ is said selling advertisers inventory on The Scene at higher rates than YouTube can charge, leveraging its brand equity, the quality of its programming, and branded video series,

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

Many are the platforms that provide users with 24/7/365 video content, much of which is created by the same users that consume it. While some of the content creators contribute sporadically, others have already become “domestic celebrities”, and have already started making money out of what started out as a pastime. Youtube is a good example for this: through their Partner Program, users that generate and upload original content can earn revenue from the ads that appear on their own channel.  While this has happened for years already in the U.S., it is a novelty in the U.S. Hispanic market and Latin America…and not least in Spain where MCN 2Btube has pan-latin ambitions.

Lorena Hure contributed to this article

hub-networks101-manageThis might seem like a fad for many, however, something seems to be going on when you see that an Argentinean showman and TV tycoon like Marcelo Tinelli, recently created his own Youtube Channel (whose first uploaded video had him as the protagonist). as a clear sign of the potential opportunity the internet has over the traditional television channel where he has ruled the roost in Argentina over the past 25 years.

It is in this context, that multi-channel networks make their grand appearance in the Latin World. According to Youtube’s website, “multi-Channel Networks (MCNs) are entities that affiliate with multiple YouTube channels, often to offer assistance in areas such as product, programming, funding, cross-promotion, partner management, digital rights management, monetization/sales, and/or audience development”. In other words, the purpose of MCNs is to help professionalize users in their video content production and management, thus sharing the revenue generated as a result of the service provided.

 The purpose of MCNs is to help professionalize users in their video content production and management.

In Latin America, this phenomenon seems to be gaining speed with the launch of FAV Network, a digital entertainment company managed by seasoned TV professionals, whose aim is to connect global creators, audiences and advertisers around the Latino cultural DNA. Another example is that of MiTú, which in 2014 reached a partnership agreement with Maker Studios (owned by Disney) in order to develop original content aimed at the US Hispanic market. In the long-term, MCN’s target TV advertising budgets as audiences have shifted or are shifting to online video consumption.

descargaAn important factor revolving around MCNs in Latin America is the common language spoken in the region. As Fabienne Fourquet (CEO at 2btube.com) puts it “approximately 470 million people speak Spanish as a native language, making it second to Mandarin in terms of its number of native speakers worldwide. Most MCNs have either a local focus, regional or global focus but rarely a ‘language’ focus”.

And “language focus”, seems to be 2btube’s main differentiator. According to Fourquet, “At 2btube, we believe that content can be produced locally with Spanish-speaking talents, and reach the global Latino and Spanish audience and advertisers around the world”.

Most MCNs have either a local focus, regional or global focus but rarely a ‘language’ focus’.

2btube’s executive team is made up of seasoned professionals in traditional and digital TV production and distribution: Fabienne Fourquet as CEO, Bastian Manintveld as Executive President, Ricardo Blach as Director, and Joan Carles Martorell as Operations Manager.

The enormous opportunities in the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic online video landscape will be examined in-depth by major experts of the brand marketing, agency, media and measurement world at Portada’s Latin Online Video Forum on June 3 in Miami (part of #Portadalat.)

Madrid, Miami…and Mexico City

2Btube, The Spanish MCN already has a 20-people office in Madrid, Spain, with a 300-square meters production studio. They plan to have an office with a Talent Management team and Regional ad sales team in Wynwood, Miami to work with U.S. Latino content companies and talents as well as advertisers who want to target the large U.S. Latino audience. They will also open a large office and production studio in Mexico City before the end of Q1 2015.

This, certainly, opens up a window of opportunities for Spanish speaking talents, who will be able to reach Latino and Spanish-speaking audiences around the world, as well as advertisers interested in these consumers. The language factor may also contribute greatly to the products’ commercialization and distribution, thus making this region more competitive and efficient than others.

Even if multi-channel networks are in their infancy in Latin America, and to a lesser extent in the U.S. Hispanic market, chances are they will become popular fast. It is just a matter of seeing how everything develops during 2015.

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

 

Many are the platforms that provide users with 24/7/365 video content, much of which is created by the same users that consume it. While some of the content creators contribute sporadically, others have already become “domestic celebrities”, and have already started making money out of what started out as a pastime. Youtube is a good example for this: through their Partner Program, users that generate and upload original content can earn revenue from the ads that appear on their own channel.  While this has happened for years already in the U.S., it is a novelty in the U.S. Hispanic market and Latin America…and not least in Spain where MCN 2Btube has pan-latin ambitions.

 

hub-networks101-manageThis might seem like a fad for many, however, something seems to be going on when you see that an Argentinean showman and TV tycoon like Marcelo Tinelli, recently created his own Youtube Channel (whose first uploaded video had him as the protagonist). as a clear sign of the potential opportunity the internet has over the traditional television channel where he has ruled the roost in Argentina over the past 25 years.

It is in this context, that multi-channel networks make their grand appearance in the Latin World. According to Youtube’s website, “multi-Channel Networks (MCNs) are entities that affiliate with multiple YouTube channels, often to offer assistance in areas such as product, programming, funding, cross-promotion, partner management, digital rights management, monetization/sales, and/or audience development”. In other words, the purpose of MCNs is to help professionalize users in their video content production and management, thus sharing the revenue generated as a result of the service provided.

 The purpose of MCNs is to help professionalize users in their video content production and management

In Latin America, this phenomenon seems to be gaining speed with the launch of FAV Network, a digital entertainment company managed by seasoned TV professionals, whose aim is to connect global creators, audiences and advertisers around the Latino cultural DNA. Another example is that of MiTú, which in 2014 reached a partnership agreement with Maker Studios (owned by Disney) in order to develop original content aimed at the US Hispanic market. In the long-term, MCN’s target TV advertising budgets as audiences have shifted or are shifting to online video consumption.

descargaAn important factor revolving around MCNs in Latin America is the common language spoken in the region. As Fabienne Fourquet (CEO at 2btube.com) puts it “approximately 470 million people speak Spanish as a native language, making it second to Mandarin in terms of its number of native speakers worldwide. Most MCNs have either a local focus, regional or global focus but rarely a ‘language’ focus”.

And “language focus”, seems to be 2btube’s main differentiator. According to Fourquet, “At 2btube, we believe that content can be produced locally with Spanish-speaking talents, and reach the global Latino and Spanish audience and advertisers around the world”.

Most MCNs have either a local focus, regional or global focus but rarely a ‘language’ focus”

2btube’s executive team is made up of seasoned professionals in traditional and digital TV production and distribution: Fabienne Fourquet as CEO, Bastian Manintveld as Executive President, Ricardo Blach as Director, and Joan Carles Martorell as Operations Manager.

The enormous opportunities in the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic online video landscape will be examined in-depth by major experts of the brand marketing, agency, media and measurement world at Portada’s Latin Online Video Forum on June 3 in Miami (part of #Portadalat.)

Madrid, Miami…and Mexico City

2Btube, The Spanish MCN already has a 20-people office in Madrid, Spain, with a 300-square meters production studio. They plan to have an office with a Talent Management team and Regional ad sales team in Wynwood, Miami to work with U.S. Latino content companies and talents as well as advertisers who want to target the large U.S. Latino audience. They will also open a large office and production studio in Mexico City before the end of Q1 2015.

This, certainly, opens up a window of opportunities for Spanish speaking talents, who will be able to reach Latino and Spanish-speaking audiences around the world, as well as advertisers interested in these consumers. The language factor may also contribute greatly to the products’ commercialization and distribution, thus making this region more competitive and efficient than others.

Even if multi-channel networks are in their infancy in Latin America, and to a lesser extent in the U.S. Hispanic market, chances are they will become popular fast. It is just a matter of seeing how everything develops during 2015.

Hispanic YouTube stars come out of nowhere … Una chica makes some videos in her bedroom. Two years later, maybe she’s talking to 15 other kids – or maybe she has 7.5 million subscribers to her YouTube channel.

Source: JustJaredJR.com
Source: JustJaredJr.com

The most high-profile of the latter is Bethany Mota, AKA Macbarbie07. Mota began producing “haul” videos in 2009, showing off new purchases. Her first video shows a shy, subdued tween sitting in an under-lit bedroom rambling on about some makeup she bought.

Fast forward to 2014, and Mota is on the cover of Fast Company and launching her own clothing line from Aeropostale, while flying around the world producing kicky videos about style and shopping – oh, and appearing on Dancing with the Stars.

There are plenty of Hispanic video stars, including Rosanne Pansino, Tiffany Garcia and Divino.

There will always be competition in launching new video destinations, but nothing of the scale that YouTube has achieved.

Why one blows up and another doesn’t is somewhat mysterious. For example, in her second-ever video, Mota gives a shout-out to a mentor, Blair Fowler, known on YouTube as juicystar07. Fowler began covering the style and beauty territory earlier than Mota, yet she’s coasted along at around 150,000 views per video. That’s nothing to sneeze at: Any brand would be happy with that many views of its video. But it can’t compare to the 5 to 8 million views Mota typically garners.

Secret weapons

While YouTube provides information and tools for its creators to help them garner more views, some stars have an extra edge in the form of multi-channel networks, or MCNs. This confusing moniker refers to companies that act as talent agencies and ad-sales networks for video bloggers. Many of them also produce custom content for brands featuring the stars in their networks.

MCN Omni Media and Channel Factory recently launched a joint venture called Content Labs to act as a branded content studio. Channel Factory is a native video marketing and YouTube video-ad-buying platform.

Omnia has a stable of video talent, including Hispanic stars Baby Rasta y Gringo, Divino and Garcia’s iHasCupquake. It aims to continue creating custom branded content employing the digital influencers within its MCN. Channel Factory has expertise in the granular targeting of specific audiences and optimizing videos for high clickthrough rates and ROI, according to Tamoor Shafi, CEO of Omnia Media.

target omni promo2
iHasCupquake promo for Target

“Our focus in the past two years has been working with top influencers. Sales and interest from brands has increased exponentially,” Shafi says. For example, it landed a deal with Target for four iHasCupquake episodes in which Garcia decorated dorm rooms.

Omnia helps video bloggers develop their audiences on YouTube and beyond. For example, EME Music, Baby Rasta y Gringo’s label, had only a small presence on YouTube, so Omnia helped it establish a few new channels and launch content, making use of its expertise about best practices on YouTube, such as the best time to upload, how to properly tag content and search engine optimization.

Divino’s channel had only 5,000 subscribers. When he launched two new songs, Omnia helped EME cross-promote them with strategies including targeted ad buys and placements in more popular playlists, as well as driving views through likes and favorites. The campaign bumped his subscriber numbers up to close to 40,000.

MiTú is another of the many MCNs that provide talent development services as well as opportunities for their stars to participate in sponsorship and ad opportunities. It provides them with an internal platform called MiTuVero.com that lets them check out branded opportunities they might want to participate in, as well as submit their own original content ideas. They can keep abreast of what other channels are doing and what’s working for them.

A lot of Hispanic talent creates content for a global audience.

Says Charlie Echeverry, MiTú’s chief revenue officer, “Analytics means more money and audience for these influencers. Every one of them wants to create new, bigger-budget things that can be upstreamed to other platforms.”

Internationalization

It’s interesting that many of these young online stars are not creating Hispanic-specific content, nor are their fan bases predominantly Hispanic. At the same time, non-Hispanic stars recognize the importance of the Hispanic audience. According to Shafi, Inna has a very large following in Mexico, and Omnia is helping her to optimize her video content to bring in more fans from Latin America. “A lot of Hispanic talent creates content for a global audience,” he says.

Going Over the Top from YouTube?

Next, Omnia Media plans to create branded mobile and web apps for its talent that will be used to deliver their content outside of YouTube. It’s also launched a new ecommerce initiative called iRockCustom.com to sell merchandise for its talent stable. It will design, produce and sell merchandise for its stars; each star will have a unique URL that he or she can market to their fans.

More and more of these young influencers are, with the help of their MCNs, trying to build a strong brand that’s less dependent on YouTube. That’s partly due to the fragmentation of video and the rising importance of sites including Vimeo, Vine, Twitter and Blip.tv.

But it’s also because YouTube takes, in most cases, a 45 percent cut of all ad revenue, although it reportedly is trying to do better in supporting its top stars. YouTube did not respond to several requests for an interview.

Iddo Shah, Kaltura
Iddo Shai, Kaltura

Fueling potential flight from YouTube is a series of acquisitions of MCNs by mainstream entertainment companies. For example, Maker Studios, recently acquired by Disney, likely hopes to move as much of its audience as it can off YouTube and onto Maker.tv, according to Iddo Shai, director of product marketing for Kaltura, an end-to-end, over-the-top video platform.

He points out that right now, it’s difficult for advertisers to do integrated campaigns that include YouTubers’ videos and other media, as well as to create the innovative campaigns that marketers crave.

“On YouTube at this time, that is very hard to do. There are some changes on YouTube, and maybe they will become more flexible in what they especially allow the upper talent to do. But they will never give full access — and rightfully so. They are a strong platform and want to control much of the revenue and the content,” Shai says.

But the MCNs are becoming strong in their own right. They have to race with YouTube to reserve advertising on their stars’ videos. Whoever reserves first gets the inventory, making it harder to plan and execute the larger campaigns that MCNs are increasingly angling for.

Omni’s contracts with talent usually include obtaining exclusive rights to selling their YouTube inventory – except, of course, for YouTube, which also can sell it. Some contracts include the exclusive right to sell brand content on their channels. While Omnia competes with YouTube to sell its stars regular inventory, Shai points out that there are a lot of cases where the companies collaborate, with YouTube handling the media side and Omnia selling the custom ad products.

Will these rising stars flee YouTube altogether? Not a chance, according to Shai. He says, “There will always be competition in launching new video destinations, but nothing of the scale that YouTube has achieved.”

Other articles on the emerging (Hispanic) online video media and marketing sector: MCNs in Hot Pursuit of Brands and Are Multichannel Networks the Future of TV?

In the second  article on Multichannel Networks (MCNs), Portada Digital Media Correspondent Susan Kuchinskas looks at  how MCNs gather the best of independent video programming, often being distributed via YouTube channels, and then play matchmaker between brands and individual content creators.

Steve Minichini, Assembly
Steve Minichini, Assembly

Agencies have long relied on YouTube for its huge reach. It serves a very specific purpose within the online video advertising realm, according to Steve Minichini, managing partner at  MDC Partners-owned Assembly. “At Assembly, our digital video philosophy centers around a specific approach which blends top-tier video sponsorships coupled with a mix of second- and third-tier video providers to ensure we have the right balance of targeting, reach and efficiency,” Minchini says. Right now, he adds, his agency sees YouTube as a reach play for that second- and third-tier video content.

But the MCNs aim to change that. Multichannel networks are similar to the blog ad networks of yore. They try to gather the best of independent video programming, often being distributed via YouTube channels, and then play matchmaker between brands and individual content creators, while providing varying levels of business development advice to the YouTube celebrities. Brands appreciate MCNs because they enable them to work with one business-minded point of contact.

A “frenemy” called YouTube

MCNs are looking to expand beyond the YouTube platform for a couple of reasons. First, they hope to increase profits. Google takes a reported 45 percent cut of YouTube ad revenue, although individual creators or networks may negotiate better deals. Second, there’s not enough flexibility in YouTube’s ad formats.

Today’s online video stars have huge audiences that definitely would watch a few prerolls to get the content.

Today’s online video stars have huge audiences that definitely would watch a few prerolls to get the content, says Iddo Shai, director of product marketing for Kaltura, a new end-to-end, over-the-top video platform that provides monetization, social interaction and personalization. “So the online inventory is actually very significant. On YouTube at this time, prerolls are very hard to do.” He notes that YouTube has been making some changes in order to become more flexible in what they allow the upper tiers of talent to do. “But they will never give full access — and rightfully so. They are a strong platform and want to control much of the revenue and the content,” Shai says.

xyrtec casa linda MiTuNow, MCNs are pitching custom, branded content deals, product placements, spokespeople – you name it – for the producers in their stables. New Buzz TV CEO Nicholas Buzzell points out that online distribution platforms enable things like clicking through a video ad to buy a product or download a coupon.

MiTú, an MCN targeting the Hispanic and Latin American realm,  has created a sizzle reel pitching branded entertainment, original content, programming by MiTú’s top influencers, and “influencer clip seeding.” As an example of branded content, a demonstration of flower arranging on the YouTube channel Casa Linda is sponsored by allergy medicine brand Zyrtec and includes a shot of the product on-set.

You can’t buy a YouTube channel, but you can buy the networks that manage them.

Acquisition targets

There’s also huge demand for MCNs on the part of established entertainment companies. You can’t buy a YouTube channel, but you can buy the networks that manage them. The same week that New Buzz launched, AT&T and The Chernin Group announced that their subsidiary, Otter Media, would buy Fullscreen, the not-quite-four-year-old MCN that manages more than 50,000 content creators with a collective range of 450 million subscribers and 4 billion monthly views. The Chernin Group also has invested in MiTú. Last year, Dreamworks bought AwesomenessTV, and earlier this year, Disney acquired Maker Studios, while Warner Bros. made a strategic investment in Machinima.

These companies are buying access to eyeballs and talent, according to Shai – at least for now. Down the road, he thinks Disney et alia could take an MCN star’s shtick and spin it off into a TV series or feature film. He says, “Once you’re in business with a guy who has 30 million followers, you can really do something with it.”

Amy Pham of Maker
Amy Pham of Maker

It remains to be seen, he adds, how the very independent YouTube sensations will take to working with a control-freaking behemoth like Disney. “This different breed of talent who are used to doing whatever they want to do, and turning down a deal if they don’t feel it’s right for them … how will they fit into a huge entity like Disney?”

Multichannel networks are similar to the blog ad networks of yore. They try to gather the best of independent video programming, often being distributed via YouTube channels, and then play matchmaker between brands and individual content creators.

That’s where the MCNs can prove that those multi-million-dollar acquisitions were worthwhile. Meanwhile, Shai thinks the MCNs will try to build their own brands away from YouTube. While video personalities have a fair number of what he calls “soft fans” who probably only would watch on YouTube, there’s definitely a significant chunk of those 30 or whatever millions of fans who will pay to get more access to their favorite talent. He thinks Maker will slowly but surely start to promote its own brand, build some apps and eventually have its own channel on Roku or other connected TV platforms. Shai says, “They will definitely have a strong enough distribution platform that they fully control, keep all the ad revenue and can do sponsorships. They can do more than what YouTube gives them.”

In a world where cable and the web are fragmented, we would become a tile in this digital universe.

This is the vision that Buzzell of NBTV Studios shares. He says, “The MCN model we’re seeing today is the first iteration of what this space will become.” Ultimately, he sees New Buzz being an equal player with NBC or Fox and accessible from any device. He says, “In a world where cable and the web are fragmented, we would become a tile in this digital universe.”

This is the second of two articles exploring how Multichannel Networks (MCNs) work and their role in the emerging online video ecosystem. The first article is “Are Multichannel Networks the future of TV?”

The Multichannel Network (MCN) World is smoking hot. YouTube content has grown up – so much so that it’s growing off the platform, thanks to multichannel networks, or MCNs, that are investing in original content and investigating new distribution channels. Is this the future of TV? What major players told  Portada Digital Media Correspondent Susan Kuchinskas.

nbtv

On September 26, NBTV Studios launched New Buzz TV, an over-the-top multichannel network that will curate content across six channels, including multicultural. Its aim is to provide a single distribution platform for premium content producers, offering them content development, talent management and video production services. At the same time, it will partner with brands to create original premium video content.

In a world where cable and the web are fragmented, we would become a tile in this digital universe.

“It’s about identifying things that have high production value and good storytelling that might have an existing audience on another platform,” says CEO Nicholas Buzzell. “The mission is to make it easier for people to discover premium content and help them find things.”

Original programming is also part of the plan. Buzzell, who helped launch AOL Latino, has been producing Hispanic video for several years, and some of this will be distributed on New Buzz TV. For example, NBTV Studios produced and owns a feature film starring Puerto Rican comedian Luis Raúl that had a theatrical release in Puerto Rico and was available as video-on-demand in the United States and Latin America. It’s also planning a show called “Gazpacho,” a program that will recap the previous day’s news and entertainment, with commentary from hosts.

Buzzell says all content deals will be non-exclusive, and he’s offering producers a share of ad revenue, as well as of future subscription revenue.

Producers rock

Video producers represented by MCNs benefit by being able to focus on content instead of having to take incessant meetings and wade through contracts – oh, yeah, and by increasing their revenue.

Karla Celis MiTu Influencer
Karla Celis, MiTu Influencer

Those meetings with brands could be incessant, indeed. There’s huge demand for placement in the hottest channels – and Hispanic is caliente. MiTú recently partnered with Maker Studios, provider of video content for millennials, to provide culturally relevant content to brands targeting the U.S. Hispanic market. Maker did have direct relationships with a host of brands directly, but it didn’t have expertise in multicultural content. Says Charlie Echeverry, MiTú’s chief revenue officer “Maker was getting inquiries directly about talking to Hispanic audiences. Their response prior to our partnership was that they didn’t specialize in it.”

MCNs usually offers various sorts of talent management and consultations on content. NBTV offers original content development, talent management, and video production services to celebrities.

MiTú’s top influencers have growth managers assigned to their channels to help them develop better content and take advantage of trending topics. For example, during the World Cup, a food channel might be advised to develop recipes tied to countries that were playing, while a beauty channel might get a suggestion to do a spot on what to use to paint your face in your team’s colors.

Echeverry says this is one of the biggest values MiTú offers to producers. “Recruiting them is easy,” he says. “The real value is in building them up to something greater than what they currently are, on a personal level but also through technology,” such as analytics.

This is the first of two articles exploring how Multichannel Networks (MCNs) work and their role in the emerging online video ecosystem. The role of Multichannel networks in the Latin Digital Media world will be analyzed in Portada’s upcoming Evolving America Summit at Digital Hollywood on October 21 in the Ritz Carlton, Marina del Rey, Ca.

What: Spanish-language media company Televisa and MiTú have signed a multiyear multiplatform deal, under which they will jointly develop and distribute original programming in different formats. Televisa executives also explained at last week’s IAB Mexico Conference (coverage in Spanish) that Digital is now the “DNA” of Televisa’s content production system.
Why it matters: The agreement will allow Televisa to  leverage MiTu’s digital experience and its’ catalog of new Latino talents to develop content, concepts and innovative formats for various digital platforms.

Televisa_Jose_Baston-Spanish-language media company Televisa and MiTú , an Internet-media and digital platform company focused on Latino audiences, have signed a multiyear multiplatform deal, under which they will jointly develop and distribute original programming in different formats. The Spanish-language producer will be using MiTu’s digital experience and roster of YouTube talent to develop content and formats for online media. Televisa will also distribute MiTu’s English- and Spanish-language content. Financials of the agreement were not disclosed.

Televisa president Jose Antonio Bastón (photo), said at last week’s IAB Mexico Annual Conference (see our Spanish-language coverage) that the agreement will allow Televisa to  leverage MiTu’s digital experience and its’ catalog of new Latino talents to develop content, concepts and innovative formats for various digital platforms.

Digital, now the DNA of Televisa’s Content Production

“Since we started in the digital industry over 14 years ago, we have made a big effort to understand the changing habits of a new generation of consumers. As a result of this  effort we started a deep process of transformation in the way Televisa approaches the digital realm, “he said.

Our digital efforts have changed from being a single business unit  to become the intrinsic DNA of our content production.

During his participation in the 2014 edition of IAB Connecta, Bastón explained that “interactivity” is  the key word  around which Televisa’s digital strategy will be based in order to maintain its global leadership in the production and distribution of  multiplatform Spanish-language programming.

The four strategy pillars:

  • Splitting own productions to digital platforms
  • Specific content development for digital native audiences
  • Strategic alliances
  • World class technological support

During the IAB Mexico conference, Bastón explained that the first pillar is the splitting of current content on digital platforms, as already happened during the 2014 Soccer World Cup in Brazil.

“The number of users who used our digital offering was extraordinary, almost 11 million. During some matches broadcasted on TV, the digital offering even beat pay-TV platforms in terms of audience,” assured Bastón.

Content production for digital native audiences is the strategy’s second pillar of the strategy, and for that matter productions like LOGOUT will be held, ​​airing from 2015 onwards.

“A product made from its origin to the second screen to the second screen, what does this mean? That there is a product produced you see on the original screen and there also a product produced you’re watching at the same time while solely on the digital platform,” he specified.

Strategic alliances and technological support are the third and fourth pillars, and along with them is where the partnership with MiTu lays.

Four pillars in Televisa’s Digital Ecosystem

Bastón says that to design the current strategy , they first defined a digital ecosystem on four basic elements linked to exclusive content production:

  • televisadeportes.com
  • noticierostelevisa.com
  • TV
  • Entertainment

“We are also integrating TV channels properties and paying specific niches such as music, film, radio, and publiching and film production.”

Bastón pointed out that all Televisa’s digital efforts have five common denominators: They are linked to exclusive content, have a high commercial potential, are born with a multi-platform logic, see interactivity as an opportunity to adapt content and increase engagement with brands .

He also recalled that, some time ago, the splitting to digital was limited to broadcast on digital  the same contenton television.

“Today we have learned to produce specific content that is later complemented on different screens. Our original writers imagine and develop their stories considering a multi-screen approach. ”

What: Latino online video startup MiTu just raised an additional US $10 million in a series B funding round. The new funding was led by Upfront Ventures. The company’s other investors included The Chernin Group , Allen DeBevoise (Machinima) and Advancit Capital. According to the company, the funding will  build out its production facilities in Los Angeles and Mexico City, and expand its engineering and sales teams.
Why it matters: The rise of YouTube , at present the broadest channel to reach the Hispanic market, has created new video distribution opportunities for platforms like  MiTu or FameBit, which basically  give media personalities broad distribution options for their content. With YouTube as the largest player in online video, it’s the best test-case for building video-focused, new media brands.

descargaThe rise of YouTube  and its attendant online celebrity millionaires has created new opportunities for venture investors to launch new marketing and advertising platforms.

MiTu or FameBit, can help to bring more cash to YouTube’s “talent”, who ironically see 45% of the ad dollars generated from their videos go straight into YouTube’s pocket.

FameBit connects brands with influential YouTube stars to create original video content that is shared with their thousands to millions of engaged viewers.Its’ model allows brands to post products and services and have YouTube content producers directly build video segments around a company’s virtual or actual wares. Since its launch, the platform has done 1,200 video campaigns for over 200 brands and has around 3,000 active YouTube personalities producing roughly 500 videos per month.

Now FameBit developers are working to build a marketplace for brands to find, hire, and collaborate with YouTube content creators for product and service endorsements.

Mitu is a new Latino-fueled media brand and digital network that connects thousands of Latino content creators with viewers around the world. This company has announced a US$10 million round from investors including Allen DeBevoise, and Upfront Ventures, which backed the multi-channel network Maker Studios. The company counts with 1,200 content creators on its network , who generate 400 million monthly video views. Its channels have around 40 million subscribers and generate 120 million unique cookies — a measurement YouTube itself considers when it comes to traffic purposes. However, it has to be said that MiTu is a MCN (Multichannel Network) that not only relies on YouTube Distribution, but has also partnered with other media properties including AOL and Univision for video distribution and monetization. MiTu was founded by Doug Greiff, Beatriz Acevedo, and Roy Burstin. MiTu says it has 400 million monthly video views, 40 million subscribers and 1,200 video creators creating content for its channels.

“We are exclusively focused on working with Latino content creators and helping them connect with Hispanic audiences in the U.S. and Latin America. When you think about starting up a media company from scratch you think of digital first,” says Roy Burstin, one of the co-founders of MiTu and a former Bertelsmann executive.

When you think about starting up a media company from scratch you think of digital first
 

According to Burstin, YouTube is simply the first and broadest channel to reach a Hispanic market dominated by traditional broadcast gatekeepers, which haven’t opened enough gates to meet demand for certain kinds of content.“They do a bunch of things really well, like novelas, sports, and news, but they leave a lot of whitespace in areas like beauty, ‘DIY’, technology and comedy,” Burstin says. “If you were a latino content creator in the U.S., you had to be lucky, connected, or attractive to get deals. Now you can get worldwide distribution for almost no fee.”

“A lot of people look at [MiTu] as a YouTube business,” says Burstin. “As far as a distribution platform, YouTube is the first step. We have signed deals with companies like AOL and Univision to provide them with our content. The third leg of that stool is something we’re going to start implementing now — creating destinations primarily on the Web,”he added.

Although YouTube is a massive platform on its own, many of these multi-channel are operating much more like digital-first studios, giving a new generation of media personalities broad distribution options for their content. As Burstin notes, any business built on a single platform is not entirely an attractive business model, but with YouTube as the largest player in online video, it’s the best test-case for building video-focused, new media brands.

What: Latino online video startup MiTu just raised an additional US $10 million in a series B funding round. The new funding was led by Upfront Ventures. The company’s other investors included The Chernin Group , Allen DeBevoise (Machinima) and Advancit Capital. According to the company, the funding will  build out its production facilities in Los Angeles and Mexico City, and expand its engineering and sales teams.
Why it matters: The rise of YouTube , at present the broadest channel to reach the Hispanic market, has created new video distribution opportunities for platforms like  MiTu or FameBit, which basically  give media personalities broad distribution options for their content. With YouTube as the largest player in online video, it’s the best test-case for building video-focused, new media brands.

descargaThe rise of YouTube  and its attendant online celebrity millionaires has created new opportunities for venture investors to launch new marketing and advertising platforms.

MiTu or FameBit, can help to bring more cash to YouTube’s “talent”, who ironically see 45% of the ad dollars generated from their videos go straight into YouTube’s pocket.

FameBit connects brands with influential YouTube stars to create original video content that is shared with their thousands to millions of engaged viewers.Its’ model allows brands to post products and services and have YouTube content producers directly build video segments around a company’s virtual or actual wares. Since its launch, the platform has done 1,200 video campaigns for over 200 brands and has around 3,000 active YouTube personalities producing roughly 500 videos per month.

Now FameBit developers are working to build a marketplace for brands to find, hire, and collaborate with YouTube content creators for product and service endorsements.

Mitu is a new Latino-fueled media brand and digital network that connects thousands of Latino content creators with viewers around the world. This company has announced a US$10 million round from investors including Allen DeBevoise, and Upfront Ventures, which backed the multi-channel network Maker Studios. The company counts with 1,200 content creators on its network , who generate 400 million monthly video views. Its channels have around 40 million subscribers and generate 120 million unique cookies — a measurement YouTube itself considers when it comes to traffic purposes. However, it has to be said that MiTu is a MCN (Multichannel Network) that not only relies on YouTube Distribution, but has also partnered with other media properties including AOL and Univision for video distribution and monetization. MiTu was founded by Doug Greiff, Beatriz Acevedo, and Roy Burstin. MiTu says it has 400 million monthly video views, 40 million subscribers and 1,200 video creators creating content for its channels.

“We are exclusively focused on working with Latino content creators and helping them connect with Hispanic audiences in the U.S. and Latin America. When you think about starting up a media company from scratch you think of digital first,” says Roy Burstin, one of the co-founders of MiTu and a former Bertelsmann executive.

When you think about starting up a media company from scratch you think of digital first
 

According to Burstin, YouTube is simply the first and broadest channel to reach a Hispanic market dominated by traditional broadcast gatekeepers, which haven’t opened enough gates to meet demand for certain kinds of content.“They do a bunch of things really well, like novelas, sports, and news, but they leave a lot of whitespace in areas like beauty, ‘DIY’, technology and comedy,” Burstin says. “If you were a latino content creator in the U.S., you had to be lucky, connected, or attractive to get deals. Now you can get worldwide distribution for almost no fee.”

“A lot of people look at [MiTu] as a YouTube business,” says Burstin. “As far as a distribution platform, YouTube is the first step. We have signed deals with companies like AOL and Univision to provide them with our content. The third leg of that stool is something we’re going to start implementing now — creating destinations primarily on the Web,”he added.

Although YouTube is a massive platform on its own, many of these multi-channel are operating much more like digital-first studios, giving a new generation of media personalities broad distribution options for their content. As Burstin notes, any business built on a single platform is not entirely an attractive business model, but with YouTube as the largest player in online video, it’s the best test-case for building video-focused, new media brands.

 

What: Latino multi-channel network MiTú has partenered with NALIP (National Association of Latino Independent Producers) to support Hispanic organizations in developing original content.
Why it matters: MiTú will be guiding NALIP´s member on how to leverage their new platform.The partnership  will officially launch with  “What Moves You Forward”  video contest.

mitunalipMiTú, the Latino media brand and multi-channel network dedicated to Latino content, has announced it will partner with the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP). The alliance will allow organizations to cross promote and market each others’ services and programming while developing original content and new talent.

NALIP has recently launched a digital track for their membership and MiTú will be guiding NALIP membership on how to leverage their new platform.
 

The partnership will be officially launched with a video contest called “What Moves You Forward” for the organization’s content producers leading up to NALIP Media Summit 2014, in which MiTú will have a presence supporting their digital development panels and kick off a series of co-developed digital workshops.

Beatriz Acevedo, founding partner and president of MiTú Network states, “Both MiTú and NALIP share a similar vision to provide and promote professional opportunities for Latino content creators, and I look forward to partnering with Axel Caballero and his team to develop fresh new content for the millennial generation.”

“We are increasingly connecting creators with brands, as well as with buyers to develop original content. We look forward to supporting NALIP’s entry to these relationships,” states Roy Burstin, chief executive officer and founding partner, MiTú Network.

“NALIP is excited to forge this innovative partnership with MiTú Network and our organization. We know that this will result in many new opportunities for countless Latino content creators using digital as a medium to present their work and advance their careers, ” stated Axel Caballero, executive director, NALIP.

MiTú Network provides digital content to the fastest growing powerhouse market: U.S. Hispanics. Led by Latino TV industry veterans Doug Greiff, Beatriz Acevedo and Roy Burstin, MiTú Network launched in the spring of 2012 and so far has more than 36 million global subscribers and over 333 million global monthly views  according to 2014 YouTube Analytics.The network is backed by The Chernin Group LLC (TCG) along with other investors including: Allen DeBevoise, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Machinima; Advancit Capital, a venture capital firm founded by Shari Redstone and Jason Ostheimer; Quincy Smith of the internet and media-focused merchant bank Code Advisors; and Juan Cristóbal Ferrer of Ferrer Comunicación in Mexico.

What: Multichannel Network MiTú  has closed a licensing agreement with AOL to syndicate Hispanic video content over a wide array of AOL Hispanic digital properties.
Why it matters: Online Video is one of the hottest inventory pieces in the overall and U.S. Hispanic ad market. Different major players are positioning themselves to best provide advertisers relatively scarce online video inventory.

MiTú, a multi-channel network (MCN) exclusively dedicated to Latino content, announced that it has closed a content licensing agreement with AOL across all of its digital platforms, including The Huffington Post, AOL and its Hispanic content network, Voces. The agreement will allow MiTú to syndicate its original and partner produced content to AOL in both English and Spanish. AOL, particularly after the purchase of Adap.TV has strengthened substantially its position in the online video advertising market with its video ads reaching more than half of all Americans online (comScore Video Metrix – Ads only).

While the deal is international the main emphasis will be put on the U.S.

Content Verticals

Online VideoRegarding the type of content verticals that MiTú will be providing video content to AOL, Charlie Echeverry , Chief Revenue Officer at MiTú tells Portada that they will be “Lifestyle and male variety as well as a variety of subcategories, from Food to Health to Home, etc…”.  According to Echeverry,  “The content may be available on other properties and is available as of last month on Univision’s digital verticals as well.”Echeverry adds that while the AOL deal is international the main emphasis will be put on the U.S..

What is the nature of the deal. Fee paid per content ad revenue share deal or both? Echeverry answers that he cannot share specific terms of the deal, “but both AOL and MiTú will benefit from broad distribution of the content and the associated monetization that occurs around that distribution.” He adds that either AOL or MiTú may sell advertising into the content with certain provisions.

New Round of Funding?

Market insiders know that MiTú is currently negotiating a new a round of funding,  Neither Charlie Etcheverry nor MiTú s Chief Creative Officer Doug Greif were able to answer a question about this at this time. MiTú is currently backed by The Chernin Group LLC (TCG) along with other investors including: Allen DeBevoise, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Machinima; Advancit Capital, a venture capital firm founded by Shari Redstone and Jason Ostheimer; Quincy Smith of the internet and media-focused merchant bank Code Advisors; and Juan Cristóbal Ferrer of Ferrer Comunicación in Mexico.