Online Advertising Playbook

While everybody is familiar with the classic online ad formats, such as the now standard banner ad and pre-roll video advertisement, new delivery options are being introduced constantly. While many of these options are available initially in the general market, the Hispanic market is becoming increasingly sophisticated and is closing the technology gap. Here, Portada takes a look at some of the options available to Hispanic advertisers looking to take advantage of the online medium in less traditional, increasingly eye-catching ways.
 
Homepage Roadblock: is a basic ad configuration consisting of at least two separate Ad-banners on a single page, generally placed in close proximity to one another. The format derives its name from the notion that an online visitor will inevitably take note of the ad. 
 
Pros: Highly visible, no advanced video/audio web design required.
 
Cons: Relatively static presentation.
 
Sliding Billboard: is essentially a banner ad that takes up a fair amount of space for a few seconds and then minimizes itself into a much less conspicuous banner ad.
 
Pros: Hard to miss. The ad is in motion for a time so the user takes notice. It then recedes and is out of the way.
 
Cons: Limited cons. Curmudgeonly users often despise any advertiser interruption of their content consumption. But then again, they would just as soon rid the internet of advertising altogether, and that’s not exactly how things work in freely available media…
 
 
Introstitial: The introstitial is an ad that appears when the user clicks on a link. Once the link is clicked, the advertisement is displayed for a predetermined amount of time before the user arrives at the intended page.
 
Pros: Assured ad view There is no way to not notice this ad as it dominates the entire screen for a finite period of time.
 
Cons: Potential user alienation. The user has clicked on a link and instead of arriving directly at his/her selection, arrives at an advertisement. This can potentially incite resentment from the user. To ameliorate this concern, most publishers offer a “skip this ad” feature, so the “captive” viewer is not a “hostage” viewer.
 
 
Breaking News Sponsorship: Some publishers offer this type of sponsorship, where the user can view some video of breaking news only after viewing the sponsor’s ad.
 
Pros: Assured ad view.
 
Cons: User might resent having to view ad to get to the “breaking news” they urgently seek. This possibility can be mitigated by a short advertisement.
 
 
Homepage Fixed Placements: With this format, the advertisers logo becomes a free-standing fixture on the homepage, sometimes right at the top of the page in prominent positioning. This ad may or may not be reinforced by an additional banner.
 
Pros: Noticeable, but unimposing.
 
Cons: Can potentially be overlooked.
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Editorial Staff @portada_online

Portada Staff

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