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Pepsi announced an integration with Telemundo’s, through which it will become the first-ever beverage sponsor of La Voz, the Spanish-language edition of NBC’s  “The Voice.” As the show’s first-ever beverage sponsor and prizing partner, Pepsi will take the season two stage by storm, celebrating Latin music and the talented phenoms giving everything to become the next big musical superstar. The premiere episode of season two of “La Voz” is set to air this Sunday, January 19th.

 

Esperanza Teasdale
Esperanza Teasdale, VP & General Manager, PepsiCo’s Hispanic Business Unit

The new investment reflects Pepsi’s Hispanic Business Unit commitment to Hispanic Marketing and to “elevate the voice of the Hispanic consumer”, Esperanza Teasdale, VP & General Manager at PepsiCo’s Hispanic Business Unit , tells Portada. “The La Voz sponsorship, which taps into the Pepsi brand’s rich heritage in music and entertainment, allows us to celebrate Hispanic culture and passion points and support the next generation of talented musicians who aren’t afraid to live life their way and chase their musical dreams,” Teasdale adds.

The campaign is focused on Fusionistas who celebrate both the Hispanic and overall American culture.

Pepsi will level up the season two “La Voz”  prize, bringing the original $100k grand prize up to an epic $200K.  The integration will span the blind auditions, battle rounds and live performances.  It will feature cups branded with Pepsi in the coaches’ chairs and include Pepsi branding across a number of touchpoints:  multi-screen  presence throughout the season, in-show and out-of-show custom activations on linear and social and prominent thematic storylines woven throughout the season.

La Voz Sponsorship with the Fusionistas Target in Mind

Teasdale, a half Ecuadorean and half Colombian executive, notes that “Pepsi understands the passion point that Hispanics have with music. It’s in their DNA.” She adds that the campaign is focused on Fusionistas who celebrate both the Hispanic and overall American culture.”

 

“Eso es lo que quiero”

The integration will also bring to life and feature the newest U.S. Pepsi campaign tagline, “That’s What I Like” (“Es Lo Que Quiero”).  Launched earlier this month, the new tagline is the brand’s first in two decades and is inspired by the most loyal Pepsi drinkers, who proudly like what they like and live their lives out loud without worrying about what others will think – whether that’s belting out a song at karaoke, clapping at the end of a movie, or simply enjoying a Pepsi.

Pepsi unveiled five new national commercials to launch the new tagline, three of which were developed in partnership with the Pepsi brand’s Hispanic agency, Alma (“DJ BBQ,” “Subway,” and “Lavandería).  The new ads spotlight various everyday people getting lost in a moment and finding themselves dancing in unexpected places or situations, despite the amused gaze of onlookers.  Each spot is underpinned by a variety of upbeat music spanning hip-hop, dance hall, Latin pop tracks and more. The spots will air across English and Spanish-speaking properties to reach the brand’s ever-growing fusionista fans, Latinos celebrating and blending their Hispanic and U.S. cultures.

The quick-service-restaurant industry is one of the sectors that are expected to continue growing steadily in the U.S. As competition multiplies, QSR marketing needs to become more precise, and tailored for specific audiences. 

What Does QSR Marketing Mean?

Quick-service restaurants are those where consumers pay for food before eating. In the U.S., QSRs typically sell burgers, sandwiches, ethnic foods, pizza, pasta, and chicken. This industry excludes coffee and snack shops. In recent years, QSRs have started to diversify as a result of evolving consumer behavior and preferences. Thus, the space has become more crowded.

QSR brands have to be smart about their marketing. They already have two main advantages: low prices and convenience. Even though the category has performed well recently, as shown by the US $273 billion in revenue and an average yearly growth of 4.1% in the last five years, heavy competition forces QSR operators to differentiate in a fierce battle where smarts mean everything. 

QSR Marketing expert
Alex Tokatlian

One way to be outstanding is by offering outstanding experiences. In the words of Alex Tokatlian, Brand Marketing Director at Marco’s Pizza and until late 2019 Advertising Manager at Domino’s Pizza*,  “experience matters a 100%. It’s different for our category because people are mostly enjoying their pizzas outside of the restaurants. They get it delivered to their home, but we do everything we can with technology to make the experience as easy and as seamless as possible. We’ve done things like Domino’s Hot Spots, that mean you don’t need a specific address to receive a pizza, you can have it delivered to the beach, the park, etc. We find ways to bring meaningful service innovation to life, just to make that pizza experience easier and faster.”

Experience matters a 100%.It’s different for our category because people are mostly enjoying their pizzas outside of the restaurants.

How Quickly is the QSR Marketing Industry Growing?

The QSR industry in the United States is forecasted to reach US $731.8 billion by 2024. The main factor driving the industry growth is the digitalization of food services, including anticipated reservations, orders, and online payment. This is a great opportunity for marketers, as digital advertising is expected to grow from 36.1% in 2019 to 43.8% of total QSR Marketing by 2023.

In 2018, McDonald’s was the top spender within the category. With US $761 million spent in ad expenditures, the chain was way ahead of brands such as Domino’s, on the second spot with US $418 million, and Taco Bell on the third spot with US $415 million.

QSR Marketing Top Spenders
Top 10 QSR Marketing Spenders. Source: Statista

What’s the Role of Technology?

A recent report by the National Restaurant Association used a forecasting approach based on questionnaires sent to experts to predict the future of QSRs by 2030. Three out of five developments center around technology: mobile payments, handheld payment terminals, and a majority of digitally-placed takeout or delivery orders placed digitally.

QSR marketing exampleEvidently, QSR marketing should take this into account. We asked Alex Tokatlian about how Domino’s is taking advantage of technology to improve marketing. He told Portada about their ground-breaking initiative “Points for Pies”, a loyalty program that rewards consumers of the pizza category regardless of where they eat. “It was a big effort right before the super bowl, the first of its kind as far as we know,” shared Tokatlian. “I don’t think there’s been another brand willing to reward consumers for participating in the category, not specific to the brand.”

Also, the program is completely mobile-based and uses artificial intelligence. “We know technology is highly relevant in the multicultural segment, and we had the experience available in Spanish as well,” commented Tokatlian. “It was also our first time using AI in this capacity. We had a “Pie-dentifier” built into the app, which scanned the images you put it on and it had to decide whether it was pizza or not. If it was pizza, we awarded the points to the customer.”

QSR Marketing and the Multicultural Opportunity

According to recent data, 40% of America’s population will be multicultural by 2021. Also, Hispanics account for 20% of QSR sales. “Hispanics are also more family-oriented when eating out,” mentioned Geoscape CEO César Melgoza to QSR magazine. “Half of Hispanic restaurant visits from Spanish-dominant Hispanics include parties with children, and one-third of visits from English-speaking Hispanics include children. This is compared to only 29% of non-Hispanic families who bring their children to restaurants.”

QSR Marketing expert
Aisha Burgos

Moreover, QSRs are important to Hispanics not only in the U.S., but also in their origin countries. “The QSR category is very relevant for Hispanics,” shared Aisha Burgos, SVP of Digo Hispanic Media. “In Puerto Rico we estimate that there are 1,300 quick service restaurants in an island that measures 100×35 miles. According to Scarborough, 88% of the population of Puerto Rico have visited a QSR in the past 30 days. We see how these restaurants are using omnichannel strategies. They’re trying to connect with the right person at the right moment with the right message.

 

 

Why Digitalization is the Key According to Digo Hispanic Media

Burgos agrees that digitalization is a crucial component of QSR marketing growth and efficiency. “In digital, we’re seeing a lot of different strategies that include high impact display banners when they are launching a new product,” she explained. “This is a very effective strategy since it helps them create awareness in the first stage of the funnel. Some examples of high impact banners that they use include formats like the interscroller, rich media, takeovers, and video. We also see how they use day parting in a very effective manner to showcase their menus and products in the correct context for the user.

These restaurants are using omnichannel strategies to ensure they connect with the right person at the right moment with the right message.

Actually, Digo Hispanic Media is seeing an “always on” approach with QSR marketing. “They need the reach and frequency to stay relevant in a competitive landscape,” said Burgos. “In our sites we’ve seen an average of .30% CTR for this category, which is really good since most of these banners don’t necessarily have a clear CTA. Their main focus is to drive traffic to their locations, not their sites. With 90% of traffic coming from mobile, QSRs are very clear that they need to be in mobile.”

 

Brands Know How Important Multicultural Consumers Are

The growth potential and buying power of Hispanics make of this group the most important multicultural audience. For Domino’s Pizza, it’s important to really make Hispanics like they’re included in the brand’s marketing. “We always have to keep an eye in how media consumption habits are changing, the best way to reach the consumer and also what’s most effective for our franchisees,” said Tokatlian. “So we’re always trying to understand media behavior and how to reach different audiences. Specifically for multicultural audiences, we think tailored messages make more sense. We’re very disciplined in our approach, we’re very much into the data, we test and learn everything to make sure the investments we’re making are effectively driving sales.

A customized message is important, but you have to find a balance between broad general marketing and where it makes sense to send a more nuanced message.

In fact, Hispanics are a very important part of business for Domino’s. “As a national brand we have a footprint all over the country in major cities, especially in markets with high Hispanic populations; 20% of stores are in high Hispanic markets and those stores account for 25% of our sales,” shared Tokatlian. “For the multicultural segment, we did a spot featuring an employee explaining the ‘Points for Pies’ program. He goes around different situations and different parts of the city showing ways in which people enjoy pizza. We had a corner slice shop, eating pizza at home with the family… We used examples that are relevant for that audience, beyond just language.”

Furthermore, Domino’s genuinely cares about giving back to the community. Their employees have the possibility to become franchisees, and 90% of Domino’s franchisees started off working at a store. “The people that are franchisees have come from within, they have grown at our stores,” told Tokatlian. “Often they end up serving the communities that they came from. In terms of our national footprint in Hispanic communities, you do get a lot of multicultural franchisees.”

How to Reach Those Multicultural Consumers?

The first obvious answer is data. For Domino’s Pizza, data has been important since before it was smart. As Alex Tokatlian explained, “We needed people’s addresses and phone numbers. We also look at their order preferences to offer improved experiences. Knowing what they like, how they order, how they use our website… It’s very important for us to understand our consumers. The experience is customizable, there are always certain toppings that certain markets order more.”

Furthermore, said Tokatlian, it’s very important to test and learn. “Everything we do, we put the rigor up front to test and measure if things are working or not, which allows us to be more efficient and effective in marketing and media strategies. That’s my best advice. It requires some inspiration but also a sense of discipline. Trying to think ultimately what will be the best thing to drive the business and engage with customers in a way they want. A customized message is important, but you have to find a balance between broad general marketing and where it makes sense to send a more nuanced message. It’s all about being disciplined, leveraging data and taking a measured approach to things.”

* Alex Tokatlian was interviewed for this story in the summer of 2019

2020 promises to be an exciting year in marketing. We asked brand and media agency executives that are part of the Portada Council System where they see the main challenges and opportunities.

 

As the new year fast approaches, Portada touched base with brand marketers and media agency executives, members of Portada’s Council System. We asked them what 2020 could bring in terms of challenges and opportunities. Among the most alluring opportunities and/or challenges, they cited: preparing for a world without (or a smaller) Facebook, more proprietary data for brands, efficient cross-screen metrics, marketing in a divisive political scenario, and finding synergies between Hispanic and general marketing campaigns.

 

2020 opportunities: Preparing for a world without (or a smaller) Facebook

2020 opportunities expertMarketers’ reliance on social media as a marketing and lead-generation tool has been parallel to Facebook’s rise to social media heaven. But has the social media giant reached its zenith or, even worse, is it starting to decline? “How to future proof my business in a world without or a smaller Facebook. In performance marketing, Facebook is still king, and also in terms of reach and signals of consumers’ interests and intent. What happens if Facebook changes? Or if there is regulation? Or if it doesn’t enjoy the popularity of generations like Z and beyond? This is more of a longer-term challenge, ” says John Sandoval, Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager at Intuit.

How to future proof my business in a world without or a smaller Facebook. In performance marketing, Facebook is still king, and also in terms of reach and signals of consumers’ interests and intent. What happens if Facebook changes? Or if there is regulation? Or if it doesn’t enjoy the popularity of generations like Z and beyond?

 

Brands need more ownable and proprietary data

2020 opportunities expertTo Peter Lee Brown, Brands & Communications Strategy, at Nestle, “Data has become commoditized, brands need more ownable, proprietary data“. Related to this challenge, Brown sees an opportunity for brand marketers in terms of “lean innovation and in-housing capabilities”, as he expects them to “lead to greater speed, creative expertise, and control.”. According to Brown in the current scenario of perpetual disruption, “brands can drive disruption and become challengers.”

Ariela Nerubay, Chief Marketing Officer at Curacao, also cites disruption, in this case in the retail space as an alluring opportunity: “Disruption of the retail in-store experiences to drive traffic to physical stores.”

 

2020 opportunities

If you are interested in joining the Portada Council System, our year-round knowledge-sharing and networking platform, please contact us here if you are marketing services supplier and here if you are a brand marketer.

 

Making second-generation Hispanic campaigns attractive to non-Hispanics…

Successful marketing to the LatinX consumer (second and third-generation Hispanics) is paramount to the progress of Corporate America in 2020 and beyond. Ariela Nerubay, Chief Marketing Officer at Curacao, tells us that “How to develop targeted campaigns for the 2nd and 3rd gen Hispanic on general market media that also attracts non-Hispanics” is one of the main challenges for her company in 2020. Similarly, she also cites developing a “lead generation strategy for Hispanic and non-Hispanic customers with same creative” as a challenge and opportunity.

 

…in a world where it is increasingly “not good” to be the “other”.

Marketing in a politically convoluted environment that is often divisive has been an important topic at Portada Council System workshops in 2019. Going into 2020 it will continue to be a challenge for brand marketers. As Intuit¨s John Sandoval notes “Specifically to multicultural marketing, in a country and increasingly in a world (last week’s UK election) where it is ‘not good’ to be the other or a minority or a population group other than the ‘mainstream’, how do we get the resources, attention, etc, from across the landscape? What if Trump is re-elected for another 4 years?”

 

Cross Screen Measurement to understand Reach and Frequency

The ascent of video marketing, partly a result of the substitution of TV media budgets by video, is bringing in more 2020 opportunities for media buyers. Darcy Bowe, SVP, Media Director, Starcom USA tells Portada that “cross-screen measurement that allows us to understand overall reach and frequency, including understanding where truly incremental reach is being driven” is an important opportunity for efficient media buys in 2020. Bowe is part of Starcom’s Video Center of Excellence, where she focuses on investing in all video media as well as creating content and building integrated programs in the video media space on behalf of her clients.

Given the range of CPMs and creative units across media types, how do we value an impression in each type and how does that impact ROI?

Bowe also notes that, given the range of CPMs and creative units across media types, it will be important to develop solutions for how impressions should be valued in each type and how this impacts ROI. To resolve the relationship between performance and branding (awareness) will be another challenge: “How can we best create media plans that balance targeting the most likely consumer to interact & transact with the brand as well as find broad reach to create awareness?”

Realogy’s Karim Amadeo has been promoted to Manager, Multicultural & Growth Market at Realogy Holdings and CENTURY 21. We touched base to learn more about her new position and Realogy’s multicultural marketing strategy. 

 

Karim Amadeo, a Portada Council System member, has recently been promoted from Manager, Hispanic National Hispanic Advertising, Century 21 Real Estate to Manager, Multicultural & Growth Market at Realogy and Century 21. We wanted to know more about this new position, so we sat down with Amadeo to ask her a few questions about this new role and Realogy’s multicultural marketing strategy overall.

Realogy is a publicly listed major provider of residential real estate services in the U.S. Its brands include Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate, CENTURY 21®, Climb Real Estate®, Coldwell Banker®, Coldwell Banker Commercial®, Corcoran®, ERA®, Sotheby’s International Realty® as well as NRT, Cartus®, Title Resource Group and ZapLabs®, an in-house innovation and technology development lab. The company, headquartered in Madison, NJ, operates around the world with approximately 188,600 independent sales agents in the United States and approximately 111,200 independent sales agents in 113 other countries and territories. According to the most recent financial statement, Realogy spent US $202 million in marketing in the first nine months of 2019 versus 199 million during the first nine months of 2018.

Realogy provides independent sales agents access to leading technology, best-in-class marketing and learning programs, and support services to help them become more productive and build stronger businesses. In her expanded role, Amadeo tells Portada, she will be serving all the Realogy brands, while continuing to lead Multicultural National Advertising efforts at Century 21 Real Estate.

Realogy's Karim Amadeo
Realogy’s Karim Amadeo

“As part of my expanded role, I will focus on managing our industry partnerships and increasing our agent and broker engagement efforts,” she commented. “Additionally, I will continue to work with CENTURY 21 on its Empowering Latinas campaign, which launched in 2017 and has awarded more than 100 scholarships to Latinas in Miami and Houston markets, as well as the brand’s collaboration with the Eva Longoria Foundation.”

As part of my expanded role I will focus on managing our industry partnerships and increasing our agent and broker engagement efforts.

Realogy’s Multicultural Objectives

When asked about which in her opinion are the main objectives of Realogy when it comes to the multicultural consumer, Amadeo answers that “Realogy has worked to elevate our engagement throughout the year, and has commenced a three-year Growth Markets strategic plan to leverage the scale of Realogy and better align our internal brand teams. We participate in industry conferences that specifically focus on policies that support a more diverse market.”

In addition, Amadeo explained that executives and affiliates volunteer as speakers to join the conversation and make a positive impact in the real estate industry and in the community in two ways: “First, as a shared service for our different brands, Realogy seeks to attract and retain diverse corporate talent, agents and brokers to mirror or exceed growth market demographics in the communities that we serve. Second,  as end-consumer Realogy focuses on external diversity marketplace efforts by forming partnerships with professional real estate associations whose ongoing missions are to improve diverse homeownership rates, including among the Hispanic, Asian-American, African-American, and LGBT communities.”

Cultural traditions that drive multicultural shopping are also resonating with many mainstream shoppers, which increases return on investment and magnifies the business case for reaching multicultural consumers.

Growth Opportunity

According to Amadeo, “the population growth and the increase in buying power of Hispanic, African-American, Asian, and LGBTQ segments has provided significant growth opportunities for companies that serve the needs of multicultural consumers. Brands that provide a high level of service and support to multicultural consumers are finding success. It’s not about simply having an ad in a different language. Rather, it is about being culturally relevant. We still need to see more ethnic diversity in marketing and media.”

Increased ROI

Amadeo adds that “According to Nielsen, the multicultural consumer is younger than the rest of the population and a trendsetter and taste maker across a broad range of categories, from food and beverage to beauty products.”

Reaching out to this segment has an important potential to increase ROI. As she explains, “Cultural traditions and social aspirations that drive multicultural shopping and product behaviors are also resonating with many mainstream shoppers, which increases return on investment and magnifies the business case for reaching multicultural consumers. Additionally, multicultural consumers have a higher life expectancy, living longer than their White Non-Hispanic counterparts.”

New Lead Generation Programs

Realogy’s overall marketing strategy has recently been strengthened by several lead generation programs, as we could infer from CEO Ryan Schneider’s conference call with financial analysts on November 7. Over the past year, Realogy has launched multiple marketing products, including Listing Concierge and Social Ad Engine to help drive better marketing for its agents.”We are excited to enter 2020 with three new high potential lead generation programs that can provide high quality leads to our agents and franchisees and deliver great value propositions to consumers,” said Schneider.

“In Q3, we launched Exclusive Look, a new marketing product available to all of our 47,000 Coldwell Banker owned brokerage agents share and search new listings before they are available to the broader market via public websites,” he added. “Second, last quarter, we launched TurnKey in collaboration with Amazon, as a new source of lead generation for our agents and franchisees. In Q3, we launched the Realogy Military Rewards program. And more recently we announced an Affinity lead generation program with AARP that will launch in Q1 of 2020.”

Portada Council System members have voted for the topics to be discussed at the three main speaking slots at Portada Los Angeles on April 2, 2020. The topics revolve around data collection with a cultural approach, influencer marketing, and consumer insights. 

 

For over a decade, Portada has been there to offer a space in which experts can discuss the most relevant issues of marketing and advertising. Now, for 2020 we are taking it one step further by inviting brand and agency decision-makers (members of the Portada Council System) to get directly involved in the selection of the content of each of our events.

Consequently, the brand marketers in Portada’s Council System have voted for the topics to be discussed at the three main speaking slots during Portada Los Angeles on April 2, 2020.

“The brand marketers in our Council System play a crucial part in determining the topics of our events. By having these leading practitioners suggest and vote for the themes of the three main speaking slots, we make sure that brand marketing, tech and media executives targeting the diverse U.S. consumer get the most relevant content available in the marketplace,” says Marcos Baer, president of Portada.

Below are the three winning topics as well as comments from Portada Council System members as to why these reflect their interests.

Portada Los Angeles Keynote: Why data scientists need to be cultural experts (A media planner/buyer perspective)

In 2017, the Economist declared data, and no longer oil was the most valuable resource in the world. And even though brands and agencies now have access to tremendous amounts of data, the tricky part is how to make sense of it. For the Portada Los Angeles Keynote talk, Council System members selected the topic of data collection and the extra layer of adding a cultural filter to how that data is processed. Below are the members’ thoughts and questions around the issue.

 

I’d like to hear how data scientists are cutting data to understand audiences and behaviors at the multicultural level. It would be interesting to see how the data changes once you’ve looked at it from a cultural perspective.

Would be interested to hear from data scientists about how they layer in cultural understanding. Is it all done in algorithms or are they also making “manual” choices based on cultural nuances?
Sometimes people have the view that with enough data, you can target anyone effectively, thereby removing the need to appeal to the audience’s culture. How can we continue to recognize the importance of culture in this technology-driven age?

How to combat bias in data, examples of how data can be interpreted in different ways by people who do not understand the culture?

I notice there is a shift where many ethnic or multicultural agencies are moving beyond population subgroups (Hispanic/Latino, Asian, etc) and shifting towards culture. So in a way, culture and being culturally relevant is the latest evolution of multicultural marketing. It would be good to hear how the rigors of data relate to culture or vice versa.

Consumer Insight Highlight Speaking Slot: What creates brand lift?

How to measure brand lift. How to understand the impact of media spend.

This seems fairly obvious, but with so many marketers choosing to focus on attribution and lower-funnel metrics, it’s important to remind ourselves that without a strong brand identity and awareness, the purchase funnel will dry up.
I am especially interested in understanding how can I lift or transform a brand’s reputation and perception online, social listening studies, setting benchmarks, improving engagement based on brand interactions that aren’t necessarily transnational, cause-related marketing and its true impact on brand love and conversion.

 

MarTech Solution Spotlight: Evolving Influencer Marketing

How do you break through the clutter in an age where people are used to influencers pitching product after product?

Which industries, type of messages or cultural moments are influencer moments and which are not?

Understanding how companies evaluate influencer marketing’s impact on their objectives. And also how they think about leveraging influencers.

As media markets are diversified to include more faces and individuals that come and represent specific communities it’d be pertinent to hear more about the process of influencer identification, vetting, and relevancy in the different markets we are trying to influence.

It would be good to understand how this has evolved and what the next platform capabilities are.

Portada Los Angeles 2020 will be a unique experience. First, the three different Council System bespoke workshops will take place in the morning. Also, brand marketers and best-of-breed marketing services suppliers will have 1:1 meetings and attend VIP networking functions. In addition, attendees will learn at four exclusive and highly-curated speaking slots on the themes outlined above, which were voted by the over 100 brand marketers in the Portada Council System.

More information about the structure of speaking slots at Portada events:

  • Keynote: 45-minute session. An overarching topic of paramount importance to the brand marketing community to be addressed by subject matter experts who provide innovative solutions.
  • Consumer Insight Highlight: 25-minute session. Consumer Engagement and sales conversion are the ultimate objectives for brand marketers. This session will provide key and fresh consumer insights that foster the understanding of the U.S consumer and provide actionable tips for marketers.
  • MarTech Solution Spotlight: 25-minute session. Technology plays a crucial role both for consumers as well as an enabler for marketers. During this session a major brand marketing thought leader will reveal the latest trends on the use of technology by consumers and brands.
  • Partner Thought Leadership Presentation. An opportunity for a Portada partner to gain major exposure in front of a listening audience of major brand marketing executives.

For more information about Portada Los Angeles on April 2, 2020 click here

 

For brands who want to connect with Caribbean Hispanics in the U.S., baseball could represent the right platform to start a long-term consumer-brand relationship. Nearly one-third of all major league players are Latinos, including those born in Latin America and within the 50 U.S. states. The Dominican Republic has the highest number of players in the big leagues.

Once upon a time, on May 9, 1871, Estevan Enrique “Steve” Bellán debuted as the first Latin American born individual to play professional baseball in the U.S.A. He played as a third baseman for the Troy Haymakers in New York. About 200 years later, nearly one-third of all major league players are first or second-generation Latinos.

connect with caribbean hispanics
Augusto Romano, CEO at Digo Hispanic Media.

According to the Major League Baseball (MLB), the Dominican Republic has the highest number of international players in the big leagues, with 102 players during Opening Day in 2019. Second in the ranking is Venezuela, with 68 players, and Cuba comes in third with 19 players. “Baseball receives the most attention in Caribbean countries, even more than soccer,” Augusto Romano, CEO at Digo Hispanic Media, tells Portada.

Catering for A Segment’s Needs

First, Digo noticed Caribbean Hispanics are a niche market with particular needs, separate from the general Hispanic market. Then, the U.S Hispanic audience network figured how to reach about five million Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Dominicans who are concentrated on the east coast of the U.S. However, Romano has a new strategy in mind: “Get to them through baseball!

Get to them through baseball!

Born from the union of the two largest media groups in the Caribbean, GFR Media from Puerto Rico and Grupo Corripio from the Dominican Republic, Digo’s audience has shown a special interest in how Caribbean-born baseball players are developing within MLB. We write stories about the players in a culturally relevant manner, starting with their origins, something the mainstream media doesn’t do. This allows U.S. Hispanic fans to follow players from their country of origin on our premium sites, says Romano. Nevertheless, it seems brands are still missing out on the opportunity.

Individual Promotions

According to Josh Rawitch, Sr. Vice President, Content & Communications for the Arizona Diamondbacks, since last year, the MLB has been working on promoting individual players.This is an important shift in the league’s marketing strategy where traditionally entire teams were promoted.

“The league is smart enough to let these players be who they are,” Rawitch tells Portada. “Therefore we are letting their personalities show a little bit more.”

Most of Arizona Diamondbacks’ fans come from Mexico and Venezuela. However, the team also recognizes the importance of its Caribbean followers. The star, pitcher Yoan Lopez, for example, is from Cuba.

Concerning Puerto Rican players, Esteban Pagán, sports editor at GFR Media, believes that even though Puerto Rico has produced four island born hall of famers, and they have always been very active and noticeable with players in the league, right now there’s a new group of very talented players that are starting to arise. It is a matter of time for us to see more profesional global Puerto Rican players, he explains. “Brands are missing out on opportunities to connect with the U.S.H. audience because these big players are just starting to emerge and are recently being noticed and followed by MLB fans.”

“We are in the exact time in which we can see the potential [of the Caribbean players] in the long run,” Jorge Cabezas, GFR Media, General Manager, adds.

Connecting With Caribbean Hispanics

“The way we try to connect with the Caribbean fan base is first through our social media accounts. They’re being followed by Latinos all over the world, thus we specifically try to highlight our Hispanic players. We have some Cuban players and tons of Venezuelans and Dominicans,” adds Rawitch. “We know when we are sending out messages on social media, we are interacting heavily with fans from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.

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The second way the D-Backs are connecting with Caribbean Hispanics is through their local baseball academy in the Dominican Republic. In fact, all 30 major league clubs have baseball academies there, according to Anthony Salazar, chair of the Latino baseball committee.

The way we try to connect with the Caribbean fan base is first through our social media accounts.
Josh Rawitch
Josh Rawitch, Sr. Vice President, Content & Communications at team Arizona Diamondbacks.

“We go down there for graduation every January or February. Moreover, we do a second trip when we do a clinic in the Dominican Republic or we’ll do public appearances,” explains Rawitch.

As a matter of fact, Digo Hispanic Media recently announced their exclusive partnership with NGL Collective, focused on custom content generation.

Their first docuseries named “Las Academias,” explores the beautiful island of the Dominican Republic along with the small towns scouting for talented hopefuls. These athletes each and every day train at one of the 30 major league youth training camps across the island.

“Brands will have access to sponsor these content series via our sales team and we will insert them in the story to ensure their brand and products are showcased in a relevant and engaging manner,” said Aisha Burgos, SVP of Sales & Marketing for Digo Hispanic Media.

Brands’ Approach

It seems that the league and its teams are already reaching out to their Hispanic and Caribbean Hispanic fans. So, what’s happening with brands?

Most brands recognize that outside of soccer, baseball is probably the second most followed sport in Latin America. However, in some countries like Cuba or DR, it is even bigger, believes Rawitch. “Simply, look at the sheer volume of people who are following baseball from the Caribbean. If you’re a company looking to communicate with them, it makes sense to find your way there through a major league team, for instance.”

According to Google Trends, in the past 12 months the words baseball, beisbol and pelota were the most searched the most in countries like the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Panamá & Venezuela. “Baseball runs in our blood. This represents a huge opportunity that brands need to take advantage of,” said Romano.

ANA announced the winners of the 2019 Multicultural Excellence Awards in 12 categories during the ANA’s 2019 Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference. Nike won the Best in Show award for the “Dream Crazy” spot. 

For 19 years, the ANA Multicultural Excellence Awards have recognized client-side marketers and their agency or media partners who produce the best multicultural advertising campaigns. This year, the competition, open to both ANA members and nonmembers, received 224 entries of campaigns produced between June 2018 and June 2019.

Sponsored by the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Committee, the awards were created to recognize the outstanding work being done in the multicultural marketing industry.

Nike and ad agency Wieden+Kennedy received top honors, winning the Best in Show award for its spot called “Dream Crazy.” The two-minute video features former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick and several other professional athletes such as LeBron James and Serena Williams. It encourages viewers to believe in and pursue their dreams no matter how unreachable they might seem. Last month it received an Emmy award for the year’s most outstanding commercial.

In addition to the “Best in Show” award, grand prize winners were honored in 12 categories for industry-leading advertising at an awards ceremony held during the ANA’s 2019 Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference.

The award recipients were announced at the ANA Multicultural Excellence Awards Dinner, hosted by Gilbert Dávila, chair of the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Committee, and Claudine Waite, ANA Director, Content Marketing Committees & Conferences.

The 2019 winners in each category are the following

Category Client Agency
Asian Comcast GALLEGOS United
Print Comcast GALLEGOS United
Audio Walmart Lopez Negrete Communications
LGBT Procter & Gamble Grey Canada and MMK
Experiential Marketing Procter & Gamble/BMW Courageous Studios
Total Market Procter & Gamble Saturday Morning Group
People with Disabilities Wavio Area 23, An FCB Health Network Company
Hispanic Anheuser Busch, brand Estrella Jalisco David
Digital/Social/Mobile Black & Abroad FCB/SIX
African-American Nike Wieden+Kennedy
Socially Responsible Monica Lewinsky BBDO New York, BBDO New York, O Positive, Dini Von Mueffling Communications
Significant Results Microsoft McCann New York
Best in Show Nike Wieden+Kennedy

 

 

A summary of the most relevant consumer insight research in the U.S. and U.S. Hispanic markets. If you’re trying to keep up with the latest happenings, this is your one-stop shop.

  • Conviva’s recent report on the state of streaming shows overall streaming has increased rapidly, with viewing hours up 53% year over year. Roku remained the most popular way to stream in Q3, up 73% year over year to capture 25% of all viewing hours. NFL streaming tallied a 77% increase in plays led by mobile devices, up 109%. For top streaming providers’ social accounts Facebook led in followers, Instagram led in engagements, and YouTube led in social video views.

 

  • U.S. President Donald Trump’s approval ratings are underwater among Hispanics in Florida according to a statewide survey of 600 voters conducted by the Business and Economics Polling Initiative (FAU BEPI ) in Florida Atlantic University’s College of Business. The poll shows Hispanics overall have an unfavorable opinion of Trump, with 48% disapproving of his job performance, while 31% approve, and 22% are undecided. Trump’s approval is underwater with Puerto Ricans at 64% disapproval and 19% approval. However, those from Mexico are split, with 43% disapproval and 38% approval. Cubans provided a bright spot for Trump, with 47% approval and 28% disapproval.

 

  • According to the new study Pet Population and Ownership Trends in the U.S: Dogs, Cats, and Other Pets, 3rd Edition by Packaged Facts, more than half (54%) of American households have a pet, and households with pets will total 67 million in 2019. The two most popular pets, dogs and cats, live in 39% and 24% of U.S. households, respectively. One in eight households has other pets—including fish, birds, reptiles, or small animals such as rabbits, hamsters or gerbils. A key trend shaping today’s pet owner population is its increasing diversity. Compared to a decade ago, pet owners are now more likely to be a member of a multicultural population segment (28% in 2018 vs. 22% in 2008).

 

  • A new study by Twilio has found consumers prefer email and text when talking to brands, despite a wide availability of channels. The survey, which includes responses from 2,500 global consumers, also concluded that consumers are more likely to reward businesses that adhere to their preferred channels. The study found include that channel, frequency and timing will influence consumer behavior and sentiment, as 94% of consumers reported they are annoyed by the current communications they receive from businesses, citing high communication frequency (61%), irrelevant content (56%), not remembering opting in (41%) and being contacted on the wrong communication channel (33%) as the reasons.

 

  • A new U.S. nationwide survey by Genesys of 800 consumers over the age of 18 has concluded that 68% have positive interactions with customer service bots. While 21% say they can “almost always” resolve their issue through a bot without escalation to a customer service representative, 47% say they can do this “more than half of the time.” Moreover, 73% of respondents are open to dealing with a chatbot, even though half (51%) say this is only when the issue is simple or transactional, such as checking account balances, resetting passwords or confirming order status. 

 

  • According to research firm Toluna, 58% of U.S. consumers of all age groups identify themselves as being ‘extremely’ or ‘very’ environmentally conscious, with almost half (45%) of those aged 18 to 34 stating that it is extremely important to buy goods that are produced in an environmentally friendly way. More than a third (37%) of the 1,000 U.S. consumers who took part in the survey say they seek out and are willing to pay up to 5% more for environmentally friendly products.

Portada Insights Reports are tools that help navigate different disciplines of marketing for both brand marketers and marketing service suppliers. Portada’s new report, ‘How Brands Engage U.S. Hispanics: New Segmentation Approaches’, sheds light on how brand marketers can better reach this multicultural segment.

 

Even though Hispanics account for about 17% of the U.S. population, and in spite of their demonstrated buying power and high indexes of technological adoption, most companies still struggle to come up with appropriate multicultural marketing strategies. The need to implement new, more efficient segmentation approaches to engage and retain the U.S. Hispanic consumer is becoming more pressing.

Consequently, Portada has compiled a series of insights that shed light on how brand marketers can face the new multicultural reality. The new Portada Insights report, titled How Brands Engage U.S. Hispanics: New Segmentation Approachesprovides a fresh perspective on the media advertising expenditures reaching Latinos in the U.S. In addition, it shares the results of research conducted throughout the year at closed doors with the Portada Council System members.

“As the United States get more diverse and more complex from a consumer behavior perspective it has become an imperative for brand marketers to develop new segmentation approaches to target multicultural consumers; particularly the U.S. Hispanic consumer. This Portada Insights report is an example of how our knowledge-sharing and networking platform, the Portada Council System, works on innovative approaches for brands to engage consumers in the multicultural United States,” says Marcos Baer, president of Portada.

 

The Portada Insights report How Brands Engage U.S. Hispanics: New Segmentation Approaches includes:

  • Thought Starters
  • Data reflecting the new Hispanic reality, including Hispanic-targeted English-language and Spanish-language media expenditures and forecasts based on research by Portada.
  • Challenges and opportunities in deriving new segmentation approaches as seen by brand marketers
  • Practical examples of why the changing identity features of Hispanics can be a major challenge for marketers
  • Solution Approaches

 

Fresh Out of the Oven, Download Now

If you are a brand marketer, download here.

If you are a marketing services vendor, download here.

 

 

We sat down with Alex Gallegos, Senior Director, Sales & Marketing at L.A. Care, to discuss healthcare marketing initiatives for Hispanic Americans in Los Angeles. In this exclusive interview, Alex talks about L.A. Care’s marketing tactics and media mix. 

 

In recent weeks, we’ve been following L.A. Care’s moves to improve healthcare in Los Angeles. In early September, L.A. Care Health Plan and Blue Shield of California Promise Health Plan announced a five-year commitment to expand Community Resource Centers across Los Angeles County.  In total, they will jointly operate 14 resource centers in L.A. County. Each center will serve approximately 72,000 people per year when services and staff are fully built out, serving more than one million Angelenos annually.
By the end of the same month, L.A. Care announced it appointed Las Vegas-based Ntooitive as its digital marketing AOR. Together, Ntooitive and L.A. Care’s marketing team now coordinate and manage traditional media buying, digital media services, and digital creative production with a focus on delivering campaigns aimed at raising brand awareness and product growth.
Around that time, Ntooitive announced a new data-driven digital marketing service, Ntooitive Healthcare, that helps companies in the healthcare industry to reach target audiences. Both companies are working together to replicate the success of last year’s enrollment period. They trust that their efforts will allow more local communities access to affordable healthcare insurance. We talked to Alex Gallegos, Senior Director, Sales & Marketing at L.A. Care, about the marketing initiatives and media mix in his mind for this enrollment season.

Healthcare Marketing Tactics

Portada: What would you describe as advanced multicultural healthcare marketing tactics?

Healthcare Marketing Expert Alex GallegosAlex Gallegos: There is certainly a broad definition that can be associated with a term like “advanced multicultural marketing tactics”.  We approach our audiences in a way that I feel is very practical. The first step to that is listening and understanding. Our members all have diverse backgrounds, needs, and wants, and it’s our job to act in a way that is relevant to them. In some cases, that means we have different marketing channels for different audiences, and in some cases, that means we say things differently. In other cases, that means that we partner with community-based organizations. I feel that being advanced means being ready to do things differently because it’s the right way to do it for that person/audience.

 

Portada: How many Californians qualify for Covered Open Enrollment?  What amount of the above are Hispanic?

A.G.: In theory, the pool of people who are eligible for Covered CA is very high. The point of distinction here is how many people really do need access to the Covered CA exchange. A large majority of people receive coverage through their employer and even Medicare, this means the difference of people left are those that should consider Covered California as an option. California has done well in the last six years to get people to enroll into Covered CA, and now the opportunity really is focused on the people who may want to switch through shopping health plans based on their needs. The demographics of L.A. County eligibles is very reflective of the county demographics as a whole, I would say roughly half the market is Hispanic or identifies as Hispanic.

 

We are all connected to a device and use the internet for everything, so we need to be more omnipresent in our advertising.

 

 Top VS. Bottom of the Funnel

Portada: What marketing activities of L.A. Care would you categorize as top of the funnel?

A.G.: We utilize a lot of outdoor marketing to create product visibility – billboards, bus advertising, digital billboards, transit shelters. In addition, we are investing more and more in digital, it just makes sense. We are all connected to a device and use the internet for everything, so we need to be more omnipresent in our advertising. You can expect to see our digital advertising on Pandora, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Spotify and many leading websites.

 

Portada: What about the bottom of the funnel?

A.G.: We leverage our television and radio partnerships to really drive calls to our enrollment call center. We also leverage our medical group and broker partnerships to help create sales opportunities. And lastly digital. Digital, while being at the top of the funnel, also creates plenty of conversion opportunities with lead generation and the use of our shopping website for L.A. Care Covered.

 

We know that a bad web experience can derail an enrollment opportunity, so we take our web and digital experience very seriously.

 

Portada: To what extent is the success of your campaigns based on your users’ online experience?

A.G.: We look very closely at web traffic, search traffic, and the performance of our digital investments. It helps us understand what people are looking for, what people use on our websites and how we need to enhance our digital touchpoints. We know that a bad web experience can derail an enrollment opportunity, so we take our web and digital experience very seriously. Websites have to be easy to use and very functional.

 

L.A. Care’s Media Mix 

Portada: Please describe the media mix of LA Care’s current campaign.

A.G.: I would break it down as follows:

30% – Outdoor, out of home

10% – Print and events

30% – Radio and television

30% – Digital

 

 

Portada: How has the media mix changed compared to 5 years ago and why?

A.B.: We have invested more in our digital offerings and Los Angeles being a commuter market, we have also grown our outdoor partnerships. The feedback and the research we undertake tells us that product and brand awareness has grown. Also, our membership has grown significantly. We will continue to monitor trends and make adjustments as necessary. A good marketer is always evolving.

This year, Pandora is presenting the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference, which will take place on November 6-8 in San Diego, California. 

 

On behalf of ANA’s Alliance for Inclusive and Multicultural Marketing (AIMM), PQ Media has just released a study titled U.S. Multicultural Media Forecast. According to the results of the study, 95% of the media revenues are concentrated in non-Multicultural media when only 63% of the population base is non-Multicultural, which means there is a huge opportunity for growth.

ANA Multicultural Marketing & DiversityFor twenty-one years, ANA has organized a yearly conference focused on multicultural marketing and diversity. On November 6-8, marketers from Denny’s, Facebook, PepsiCo, McDonald’s, Ulta Beauty, Ford, Facebook, Chico’s BBDO New York, and Subway will share their best practices at the 2019 ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference, presented by Pandora. They will share their successful strategies of marketing to multicultural segments, they’ll discuss how they measure ROI of multicultural marketing plans and how they come up with inclusion strategies that create authentic and meaningful impact.

Marc Pritchard, Chief Brand Officer at The Procter & Gamble Company, will facilitate a discussion with other industry disruptors who talk about actions that can help you become a force for equality and inclusion throughout the entire creative world. Just a couple of months ago, in June, Marc Pritchard became the trending topic of Cannes Lion when he said “If you’re not doing multicultural marketing, you’re not doing marketing.” At the ANA Masters of Marketing Conference on October 4, Pritchard shared P&G’s plans to disrupt the industry with first-party data.

Register here!

We talked to Terry Sell, national truck manager at Toyota Motor North America, about Toyota’s recent soccer campaign featuring Jorge Campos.  Toyota is one of the top 10 spenders in broadcast TV advertising, with $157 million spent in 2017. Through the campaign “Choose the Toughest Field”, the car company has managed to reach out to three audiences: Hispanics, soccer fans, and car lovers. Here’s what Sell had to say.

Toyota Campaign
Photo via Toyota.

Portada: Tell us what the “Choose the Toughest Field” soccer campaign is about.

Terry Sell: “The ‘Choose the Toughest Field’ soccer campaign is the 2019 soccer platform for Toyota. It builds powerful connections between the sport of soccer, players, fans, and trucks. The campaign was inspired by some of the more traditional playing conditions in Latin America. We considered that soccer is often played in dirt fields rather than nicely groomed grass. Those tough fields are where players exhibit their true potential, just like our trucks. The campaign’s commercials capture the toughness of the Tacoma and Tundra trucks as they take on tough terrains in a rough, non-traditional environment, thus their connection to the sport.”

To learn about another automotive brand that is reaching out to U.S. Hispanics, read  How to Market to Hispanic Consumers According to Kia’s Senior Director of Multicultural Marketing.

P: Who is the target of the campaign?

TS: “Toyota has long recognized Hispanic guests as a linchpin of its success. Hispanic vehicle registrations account for over 20% of overall registrations, making the Hispanic market a significant portion of Toyota’s overall success. In fact, Toyota has been the number one automotive brand among Hispanics for 14 consecutive years.”

Hispanic vehicle registrations account for over 20% of overall registrations.

P: On which platforms will it appear?

TS: “The campaign broadcast elements were timed for the 2019 Concacaf Gold Cup. But it will continue through March 2020 on other soccer media properties that we sponsor such as the UEFA Champions League, the U.S., and Mexican National Teams and Liga MX.”

P: Why did you choose retired Mexican goalkeeper Jorge Campos as your spokesperson?

TS: “We are delighted to partner with Mr. Campos. He is the embodiment of someone who has taken on the toughest terrains throughout his life and career as a legendary soccer player. His personal story, very much in sync with the attributes of the vehicles, resonates incredibly well with fans.”

Mr. Campos is the embodiment of someone who has taken on the toughest terrains throughout his life and career as a legendary soccer player.

P: How will you measure the success of the campaign?

TS: “Our goal is to drive consideration for Toyota trucks by increasing model association within their competitive set, and elevate ad awareness, vibrancy, opinion, consideration, and imagery. On the ground, through our interactive footprint at events, we are looking at engagement levels that funnel into sales leads.”

Photo via Toyota.

P: What other activities will you do around the campaign, off-screen?

TS: “The campaign has a diverse and robust digital and social component, including videos and rich mobile display ads and banners. For our social channels, we teamed up with Jorge Campos to develop a series of soccer technique videos. These showcase his great foot skills to engage guests in the sport.

Off-screen, we’re bringing the campaign to life through an interactive soccer footprint. It was present throughout the Gold Cup games and will be present during our sponsorship of Tour Aguila with our Club America partners in July. Also, it will appear at the Toyota Copita Alianza youth tournaments that continue through September.”

Off-screen, we’re bringing the campaign to life through an interactive soccer footprint.

P: Does this campaign appeal to any other market apart from Hispanics?

TS: “Soccer is part of the Hispanic culture. It is part of their life and brings generations together to enjoy the game. In fact, we know that Hispanics over-index when it comes to viewership in the U.S. With that in mind, our campaign fully focuses on this important target market for our brand.”

This is not the first time Toyota uses a Mexican celebrity to reach the Hispanic audience. Check out the campaign with movie star Diego Luna.

P: What challenges do you face with this campaign and how will you overcome them?

TS: “As soccer continues to gain popularity in the U.S., we have seen more brands getting into this space. Toyota has supported the sport and engaged with its fans for more than a decade so we’re appreciative of the brand loyalty we’ve received from fans and owners over the years. We’ll continue to engage with fans by developing creative campaigns that leverage partners, properties and celebrity talent that truly speak to the fans and to the essence of the game.”

As soccer continues to gain popularity in the U.S., we have seen more brands getting into this space.

P: What else are you working on?

TS: “As I mentioned, our campaign ambassador, Jorge Campos, engaged with us on a series of videos showcasing soccer techniques. In August, Jorge Campos hosted a soccer clinic at one of the Toyota Copita Alianza youth tournaments. We’ll also recognize a stellar student-athlete with a scholarship for their outstanding accomplishments in the classroom and on the field as part of our partnership with Alianza de Futbol.”

 

What: Multicultural Audience Measurement experts offer Portada insights around the problem of audience under-representation.
Why it matters: Measurement firms under-represent multicultural audiences by as much as 25%, which causes a negative impact in media investment and produces overall flawed results.

 

Audience measurement has never been more complicated, as cultural nuances and consumer behavior shift and change, and the proliferation of new technologies demands multi-channel strategies. The task is even more difficult when it comes to measuring multicultural audiences. Experts tell Portada major measurement firms under-represent these audiences by as much as 25%. If this is the case, the media budget for targeting multicultural audiences should be substantially higher than it is right now. Just for Hispanic marketing, Portada estimates overall expenditures of US 6.07 billion in 2019. However, if firms under-represent audiences by up o 25%, media expenses could increase by up to US 1.5 billion. Admittedly, this is a back-of-the-envelope calculation. Nevertheless, it highlights the importance of accurate multicultural audience measurement in satisfying clients’ needs, and its potential for the multicultural media industry.

The lack of a common audience measurement currency in multicultural audience measurement impacts media investment levels negatively.

Competition Rising

For many years now, companies like Nielsen and Kantar have offered advanced TV audience measurement. However, competition has increased. New players offer digital solutions that claim to be more comprehensive. This forces the bigger players to think of new ways to keep up with how audiences move and evolve. Inconsistencies between reported data reveal the lack of a common audience measurement currency in multicultural audience measurement. Hence, there’s a negative impact in media investment.

Furthermore, marketers’ biases lead to incorrect data interpretation. In turn, this leads to bad consumer experiences and negative overall results. How can we expect to move the needle if we can’t even tell where it is? In order to find out more about how to face these challenges, we talked to experts who understand how audience measurement impacts media planning and buying: Dana Bonkowski, SVP, Multicultural Lead at Starcom; Mebrulin Francisco, Managing Partner, Sr Director, MPlatform, GroupM; Nelson Pinero, Senior Digital Director, Senior Partner at GroupM; and David Queamante, SVP, Client Business Partner at UM Worldwide.

 

Audience Under and Over-Representation

All interviewees agree that multicultural audiences are still under-represented by major measurement firms. One of the reasons for this, explains Mebrulin Francisco, is the lack of insight into how audiences behave. Francisco mentions as an example all those times when data providers collected data on Hispanics. But once her team digged deeper, they realized the majority of Hispanics represented were English-dominant. This is a big issue because “it means the data is not representative of all the Hispanics in the U.S., creating a blind spot,” she says.

Mebrulin Francisco

The same has happened in the other extreme, where you can have over-representation of Spanish-dominant consumers, creating a blind spot for Bilingual or English-dominant Hispanics. “This is especially the case within sets that depend on cookie level data,” Francisco explained. “If this is true for the Hispanic segment, which is the largest among multicultural consumers, think about the under-representation of African-American or Asian segments. Many data providers do not even report on these multicultural sub-segments.”

 

Language preference won’t singlehandedly define and capture an audience. So, in many cases, a large portion of a given audience is not captured. 
Dana Bonkowski

Therefore, the first thing is having a representative sample of the audience. It might seem obvious, but in the words of David Queamante, “Unless measuring companies take the time to ensure they are gathering information from a representative sample of users, they will under-count multicultural audiences by default”. This represents a challenge. As Dana Bonkowski mentions, “engagement with culture-driven content is often the best signal to identify whether or not a person is ‘multicultural’. But language preference won’t singlehandedly define and capture an audience. So, in many cases, a large portion of a given audience is not captured.”

 

Multicultural Media Consumption is Elusive

Marketers have long assumed that a universal approach can reach audiences. However, “in doing so they fail to identify key nuances in motivations, attitudes, and behavior across consumer segments leading to an incomplete marketplace assessment,” explained Mebrulin Francisco. In the case of multicultural consumers, it’s even more complicated to hit the mark: Since datasets are limited, firms “do not flag multicultural consumers accurately and do not provide a holistic view of the brand’s performance, blurring meaningful insights,” said Francisco.

Multicultural media consumption is concentrated on certain outlets that [aren’t always] included on measurement companies’ surveys and reports. Therefore, multicultural media consumption may seem to ‘disappear’.
David Queamante

Moreover, multicultural audience measurement is rarely accurate. Why is that? As David Queamante explains, “Multicultural media consumption is concentrated on certain outlets that may not always be large or prominent enough to be included on the measurement companies’ surveys and reports. Therefore, multicultural media consumption may seem to ‘disappear.'” Besides, as Queamante mentions, not all measurement companies offer surveys in Spanish. This oversight considerably reduces the representation of Spanish-dominant Hispanic audiences, for example.

 

Privacy Issues Complicate Measuring Even More

This new era has brought significant advantages. For example, we can measure whatever happens as long as it happens online. However, the fact that it’s now easier to use and collect data as also brought up important privacy issues. Nelson Pinero predicts: “With audiences paying a little bit more attention to how and which personal data is being shared, it will become a bit more difficult to reach a diverse audience.”

Nelson Pinero

However, this is already a reality. Media buyers and agencies are working together around the problem of accurate audience measurement. But “what follows now is all part of the balancing act between data and the years of experience that allow the media buyers to react dynamically to market conditions and to, ideally, optimize plans,” adds Pineiro. “Audiences will take more control of how they are reached, and agencies trying to find the right audience will need to cross-reference their deterministic/probabilistic data to enhance plan performance.”

What Happens Now?

The obvious prediction is that data science will become even more important in the digital world. “Measurement is the new black,” declares Mebrulin Francisco. “As we push towards a data-driven age in marketing, science, quantification, and data are going to continue to be a cornerstone of decision making. If I cannot measure the impact of my investment, understand my audience impression on a site, or reach potential, it will be very hard to make a case for using a partner.”

Start building out multicultural and cultural expertise in house to accurately represent these audiences in your data streams.

Moreover, the immediate future is inescapably multicultural. Marketers need to use art to harness the power of all this data in order to represent audiences accurately. Experts like Mebrulin Francisco believe a good way to start is with first-party data. “If you are in the audience measurement space my recommendation is to start building out multicultural and cultural expertise in house to accurately represent these audiences in your data streams.”

When asked for her views on the future, Dana Bonkowski shared the hope that “marketers invest to better understand the business-building power of multicultural audiences. More than 30% of all Americans fall in one or more ‘multicultural’ audience buckets. The question should be “How can you afford not to invest against better multicultural audience measurement?”

 

We caught up with Kia Motors America’s Eugene Santos, Senior Manager, Multicultural Marketing, about Kia’s new multicultural campaign, Driving Forces. Anything related to the Hispanic market comes to Santos’ desk first, so he knows a thing or two about how to market to Hispanic consumers. He told Portada New York 19’s audience all about Kia’s first time using influencer marketing to target Hispanics. 

Eugene Santos, Senior Manager of Multicultural Marketing at Kia, has spent years practicing how to market to Hispanic consumersThe last time we spoke to him, he gave us a preview of what he had in store for the brand’s next Hispanic-oriented campaign. All we knew at the moment was the goal, to reach the Hispanic segment through an emotional connection to the brand’s new slogan. Fast forward to a couple of months later, Kia has launched Driving Forces, a campaign that involves real Latino stories.

Eugene Santos discusses Kia’s Driving Forces campaign at Portada New York

“We launched a message during the super bowl: Give it everything,” Santos said to an audience of fellow brand marketers at Portada New York. “In the past, Kia has been successful with Superbowl commercials. But now that the message is out there, what do we do with it? What does it mean? Especially for Latinos.”

The problem facing automakers these days, according to Santos, is that vehicles are smarter and last longer, so consumers are holding to their cars for more time. “The need for an automobile has decreased,” Santos pointed out. But the campaign has already proved to be fruitful, as the 200-percent increase in traffic to the Kia Soul landing page shows. Santos shared this and other pieces of information in exclusive at Portada New York… metrics not even Kia’s management had seen!

 

Still Talking Up the Hispanic Market

For a Korean brand that is relatively new to the U.S., the new Driving Forces campaign is a huge deal. “As all multicultural marketing managers know, budget is an issue,” said Santos. “Since Hispanics account for 18% of the population, General Market assumes we should have 18% of the marketing budget, but it doesn’t work that way.”

In fact, a real problem that stood out throughout the Portada New York conferences was the need to convince management of the relevance of Hispanic consumers. “You’d think that in 2020 we wouldn’t need to fight to convince organizations about the Hispanic business opportunity,” commented Santos. “But we keep fighting the same fight. Therefore, make sure you can show metrics that the general market understands.

The good news is: insightful, culturally nuanced campaigns are an important step to increasing companies’ awareness…, and getting a few more ad dollars. “Telling a story allows us to continue to connect with our audience and keeps the brand on top of mind. This might look like a simple project, but it’s making our company reconsider how they think about multicultural,” shared Santos.

 

An Effective Campaign Will Take You Far

As Eugene Santos explained, a successful campaign can yield results that are very important for the long run: not only can it get you more budget with management, but it can also ease you into the next step of your strategy.

That’s why Santos likes storytelling; it can elevate your brand by telling relatable stories to consumers and then follow up on those stories. But many times complications arise from the start in multicultural marketing. Whether it’s the lack of multicultural representation in management, inaccurate audience measurement or a lack of creative assets, it’s still difficult to know how to market to Hispanic consumers, starting from the (still relevant) question of what language to use.

 

Problem: How to Market to Hispanic Consumers

“When people think ‘Hispanic’, they automatically assume they have to use Spanish,” told Santos. “It doesn’t have to be that way. So for the first time, we’re using English-language creative to reach Hispanics. Bilingual and bicultural creatives go a long way.”

But the problem persisted: how could they elevate the Kia brand in a meaningful way? There were many factors at play, like limited assets, recent leadership changes and a low budget. “For a long time people have assumed that Kia is a cheap Korean Brand, but for the last 5-6 years, Kia has been recognized with top quality distinctions with brands like Mercedes and Porsche,” pointed out Santos. “Kia has various brand messages, but the objective was to dilute it into one message that created top brand consideration.”

 

Answer: Brand Ambassadors Who Share the Consumers’ Stories

Influencers are a risk, and yet most marketers have experience with them. They all learn that the only effective influencer marketing is based on brand ambassadors that share a true affinity with the brand’s values. For that reason, Santos chose two unique influencers that could tell the Latino story, because it was theirs.

“How do we tell the underdog story, which is really the Kia story, and how do we tell the Latino story to them?” asked Santos rhetorically. “I want to talk about the professional who is trying to do something different and relate it to my key customer.”

Consequently, Kia worked with Andrea Londo, a self-proclaimed border child who commuted from Tijuana to San Diego every day to go to school. Now, she is living her dream of being an actress. “You probably don’t know her, but in 2-3 years you will,” assured Santos. On top of everything, Londo drives a Kia Optima, which made for a perfectly organic fit.

Click here to learn Andrea Londo’s story

Clara Pablo, the other influencer featured in the campaign, is the manager of Miami-based Latin Pop group CNCO and of Colombian singer Maluma. Music is one of Kia’s verticals, which allowed for an organic fit with Pablo. In addition, she’s a breast cancer survivor and awareness advocate, which adds “a humanistic element that allows us to send out a message not only about cars but beyond. Young Latinos want to connect with brands that stand for the same things they do.”

Watch Clara Pablo’s story here

 

Once You Have the Right Message, Put it In the Right Creative (and Get the Right Partner to Do It)

One of the first things to do if you wish to launch a successful campaign is choosing the right partner. Because of the various problems multicultural marketers have to face, an agency that can really carry your message is as important as the message itself. For the Driving Forces campaign, Kia partnered up with Verizon Media. “We knew they could programmatically expose our message to a wider audience that is bicultural. Also, their creative studio, RYOT, could help us with assets that allowed us to show our message in relation to the creative,” explained Santos.

Together, they came up with docu-style creatives and an array of branded formats to tell the story of Latinos and Latinas. Through the two “driving forces” the brand chose as ambassadors, they focused on upbringing, biculturalism, accomplishments and their will to tackle a challenge. “The main goal was for them to connect with us,” stressed Santos. “We wanted to hit them at different points of their journey to let them know that we’re here for them and we understand them.

 

Results (Spoiler: Cultural Marketing Works)

The results so far have been positive. The completion rates above the benchmark of both videos show that consumers are interested. Also, CTRs are the same in Spanish and English, so language doesn’t always matter as long as viewers really connect with the message. “If the emotional component is there, they’ll stick around and come back,” said Santos. Reach and engagement have also been good, which has given Santos the confidence to ask for more budget.

Ultimately, Santos concluded that it’s all about three key rules. First, define your strategy: be clear on what the content should speak to and ensure alignment to overall brand strategy. Second, listen to your gut. Pick a partner that can execute and deliver significant reach for your targeted audience. Finally, don’t forget to ask yourself this question: what’s my next move?

 

Featured image designed by welcomia / Freepik

thereforeNFL extends Facebook partnership until 2020. Here you’ll find a weekly summary of the most exciting news in multicultural sports marketing. If you’re trying to keep up, consider this your one-stop-shop.

partnershipNFL

The Oakland Raiders have named Twitch as the founding partner of their new Allegiant Stadium in Las Vegas. The deal, which starts in 2020, will see Twitch have a branded lounge in the lower level of the 65,000-seater stadium. The aim of the partnership is to make Las Vegas ‘the global hub for esports’.

The Philadelphia Eagles launched a redesigned mobile app. The platform includes a new content interface featuring live TV and radio streaming access from Eagles’ games for the first time. The app is available on iOS and Android devices.

The NFL extended its partnership with Facebook for two more years. Under the extension, the Facebook Watch video service will continue as a platform for three-minute game recaps of all regular-season contests. Similarly, video highlights will also be accessible from the NFL Draft, Pro Bowl, and scouting combine.

Subscribe to Portada’s weekly Sports Marketing Updates!

MLB

MLB signed a multiyear partnership with EquiLottery Games. The deal makes this the first North American pro league to tie in with lottery draw game. Looking to boost fan engagements, MLB has thrown out the first pitch on Baseball Bucks. “We are always aiming to work with partners who share our goal of providing innovative ways for fans to engage with live games,” said Kenny Gersh, MLB’s executive vice president for gaming and new business ventures.

UFC

UFC and Toyo Tires expanded their long-time partnership to launch a new annual end-of-year awards program that honors UFC’s top fighters, performances and moments. The winners of the ‘UFC Performance of the Year’ and ‘UFC Fight of the Year’ awards will be personally chosen by UFC President Dana White. Meanwhile winners in the ‘UFC Honors Fan Choice’ group will be determined through social and online voting.

Broadcast/Radio

Univision’s TUDN Radio network strengthened its affiliate base, signing 10 new deals. Therefore, with 38 stations TUDN Radio reaches more than 60% of all Hispanic adults in the U.S., thanks to its presence in top Latino markets including Los Angeles, New York, Miami, Houston, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Chicago, San Antonio, and Phoenix.

FuboTV is officially debuting its own free-to-view TV channel. Hence, the platform will expand its reach via third-party connected-TV platforms Xumo, which also powers LG Channels; Samsung TV Plus; and the Roku Channel. Therefore, Fubo Sports Network features a mix of original programming, licensed content from partners as well as some live college football and basketball games, soccer matches, horse racing, and cycling action.

What: Digo Hispanic Media and NGL Collective have announced an exclusive partnership. NGL’s Studio division will create custom content that will be anchored on Digo’s network of publishers and culturally relevant sites.
Why it matters: The combination of NGL Studio’s full-scale production services specialized in U.S. Hispanics and multicultural millennials and Digo’s culturally relevant premium publisher network, is tailor-made to deliver against the firms’ growing demand for content with distribution at scale.

Digo Hispanic Media and NGL Collective are companies with a lot in common. Both were born from the need to cater to the needs of U.S. Hispanics. While NGL Collective, co-founded by David Chitel and Ben Leff, focuses on media and entertainment for the “New Generation Latinos”, Digo was born from the need to address the specific subsegment of U.S. Hispanics whose roots are in Puerto Rico, Cuba or the Dominican Republic.

The leaders of these two companies have over half-a-century of experience in the field between them, and now they have officially joined forces. Augusto Romano, founder and CEO of Digo Hispanic Media, and NGL Collective’s co-founder and Chief Operating Officer, Ben Leff, will lead a strategic partnership of their firms. Together, they will leverage Digo’s audience and NGL’s production services in order to reach U.S. Hispanic audiences through the right channels and messages.

NGL’s Studio division will produce custom content, which will then be distributed and amplified via the NGL Media and NGL Social platforms, and anchored on Digo’s culturally relevant sites and social channels.

“We are super excited to have found the perfect match for Digo’s audience engagement and content strategy. With NGL, we will not only be able to continue offering our audience high-quality content, but we will also be able to offer very relevant, familiar and even nostalgic content to our U.S. Hispanic audience. Even though our audience lives in the U.S., they deeply connect to the different publisher sites in our network. There’s a strong need to know what’s going on in their countries of origin, and what’s impacting their friends and family back home. Our audience also loves to share stories of success of other Hispanic men and women just like them with their friends and family here in the U.S.,” said Romano.

The combination of NGL Studio’s full-scale production services specialized in U.S. Hispanics and multicultural millennials and Digo’s premium publisher network, is tailor-made to deliver against the firms’ growing demand for content with distribution at scale.

“It’s great to be partnering with Augusto and his team to extend NGL Studios’ best in class production capabilities to their clients looking to engage Digo’s audience with premium content,” said Leff.

“Digo’s unique publisher base, especially amongst Hispanic audiences from the Caribbean, represents a great complement to NGL’s existing massive video distribution platform,” adds Javier Chanfreau, President of NGL Publishing.

“This is perfect for brands that want to connect with a true premium U.S. Hispanic audience in a brand safe environment. Our Hispanic composition is the highest in the market at 93%. Brands will have access to sponsor these content series via our sales team and we will insert them in the storytelling to ensure their brand and products are showcased in a relevant and engaging manner,” said Aisha Burgos, SVP of Sales & Marketing for Digo Hispanic Media.

 

MLB teams could generate US$11 million from jersey patch deals. Here you’ll find a weekly summary of the most exciting news in multicultural sports marketing. If you’re trying to keep up, consider this your one-stop-shop.

jersey patch
Cleveland Indians pitcher Carlos Carrasco, via Wikipedia.

MLB

According to Nielsen, MLB teams could make more money from jersey patch deals than NBA franchises. If the league allows them to start selling the sponsorship inventory, an MLB sleeve sponsor would appear on camera almost three times as often. As a result, Nielsen estimates that these jersey deals could generate US$11 million in brand value per team each season.

MLB and the Chinese Baseball Association signed an agreement to help relaunch the China National Baseball League (CNBL). China’s top domestic baseball competition has been going through a challenging time since its inception in 2002. In 2012 and 2017 the league was suspended due to a lack of funding and exposure.

NFL

Former Jacksonville Jaguars and Oakland Raiders head coach, Jack Del Rio, will join ESPN as an NFL analyst. He will appear on NFL Live, SportsCenter, ESPN Radio and more throughout the year. “I’m really looking forward to the upcoming football season and my new role with ESPN!” said Del Rio.

Oakley became an official on-field partner and licensee of the NFL. The four-year partnership is the biggest sports deal in the brand’s history. Apart from becoming the official shields and eyewear Powered by Prizm Lens Technology, Oakley will provide Officially Licensed NFL Eyewear available for fans.

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eSports

League of Legends reached the highest viewership in professional gaming, according to Newzoo. 23% of people who watch esports online prefer League of Legends. In comparison, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (20 percent) and Overwatch (16 percent) have the next highest viewership of all esports titles.

NBA

The Boston Celtics could be ending their jersey patch sponsorship deal with General Electric (GE) a year early. Although, the NBA team signed signing a three-year deal worth US$7 million a season.

Tennis

Naomi Osaka is the world’s most marketable athlete for 2019, according to a SportsPro ranking. The Japanese tennis sensation is the second woman to top SportsPro’s annual list of the world’s 50 most marketable athletes. Osaka replaces Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba at the top of the list, who now holds place 11.

What: For years, large chains have targeted Hispanics by adding a special aisle with select items from their home countries. These days, this approach can be a bit outdated. Here are some Hispanic grocery shopping insights, as diversity and globalization demand a more integrated approach.
Why it matters: Marketers are well aware that Hispanics are a huge consuming force that will only grow in time. It’s important to come up with ways to really cater to the community’s needs.

 

The Hispanic Cooking Rites

Us Latinos love our food. We love preparing it, we love planning it, we love buying fresh ingredients. Cooking and sharing is the ultimate family-bonding experience. Homemade meals are the first thing we miss when we’re away. We make them anywhere to feel at home. All these cultural traits not only make us great cooks, but also great produce and grocery shoppers. According to The State of the Plate, a 2015 Study on America’s Consumption of Fruits & Vegetables published by the Produce for Better Health Foundation, Hispanic grocery shoppers rank highest in produce consumption amongst 3 other ethnic groups (White/Non-Hispanics, Asians, and Black/Non-Hispanics).

There’s something all food marketers in the U.S. need to understand in order to cater to their Hispanic customers: From the moment the menu for a Hispanic table is conceived, every step of its preparation matters. Supermarkets appealing to the target can assert everything they must do to satisfy an ever-growing consumer base by being aware of the particularly ritualistic nature of Hispanic kitchens. Latinos love hand picking their food, buying enough ingredients to last for several meals, and trying out new ingredients on a permanent effort to enrich and expand their gastronomic experiences. But there’s one problem. Even though marketers are well aware that Hispanics are a consuming force, some have chosen to label and separate Hispanic (and generally ethnic) foods and products. This segregation rings counterintuitive and obsolete.

Finding the Balance Between Diversity and Globalization

Hispanics are widely diverse as a group. Every single Hispanic country has different ancestral dishes that require specific ingredients for their preparation. In addition, Millennials have been exposed to the culinary options of a globalized economy. This surely has an affect on traditional menus, even if Latino families have a specific and deep-rooted meal preparation routine.

Nearly six in ten Hispanics are Millennials or younger, according to Pew Research Center’s 2014 report, The Nations Latino Population is Defined by its Youth. 40% of American Millennials are multicultural, and more than half of this group are Latinos. As a global society would have it, we want to be able to make corn flour tortillas, but we want them filled with swiss cheese. According to The Why? Behind the Buy, a study conducted by Acosta Marketing and Univision in 2015, 57% of Hispanic Millennial Shoppers ages 25-34 say they often try new flavors/products.

 For years, the larger chains have catered to the Hispanic consumer (primarily) by adding an ‘Hispanic’ or ‘International’ aisle and placing select merchandise from Latin America. […] It is unclear if this format is successful.

Nothing more American than… Pizza?

As we have said before in other articles, foods that used to be foreign at some point, like pizza, sushi, and tacos, are such a big part of a global food culture that no one hardly ever questions their place in American households. These days, being able to find a wide variety of products from around the world is expected. In some cases it’s a given, because we live in a connected world in which boundaries are more blurry each day. As Rishad Tobaccowala, Chief Growth Officer at Publicis Groupe, said to Portada in a recent interview, “An idea that is not aligned with the unstoppable trends of diversity and globalization is doomed from the start.”

How to Include a Niche

For a minority seeking inclusion, all manifestations of inclusion are welcome. Supermarkets could start by dropping the label “Hispanic groceries” to call them just groceries. Yet, many supermarkets have tried to cater to the Hispanic audience by adding “exclusive” sections with the products Latino audiences may find at home. “For years, the larger chains have catered to the Hispanic consumer (primarily) by adding an ‘Hispanic’ or ‘International’ aisle and placing select merchandise from Latin America […] Some of the largest, such as HEB in Texas, developed their Mi Tienda (My Store) format which is located in a high dense Hispanic neighborhood. A larger store than a neighborhood store. It is unclear if this format is successful” says Randy Stockdale, director of Solex Marketing Solutions.

Problem is, inclusive as this effort may appear at first glance, Latinos already comprise 17% of the total American population. Inserting a Hispanic section surrounded by aisles of  “non-Hispanic” products might end up falling short for this ever-growing segment. “I don’t subscribe to a Hispanic aisle”, says Stockdale. “I would rather see the stores, particularly the larger chains, place like-items together and provide a greater convenience. Have you ever found Goya Olives in the general Olives section? Likely not.” Think of it this way: limiting their space is also limiting their consumption to one tiny section of an entire store.

Frozen Hispanic

In July 2017, a tweet got viral because one man saw the mockery potential of a supermarket freezer labeled “Frozen Hispanic.” He decided to pose as just that… a frozen Hispanic. The tweet got 152,278 retweets of people that didn’t see the need to separate frozen tamales from frozen chicken wings. Supermarkets would greatly profit from including Hispanic products without differentiation. It’s been proven that Hispanic consumers are generally willing to try new, different things.

An Emotional Connection

Brands like Jarritos spark the joy of feeling represented and identified while being abroad. Many people immediately purchase products that make them feel homesick when they’re abroad. This speaks of the great importance of having a supermarket experience that appeals not only to your needs, but to your emotions, comfort zone, and memories of home.

And just like it would at home the store needs to feel just like any other supermarket with staple sections. In Canadian supermarkets, for example, diversity is tangible all around. A variety of multicultural shoppers experience all kinds of international foods available to everyone. Anyone can add tzatziki, udon noodles, and jasmine-infused rice pudding to their shopping basket.

Just as the world’s boundaries are thinner, the gaps between demographic segments are narrower. We want to connect to our heritage, but we don’t want to feel isolated by it. We all want to feel human. So, if including a separate Hispanic grocery section on the supermarket is no longer a viable option, what is? How to attract Hispanics and make them feel welcome and included while strongly driving purchase intention? The answer lies in the power of emotions.

What Should Supermarkets Do, Then?

 In short? “Enhance their joy of shopping”, conclude Acosta and Univision on The Why? Behind the Buy. Perhaps general retailers could learn a thing or two from Hispanic grocery concept supermarkets like Northgate González Markets. The chain not only features an in-store tortillería, carnicería, and cocina, but that also offers children cooking classes and a gift certificate upon completing six lessons.

Or Fiesta Mart in Texas, offering a variety of fresh, organic, locally sourced produce with a side of social community programs to educate children and help feed the hungry. “I would not say [larger chains] are not doing a good job,” says Randy Stockdale. “They are trying at least. But, I would state that the larger chains should provide a friendlier-Hispanic atmosphere and improved merchandise. I am a strong proponent of bilingual in-store signage where the store is high-Hispanic density”. Therefore, the wisest move is to be inclusive and open-minded in both directions.

Both Fiesta Mart and Northgate Gonzalez are on the other side of the spectrum. Just as there are Hispanic aisles, there are entire stores that focus on the Hispanic community. But this doesn’t mean the general market should not come. There’s no reason to separate minorities, communities are not separate anymore. Everyone is welcome because everyone is from everywhere. No man is an aisle.

 

What: We talked to multicultural marketing experts, Rent-A-Center’s Maria Albrecht, NFL’s Marissa Fernandez, Group M’s LaToya Christian, and Intuit’s John Sandoval about key brand attributes for successful multicultural marketing.
Why it matters: As ethnic minorities become majorities in the U.S., companies will need to do multicultural marketing if they wish to survive.

When is the right time to do multicultural marketing? Who are the right brands to do it? Which are the right attributes for success? Portada talked to a group of multicultural marketing experts. Unsurprisingly, all their answers point unequivocally in the same direction. If you have a business and wish to be relevant, you have to do multicultural marketing. Take note of the following pieces of advice and be ready for the future.

1. Being Inclusive Isn’t Optional Anymore

Multicultural Marketing Experts
Group M’s LaToya Christian

“Diversity” and “inclusion” are two of today’s buzzwords, but they deserve every tiny part of the buzz. “At this stage of the game just understanding the U.S. landscape, demographics, and the way culture is being adapted is what all brands should be striving for,” says LaToya Christian, Associate Director of Marketing Analytics, Multicultural at Group M. “Work to be culturally inclusive and relevant across the board regardless of what segment you’re referring to.”

 

Multicultural marketing is no longer an afterthought or checked box; it has become a key strategy for business growth.
Multicultural Marketing Experts
NFL’s Marissa Fernandez

There’s no reason why any brand shouldn’t start thinking about doing multicultural marketing. In fact, they’d already be starting late. “Looking at the US population current data, as well as the projections, I’d be hard-pressed to believe there are many businesses that wouldn’t benefit from multicultural marketing,” observed Marissa Fernandez, Director, Marketing Strategy and Fan Development at the NFL. Multicultural consumers are already a significant part of the population, and their presence will continue to grow. Ignoring this would be a missed opportunity for any brand.

Multicultural Marketing Experts
Intuit’s John Sandoval

“Multicultural marketing is no longer an afterthought or checked box; it has become a key strategy for business growth,” explained along these lines John Sandoval, Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager at Intuit. “It’s time for brands to acknowledge this diversity as well. As long as you have customers purchasing your products, you should be considering multicultural marketing.”

 

 

2. The First Step is Pure Demographics

Even before thinking about brand attributes, you need to seriously consider whom you’re addressing. Deciding to do multicultural marketing is obviously not enough. The first steps are looking closely at your target, and also at your own positioning. “‘Multicultural consumers’ is a very heterogeneous group,” asserts NFL’s Marissa Fernandez. “Strive to narrow the target based on potential right to win and size of business opportunity.” There’s no way to reach all multicultural consumers at once just as it happens with non-multicultural consumers. Hence the importance of specific targeting.

If you’re not speaking to them, you’re not connecting with them. From a pure demographics perspective that raises a flag for me.
In 2015, Target spoke to multicultural consumers with its #SinTraduccion campaign. Sobremesa is an impossible-to-translate Spanish word referring to time spent at the table after a meal.

Moreover, as Group M’s Latoya Christian explains, looking at pure demographics gives you an idea of who you should try to reach. “If you’re a regional brand, like a brand we had from Georgia,” she tells us, “one of the first things that I think of is ‘What’s going on with your African-American consumers?‘ By pure demographics that is who is in that area. If you’re not speaking to them, you’re not connecting with them. From a pure demographics perspective that raises a flag for me.”

Also by Portada: Multicultural Marketing: How to Use Seamlessly in Total Marketing Campaigns

 

3. The Key to the Treasure: Be True to Yourself

Fenty Beauty is one of LaToya Christian’s favorite brands. It embodies the idea of inclusion by offering 40 shades of makeup, a feat that no brand had done ever before.

There is no magical recipe for successful multicultural marketing, except perhaps being true to your values and asking yourself the right questions. “You shouldn’t necessarily alter your brand essence or who you are as a brand to force a fit or to appeal to one specific audience,” noted LaToya Christian. “It should be less about the brand changing itself and more about how it’s positioning itself based on what consumers needs are.”

Multicultural marketing experts must ask brands a few questions to ensure they remain relevant. For example, according to John Sandoval, we need to ask “Is your brand connecting to this audience on an emotional level? Are you listening to them? Are you engaging in two-way conversations with them through social media? Do you have cultural consultants who can help ensure the messages are relevant? Where and how is your product being consumed? Does this differ from general market, or even within the various regions of the country?”

 

4. Don’t forget Universal Appeal and Relevance!

Multicultural Marketing Experts
Rent-A-Center’s Maria Albrecht

Having said that, it is possible to observe that brands who are successful in multicultural environments have a few important characteristics; the most important one, though ironically, is relevance independently from segment. In the words of Maria Albrecht, Hispanics Markets Lead Marketer at Rent-A-Center, “A brand’s attributes must have universal appeal and must also leverage the points of convergence and divergence that exists in the market, especially as they relate to customers’ needs, wants, aspirations, and expectations.”

Just as when addressing any audiences, brands targeting multicultural consumers must be sure to be relevant. As John Sandoval would ask, “Could a multicultural audience say ‘This is a brand for me’?”. He says brands also need to be functional and beneficial. In his words, ask yourself these questions: “Is this product something that consumers can use regardless of culture? How will my brand help improve the consumer’s life?” Among the tools Sandoval recommends to be more relevant, brands can try for bilingual/biculturally appealing information, credible brand ambassadors, and distribution in key markets.

5. According to Multicultural Marketing Experts, Here’s What You Shouldn’t Do

Mistakes are easy to make, and more often than not these stem from misconceptions or from going off a tangent. These are the 5 mistakes our interviewees identified as the most common, together with their advice to avoid them:

  • Misconceptions of the various segments:

“Sometimes a lot of what we see is misconceptions or biases about the various segments,” points out LaToya Christian. “I know in the Hispanic segment marketers sometimes get very lazy and they automatically go to language. So it’s like ‘Oh, if I just do it in Spanish, cool, I’m done.’ You really need to take some time to understand who the consumer group is, how to utilize brands within your category, how to speak to them, what are their nuances beyond just a language perspective”.

  • Looking at your product through your own biases:

As explained by Christian, “One of the things that unfortunately as marketers we sometimes do is we put ourselves into the minds of the consumers, which is not accurate because we’re not always the consumer of certain brand or product.” Then, marketers need to push their own looking glass aside and really take the time “to understand how consumers are behaving, what they say about their brand, and really taking it from that perspective,” she says.

 

 

Multicultural marketing experts must understand their field is an art and a science. Even with all the data in the world at your disposal, you can check off the “Science” box, but there’s still the “Art” side of the equation.
  • Waiting too long to act:

“I think sometimes companies overanalyze the opportunity and fail to see there is financial risk in inaction,” asserts Marissa Fernandez. “I encourage brands to test, start small, minimize the risk, measure, learn, do research, and grow multicultural efforts, even if it’s slowly over time.  The business opportunity is probably too big to pass up.”

  • Not using enough data:

“Any info needed to develop and execute a winning strategy must be triangulated by at least three sources such as the company’s performance results, internal and external surveys, customer focus groups, qualitative or quantitative research, targeting tools, store/location visits, customer polls, social media feedback, or competition’s moves,” recommends Maria Albrecht. “Relying on one or two sources will only lead to an incomplete view of the market’s landscape. Also, we’d be missing opportunities for the company.”

  • Relying too much on data:

“Multicultural marketing should not be about building data in order to start. Instead, it should be about leveraging existing data to launch a program and using those real-life examples and results to tailor and improve communication with this audience,” says John Sandoval. “Multicultural marketing experts must understand their field is an art and a science. Even with all the data in the world at your disposal, you can check off the “Science” box, but there’s still the “Art” side of the equation.”

In conclusion, keeping an eye on the future is important, but the future is already here. As Marissa Fernandez points out, “we know the future of our country IS diverse, IS multicultural.  I’m a believer that in our lifetime, multicultural marketing won’t be called that anymore— it will just be MARKETING.”

Digo Hispanic Media has opened an office in midtown New York to service its growing base of New York area based agency and brand direct clients. Digital Sales & Programmatic Specialist Stefan Garcia will be working out of the NYC office, which is led by Augusto Romano, CEO and Aisha Burgos, SVP.

Digo Hispanic Media has opened an office in midtown New York to service its growing base of New York area-based agency and brand direct clients.

Digo Hispanic MediaDigital Sales & Programmatic Specialist Stefan Garcia will be working out of the NYC office, which is led by Augusto Romano, CEO and Aisha Burgos, SVP of Digo Hispanic Media. Digo Hispanic Media was born when two of the largest media companies in the Caribbean, GFR Media from Puerto Rico and Grupo Corripio from the Dominican Republic. Digo exclusively represents premium publisher brand-safe websites, of which it owns and operates the majority.

According to the Comscore June 2019 report, Digo has the largest percentage of Hispanics (93%) as part of their audience compared to its competitors. Digo’s websites also exceed their competitors when comparing their audience engagement with an average of 4.7 minutes per visit, providing advertisers a more premium, pure and engaged U.S. Hispanic audience to connect with.