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What: The ANA Educational Foundation has released the results of a study on efforts and difficulties around making the marketing talent pool more diverse.
Why it matters: Even though the marketing industry has come a long way on the inclusion road, only 13% of CMO positions are filled by people of color, signaling there are still long gaps between reality and achieving a diverse industry.

According to a new report by the ANA Educational Foundation, the marketing industry’s efforts to recruit a more diverse workforce are still not enough, as the overwhelming majority of the talent (87% of CMOs) is still predominantly white. The report, titled “Bridging the Diversity Disconnect: Charting More Inclusive Pathways to Growth,” touches on the various reasons why it’s essential to make the talent pool more diverse, as well as the factors that are still an obstacle for this to become a reality.

Why is Diversity so Important for the Industry?

According to the report, the structural disconnects between academia and industry need to be bridged because recruiting and retaining diverse talent brings direct benefits such as:

  • Good business results
  • Higher performance standards
  • Better team dynamics
  • More organizational agility
  • Better strategy overall

What Isn’t Working?

However, when interviewed by the research firm Egg Strategy, diverse talent acknowledged that breaking into the industry and then staying there was incredibly hard. The research identified factors like:

  • Management disconnect
  • Microagressions
  • Cultural illiteracy
  • Workplace integration dissonance

According to the study, there has been significant effort by companies such as Hewlett-Packard and Verizon to work with their agency partners to ensure diversity on the teams when executing campaigns. However, diversity numbers are still pretty low, as shown in these graphics taken from the report:

As written in the report, “the industry has focused on addressing the diversity issue, which is the right issue to focus on — but we have taken the wrong approach.”  The phrase “diversity and inclusion” suggests that diversity comes before inclusion when in reality diversity results from being inclusive. The problem then is that focusing on the result instead of thinking of how to get there makes us distracted from all the requirements to get to that result.

Thus, the report concludes that the focus must be how we can be more inclusive as an industry, both to attract and retain outstanding diverse talent: “Greater inclusivity is the key to improving diversity, and it has been demonstrated more diverse teams drive business growth. Inclusivity also signals to our next generation of talent that their voices truly matter, that they belong in the marketing and advertising industry, and that their talent is sorely needed.”

Cover image adapted from the report.

What: We caught up with industry pioneer Rochelle Newman-Carrasco of Walton Isaacson at the ANA Multicultural Conference and asked her a few questions about the growing momentum of The Alliance of Multicultural Marketing (AIMM).
Why It Matters: Carrasco shared insight from the founding members of AIMM in order to provide a range of perspectives on areas of importance to the industry.

In October 2016, the Association for National Advertisers took an important step in encouraging the industry’s progress when it established the Alliance for Inclusive and Multicultural Marketing to establish a “powerful, unified voice for the advancement of multicultural marketing.” A year later, the group is working cooperatively, transparently, and methodically to set the groundworks for a marketing industry that better reflects today’s diverse audiences.

Industry Must ‘Separate Excuses from Legitimate Concerns’

When the AIMM met in August 2017, it was stated that accessibility, accuracy, and affordability of multicultural-specific data were some of the most significant obstacles in developing effective strategies for advancing Multicultural. But what strategies are in place to tackle these challenges?   

Carlos Santiago, President of Santiago Solutions Group explained: “The Alliance is identifying issues that are standing in the way of progress and then bringing unified industry clout to the table in order to change supplier behavior insofar as diverse consumer groups are concerned.”

There is a tendency (perhaps due to lack of access effective data) to make excuses when it comes to Multicultural, and “the key is spending the necessary time to separate excuses from legitimate concerns – having zero tolerance for cop-outs like ‘it’s too hard’ or ‘it’s too expensive,’” Santiago added.

Santiago explained that the “siloed approach to problem solving” may not work as well as “having diversity of thought come up with innovative solutions,” which is why the Metrics and Measurement Committee, led by Gonzalo del Fa of Group M Multicultural (who is also a Portada Editorial Board member), has “laid out a really robust plan of action, and [the group is] moving into a very exciting stage of implementation that will include a Multicultural Data Roundtable.”

‘It’s No Longer Possible to Keep this Failure Hidden’

This is not the first time that marketers have sounded the alarm and expressed how urgent this Multicultural crisis is. So what’s different this time?

Rochelle Newman-Carrasco, EVP at Walton Isaacson, insisted that “it’s no longer possible to keep this failure hidden, especially from internal and external stakeholders for whom ‘multicultural’ is more than a department.”

Failing to reach and connect with Multicultural audiences has real implications for all serious brands in today’s world, and “for many consumers and employees, multicultural matters are life and death matters — matters of image and identity that can inspire or alienate generations to come,” Carrasco said.

‘Whole Communities of Consumers Are Missing or Minimized’

Perhaps one of the first steps in making real progress is holding brands accountable for their lack of effort. Carrasco explained that “poor performance is directly related to segment-specific neglect, whole communities of consumers are missing or minimized throughout the marketing cycle—missing from staffing, budgeting, and creative representation.”

Poor performance is directly related to segment-specific neglect, and whole communities of consumers are missing or minimized throughout the marketing cycle—missing from staffing, budgeting, and creative representation.

While some more visionary brands are stepping up to make their Multicultural efforts more than a symbolic gesture, “other brands are having their course corrected by consumers who will no longer accept failure at their expense,” Carrasco insisted. “Marketers must understand that culturally-specific marketing is not just a theoretical exercise or something to track in the P&L or on a spreadsheet.”

Brands ‘Discovering Ways to Balance the Benefits of Collaboration with Restrictive Guardrails’

While sharing Best Practices and lessons learned from experiments in Multicultural are key if the industry as a whole is to progress, “certainly there is a natural reticence to share proprietary details” said Lisette Arsuaga, Co-President and COO of Davila Multicultural Insights. But she emphasized that this is changing, and that “brands are discovering ways to balance the benefits of collaboration with restrictive guardrails.”

What do brands get out of sharing and collaborating? “Participation in an exchange that triggers discovery and progress in ways that hunkering down and walling off a brand do not,” Arsuaga said.

Within the framework of AIMM, we see brands seizing opportunities to enter into dialogue with one another and to offer up their processes while taking in the learnings of others.

“Within the framework of AIMM, we see brands seizing opportunities to enter into dialogue with one another and to offer up their processes while taking in the learnings of others.”

Arsuaga also added that making a unified effort to bring in new, diverse talent is key: “Multicultural cannot reach its full potential without filling a pipeline with new talent and joining together to do so.”

The ‘Total Market’ Problem

After the August meeting, Carrasco of Walton Isaacson asserted that the AIMM was exploring the effectiveness of the term ‘Total Market,’ saying that “while the Total Market Committee has not yet repealed and replaced the phrase ‘Total Market,’ there is data to support that its usage, and often random application, has hindered rather than helped marketers to powerfully connect with multicultural communities.” Since then, AIMM’s Total Market Committee, led by David Cardona of Clorox and Javier Delgado of Coca-Cola, has dedicated a significant amount of effort to reaching a definitive conclusion on how well ‘Total Market’ works for the industry, launching a campaign called #TotalMarketDoneRight.

Gilbert Davila, Chair, ANA Multicultural Marketing and Diversity Committee asserted that “AIMM’s aim is to shatter myths and address the many misinterpretations that have occurred since this concept was introduced several years ago.”

Davila explained that “Total Market was intended to level the playing field and bring multicultural marketers to the mainstream marketing table where they rightly belonged…Instead, the concept became a convenient excuse for eliminating resources and budgetary line items in the name of efficiencies.”

While Total Market was supposed to address the “absence of multicultural consumers in what is often referred to as ‘mainstream’ marketing, it was not intended to eliminate culturally targeted marketing nor was it meant to make cultural specialists irrelevant,” Davila clarified.

‘If You’re Not Reflecting Diverse Audiences You’re Rejecting Diverse Audiences’

Where will the AIMM go from here? While Davila reinforced that “AIMM is laser-focused on bringing back the integrity of marketing that is both universal and unique,” the renewed and refreshed commitment to this topic will require concrete actions that the group is ready to spearhead.

Marketers create messages that impact the mirror we hold up to America and the world – if you’re not reflecting diverse audiences you’re rejecting diverse audiences and that’s not solved with casting, it’s only solved with clarity and commitment.

Santiago of Santiago Solutions Group described the AIMM’s approach as “going down a path of disruption and innovation and avoiding the well-worn traditional approaches to quick but unremarkable fixes.”

The intent is there, but hopefully action will follow. “Marketers create messages that impact the mirror we hold up to America and the world – if you’re not reflecting diverse audiences you’re rejecting diverse audiences and that’s not solved with casting, it’s only solved with clarity and commitment,” Carrasco emphasized.

What: Social media — particularly Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram — has emerged as a key component in supporting sponsorship activations among a great majority of marketers, according to a new study by the ANA (Association of National Advertisers).
Why it matters: The study revealed that 85 percent of the marketers surveyed use social media to support sponsorships before, during, and after the sponsorship.Additionally, almost half (44 percent) employ a range of “advanced technologies” such as 360-degree photography, beacons, virtual reality, and RFID (radio-frequency identification) as support for their sponsorship activations.

The study, “Use of Social Media and Advanced Technologies for Sponsorship,” indicated that the primary reasons marketers use either social media or advanced technologies to support a brand’s sponsorship activations were the same:

  • Generate awareness
  • Connect with customers during the event
  • Improve brand perception

“Sponsorships are becoming an increasingly important part of the marketing mix, and with good reason,” said ANA CEO Bob Liodice. “Giving those activities a boost via the aggressive use of social media and other new technologies makes sense because of the ROI it provides.”

Sponsorships are becoming an increasingly important part of the marketing mix, and with good reason.

Sponsorship spending in North America is projected to be $23 billion in 2017, according to ESP/IEG, a consultancy that tracks sponsorship spending and trends. Sports events dominate the list of all sponsorship spending, accounting for about 70 percent, followed by entertainment at 10 percent.

Preferred social media platforms used to activate sponsorship included:

  • Facebook (92 percent)
  • Twitter (87 percent)
  • Instagram (70 percent)
  • YouTube (47 percent)
  • LinkedIn (41 percent)
  • Facebook Live (27 percent)
  • Snapchat (27 percent)
  • Pinterest (13 percent)

The study noted that internal resources are most often used for the management of social media and/or advanced technologies to support a brand’s sponsorship activations; external agency resources are also used (e.g., digital/social agency and sponsorship agency), but to a lesser extent.

In addition, the amount of social media exposure generated was the top choice, by a wide margin, for measuring the effectiveness of a brand’s social media sponsorship activity. For advanced technologies, on-site activity tracked at the sponsorship event and the amount of social media exposure generated were the two top choices for measuring effectiveness.

METHODOLOGY

The survey was conducted in June 2017. In total, 119 ANA corporate members participated. Of those, 55 percent were characterized as “senior marketers” (director level and above) while 45 percent were “junior marketers” (manager level and below). Forty-nine percent of respondents had 15 years or more experience in marketing/advertising. Seventy-seven percent work at organizations with an annual U.S. media budget of less than $100 million; the other 23 percent work at organizations with an annual U.S. media budget of $100 million or more. Those organizations are primarily B-to-C (38 percent) with some B-to-B (20 percent), and B-to-C/B-to-B for the remainder.

For purposes of the survey, the term sponsorship was defined as “a cash and/or in-kind fee paid to a property (typically sports, entertainment, non-profit event, or organization) in return for access to the exploitable commercial potential associated with that property.” A property was defined as “a unique, commercially exploitable entity, typically in sports, arts, events, entertainment, or causes.”

online_video_marketing_guide_2016_eng_page_01

Multicultural is the new mainstream. That is why we are very excited to publish the 2017 ANA Portada Multicultural Thought Leadership Supplement, an exclusive partnership betweeen Portada and the Association of National Advertisers (ANA).

HIGHLIGHTS

•  Totally Sold on Total Market? Three big Brands weigh in on a promising approach to marketing communications
•  6 Habits of highly effective multicultural marketers
 Xavier Turpin on driving change at Dunkin’ Brands
•  A blueprint for creating a unified voice
•  Truths about Multicultural Milennials

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A summary of the most exciting recent news in online video in the U.S., U.S.-Hispanic and Latin American markets. If you’re trying to keep up, consider this your one-stop shop.

US/US-HISPANIC MARKET

Vice Media announced that it will be doing scripted video programming through a partnership with digital media studio Blackpills. All of the content will be made for mobile viewing and distributed exclusively through Vice’s online video channel.

AT&T, Verizon, Johnson & Johnson and other leading U.S. advertisers are pulling hundreds of millions of dollars in ads from Google and YouTube due to worries that their ads appear next to extreme, hateful content. AT&T will halt all ad spending on Google except for some search ads.

Adobe has revealed two new “clouds,” Experience Cloud, which includes an extensible platform, data, and content systems, and Advertising Cloud, which “rings performance and brand advertising data together so advertisers can see it all in one place, and view their campaigns in a cohesive way.”

Instagram announced that users will now be able to save live videos to re-watch later. At the end of a live video, a ‘Save’ button will now appear in the upper right corner.

Comcast Technology Solutions has entered into an international channel deal with broadcasting and media technology systems architect Qvest Media to offer Tier-1 broadcasters, telecommunication operators and pay-TV companies tools that simplify the publishing, distribution and monetisation of online video content.
Altice N.V. announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire advertising marketplace Teads, which has an audience of more than 1.2 billion unique visitors including 720 million via mobile.
 MGID, a provider of native advertising and marketing solutions, announced that its user dashboard is now available in Spanish. The launch is the first in a series of localized user interface rollouts, and will provide a more streamlined experience for MGID’s Spanish-speaking clients.
 DMP Lotame announced the general availability of Lotame Onboarding — a people-based marketing service powered by LiveRamp™ IdentityLink — following a successful beta testing period.

Deloitte‘s latest study, the “Digital Democracy Survey” asserts that 80% will skip digital TV/video commercials, and that over 70% of Millennials and younger Gen Z viewers find mobile ads to be “irrelevant.”Ad-blocking software is a big part of Millennials’ digital media usage: 45% use ad blocking software, with 89% saying that they use it to avoid all advertising. 40% of these respondents use ad-blocking software on their smartphones.

A study of Kellogg Co. brands by Nielsen Catalina Solutions found that when online video ads that meet the Media Rating Council standard saw higher sales lift than those that did not. Ads deemed “likable” by panelists for copy testing firm Ace Metrix had the strongest sales lift of all – a 172 index where 100 is the average for people exposed to ads in the study.

Akamai Technologies announced it has a new technology, Akamai Media Acceleration, to improve the viewing experience for people who watch over-the-top video services.

The Association of National Advertisers has called on digital “walled gardens” — platforms that intermediate their users’ identities with advertisers who target them through the platform’s closed ecosystem — to “allow independent audits” by industry audience ratings self-regulatory watchdog, the Media Rating Council (MRC). The ANA issued an advisory calling on the platforms and explicitly citing the likes of “Amazon, Foursquare, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Snapchat, and Twitter,” following a member survey, which found that 90% favored independent audits by the MRC.

LATAM MARKET

AT&T‘s operations in Mexico have been successful, partly thanks to their online video efforts, as the service saw 1.3 million wireless net subscribers in 4Q16. In Latin America, DIRECTV lost 21,000 video subscribers in 4Q16, with weak performance in Brazil. The total number of Latin American subscribers for the company now stands at 12.5 million.

The Brazilian ad tech company Predicta has entered into an agreement with video ad platform YContent, whose products allow publishers to attach video to any form of content on websites.

New research from Interact and the Argentinian Association of Digital Agencies reveals that 60% of respondents professionals forecast positive results by the end of the year, with uninterrupted growth, despite a surrounding changing environment.

We are excited to announce our exclusive partnership with the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) for the publication of a Multicultural Thought Leadership Issue. The partnership reflects Portada’s standing as the leading property in multicultural  marketing, media and technology  reaching more than 130,000 marketing and technology executives in the Americas through leading events, digital and print properties.

Introducing the 2017 Association of National Advertisers (ANA) Multicultural Thought Leadership Supplement in partnership with Portada:

Premium Editorial Content

• Thought leadership from the ANA’s Research Team and ANA Members.
• The brands that understand the Total Market Approach. How, why and the results
• Profiles and Interviews with Key Brand Marketers in the Multicultural Space
• Additional Thought Leadership content from ANA research and case studies
• Case Studies of ANA Multicultural Award Winners in different categories

Distribution

• As a special digital supplement published on www.portada-online.com, 50,000 UV/ month,
distributed to Portada’s audience online for free download.
• Digital Distribution and promotion by ANA
• Online Pub Date: April 4, 2017
• Within Portada print issue and distributed at all major conferences

Position yourself at the cutting edge of multicultural and cross-cultural market in the U.S. by aligning with the ANA (which incorporates the largest brand advertisers in the U.S) and Portada
(the largest trade media in the multicultural space reaching more than 120,000 marketing executives in the multicultural space.)
Opportunities within the ANA Multicultural Thought Leadership Issue:
• Content Marketing
• Partner Messages
• Partner Interviews
• Display Advertising
• Spreads

Reach out to Sales/Marketing Director Kelley Eberhardt at
Kelley@portada-online.com to get more information about this opportunity!

What: The ANA (Association of National Advertisers) announced the formation of the Alliance for Inclusive & Multicultural Marketing (AIMM) to create a unified voice for the advancement of multicultural marketing.
Why it matters: The AIMM will bring together senior thought leaders from the African-American, Hispanic, Asian, LGBT and general market communities to create a united blueprint for the evolution of multicultural and diverse-segment marketing in America.

descarga-1The ANA (Association of National Advertisers) announced the formation of a new, wide ranging alliance designed to create a unified voice for the advancement of multicultural marketing.

The initiative is called the Alliance for Inclusive & Multicultural Marketing (AIMM).  Its goal is to bring together senior thought leaders from the African-American, Hispanic, Asian, LGBT and general market communities to create a united blueprint for the evolution of multicultural and diverse-segment marketing in America.

This goal is to position AIMM as the leading voice in multicultural and inclusive marketing, as well as diversity, and engage senior marketing executives throughout the country in the multicultural conversation. Work initiated by AIMM is intended to:

  • Share multicultural marketing examples through unique and distinctive forums
  • Drive ROI, primarily through marketing effectiveness and segment relevance
  • Provide leadership alignment and collaboration
  • Develop unique, growth-focused insights through collaborative research and through the creation of the multicultural marketing knowledge center
  • Create alternative and distinguished approaches to addressing industry diversity
  • Disseminate best practices of multicultural and diverse demographic segments through a robust communications program
  • Create unique marketplace experiences that provide compelling insights into the multicultural arena

AIMM will be co-chaired by Liodice, Antonio Lucio, CMO at Hewlett Packard, and Michael Lacorazza, EVP, Brand and Advertising-Integrated Marketing at Wells Fargo.  Board members will include Gilbert Dávila and Lisette Arsuaga, Co-Presidents at Dávila Multicultural Insights (DMI), and Carlos Santiago, President of Santiago Solutions Group (SSG).

As the marketplace becomes increasingly diverse, the ANA recognizes that the strategic evolution of multicultural marketing becomes even more important to brands.

“As the marketplace becomes increasingly diverse, the ANA recognizes that the strategic evolution of multicultural marketing becomes even more important to brands,” said ANA President-CEO Bob Liodice.  “To facilitate and accelerate that change, ANA invites the marketing community to come together to lead the pursuit of opportunities and to address the challenges before us.  Our strategic intent is to reach out to all constituencies in order to collectively make a difference in realizing the potential of multicultural marketing.”

“At Wells Fargo, we are about reinventing marketing, keeping our customer at the center of everything we do, and this directly aligns with the goal of AIMM,” said Lacorazza.  “We look forward to working together to advance multicultural marketing as a fresh voice in the industry.”

Dávila, who also serves as chairman of the ANA’s Multicultural Committee, added: “ANA will create a think tank that will lead an unprecedented evolution of multicultural marketing and diversity through its vision and leadership of an industry wide coalition that will provide distinctive value added to the entire marketplace.”

AIMM members committed to date include: the AHAA: The Voice of Hispanic marketing, representing over 100 Hispanic-focused companies and marketing agencies, Anheuser-Busch, Burrell Communications, Coca-Cola, Dunkin’ Donuts, IW Group, Kaiser Permanente, Kellogg, López Negrete Communications, NBC Universal, OMD, Procter & Gamble, Target 10, Univision, Video Advertising Bureau, and Wells Fargo.

Membership in AIMM for its first year will be limited and by invitation only.

 

Fortune 1000 client side marketers interviewed by the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) are heavily betting on programmatic marketing, despite the high fraud rate that is associated with programmatic media buys. Our recently introduced character Programático López is right to take time think on how the increase of programmatic buying and the propietary use of data by brands is causing seismic shifts in the advertising and marketing world.

According to a  new survey published by the ANA, the number of marketers using automated ad buying systems to purchase advertising has more than doubled over the past two years, fueled in part by marketers’ desire to better target their customers. The survey also reveals that marketers are taking steps to better protect themselves from some of the issues, such as having a more hands-on approach to programmatic. About 31% of the companies polled said they have expanded their in-house capabilities to manage and oversee the function.

The study, which polled 128 marketers and was conducted by research firm Forrester, found that 79% of advertisers have made programmatic ad buys over the past year. That is up significantly from a similar study that was done in 2014, which found only 35% of the advertisers had used programmatic buying.

ANA represents many of the country’s largest advertisers such as Procter & Gamble, General Motors and AT&T.

Advertisers are increasing their use of automated buying even though 70% of respondents that did programmatic ads last year were concerned about higher levels of bot fraud in programmatic buys.

Advertisers are increasing their use of automated buying even though 70% of respondents that did programmatic ads last year were concerned about higher levels of bot fraud in programmatic buys. Bots are computer programs that mimic human web-surfing and artificially boost site traffic. In January, the ANA estimated that marketers wasted about $7 billion last year on online ads that people did not see.

Fake Web traffic isn’t the only thing marketers are anxious about, the study showed.
The majority of advertisers polled also expressed concerns about the lack of transparency in how much an ad actually costs when buying via an automated system and the “dearth of information about whether an agency reaps financial gains from the media seller by using the client’s funds,” the ANA said.

The ANA is currently trying to bring more visibility to the market and is investigating agency transparency. Marketers worry that some agencies have agreements in place with media sellers that reward them for directing more of their clients’ budgets to specific vendors.

The new survey does reveal that marketers are taking steps to better protect themselves from some of the issues, such as having a more hands-on approach to programmatic. About 31% of the companies polled said they have expanded their in-house capabilities to manage and oversee the function.

A just published Association of National Advertisers Survey (ANA), shows that brand marketers (clients) are demanding a more holistic approach from agencies and for a better way for agencies to communicate with other agencies. Survey answers from clients included: “Be more collaborative with other agencies to deliver the best results for the client, rather than protective over their share of wallet,” and “streamline their network P&L (have one!) to support our business, not theirs.”

In the first quarter of 2015 (between January 28 and February 25), the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) conducted parallel surveys among ANA members and agencies on issues related to the client/agency relationship. According to the survey client and agencies agree that “their client/agency relationships are strong; they trust the other and that a long-term client/agency relationship is important.” However, “agencies are not in alignment on the fairness of their compensation arrangements.”
Another result of the survey is that brand marketers (clients) are demanding a more holistic approach from agencies and for a better way for agencies to communicate with other agencies. Below we delve deeper into this aspect of the Survey:

QUESTION 1: Do agencies work well with other agencies?

 

Strongly AgreeAgreeNeither Agree or DisagreeDisagreBOTTOM TWO
CLIENT: Our agencies work well with other agencies11%54%22%10%32%
AGENCY: We work well with other agencies/36%52%10%1%11%

SOURCE: 2015 ANA Survey “Enhancing Client Agency Relationships”
COMMENTARY: Clients and agencies agree that agencies work well with other agencies — but those levels of agreement differ. While 88 percent of agencies agree, 65 percent of clients agree. Meanwhile, only 11 percent of clients strongly agree versus 36 percent of agencies. Almost a third of clients either disagree or neither disagree/agree with the statement that agencies work well with other agencies.

 

QUESTION 2: (Clients were asked: )“What could your agency do to foster a more productive client/agency relationship?”

Top responses:
• Be more proactive
• Have a better understanding of the client’s business
• Integrate/collaborate with other agencies
• Increase transparency

3. Selected verbatim highlights from open-ended questions to clients:

Be more proactive than reactive.
Partner across holding company affiliates to bring integrated team that is more efficient and doesn’t add layers.
They can work more collaboratively within their different groups as well as with different agencies.
Be more collaborative with other agencies to deliver the best results for the client, rather than protective over their share of wallet.
More collaborative cross-agency briefings and brainstorming.
Our key AORs need to communicate better with tactical agencies.

Streamline their network P&L (have one!) to support our business, not theirs.

They can work more collaboratively within their different groups as well as with different agencies. Too often there seems to be a turf war.

YOUR THOUGHTS: Whether you are on the brand marketing, agency, media or vendor side, an efficient client-agency relationship is key for you: What are your thoughts on the client agency relationship. Post your comments below or on the Portada LinkedIn Group!

Marketing to Millennials was a key issue discussed by major brand marketers during the Annual Multicultural & Diversity Conference organized by the Association of National Advertisers in Miami. Perhaps the general sentiment was best expressed when Wendy Clark SVP, Global Sparkling Brand Center at The Coca-Cola Company said “you can’t understand Milennials unless you understand Multicultural Millennials”.

Association of National AdvertisersMillennials consumption is dramatically changing the way National Advertisers market themselves.  Coca Cola’s Wendy Clark noted that “digital natives are changing the world.” As examples of how important the new digital native generation is, she said that 63% of Facebook’s audience checks in more than once a day into the social network. 1,000 selfies are being taken every second and there are 4 billion dailiy queries on Google.

If you can’t say it with a hashtag it is not concise enough.

Concise and in Context

Clark emphasized that in order to communicate effectively with the digital native Millennial, it is crucial to be concise and communicate in context: ” If you cant say what you intend to say in a hashtag it is not concise enough. It does not matter how good your content is if you don’t do it in context,” Clark concluded.

 

A recap of major news on the marketing and media front from around the web compiled by Portada’s Editorial Team.

  • Casa Latina acquired by Marketplace Events
    Do smaller Latina(o) owned businesses have a unique opportunity to partner, or be acquired by, larger established general market companies? According to Nora Diaz Bretherton, CEO and Founder of Home Media Expo company Casa Latina, this is definitely the case. Casa Latina, was recently acquired by Marketplace Events (MPE), America’s largest Home show producer, While MPE will own the Casa Latina Expo, Diaz Bretherton and her team will continue to work with Marketplace Events to “provide leadership direction for the Expos in partnership with MPE and with the full support of that company’s infrastructure.” Following the theme of partnering with large companies that are not active in the Hispanic market, Casa Latina is partnering with Blogher, the biggest blogger collective in the U.S., to integrate the Blogger Business Bootcamp in a separate area of its November 15 New York Casa Latina Home Expo. Under the new MPE ownership Casa Latina is planning three 2015 Expos in Miami and Orlando. Additional shows are being evaluated for other major Hispanic markets including Texas and California.
    • Kraft spends 35% of advertising digitally but rejects 85% of RTM impressions
      Kraft“We’re not looking to drive down advertising costs per se. We’re driving for improved advertising effectiveness,” said Kraft EVP and CFO Teri List-Stoll during the company’s quarterly earnings call. “We’re also realizing meaningful efficiencies as we shift our spending to more targeted digital media.” Digital accounted for more than 35% of Kraft’s total ad spend in Q3, a 25% increase YoY. However, concerns over ad fraud, viewability and overall inventory murkiness are causing Kraft to reject up to 85% of all impressions offered via real-time ad marketplaces, Kraft’s ‎Director, Data + Content + Media Julie Fleischer said last week at the Ad Age Data Conference in New York. “That 75% to 85% is either deemed to be fraudulent, unsafe or non-viewable or unknown,” Ms. Fleischer, the company’s director of data, content and media, said, referring to the rejected impressions. “Think about what this means for us as an industry. When we’re rejecting 75% to 85% of the impressions available, that’s a problem.

        • B2B Marketers join ANA
          ana_logo
          The Business Marketing Association (BMA) is joining the Association of National Advertisers (which btw: next week will be celebrating its Annual Multicultural Conference in Miami). Bob Liodice, CEO of the ANA tells Adage that about 160 of the ANA’s 630 member companies (25%) are exclusively b-to-b focused. However, “B-to-b fell off the radar at some point. In the b-to-b area, we felt we were underserving our members, and we have had a strategic goal of improving our focus in the b-to-b area.”

            • Visible Measures gets US$ 7 million funding to get more Visible
              Digital video ad firm Visible Measures announced that it has closed a US $7 million investment round with participation from General Catalyst Partners, Mohr Davidow Ventures, DAG Ventures, Northgate Capital, Common fund, and Advance Publications. The company will use the funding to continue to help brands win the battle for consumer attention by programmatically leveraging video and native advertiser content.

Nasty, nasty bots that suck up ad dollars while leaving brands with phony stats is probably a huge issue for advertisers. How huge? The ANA’s partnership with White Ops in The Marketers’ Coalition aims to identify the extent of click fraud. During the study, campaigns of participating brands will be tagged to allow White Ops to monitor them for fraud. Are Hispanic campaigns included in the effort? If so why?

Click FraudThe number of brands that are contributing campaigns is up to 34, according to Bill Duggan, ANA Group EVP, and it may get up to 40 before the study begins in August. The organization made a special effort to recruit Hispanic marketers, Duggan says.

“As you know, digital and mobile usage among Hispanics over-indexes versus the general population, so it is very important to have Hispanic representation in this initiative,” Duggan says.

But whose problem is it, really? Shouldn’t it be the responsibility of the ad servers and ad exchanges?.

Hispanic campaigns are being contributed by brands in categories including CPG and spirits. The Hispanic results will be broken out separately and reported upon with comparisons to the general market campaigns. The ANA did not include any other specific demographic targets, because, Duggan says, “It just adds another level of complexity.”

Lee Vann, Captura Group
Lee Vann, Captura Group

Hispanic marketers are already well aware of click fraud, and many of them are resigned to it as a cost of doing business. Says Lee Vann, CEO of Captura Group, ” Overall my sense is that click fraud is a significant problem in the industry that marketers have learned to live with. In a sense, marketers build click fraud into their digital media plans and ensure that the ROI (with click fraud accounted for) is there when purchasing CPC based ads.”

My assumption is that click fraud would not be as prevalent as the sheer volume of Hispanic ads and the relative CPC of such ads tends to be lower than general market.

There’s no indication whether Hispanic campaigns might be more or less prone to click fraud. On the one hand, Vann says, “My assumption is that click fraud would not be as prevalent as the sheer volume of Hispanic ads and the relative CPC of such ads tends to be lower than general market.”

On the other hand, it’s hot market right now, and, as brands move in, so will fraudsters.

In its announcement of the initiative, the ANA referred to “serious breakdowns in the marketing supply chain.” But whose problem is it, really? Shouldn’t it be the responsibility of the ad servers and ad exchanges?

Tim Surowiecki, Horizon Media
Tim Surowiecki, Horizon Media

Yes, it should, according to Tim Surowiecki, VP of digital media search & analytics for Horizon Media. However, in the absence of reliable preventions among ad servers, Horizon is already working with third-party vendors to reduce click fraud. “We don’t put our clients’ dollars into the market without solutions on the technology side to prevent us falling victim to it,” he says. ” Ideally we wouldn’t have to bring in those third parties, but we wouldn’t need those solutions if the ad server/ad exchanges had been keeping up with fraud out there.”

In fact, marketers and agencies are in a technology arms race with the bad guys, according to Carlos Salinas, CEO of Spanish Media Group. “Sadly, it’s not only the good guys who are innovating,” he says, adding that the best hope for reducing click fraud is fraud detection technologies that are as good as the targeting, reporting and optimization tools agencies use. He adds, “This problem is costing real money to brands and digital marketers, so it’s in everyone’s best interest to be genuinely proactive about the issue.”

Carlos Salinas
Carlos Salinas

The fact that there are multiple companies and campaigns in the study could help identify trends and provide insights that could aid the development of anti-fraud tools and best practices, Salinas thinks.

Surowiecki thinks the ANA study will be most helpful on the public relations side, making it “official” that there’s a problem – and he hopes that will get the ad servers to step up. “People in this on a day-to-day basis already know this is reality.”

Says Duggan, ” One reason we are so interested in being involved is we think advertisers need to take a stronger role not only in identifying the issues but also in helping with solutions. The marketer has the most to lose and the most to gain, because it’s their money. We’re involved to elevate the issue with our members and have them be part of the solution.”

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