Tag

virtual reality

Browsing

What: FOX Sports will be offering the UEFA Champions League final live in virtual reality through
the broadcaster’s VR app. The match will take place this  Saturday match between Italian soccer club Juventus and Spain’s Real Madrid. FOX holds the English-language rights to the UEFA Champions League until 2018, when the rights will be taken over by Turner.
Why it matters: FOX Sports has been making an effort to stay up-to-date with consumer technology, which is why the channel has broadcast major events in VR, such as Super Bowl LI, the 2017 Big East Men’s Basketball Tournaments, the 2016 MLS Cup, and the 2016 Bundesliga season opener.

FOX Sports announced it will be broadcasting the UEFA Champions League final live in virtual reality, as well as statistics and pre-game VOD features through the Fox Sports VR app. Together with its technology partner, LiveLike, FOX will broadcast the game using three cameras positioned around the pitch, including one wide-frame shot and two behind each goal. This will let the broadcaster

According to Michael Davies, Senior VP, Field & Technical Operations at FOX Sports Media Group, there are still some quality details to be improved. But, he stated this won’t matter because virtual reality is more of a “companion experience”, where fans aren’t actually watching the whole game on their devices.

“We still think that that is really valuable and a really cool way to experience sports on the side,” he said. “That’s why we’re trying to give VR a helping hand through the interactive elements.”

Juventus and Real Madrid will play the Champions’ final next Saturday, June 3.

What: Facebook announced it is entering the world of augmented reality during the F8, its annual Developers Conference, taking place April 18-19.
Why it matters: Mark Zuckerberg each year presents new technologies the social media giant will be adding to its platform. This year Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality were discussed. Both technologies open up enormous opportunities for marketers and the advertising industry.

Facebook has once again surprised the marketing and tech community. The company’s big bet this year is on augmented reality and virtual reality, according to Zuckerberg’s comments at the F8, Facebook’s annual global developers conference.

The augmented reality plan is to enable an add-on in the app for using the phone’s camera, so users can share fun moments using special effects such as 3D and object recognition.

“Precise location, 3D effects, and object recognition are the three technological bases for augmented reality,” Zuckerberg said.

According to Zuckerberg, the potential for 3D elements within the FB virtual platform are tremendous for brands. Imagine, for example, that a candy company decides to invest a couple of million dollars in a campaign. Through this new platform, you could take a photo of your bedroom or living room and then fill that virtual space with millions of sweets. The visual impact created through this technology will be beyond anything we imagine.

Precise location, 3D effects, and object recognition are the three technological bases for augmented reality

It would also have a relevant impact on object recognition and information. For example, if you have a bottle of wine on the table, you could ask for information about it, from brand details to where to get it. This technology will change the way e-commerce is done.

The new technology is in its beta phase. The company will be releasing the changes little by little, it said. But it is estimated that users will be adding virtual reality to their daily lives by the end of this year.

If you have a bottle of wine on the table, you can ask for information about it, from brand details to where to get it.

Finally, Facebook provided a glimpse of Facebook Spaces, the virtual reality app through which users can hang out with each other without leaving home. Here again, we see significant potential in terms of marketing and a revolution for the world of advertising.

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

This year’s GSMA Mobile World Conference is over, but what awaits to be seen is how this year’s trends are implemented in the industry. Attendee Pedro Forwe, director of Argentina-based programmatic advertising firm KickAds, reported back to Portada about the highlights from this year’s event, and the mobile ad industry’s biggest challenges in 2016.

Record Attendance

One of the most impressive aspects of this year’s MWC was its size, as attendance surpassed 100,000 (from 204 countries) for the first time ever. Over 2,200 companies from industries like finance, healthcare and automobiles convened in the Fira Gran Via and Fira Montjuic event venues in what GSMA Ltd CEO was John Hoffman said “incorporated a diverse range of events, spanning multiple sectors and interests, reflecting the expanding role of mobile around the world.”

Pedro Forwe, director, KickAds
Pedro Forwe, director, KickAds

Exhibitors were mobile operators, software companies, equipment providers and internet companies, and the event featured keynote events delivered by big players like AT&T, BuzzFeed, Cisco, Ericsson, ESL, Facebook, Ford Motor Company, GE Digital and Getty Images.

But to Forwe, “the biggest highlights were clearly the new Samsung Galaxy model, the S7, and LG’s LG 5, which stole everyone’s attention at the event.” These two new smartphones are the most talked-about Android models of the year, with the former offering liquid cooling, wireless charging and water resistance and the latter offering a removable battery, an impressive modular accessories system and a Type-C USB port.

Ad Blocking on the Tip of Everyone’s Tongue

One of the hottest topics at the event was how to deliver content that gets past ad-blockers. “There were a few very interesting discussions about the topic, and about the most efficient way to put together advertising campaigns that are non-invasive and friendlier to the user,” says Forwe.
But it appears that there was no clear conclusion to this debate, as ad blockers and ad sellers continue to clash, and industry leaders are unable to agree on the best solution. It may not be as urgent as some thing, though, as mobile ad blocking penetration will still only reach 0.3% by this year, according to James Hilton, global CEO and founder at M&C Saatchi Mobile. The key will be changing advertising approaches so that users don’t feel the need to download ad blockers. Whether that’s possible is yet to be seen.

Virtual Reality Everywhere

When Mark Zuckerberg says something’s going to be big, you know people will start paying attention to it. And that’s exactly what happened with virtual reality, as a wave of companies dedicated to creating different kinds of mobile VR experiences has emerged in the past year or so.
But the path to profit in this industry has not been discovered yet. Fore claimed that he “observed a strong tendency with everything related to virtual reality…but the biggest problem will be monetizing it for developers.”

The Internet of Things Still Happening

Although sometimes it feels like we’ve been waiting for the IoT to really happen, Fowre confirmed that the the Internet of Things “is still growing very strongly,” and was a big standout at the MWC. The IoT section of the event proposed a world full of connected smart devices like smartphones, smartwatches and VR headsets developed by companies like Samsung, LG and Sony.
There is understandable pressure to innovate in this sector, as spending for IoT-inspired services like network deployment, operations management and data analytics is expected to hit $257 billion this year.
Fowre also noted that this year’s event featured many solutions for more efficient information management in the wake of the Big Data revolution. This was to be expected, as the Internet of Things generates such a high volume of Big Data that needs to be organized and analyzed if anyone is to make use of it.

Video Advertising: The Ideal Engagement Tool

To Fowre, the biggest highlight when it came to advertising was video. Mark Zuckerberg went so far as to claim that there is more engagement with videos on Facebook than it does on its YouTube channel. “Even the booth in Hall 8.1 directed all your attention and communication to Video. The most interesting thing, in this sense, was mobile video apps, which had strong growth in 2015,” Fowre said.
Fowre noted that other highlights included Latin America’s growth in “monetizing inventory in the region through innovative formats – mostly Video and Native Ads.”
There’s so much going on in mobile that it’s almost impossible to lump all of the area’s activity under one industry label. What’s certain is that mobile technology is now relevant to almost every aspect of our lives, and while some trends will come and go, the way we use our phones will dictate the direction of many industry sectors’ attempts at innovation.

 

sands-floor-sm As weary ad execs wandered home from CES 2015, we took a look at what this mother of all consumer electronics shows revealed about the future of advertising. We identified five trends that we think will matter for advertisers in the years to come, and checked in with three smart executives to get their thoughts.

1. Connected Watches

They show no sign of going away, with twice as many wearable exhibits as at CES 2014. But ads on them? Really? Probably, according to Jeremy Sigel, director of mobile, North America, for digital agency Essence. “Similar to mainstream mobile ad formats, it is easy to envision a full-screen interstitial ad or even a 15-second video on a smartwatch,” Sigel says. He points out that while a watch face may seem small, the dimensions would be similar to a Facebook mobile newsfeed ad. “While smartwatch ads may start there, the bigger opportunity will be highly contextual push notifications that strive to be additive, and branded applications that are inherently helpful to keep a brand top-of-mind.”

smart-watches-sm

If you think people won’t accept ads on their smartwatches or fitness devices, just remember that in the early days of mobile, people said the same thing about their phones. In fact, some of us, ahem, are old enough to remember when advertising on the World Wide Web was frowned upon.

2. OTT TV:

Dish’s SlingTV streaming service gave another push to over-the-top video, enabling subscribers to watch live TV, video-on-demand and 12 cable channels on a variety of devices. It also could open the way for better targeting and tracking of TV ads. Sling did not immediately respond to an email about its ad plans, but third-party ad networks may start salivating now.

Pat McKenna, CEO of Strike Social, says Sling and other OTT services will help marketers get a more accurate comparison of the performance of video ads on TV and digital. Strike Social is a third-party TrueView advertising, targeting and analytics platform that tracks video-ad performance across YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. The key to achieving this, according to McKenna, is for OTT services to provide APIs and consistent data to allow ad servers and analytics platforms to consume their data. “The opportunity for us is to marry performance data across all platforms, and then provide the report to [advertisers],” he says.

David Santana, art director at global, digital marketing agency Deep Focus, says that Sling TV’s $20 monthly subscription, no-contract deal will be attractive to Hispanic consumers, who are gravitating to other companies like T-Mobile that don’t demand customers lock themselves in. He says a bigger win will be if Sling TV develops content packages for Hispanics, the way that DirectTV does. (In December DirecTV introduced OTT Video Service Yaveo targeting the Hispanic population.) “The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow,” Santana concludes.

The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow.

3. Connected and autonomous cars

Internet-connected cars have been around at least since BMW introduced ConnectedDrive in 2011 – and CES 2014 seemed to be the CES of the Car. This year, more than a dozen cars were on display, many of them highlighting current or concept connected-car technology. With Google powering or at least participating in several of these offerings, you have to wonder: Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls. There’s also a strong –someday – play for ads on the so-called infotainment screens, the ever-larger digital dashboard screens that show everything from what’s playing on the sound system to your navigation route to use Facebook.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyCox6In5bg&w=560&h=315]

How about sending the driver a McDonald’s coupon when she’s approaching the restaurant? Actually, TeleNav has been doing that since 2010. The problem has always been, and continues to be for now, getting enough scale to make it worthwhile for national advertisers to bother. Maybe someday …

Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls?

 

Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball

4. Virtual Reality

Volvo, Dos Equis, Marriott, HBO, Tourism Australia and a handful of movie marketers have already released branded apps. VR is cool and fun, but hampered by the need to use a headset. Joining the fray among the expensive and still-in-beta Oculus Rift and the adorably crafty – and cheap – Google Cardboard headsets, Avegant and Samsung demonstrated virtual reality at the show. In the short term, VR marketing will live at trade shows and special events, where staffers can be on hand to manage the hardware and software.

Deep Focus’ Santana gives kudos to Volvo for it’s VR campaign that sent consumers who registered a Google Cardboard viewer kit. “That make it inclusive,” he says. “You don’t need a lot of money or to be in a major market to experience virtual reality. That’s important for the Hispanic community.”

Eventually, Digital Agency Essence’s Sigel thinks, that these virtual-reality “experiences” could contain ad units, in much the same way ads have been inserted into TV broadcasts, as well as into video and console games. He gives the example of a VR experience that lets you sit court-side at an NBA game. “In addition to traditional signage, the t-shirts of patrons, concessions, chants from the crowd, a comment from a court-side celebrity and shouts from players may all be sellable units,” he says.

By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?

5. Big data gets ginormous with connected-everything

The Internet of Things was one of CES 2015’s Top Tech Trends, along with wearables and autonomous cars. All these devices will generate data either all the time or a lot of the time. Location-based data combined with behavioral and contextual data could make ad targeting incredibly more complex – and possibly better. The quantified self, continuously tracked by wearables, could alone generate unprecedented amounts of usable personal data. The possibilities – futuristic as they are – are fascinating. By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?  Would his anonymous personal profile include the information that he’s more likely to respond to ads 20 minutes after he’s completed a run? How about a tweet from New Belgium Brewing after that run? Now, that’s the future of advertising.

sands-floor-sm As weary ad execs wandered home from CES 2015, we took a look at what this mother of all consumer electronics shows revealed about the future of advertising. We identified five trends that we think will matter for advertisers in the years to come, and checked in with three smart executives to get their thoughts.

1. Connected Watches

They show no sign of going away, with twice as many wearable exhibits as at CES 2014. But ads on them? Really? Probably, according to Jeremy Sigel, director of mobile, North America, for digital agency Essence. “Similar to mainstream mobile ad formats, it is easy to envision a full-screen interstitial ad or even a 15-second video on a smartwatch,” Sigel says. He points out that while a watch face may seem small, the dimensions would be similar to a Facebook mobile newsfeed ad. “While smartwatch ads may start there, the bigger opportunity will be highly contextual push notifications that strive to be additive, and branded applications that are inherently helpful to keep a brand top-of-mind.”

smart-watches-sm

If you think people won’t accept ads on their smartwatches or fitness devices, just remember that in the early days of mobile, people said the same thing about their phones. In fact, some of us, ahem, are old enough to remember when advertising on the World Wide Web was frowned upon.

2. OTT TV:

Dish’s SlingTV streaming service gave another push to over-the-top video, enabling subscribers to watch live TV, video-on-demand and 12 cable channels on a variety of devices. It also could open the way for better targeting and tracking of TV ads. Sling did not immediately respond to an email about its ad plans, but third-party ad networks may start salivating now.

Pat McKenna, CEO of Strike Social, says Sling and other OTT services will help marketers get a more accurate comparison of the performance of video ads on TV and digital. Strike Social is a third-party TrueView advertising, targeting and analytics platform that tracks video-ad performance across YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. The key to achieving this, according to McKenna, is for OTT services to provide APIs and consistent data to allow ad servers and analytics platforms to consume their data. “The opportunity for us is to marry performance data across all platforms, and then provide the report to [advertisers],” he says.

David Santana, art director at global, digital marketing agency Deep Focus, says that Sling TV’s $20 monthly subscription, no-contract deal will be attractive to Hispanic consumers, who are gravitating to other companies like T-Mobile that don’t demand customers lock themselves in. He says a bigger win will be if Sling TV develops content packages for Hispanics, the way that DirectTV does. (In December DirecTV introduced OTT Video Service Yaveo targeting the Hispanic population.) “The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow,” Santana concludes.

The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow.

3. Connected and Autonomous Cars

Internet-connected cars have been around at least since BMW introduced ConnectedDrive in 2011 – and CES 2014 seemed to be the CES of the Car. This year, more than a dozen cars were on display, many of them highlighting current or concept connected-car technology. With Google powering or at least participating in several of these offerings, you have to wonder: Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls. There’s also a strong –someday – play for ads on the so-called infotainment screens, the ever-larger digital dashboard screens that show everything from what’s playing on the sound system to your navigation route to use Facebook.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyCox6In5bg&w=560&h=315]

How about sending the driver a McDonald’s coupon when she’s approaching the restaurant? Actually, TeleNav has been doing that since 2010. The problem has always been, and continues to be for now, getting enough scale to make it worthwhile for national advertisers to bother. Maybe someday …

Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls?
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball

4. Virtual Reality

Volvo, Dos Equis, Marriott, HBO, Tourism Australia and a handful of movie marketers have already released branded apps. VR is cool and fun, but hampered by the need to use a headset. Joining the fray among the expensive and still-in-beta Oculus Rift and the adorably crafty – and cheap – Google Cardboard headsets, Avegant and Samsung demonstrated virtual reality at the show. In the short term, VR marketing will live at trade shows and special events, where staffers can be on hand to manage the hardware and software.

Deep Focus’ Santana gives kudos to Volvo for it’s VR campaign that sent consumers who registered a Google Cardboard viewer kit. “That make it inclusive,” he says. “You don’t need a lot of money or to be in a major market to experience virtual reality. That’s important for the Hispanic community.”

Eventually, Digital Agency Essence’s Sigel thinks, that these virtual-reality “experiences” could contain ad units, in much the same way ads have been inserted into TV broadcasts, as well as into video and console games. He gives the example of a VR experience that lets you sit court-side at an NBA game. “In addition to traditional signage, the t-shirts of patrons, concessions, chants from the crowd, a comment from a court-side celebrity and shouts from players may all be sellable units,” he says.

By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?

5. Big Data Gets Ginormous with Connected-Everything

The Internet of Things was one of CES 2015’s Top Tech Trends, along with wearables and autonomous cars. All these devices will generate data either all the time or a lot of the time. Location-based data combined with behavioral and contextual data could make ad targeting incredibly more complex – and possibly better. The quantified self, continuously tracked by wearables, could alone generate unprecedented amounts of usable personal data. The possibilities – futuristic as they are – are fascinating. By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?  Would his anonymous personal profile include the information that he’s more likely to respond to ads 20 minutes after he’s completed a run? How about a tweet from New Belgium Brewing after that run? Now, that’s the future of advertising.