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U.S. Hispanics

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What: Toyota has launched a campaign centered around young Latinos to promote its new Corolla sedan.
Why it matters: One-third of Toyota’s Corolla buyers are Hispanic, and the company expects this number to grow by targeting young Latino’s via emotional connections and a multi-channel strategy.

 

Toyota, one of the brands that are already known for great success among Hispanic consumers, has launched a campaign to promote the new Corolla sedan. Developed by Conill, Toyota’s Hispanic marketing agency, the campaign tries to convey the spirit of the new Latino generation: expressive, straightforward and determined. The commercial, titled “WE” and directed by David Vergés, features the voice of Mexican actor, director, and producer, Diego Luna; as well as a mural by Mexican graphic designer and artist Ricardo Gonzalez.

For some years now, Toyota has put great effort into multicultural marketing, and it’s been known as an example of success in the matter. The new campaign follows this path and draws a comparison between the new Corolla and the most important traits of the young Hispanic generation: as Gonzalez’s mural Mas Loud implies, a generation that will speak up, loud and clear.

For Toyota’s vision of how to reach Hispanic millennials, one only need to listen to Luna’s words: “True. We’ve changed,” he says in Spanish as we see the driver’s sneakers pushing the car’s pedals. “We are a whole new generation. Confident, more expressive, adding our touch everywhere we go.” Portada talked to Samuel De La Garza, Small Car Group, Senior Manager, Toyota Motor, North America, to find out more about the campaign’s conception.

 

Portada: What are the key insights about the Hispanic car buyer behind this campaign?

S.G.: In the campaign, Corolla celebrates young Latinos’ unique points of view, stories, and contribution to culture. Their creativity and ingenuity are bringing freshness to the mainstream. The new Corolla’s more progressive style, connectivity, and power make it an ideal partner for building their own stories, free of labels. Young Latinos are also the most open and curious about hybrid vehicles. Corolla also offers a hybrid engine which gives them the option to choose the Corolla that suits their story best.  And to reach younger Latinos, we use multiple channels combining digital and social, featuring dynamic copy lines and various creative assets.

Portada: What is the growth potential of Toyota in the Hispanic market? Is it larger than in the overall U.S. market?

S.G.: Over 50% of Corolla buyers are multicultural and most importantly, the compact sedan segment is the top volume segment in the Hispanic market. With the new redesigned Corolla and a campaign aimed to connect with young Latinos, we plan on regaining our segment leadership. It’s no secret that the auto industry is seeing a shift in sales from sedans to SUVs and trucks. This shift is happening at a slower pace in the Hispanic market, which makes Latinos a bigger priority for the brand in terms of overall Corolla sales.

 

Portada: How many of the 46 million Toyota Corollas were sold in the U.S? How many of those had Hispanic specific buyers?

S.G.: Currently, one out of three Corollas are sold to Hispanics, and we expect this number to increase.

 

Portada: Has the mural by Ricardo Gonzalez become viral? What social metrics can you share?

S.G.: The intention of the mural and Toyota’s partnership with its creator, graphic artist Ricardo Gonzalez, is to illustrate the bold spirit and cultural pride of Latinos. Hispanic youth resonated with the branded mural driving user-generated content. We have been very pleased with the feedback we have received for the mural in the commercial, located in Los Angeles, as well as murals we created in Las Vegas for the Latin Billboard Music Awards and at our Corolla plant in Blue Springs, Mississippi.

 

Portada: How does Toyota measure brand-lift through campaigns (overall and Hispanic specific)?

S.G.: We measure brand-lift through campaign ad trackers and/or specific brand lift studies via third-party vendors such as Kantar Added Value, Facebook, etc.

 

 

What: Energy BBDO has published the results of a study conducted to find out the true impact of the new government administration in Hispanics’ shopping and spending habits.
Why it matters: The truth couldn’t be farther from the rumors that started after the new administration: Hispanics are shopping and spending more than ever, and will likely continue to do so.

As soon as the new administration took office, a wave of anti-immigration policies spurred predictions that Hispanics would start spending less. Companies across the country wondered how this would impact them as headlines all over reported that Hispanic communities would stay home more and spend less often. Therefore, Energy BBDO decided to conduct a study to go beyond those headlines in order to find out exactly how the administration change impacted Hispanics’ minds and shopping habits during the last year.

Energy BBDO conducted more than 1000 surveys of documented and undocumented Hispanics, as well as of non-Hispanics for comparison. The quantitative research was supplemented by in-depth focus groups in Chicago and Los Angeles, and the work was supported by data from Kantar, Univision, and Pew Research.

The main takeaways from the study, explained below, proved the exact opposite of what the headlines foretold: not only did Hispanics not slow their shopping or spending, 49% of survey respondents reported shopping more often than the previous year.

 

Even Undocumented Hispanics Are Spending More

According to the study, even though headlines predicted Hispanics would spend less after the change of administration, 49% of documented respondents reported shopping more often than the previous year, while 56% of their undocumented counterparts, who could feel more threatened by the new administration, responded the same way. And since shopping is necessarily linked to spending, the increase goes hand in hand. 60% of Hispanics claim they are spending more than the previous year, just as 68% of undocumented Hispanics, vs 45% of non-Hispanics. The reason for this could be, quite simply, that “life goes on and family needs remain, no matter the political climate.”

Hispanics Aren’t Shopping Less; They’re Shopping Different

According to survey respondents, there has been a shift in the retail channels Hispanics go to. For example, outlets such as mainstream grocery and convenience stores have seen slowdowns, while preferences have shifted towards a more value-centric experience. Therefore, Hispanics have been spending more at mass merchandisers, club retailers, and dollar stores, as well as Hispanic-owned stores or community bodegas. As the study suggests, “This change in behavior seems to be the sole data point that suggests a shift generated by the current socio-political atmosphere, as Hispanics may be consciously staying within their communities for everyday purchases.”

The Real Shift Has Taken Place in Hispanics’ Attitude

U.S. Hispanics are known, among other things, for their optimism. A group that has expressed a positive mindset in spite of hard circumstances is suddenly doubting its place in the new America. Energy BBDO’s research has revealed that 50% of Hispanics have more doubts about their place versus a year ago, and 70% report an increase in prejudice displays since the last election. To quote the study, “Hispanics do not feel free to be themselves, at least not out in the open. They feel pressure to limit expressing their cultural heritage and identity. This, in turn, is causing them to find comfort in what’s familiar and welcoming within their communities.”

Conclusions

Now is the time to consider a more direct and custom approach that reaches out directly to the Hispanic community with empathy and recognition. […] Also, look for ways to show an authentic and long-term commitment, not an opportunistic one-off.

Based on the projected growth of the Hispanic population, and seeing that they’re younger than other demographics, it is likely that they will continue to increase their spending and shopping. However, they tend to prefer value-centric shopping trips as well as community-owned stores. Moreover, even though Hispanics will not stop spending, there is a lot brands can do to make up for the feelings of loneliness and not-belonging caused by the increased prejudice climate. Energy BBDO recommends that brands 1) stay true to their values, 2) celebrate inclusiveness, and 3) show empathy. “Now is the time to consider a more direct and custom approach that reaches out directly to the Hispanic community with empathy and recognition. […] Also, look for ways to show an authentic and long-term commitment, not an opportunistic one-off. Trying to fit something into Hispanic Heritage Month probably won’t have the desired effect.”

[All images by Energy BBDO]

What: Adsmovil offers technology and data for the mobile advertisement business with operations in the U.S., Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, and Argentina.
Why it matters: The company’s focus on the U.S. Hispanic market enables its clients to reach more than 90 million monthly mobile users.

Digital marketers looking to reach U.S. Hispanics should talk to Adsmovil. That’s the clear implication of comScore’s March report, which shows that Adsmovil, the leader in digital advertising for Hispanic audiences, reaches 48% of U.S. Hispanics.

Adsmovil has built a network of more than 400 premium English and Spanish-Language publishers in the U.S. Adsmovil is also fully compatible with Integral Ad Science, DoubleVerify, Grapeshot, MOAT, and Nielsen.

What makes Adsmovil Number 1 on comScore? 

  • It starts with high-quality publishers. Adsmovil works with elite publishers from the top Hispanic sub-demographics.
  • Adsmovil’s publisher base is diverse. Adsmovil is able to scale large campaigns across different high-quality verticals.
  • Adsmovil uses advanced technology to keep brands safe. Partnerships with Integral Ad Science, DoubleVerify, MOAT, and others ensure maximum security.
  • In addition to that technology, Adsmovil assigns a dedicated account team to ensure that all publishers offer high-quality inventory onlyBrands know that their content will not appear on sites that lack credibility.

“Adsmovil customizes its first-party Hispanic audiences based entirely on their mobile behavior,” said Adsmovil Chief Revenue Officer Andrew Polsky. “Depending on the type and frequency of content they consume, audiences will see relevant ads for entertainment, sports, food, travel, and more. We identify Hispanics via Spanish-language settings on their phone, the apps they’ve installed on their devices — e.g., Telemundo, Hulu, SlimTV, Semana, Western Union or Univision — and keyword searches in Spanish and English. We also use location to determine if a user frequents Latin restaurants or grocery stores and/or attends a soccer match. We then serve the appropriate ads to the appropriate people.”

 

What: Nestle’s Multicultural Shopper and Marketing Strategist Margie Bravo tells Portada her insights on how to reach the Hispanic market and do it right.
Why It Matters: Too many brands are failing to recognize Hispanic consumers are a significant percentage of their future growth. Margie Bravo shares best practices for the multicultural world, how many brands are misusing data, how to reach the Hispanic market, and the danger of cultural messaging be driven by assumptions.

 

The Largest CPG Brand in the World

Over half of the United States’s population growth can already be attributed to Hispanic Americans. This demographic is increasingly diverse in their language preferences and expressions of Latin culture. As they become the largest ethnic minority in the United States, they are carving out a new place for themselves in American culture. But brands are still scrambling to find a way to respond to these shifting social groups.

Nestle is widely recognized as the largest CPG brand in the world. They recorded $90 billion in revenue and $8.6 billion in profit for the trailing twelve months that ended on April 7, 2017. The United States is Nestle’s largest market, bringing in $27.4 billion in sales across all brands in 2016. But if Nestle and other similar CPG heavyweights are to stay on top, they will have to stay at the vanguard of multicultural marketing, particularly Hispanic.

Margie Bravo, the food and drink giant’s Multicultural Marketing Manager, is a Mexican-American mother of three bicultural children. From her position, she tries to reach the Hispanic market from the perspective of both a consumer and a marketer.

 

When Researching How to Reach the Hispanic Market, Assumptions Are Dangerous (But All Too Common)

According to Bravo, one of the most prevalent mistakes that marketers make is assuming anything about particular demographics. Failing to back up conclusions about Hispanic consumers with real data also happens often. “I think to win with multicultural marketing you need to be curious and open-minded,” Bravo explains. “Many times, when we work for a specific brand at Nestle, we think we know everything about it. We tend to answer the consumers’ questions from our perspective, thinking they are just like us.”

She pointed to Nestle’s Tollhouse cookie brand. During the holidays, Nestlé has to remember that while acculturated Hispanic-American children like to leave cookies for Santa Claus, campaigns should not assume that these children’s parents have grown up with the same tradition.

Language use among Hispanics is also varied. While Hispanic Americans are disproportionately young and tend to speak English as well as Spanish, their language preferences are not clear-cut. When discussing sentimental topics like family, love, tradition, Spanish may be preferred. However, English may be spoken at school or among groups of young friends.

 

Handle Data With Care

Bravo insisted that assumptions are still keeping marketers from connecting with Hispanics. This is a mistake, since the demographic will be key to driving brands’ growth in the United States. She pointed to a persistent lie that Hispanics don’t purchase Premium Brands. In reality, the demographic actually contributes some of the most valuable consumers for Haagen-Dazs, Nestle’s Super Premium ice-cream.

The process we follow at Nestle is to first start with business analytics, in order to identify where our sales are coming from, and then to immediately look at contributors to growth.

For all the fuss that brands are making about multicultural marketing, it appears that they need to learn to walk the walk, not just talk the talk. This means they need to invest in understanding what drives different consumer behavior within the Hispanic demographic. Brands are still figuring out how to read and make use of their data. This is part of the problem.

Even the world’s largest brands are struggling to make data analytics work in their favor. According to Bravo, too few marketers are giving growth — as opposed to current sales — the attention it deserves. “The process we follow at Nestle is to first start with business analytics, in order to identify where our sales are coming from. Then, to immediately look at contributors to growth.” Bravo said.

The American Consumers of Tomorrow Are Largely Hispanic

Marketers are still learning how to use data to dig into deeper levels of consumer trends and demographic patterns. As a result, it’s surprisingly easy to ignore the obvious, and become stuck on who is buying the products now instead of who is likely to be buying them in the future. (Spoiler alert: it’s Hispanics).

The Hispanic market accounts for around 24% of Millennial consumers. At their age, they are still in the “acquisition stage,” when they are forming their first long-term relationships with brands. If brands only pay attention to their current customers, they may find themselves ignoring a very different population and paying a large price for it in a few years.

Also by Portada: Multicultural Marketing: How to Use Seamlessly in Total Market Campaigns

Use Data to Understand Their Importance

Brands that do pay attention will see that there are significant opportunities to approach the Hispanic market. One way is by connecting and creating long-term relationships with consumers in the demographic. “They also have larger households with multigenerational family members. They’re having more kids, which opens consumption for a great number of categories,” Bravo added. But not enough brands are taking even this much into account.

“I think sometimes brands don’t ask how much Multicultural consumers are already contributing to sales in their category,” Bravo lamented. The world’s most innovative brands need to invest in training analysts to go deeper with data. They must use their information to identify variables and reveal the motivations of diverse Hispanic consumers.

When brands don’t understand where their growth is coming from in terms of the different Multicultural groups, it is very difficult to be able to defend budgets.

What’s more, brands that don’t understand data will have a hard time defending Multicultural budgets. “When brands don’t understand where their growth is coming from in terms of the different Multicultural groups, it’s very difficult to defend budgets,” Bravo said.

Multicultural Masters Will Have Significant ‘Foundational Research’

Bravo asserted that in order to reach the Hispanic market, brands are going to have to lead a special effort. They need to educate themselves and do “foundational research” so that they can truly “speak the language of culture, not just the language.” This means creating degree programs dedicated to the field and encouraging exploration of new methods and metrics that assign values to complex and evolving consumer behavior.

“Brands just need to understand that growth is the name of the game.”

Presented By NGL Media

A comprehensive roadmap to discovering U.S. Hispanic programmatic video provided by leading Latino video marketing solutions company, NGL Media. Catch NGL Media‘s CEO & Founder, David Chitel, who spoke last week at Portada’s 11th Annual Multicultural Marketing & Media Conference.

The digital video landscape provides amazing opportunities for advertisers to connect with U.S. Hispanics across paid, owned and earned media. Be it branded entertainment, social influencer campaigns, managed media buys or programmatic, the choices are many.

According to the latest IAB Ad Spend Study, 69% of digital video ad spending — or nearly US$6 billion dollars — will be allocated programmatically this year alone. U.S. Hispanic programmatic video spending has been growing in tandem.

Yet navigating the Hispanic online space can be challenging, given that the publisher landscape is extremely fragmented by different cultural identities and countries of origin. Programmatic is a particularly useful strategy to reach the U.S. Latino market at scale by facilitating access to this fragmented audience across many outlets simultaneously.

As a premiere supplier of U.S. Hispanic programmatic video, NGL Media has been blazing a trail in the space with an offering of 300+ premium publisher partners. For those who are ready to jump into the U.S. Hispanic programmatic world, we’re happy to share some best practices.

1. Understand Open Marketplace vs. Private Marketplace vs. Programmatic Direct

All programmatic is bought via DSPs and the majority through trading desks — essentially buying arms of agencies. Three basic types of programmatic deals currently dominate the field: open marketplace, private marketplace and programmatic direct.

The open marketplace is a virtual auction. Using software, buyers place bids on billions of ad impressions made available on the ad exchange. For buyers and sellers, the process can feel chaotic. For brands seeking a more premium and transparent environment, however, private marketplaces have proven to be even more attractive.

A private market place (PMP) offers a more controlled environment. The difference between open marketplace and PMPs? With the latter, the buyer sets up a direct connection to a seller’s inventory. The buyer knows exactly what inventory they’re getting, which provides a greater level of quality assurance. The seller and buyer agree on key performance indices (KPIs) and targeting specs, working together to optimize for performance and scale. A PMP brings full transparency to buyers, greater publisher control, and more premium inventory at scale.

Programmatic direct agreements are automated buys that leverage programmatic platforms, but more closely resemble a managed buy albeit with certain guarantees arranged in advance. Negotiations may include premium inventory at a set price for a guaranteed set of impressions. It’s like calling a car rental company and reserving a specific make and model rather than asking for a “mid-sized auto.”

As more and more clients jump into the programmatic space, the prevailing trend is for brands to lock up inventory in the private, rather than open marketplace. This helps assure inventory demands will be met. Demand for programmatic direct deals is also growing for this same reason.

Programmatic is a particularly useful strategy to reach the U.S. Latino market at scale by facilitating access to this fragmented audience across many outlets simultaneously.

2. Choose Your SSP or DSP Partners Wisely

Supply-side platforms (SSPs) automate the SALE of advertising by using software. Demand-side platforms (DSPs) automate the BUYING of advertising by using software.

What’s the difference? Publishers and their reps use SSPs to try to maximize pricing and provide access to buyers that might otherwise not buy their properties as a standalone but will as part of a larger programmatic buy.

Brands, agencies and their representatives use DSPs to purchase the best quality inventory at the best possible price. However, perhaps even more crucial is the search for critical mass and optimization across a broad list of sites. The other important piece — perhaps the biggest in the eyes of many marketers — is that DSPs and programmatic allow you to overlay targeting data through the DSP.

Whether you’re looking for a DSP or SSP, the process can be overwhelming. The market is inundated with options. Make sure you look for a supply side platform that’s well-connected. The wider the range of associations to inventory outlets, the wider the potential ad inventory.

Other important considerations include technical support offered and the ability to optimize campaigns for frequency caps, budgets and creative. Transparency about how the DSP or SSP makes its money is another item to be mindful of.

Finally, data is the name of the game here. Look for vendors who have access to reputable data management platforms (DMPs) and allow buyers to leverage first- or third-party data sources.

3. Avoid Data-Overlay Over-Targeting

The holy grail of marketing is to find the perfect message to deliver during points along the consumer decision journey. The use of data now allows marketers to pinpoint by specific demographics, activities and interests.

Scale can be hard to find in the U.S. Hispanic marketplace, especially if you’re looking for high-quality inventory. During the planning stage, coordinate with your SSP or publisher partner to determine the viability of an upcoming campaign and to see how much data targeting will prove useful. When setting up a PMP, be sure to include in your request for proposal (RFP) a question about how much data overlay the SSP or publisher can offer while still providing the necessary scale you seek.

Remember: Each layer of data targeting filters out more consumers. Too many layers will hinder your ability to reach desired impression goals. When targeting the Hispanic market, many clients want to add multiple layers of Hispanic user data. Some even want to target by browsers set to Spanish language. Doing so can be problematic, given already limited U.S Latino online video inventory. By finding a supply partner that has already aggregated premium Hispanic specific inventory (such as NGL Media), you have the flexibility to remove overly restrictive data targeting.

4. Hold Your Supply Chain Accountable

Huge brands like P&G and Unilever are leading the charge against digital pain points. Issues like brand safety, bot fraud/invalid traffic and performance errors have filled the trade headlines as of late. Every part of the supply chain must be held accountable: from exchanges to media companies to ad tech partners.

As you’re exploring new business relationships, be sure to address the following with your supply partners:

Invalid Traffic (IVT) and other forms of fraud: Some estimates say 20-25% of all digital expenditures goes towards fraudulent inventory, or more than $15 billion. The Media Rating Council defines two types of non-human traffic. “General IVT” is relatively simple to detect, while “Sophisticated IVT” is much harder, given that it “originates from hijacked devices, malware or misappropriated content.”

Keep in mind that some bot traffic is legit. Google runs legitimate bots across the Internet to obtain information. Most agree that some level of IVT is to be expected given all of the converging technologies that often don’t perfectly line up. Moreover, advertisers seeking 0% is less practical in today’s evolving digital environment.

Use third-party vendors to measure IVT, such as MOAT, Integral Ad Science (IAS), DoubleVerify (DV) and White Ops.

Viewability: Standards vary by company, agency and even campaign. The Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB) defines viewability as 50% of the video must be in view for two seconds or longer.

Others have set the bar higher, requiring 100 percent of pixels be in view with the sound on for half the duration of the video. Native and outstream video in some cases are allowed to play with or without the sound, and be auto-played or user-initiated.

Talk about this metric and make sure every partner in the supply-chain is clear about the client’s expectations. Define how viewability will be measured. Will it be with a third-party vendor like DV or MOAT? How will the metric be reported back to the programmatic platform?

Measurement technologies are not perfect, so if you’re requesting guarantees against viewability performance, expect to pay a higher cost per thousand (CPM).

Brand Safety: It’s always been important for clients to know their advertising is supporting content free of hate, pornography, strong language, gratuitous violence, etc.

Use a brand safety technology like IAS or DV to avoid non-safe brand sites, but also strive for transparency with your supply partner. Strike a balance.

Technology might flag an article about parenting on a premium site that mentions “breast feeding” because of the word “breast,” causing that site to be listed as inappropriate and thus blocked. Watch the blocked list, and then use common sense to determine if publishers were blocked for good reason — or because of the limitations of the technology.

Financial transparency: Clients should be able to see where their dollars are going and how well the campaign is going. Programmatic trade can help increase transparency for every impression.

5. People Still Matter

Find a partner with the resources, experience and drive to continuously update its technology. Like every area in the modern world, the pace of change is brutal. Just to keep pace with the competition, companies must innovate. Make sure you choose a partner that understands and anticipates market changes. At NGL Media, we’ve heavily invested in our proprietary video technology stack, which allows us to be nimble and agile in an ever-changing digital market.

A programmatic deal should be a true partnership between buyer and seller, especially when running PMPs. It’s easy to set up the software and let the machines run on autopilot, only interacting with the technology platforms, rather than other humans. But communication between buyer and seller is key to making sure the systems work smoothly and the campaign achieves the desired scale. People often make all the difference between a successful and an unsuccessful programmatic video advertising campaign.

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

What: Stephanie Borges, VP for North America Strategic Marketing & Partnerships at Six Flags Theme Parks, shared insights on how the park deals with marketing to Hispanic consumers.
Why it matters: Six Flags Theme Parks is trying to expand by targeting U.S. Hispanics. It is also growing in the Latin American market.

 

Six Flags Reinforces Its Marketing to Hispanic Consumers

Portada: Why did you decide to reinforce your marketing strategy towards U.S. Hispanics at this particular moment?

SB: The Hispanic market has always been important to us. With its growth, we have put a dedicated focus on creating unique and innovative platforms in partnership with other brands that want do Hispanic marketing.

Portada: What have you discovered in these consumers that makes them great clients?

SB: Our research shows that Hispanics are very family-focused and want opportunities to spend quality time together.

Portada: How are you approaching U.S. Hispanics?

Six Flags Marketing to Hispanic ConsumersSB: As a brand, we purchase Spanish-language media in markets across the U.S. We constantly monitor media consumption and the growth of SL audience delivery. Each year, we have increased our SL media investments. From a partner perspective, we have built a variety of in-park Hispanic focused programs. Through “Festival Latino,” “Cinco De Mayo,” “Día Del Muerto” and “Fiesta Fin De Verano,” brands and guests interact in a relevant way. As an example, Ortega was a “Cinco De Mayo” partner, utilizing Six Flags’s in-park assets, and conducted an on-pack in market retail program. Additionally, Six Flags host concerts with some of the hottest and up-and-coming Latino artists.

Also by Portada: Multicultural Marketing: How to Use Seamlessly in Total Market Campaigns

Differences Between Hispanics and General Market

Portada: What differences have you found in how you do marketing to Hispanic consumers compared to your strategy for targeting the general American market?

SB: From a marketing perspective, we recognize the importance of family. We understand how it connects the Six Flags experience with moments and media we select to reach the Hispanic audience.

Spanish-language TV provides programming that delivers co-viewing, and enhances our opportunity to motivate a family visit to Six Flags.

For example, Spanish-language TV provides programming that delivers co-viewing and enhances our opportunity to motivate a family visit to Six Flags. We will tailor advertising developed in the Spanish-language, but always communicate how Six Flags delivers thrills on a broader level. Our “Go Big” campaign in the general market becomes “A Lo Grande” for the Hispanic market.

Portada: What advertising platforms are you using and which ones have been working best?

SB: Broadcast TV and radio have been our primary mediums for reaching the Spanish-language market. Six Flags buys media on the local level, and these mediums help us reach our local Hispanic markets while tailoring relevant creative for each. Spanish-language TV and radio also offer us the opportunity to bring our brand to life with messages that deliver news, reasons to visit and a sense of urgency.

Growing in Latin America

Portada: You are also growing in Mexico, where you are opening a new water park next year. How important is the Mexican market for you?

SB: The Mexican market is very important for us. Our existing park is the gem in Latin America and we are excited to add a water park in that market that will open in early 2017.

Portada: Are you using similar marketing strategies for reaching out to U.S. Hispanics and Mexicans? Why does it, or doesn’t it, work?

SB: We have found that all cultures across the world understand the language of thrill. At its core, the Six Flags brand is synonymous with delivering thrills for all ages.

We found that staying true to our ‘thrill’ brand heritage while communicating the brand in a manner that is relevant to each culture and tailored to the market and language is the key to success.

As a result, we have found our park in Mexico City to be one of our top-performing parks, and recently announced the addition of a new water park to open in the spring of 2017.

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!