Tag

Gastón Taratuta

Browsing

What: IMS,  the digital marketing and communications company, will be Vevo’s advertising representative in Latin America through a partnership that was announced last week.
Why it matters: This is IMS’ first trade agreement  after being acquired by Sony Pictures Television.

VevoVevo, the all-premium music video and entertainment platform with over 11 billion monthly views globally,  has enlisted IMS to help the company expand its advertising opportunities in Latin America and educate advertisers on how best to connect with consumers in Spanish-speaking Latin America, including Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Colombia and Peru.

Latin American advertisers will have the  opportunity to target Vevo viewers through contextual targeting, music genre, and artist targeting, among other segmentation variables. Additionally, Vevo Originals, which follow the careers of emerging artists, offers brand integration opportunities on a local level.

This partnership between IMS and Vevo adds to IMS´s ongoing initiatives to bring new opportunities to the advertising market, facilitating new ways for brands to engage with their audiences. Vevo and IMS look forward to working together with businesses and consumers in Latin America, to help bring valuable messages to the digital consumers.

IMS and ComScore’s Mobile in LatAm Study revealed that two thirds of mobile users in Latin America already know Vevo and over half of Vevo mobile users consider it important in their daily use. Additionally, according to IAB’s “Mobile Video 2015, A Global Perspective,” music videos are the preferred form of video content on mobile in Latin America. The Latin American consumer is increasingly connected and dominates technology representing an excellent opportunity for digital advertising. The digital ad sales outlook for Latin America is poised for double-digit growth over the next five years.

Two thirds of mobile users in Latin America already know Vevo and over half of Vevo mobile users consider it important in their daily use

Music videos are a big part of digital Latin America and Vevo is at the forefront of this,” says Gastón Taratuta, CEO and Founder of IMS. “As the number one music site in the world, Vevo has the exceptional ability to reach and engage Latin Americans in new ways, both locally and globally.”

“Vevo’s viewership in Latin America and Mexico is continuing to grow remarkably year on year, especially in Mexico, which is now Vevo’s second largest market in terms of views – something that is very exciting for us to see,” says Nic Jones, Executive Vice President International, Vevo. “Out of Vevo’s 11 billion monthly views in June, 1.4 billion came from Mexico alone. There’s immense potential for Vevo in Mexico and other Latin American countries, and we’re excited for IMS to help us better communicate with advertisers locally, and across Latin America.”

 

 

What: Sony Pictures Television (SPT) has signed an agreement to acquire a 51% stake in Internet Media Services (IMS), one of Latin America’s largest ad sales and media buying firms in the digital space. Sony will pay approximately US $100 million for a 51% stake valuing IMS at approximately US $200 million.The deal is expected to close in several weeks pending regulatory approval.Gastón Taratuta will continue as CEO; Ignacio Vidaguren as COO; Maren Lau as CMO; and Mariano Roman as CCO. There are no significant  changes planned in the way IMS manages its business.
Why it matters: 10 year-old IMS is one of the main players in the Latin American digital media placement business, if not the main one. With the IMS purchase, Sony Pictures Television gains substantial relationships with key accounts in the region in the fast growing digital media category.

d64203c83eb0f0ee77dfaa9a2a95c342_400x400 sonypictures_logo_400x400Sony Pictures Television (SPT) has signed an agreement to acquire a majority stake in IMS Internet Media Services (IMS), one of Latin America’s largest ad sales and media buying firms in the digital space.  The agreement was announced  by Andy Kaplan, president of worldwide networks for SPT, and Gaston Taratuta, CEO, Founder and Partner for IMS.  The deal is expected to close in several weeks pending regulatory approval.

IMS is the largest independent digital ad sales company in Latin America and the largest digital media buyer in the region.  Headquartered in Miami, the company also has offices in eleven countries throughout the region.  Current commercial partnerships include Waze, Twitter, LinkedIn, Spotify, Crackle, iAds and Foursquare, among others. Taratuta will continue as CEO; Ignacio Vidaguren as COO; Maren Lau as CMO; and Mariano Roman as CCO.  No   significant changes to the business are currently planned.

CHECK OUT: Analysis-Making Sense of Sony Pictures Television’s Acquisition of IMS

Double Digit Growth in Digital Media

The digital ad sales outlook for Latin America is poised for double-digit growth over the next five years, in a region where mobile connections already surpass 120% of the population.  According to the IMS Mobile in LatAm study in conjunction with comScore, more than 60 percent of users of mobile apps such as Twitter, LinkedIn, Spotify and Waze consider that these are very important in day-to-day life.

“Gaston and his team are experts in the digital space and they have created a fantastic business across Latin America,” said Kaplan.  “With the sector growing exponentially and evolving quickly, we’re looking forward to working together to grow our collective businesses”  Additionally, Kaplan added, “we will integrate practices and intelligence with our networks and ad sales teams in the region and globally, making this an excellent extension of our current business”

“SPT combines powerful programming with an international infrastructure and a leading leadership team” noted Taratuta. “We look forward to the synergies these will bring to joint initiatives within Latin America and new regions.”

Internet Media Services, IMS  has obtained the exclusive rights from Apple to market Aples iAd advertising platform in Latin America. IMS will be immediately opening up Apple iAd to Brazil and Mexico, and then will bring iAd to the rest of Latin America.

imsApple iAd platform brings unique, compelling advertising experiences to iOS users. Most countries in Latin America are iAd-supported, and marketers that operate in Latin America will be able to reach those users on their iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch, for the first time, through iAd’s unique first-party targeting tools, exclusively through IMS.

IMS CEO and Founder Gaston Taratuta tells Portada that “On average, people spend 86% of their time in apps when on their connected devices, according to Flurry Analytics. iAd’s App Network can help advertisers connect with consumers directly on their phones and in their apps, the space in which they spend most of their time. What’s more, iAd can help brands target the right audience for their ads.”
In addition to iAd’s App Network, IMS will provide education and support for iAd Workbench, Apple’s campaign planning and management tool, and iAd Producer, the iAd tool to help brands design and develop interactive content. Apple iAd and IMS will allow brands in Latin America to sell into any app-enabled Apple device, such as iPhones, iPads and iPods Touch.

iOS is the second most popular operating system in Latin America, beating Blackberry, Windows Phone, Samsung, LG, and Series 40. As of December of 2014, iOS users were about 17% of mobile users in Mexico, and about 16% in Brazil, according to StatsCounter.

Starting in Miami, Mexico and Brazil

appleIMS will be immediately opening up Apple iAd to Brazil and Mexico, and then will bring iAd to the rest of Latin America.

Our sales efforts will initially be based in Miami, Brazil and Mexico. Once we have created success in these markets, we will move iAd into other Latin American markets, using best practices learned while expanding iAd usage in these behemoth markets.
The two biggest markets in Latin America are, of course, Brazil and Mexico, but digital advertisers are looking for opportunities to expand across the region. Regional spending on all measured media is forecasted to rise 14.3% in 2014, according to ZenithOptimedia’s September 2014 “Advertising Expenditure Forecasts,” an increase from 9.3% in 2013. With the summer Olympics being held in Brazil in 2016, there are great opportunities that advertisers can look forward to in Latin America.

With iAd, advertisers can reach their audiences on a CPM model.

How is it sold?

Taratuta tells Portada that “With iAd, advertisers can reach their audiences on a CPM model. iAd gives them the flexibility to also choose audience and ad formats that work best for each brand. They can find their ideal audience among Latin American Apple users and get their message to the right people using iAd exclusive insights and segmentation tools.”

One of our keys to success is making sure that we can educate the entire market on effective and efficient use of Apple’s iAd platform. To achieve this, IMS will create dedicate ad sales teams for iAd in Miami, Mexico and Brazil. We’ve done this kind of roll out in the past for Twitter, Waze, Spotify, Foursquare, and LinkedIn. This is what makes IMS unique, in that with each new partnership, we hire new highly skilled employees who are dedicated to educating and evangelizing the Latin American markets about these new advertising platforms.”

 

Doing business in Brazil is not only good business, but very rewarding. Alas, it is no easy feat.

At least, that was the consensus during an afternoon session at the last day of the Latin American Advertising & Media Summit in Miami, where panelists, Brazilians and non-Brazilians, shared some light on what to do  -and not do- when doing business in Brazil.

“Brazil is very rewarding, but it is really difficult,” said Mario Cordon, the Guatemala-born CMO of Open English. “There are a lot of similarities with the U.S., but there are also lots of differences too.” Cordon, whose web-based course of English has been a success in Brazil, said doing business in the country is unlike doing business in the rest of Latin America. “Sometimes Brazil feels like a different continent; a place that just happens to be in Latin America.”

Other panelists included Gastón Taratuta, the CEO of IMS Corporate, a digital marketing agency that does work for high-profile American companies, including Twitter and Netflix. Taratuta, who is fluent in Spanish, Portuguese and English, also spoke of the differences between Brazilians and the rest of Latin America, and while he said speaking Portuguese is crucial to succeed there, the single most important thing is to find the right management team to operate locally.

Other piece of advice came from Diego Terán, managing director of MEC. “Brazil is not really one market. If you launch in Brazil, you have to pick your region; it’s more like doing business in the U.S.”

Panelists also touched on media and how Brazil -along with Argentina and Mexico- continue to be a TV-centric market. In Brazil, said Taratuta, 60 cents of every media dollar is taken by Globo; and Internet advertising has grown mostly because Globo didn’t want to focus on digital. An example on how small, dynamic agencies are helping change this landscape is IMS itself. According to Taratuta, when Netflix entered Brazil, it was going to allocate 80% of their media on TV and 20% in digital. “In the end, they ended up doing the opposite: 80% on digital and 20% on TV,” he said.

Among the advantages cited by the panelists of doing business in Brazil:

  • High-penetration of credit and debit cards
  • Brazilians are tech-savvy
  • High-penetration and adoption of Smartphones
  • Several important cities, not just one like in many Latin American Countries.
  • e-commerce is well developed
  • Brazilians are leapfrogging, skipping the landline and going straight to mobile; skipping PCs and going to tablets

 

Doing business in Brazil is not only good business, but very rewarding. Alas, it is no easy feat.

At least, that was the consensus during an afternoon session at the last day of the Latin American Advertising & Media Summit in Miami, where panelists, Brazilians and non-Brazilians, shared some light on what to do  -and not do- when doing business in Brazil.

“Brazil is very rewarding, but it is really difficult,” said Mario Cordon, the Guatemala-born CMO of Open English. “There are a lot of similarities with the U.S., but there are also lots of differences too.” Cordon, whose web-based course of English has been a success in Brazil, said doing business in the country is unlike doing business in the rest of Latin America. “Sometimes Brazil feels like a different continent; a place that just happens to be in Latin America.”

Other panelists included Gastón Taratuta, the CEO of IMS Corporate, a digital marketing agency that does work for high-profile American companies, including Twitter and Netflix. Taratuta, who is fluent in Spanish, Portuguese and English, also spoke of the differences between Brazilians and the rest of Latin America, and while he said speaking Portuguese is crucial to succeed there, the single most important thing is to find the right management team to operate locally.

Other piece of advice came from Diego Terán, managing director of MEC. “Brazil is not really one market. If you launch in Brazil, you have to pick your region; it’s more like doing business in the U.S.”

Panelists also touched on media and how Brazil -along with Argentina and Mexico- continue to be a TV-centric market. In Brazil, said Taratuta, 60 cents of every media dollar is taken by Globo; and Internet advertising has grown mostly because Globo didn’t want to focus on digital. An example on how small, dynamic agencies are helping change this landscape is IMS itself. According to Taratuta, when Netflix entered Brazil, it was going to allocate 80% of their media on TV and 20% in digital. “In the end, they ended up doing the opposite: 80% on digital and 20% on TV,” he said.

Among the advantages cited by the panelists of doing business in Brazil:

  • High-penetration of credit and debit cards
  • Brazilians are tech-savvy
  • High-penetration and adoption of Smartphones
  • Several important cities, not just one like in many Latin American Countries.
  • e-commerce is well developed
  • Brazilians are leapfrogging, skipping the landline and going straight to mobile; skipping PCs and going to tablets

 

Get our e-letters packed with news and intelligence!