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By Sebastian Yoffe, Managing Director – Latin America, Lotame

COVID-19 changed it all. As marketers, and as people, we know that the way consumers live has been altered at a fundamental level by the virus and the resulting economic upheaval and social distancing practices.

Before COVID-19

In the pre-COVID-19 environment, it was easy for marketers to rely on a familiar set of personas.

Of course, creating those personas took work. Using first-party data as a foundation, marketers learned the basic habits and preferences of their audience, but they still needed third-party data to fill in the gaps in their knowledge. That meant breaking down data silos, scrubbing all the data, and deriving insights to build a working model. And once that work was done, you still had to test the results to see if they worked, or fail and start all over again. Still, the process had its rewards.

People aren’t eating, shopping or exercising the way they did just a few months ago.

Before the global pandemic changed our lives in profound ways, we could make some safe assumptions about how people lived based on available first-party data. We could guess, within reason, how the preferences of a 30-something male with a suburban ZIP code might differ from those of a woman in her twenties living in the heart of a major city.  But COVID-19 changed all that. As marketers, and as people, we know that the way consumers live has been altered at a fundamental level by the virus and the resulting economic upheaval and social distancing practices. People aren’t eating, shopping or exercising the way they did just a few months ago. They’re still doing all of those things, but daily habits have changed in ways that simply aren’t going to be captured by first-party data alone.

COVID-19 marketerSince COVID-19

Consider this simple example:

Imagine a male consumer in his mid-twenties visiting an automotive site in late 2019. He lives in a major city and his visit involves looking at a few two-door models and browsing the features. It’s behavior that would suggest he’s single, maybe in the market for a new car. When that same user logs on in June of 2020, his online behavior hasn’t changed that much. He might visit more frequently and spend more time customizing a car. He might even still be browsing two-door models but has expanded his search to SUVs and jeeps with more storage capacity. Yet his life has changed dramatically.

[…] using only first-party data there’s no way to tell that he’s probably a better target for ads […]

There’s not enough detail in the auto site’s view of this consumer to tell you that he’s now working from home, or that instead of looking to buy his first car for weekend trips, he’s now more interested in moving to the suburbs and replacing airline travel with road trips. He won’t be going overseas for a long time, but using only first-party data there’s no way to tell that he’s probably a better target for ads about a crossover model’s great gas mileage or its ability to tackle tough terrain for his trips to the mountains. Instead of the speed of a sportscar he might need in-car WiFi, roadside assistance, and the best sound system on the market.

All these changes are invisible to the OEM and its dealerships. From their perspective, he’s still a man, still the same age and living in the same location, and he’s interested in their cars.

Advertisers looking to connect with in-market car shoppers are missing out on closing this potential customer by speaking to his needs right now, rather than months ago. With the intel they have from first-party data alone, their ads are likely to fall flat, creating the kind of wasted spend that no one needs during a global recession.

Understanding a New Consumer

To understand what consumers’ lives really look like now, marketers will need to rely on third-party data. Without it, there’s no way for any digital marketer using a connected channel, to make the connection between distinct behaviors.

Data CollectThird-party data segments can reveal valuable insight for marketers. Consider the data available from third-party sources around discretionary spending. Before the pandemic, you could expect that a consumer who shopped regularly at a high-end retailer was probably in the market for work attire. Today, in a world where pajamas qualify as work clothes, someone visiting that high-end retailer might be better served with ads for outdoor wear, sleepwear, or casual clothes better suited to social distancing in the park than making a statement at the office.

These changes aren’t easily captured unless you have the data to build a complete picture of the customer.

Likewise, someone searching for a minivan might be planning a road trip for a COVID-safe summer vacation rather than to take the kids to futbol practice. These changes aren’t easily captured unless you have the data to build a complete picture of the customer. Reaching these audiences in ways that are relevant and respectful of how their lives have changed can have a big impact. But in all these cases, third-party data is the key to unlocking the right insights.

Surviving in a Changing World

COVID-19 marketers
Sebastian Yoffe, Managing Director – Latin America, Lotame

We’re in a critical moment. Many businesses are fighting not just for relevance but for survival. In this fiercely competitive new world, having a clear view of who your customers are and how they’ve changed in the last few months can mean the difference between surviving and thriving. To succeed in the rapidly changing environment, marketers need to make connections between data points and signals that first-party data alone can’t provide. For advertisers and publishers alike, third-party data closes the loop.

To succeed in the rapidly changing environment, marketers need to make connections between data points and signals that first-party data alone can’t provide.

Personally, I never could have anticipated the ways that my personal and professional life has changed in the last few months. While there’s definitely been disruption, it’s also been an opportunity to learn. Right now we’re focused on making changes that will help us cope with the new environment, but for us to connect with customers now and in the future, the digital ecosystem needs to improve. For advertisers, publishers, and consumers alike that represents a huge opportunity.

Are you using data to get a clear view of your customers? I would love to learn about your data strategy; please send me a note directly: syoffe@lotame.com

We spoke to Sebastian Yoffe, Managing Director, Latin America at Lotame on how his company’s data enrichment solutions can help brands and publishers deepen their connections to prospects, particularly in the current COVID-19 environment.

The new Background…and Why First Party Data is not Enough

According to Yoffe, “the world is changing and so are consumers. The last few months have accelerated the shift to digital as consumers rely more on delivery or contact-free pickup of goods and services. All of our habits and routines have changed as well. First-party data while valuable to understanding customers was never enough for marketers. That has been made even clearer now. It’s imperative that the industry embrace other forms of data to get to know customers and meet them where they are — in tone, message, and modality. That comes from truly understanding how they work their worlds and what’s important to them now versus a few months ago. In addition, we have always championed a connected ecosystem and only by bringing all industry players together will we grow and deliver meaningful experiences to customers. ” Sebastian Yoffe - Lotame


Check out:
 A connected digital advertising ecosystem benefits everyone.  (By Adam Solomon, Chief Growth Officer, Lotame)

 

Third Party Cookies Not Turned Off Yet by Google

Yoffe, photo left, who is at the helm of Lotame in Latin America, notes that it is important to understand that Google with its 78% Chrome market share globally has not turned third -party cookies off yet. “This is the world we live in today. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being transacted in an ecosystem where Chrome is the dominant player. If you’re not working within the current ecosystem’s parameters, how are you even advancing advertiser needs and interests on more than half of the Internet? Third-party cookies won’t be going away until 2022 so until that time, the company’s new suite of data enrichment solutions known as Lotame Panorama will use third-party cookies when they are available but they aren’t required. We’re also heavily involved in Google’s work to remove cookies but again, until then, we are fully functional in today’s environment.”

If you’re not working within the current ecosystem’s parameters, how are you even advancing advertiser needs and interests on more than three-quarters of the Internet?

Data Enrichment Solutions Company: Ready for a Future Without Third-Party Cookies

Consumers’ digital lives have only grown more complex. With billions of data points from diverse sources, brands and publishers need a long-term cure to intelligently find and connect these resources rather than a series of band-aids. Lotame‘s ID Graph technology known as Cartographer plays a crucial role in helping marketers and pu8blishers find and connect with their audiences in meaningful and respectful ways, with or without cookies.

Lotame Cartographer‘s graph technology  connecting web IDs across first-party cookies and local storage. “We use local storage because Safari expires first-party cookies after a single day whereas local storage lasts for 7 days. In addition, our graph connects web IDs to mobile ad IDs and OTT IDs,” Yoffe asserts.

Cartographer connects web IDs, browsers and devices at the people-level, giving global brands and publishers access to every visitor to their site, regardless of browser, as well as through mobile app, TV and offline. It creates a master graph of graphs, mapping connections between, among and within people, the places they visit and their interests, with the thread of consumer consent. Cartographer plots, clusters and shares diverse data connections across 90+ platform partners to find more of a brand or publisher’s audience than anyone could find alone, creating increased or “true” scale. In doing so, the universe of people it can see and cluster reaches 1.4 billion unique consumers across 4 billion active IDs globally.

Yoffe explains that Lotame Cartographer makes secure and trusted connections at three key levels – ID, individual and household – using machine learning and deterministic and probabilistic techniques.

Creating Addressable Audiences

A key benefit of the appropiate use of marketing technologies is that they should be able to draw actionable conclusions that support better decision-making, optimize campaigns, and reveal opportunities and gaps. Lotame Panorama provides the rich data, tools and technology for marketers and agencies to create addressable audiences.

Yoffe shared that marketers do a tremendous amount of research and gathering of data across siloed resources in order to develop audience targets for granola bars, for example. They might want women between 18-25 who are interested in health and shop at these specific stores. They may even have multiple personas to sell that one candy bar. The challenge in digital advertising is finding that carefully crafted audience and engaging them with your marketing message.  Yoffe notes that he “first helps marketers create these audiences by consolidating the world’s largest resource of high quality second- and third-party data. We make this data accessible via Lotame Panorama to marketers and agencies to look at overlaps and indices, to interpret the data, to understand more dimensions of a customer than ever before. Marketers and agencies then create audience segments from these assembled qualities, behaviors, and interests. And, because Lotame is powered by the Cartographer ID Graph, technology, marketers gain even more knowledge about relevant attributes and behaviours tied to the individual.

These segments can then be pushed via Lotame Panorama technology to a marketer’s DSP so that they can buy against that audience. We also enable publishers to create these rich audience segments that can be bought across their properties either via direct deals or programmatically. Lotame Panorama has ready-made pre-packaged addressable audiences that marketers can buy now from 50 DSPs. Or as we said, you can create your own.”

Beyond a DMP,  A Data Enrichment Solutions Company

Data Enrichment SolutionsHistorically, Lotame was known as a DMP.  “We believe the landscape and Lotame have evolved beyond the definition of a DMP”, Yoffe notes. “Lotame positions itself as a data enrichment solutions company. These solutions help marketers, agencies and publishers in Latin America understand customers and create addressable audiences to engage consumers everywhere they are. Unlike a traditional tech stack, Lotame’s solutions are flexible, scalable and cost-effective alternative to the walled-off options. We empower marketers and agencies to buy the solutions they need, and only those that they need as opposed to the weighty and bloated martech stacks.  We see marketers eager to tap deeper into their data strategies in the region, and include within their core business strategy data.”

We empower marketers and agencies to buy the solutions they need, and only those that they need as opposed to the weighty and bloated martech stacks.

“It’s worth noting that the need for data enrichment is more critical than ever. Due to the global pandemic, the world has changed — and consumer passions, interests and habits have changed as well. Relying on first-party data alone, marketers are missing out on those important changes in their customers’ lives and the understanding that comes with it to impact messaging, product development and more,” Yoffe asserts.

More about Lotame

Lotame is the leading provider of data enrichment solutions for global enterprises. Our connected and patented data technologies, curated second- and third-party data exchanges, and high-touch customer service makes Lotame a  trusted choice for marketers, agencies and media companies that want to build a panoramic view of their customers and activate across the cookieless web, mobile app and OTT environments. Lotame serves its global clients with offices in New York City, Columbia MD, Argentina, London, Mumbai, Singapore and Sydney. Learn more at www.lotame.com

 

 

By Sebastian Yoffe, Managing Director – Latin America, Lotame

Data Collect
By Sebastian Yoffe, Managing Director – Latin America, Lotame

Data is one of the most valuable resources businesses have. The more information you have about your customers, the better you can understand their interests, wants and needs. This enhanced understanding helps you meet and exceed your customers’ expectations and allows you to create messaging and products that appeal to them.

How do you collect this data? One of the most crucial tools for collecting — as well as organizing, analyzing and activating data — is the data management platform, or DMP. Your DMP can help facilitate all these steps and provide you with the tools you need to make the most of your data. There are various data-gathering methods you can use with the help of your DMP. We’ll explore some of the most common data collection methods below.

Primary Data Collection

The term “primary data” refers to data you collect yourself. Primary data is information obtained directly from the source. You will be the first party to use this exact set of data.

When it comes to data businesses collect about their customers, primary data is also typically first-party data. First-party data could include data you gathered from online properties and apps, data in your customer relationship management system (CRM), email marketing campaigns, offline data you collect from your customers through surveys and various other sources.

Because first-party data comes directly from your audience, you can have high confidence in its accuracy, as well as its relevance to your business. However, first-party data presents a narrow view of customers within the boundaries of a particular website or app.

Because first-party data comes directly from your audience, you can have high confidence in its accuracy, as well as its relevance to your business. However, first-party data presents a narrow view of customers within the boundaries of a particular website or app. To meet the needs of marketers who require a panoramic view of customers, you will need to enrich your first-party data with other types of data.

Second-party data has many of the same positive attributes as first-party data. It comes directly from the source, so you can be confident in its accuracy, but it also gives you insights you couldn’t get with your first-party data. Third-party data offers much more scale than any other type of data, which is its primary benefit. But third-party data can also fill in the gaps of knowledge about customer passions, interests, and behaviors.

hird-party data offers much more scale than any other type of data, which is its primary benefit.

Quantitative vs. Qualitative Data

You can divide primary data into two categories: quantitative and qualitative.

Data CollectQuantitative data comes in the form of numbers, quantities and values. It describes things in concrete and easily measurable terms. Examples include the number of customers who bought a given product, the star rating a customer gave a product and the amount of time a visitor spent on your website.

Quantitative data lends itself well to analytics. When you analyze quantitative data, you may uncover insights that can help you better understand your audience. Because this kind of data deals with numbers, it is very objective and has a reputation for reliability.

Qualitative data is descriptive, by contrast. It is less concrete and less easily measurable than quantitative data. This data may contain descriptive phrases and opinions. Examples include an online review a customer writes about a product, an answer to an open-ended survey question about what type of videos a customer likes to watch online and the conversation a customer had with a customer service representative.

Qualitative data helps explain the “why” behind the information quantitative data reveals. For this reason, it is useful for supplementing quantitative data, which will form the foundation of your data strategy.

5-Step Process to Collect Data

There are many techniques for collecting different types of quantitative data, but there’s a fundamental process you’ll typically follow, which consists of the following five steps.

1. Determine What Information You Want to Collect

First, choose what details you want to collect. Decide what topics the information will cover, who you want to collect it from and how much data you need. You may want to collect data about which type of articles are most popular on your website among visitors 18–34 years old. You might also choose to gather information about the average age of all of the customers who bought a product from your company within the last month.

2. Set a Timeframe for Data Collection

Next, you can start planning how you’ll collect your data and establish a timeframe for data collection. You may want to gather some types of data continuously. When it comes to transactional data and website visitor data, for example, you may want to set up a method for tracking that data over the long term. If you’re tracking data for a specific campaign, however, you’ll track it over a defined period. In these instances, you’ll have a schedule for when you’ll start and end your data collection.

3. Determine Your Data Collection Method

At this step, you will choose the data collection method that will make up the core of your data-gathering strategy. Consider the type of information you want to collect, the timeframe over which you’ll obtain it and other aspects you determined.

4. Collect the Data

Once you have finalized your plan, you can implement your data collection strategy and start collecting data. You can store and organize your data in your DMP. Be sure to stick to your plan and check on its progress regularly. It may be useful to create a schedule for when you will check in with how your data collection is proceeding, especially if you are collecting data continuously. Update your plan as conditions change and you get new information.

5. Analyze the Data and Implement Your Findings

Once you’ve collected all your data, it’s time to analyze it and organize your findings. The analysis phase is crucial because it turns raw data into valuable insights that you can use to enhance your marketing strategies, products and business decisions. Once you’ve uncovered the patterns and insights in your data, you can implement the findings to improve your business.

There are various methods of collecting primary, quantitative data. The right one to use depends on your goals and the type of data you’re collecting. Some of the most common types of data collection used today are: surveys, online tracking (e.g., your website or mobile app), transaction data tracking (e.g., ecommerce, in-store point-of-sale system), online marketing analytics, social media monitoring, collecting subscriptions and registration data (e.g., your email list, rewards program), and in-store traffic monitoring.

There are various methods of collecting primary, quantitative data. The right one to use depends on your goals and the type of data you’re collecting

The more relevant, high-quality data you have, the more likely you are to make good choices when it comes to marketing, sales, customer service, product development and many other areas of your business. Some specific uses of customer data include the following: improving your understanding of your audience, identifying areas for improvement, predicting future patterns, and better personalizing your content and messaging.

How are you collecting your data today? Are you using data to drive your business and connect with customers? I would love to learn about your data strategy; please send me a note directly: syoffe@lotame.com

Multicultural marketing may be officially dead (or more important than ever), but one thing is certain: smart marketers focus on culture. Three things they know and you should too…

Smart Marketers Keep Culture on the Front Burner
J. Walker Smith, Chief Knowledge Officer, Brand & Marketing, Kantar

Sometimes people have the view that with enough data you can target anyone effectively, thereby removing the need to appeal to the audience’s culture. How can we continue to recognize the importance of culture in this technology-driven age?  “Culture influences commerce.  There is a recurring tendency among business leaders to take culture for granted.  But culture is embedded in everything, and thus when culture changes everything is affected,” J. Walker Smith, Chief Knowledge Officer, Brand & Marketing at Kantar Consulting tells Portada.
“Culture is how people live.  Technology is simply a tool people use to engage with culture.  Technology is not unimportant.  It’s just not the context of life that is the root source of aspirations, expectations, and values.  That’s culture.”

 Periods of change are when culture gets noticed most, but it never goes away.  The smartest marketers keep culture on the front burner.  Lagging marketers ignore culture, so they are always behind change and new opportunities.

3 Things Brand Marketers Who Focus on Culture Know About

“Periods of change are when culture gets noticed most, but it never goes away.  The smartest marketers keep culture on the front burner.  Lagging marketers ignore culture, so they are always behind change and new opportunities, ” Kantar’s  J.Walker Smith adds.
Savvy marketers who focus on culture make sure to take into account the below three key considerations.

1. It’s Decision Science (Not Data Science)

Smart marketers who keep culture as a key priority know that ultimately data insights are there to base decisions on. That is why it is crucial that data scientists work in close coordination with brand marketing decision makers (who ultimately have the budgeting power.)

2. Marketers who Keep Culture on the Front Burner Run a Business Unit (NOT a Center of Excellence)

Data teams and cultural intelligence teams need to be embedded into the overall marketing organization. They should not act as consultants who have no real decision-making power (e.g. the Hispanic Centers of Excellence that some companies have set up are commendable initiatives but often don’t impact real marketing decision-making). The best is to integrate cultural insights into overall data analysis and marketing decision-making. For example, Curacao, a department chain store with locations in California, Nevada and Arizona which ranks among the top 100 electronics and appliance retailers in the U.S., makes sure to take  into consideration cultural insights as part of the whole marketing mix. Curacao has a team of data scientists that look at purchasing behavior and take into account culture by looking at consumers in the following way:
– Spanish-dominant
– Bilingual – Hispanic
– English-General Market

Another alternative to make sure that data insights and marketing budgets are aligned is by creating a business unit. Pepsi created a Hispanic Business unit in 2018 (a move somewhat contrary to overall U.S. marketing trends).  Esperanza Teasdale, VP & General Manager at PepsiCo’s Hispanic Business Unit, tells Portada, that her Hispanic business unit independently determines strategy , commercial tactics and, most importantly has a dedicated advertising and marketing budget. Teasdale is responsible for the overall Hispanic strategy, engagement and sales for the Hispanic business within Pepsi North America Beverages.

Smart Marketers Keep Culture on the Front Burner
Esperanza Teasdale, VP & General Manager, PepsiCo’s Hispanic Business Unit

We also have our own data team, which is responsible for analyzing the Hispanic business today. That is how we measure performance. Another part of the team analyzes consumer insights. E.g. segmentation. Their worked helped to provide a perspective of Hispanics that goes beyond years in the country and language and is more in the mindset of  the target, ” Teasdale adds.  This helped Pepsi to come up with “Es lo que quiero“, the Hispanic adaptation of the recently released tag “That’s what I like”.

Marketers in the Portada Council System voted for the topic “Why data scientists need to be culturally sensitive; A brand marketer’s perspective”  as the keynote topic for the upcoming Portada Los Angeles, April 2 conference. The topic selection highlights how important it is for brand decision makers understand the cultural implications of the data insights process.

 

3. Marketers who Focus on Culture Check Data Quality (DMP’s and DSPs)

The smartest marketers who keep culture on the front burner also know that data quality is key, particularly when it comes to cultural insights. Data management platforms (e.g. Blue Kai, LiveRamp and others) and demand side providers do not always provide solutions that capture cultural nuances. “For DSP’s and DMPs to have data on particular consumer targets, they need to identify and code them separately. Only this way you can get information/insights back,” an industry insider tells Portada. The issue is that DMP’s and DSP’s often don’t do that extra mile, because they are not paid to do it.

DMP’s and DSP’s often don’t to that extra mile, because they are not paid to do it.

We talked to Eric Tourtel, SVP of Teads Latam about the story behind the recently-announced strategic partnership with Precision, the programmatic division of Publicis Media.  We also discussed the key buzzwords and trends of the near future, and why Teads is ready to tackle them head-on with a revolutionary new tool. 

Last year, Teads closed a deal with Oracle Moat that allows buyers to select any custom billing point of viewability and transact on any viewability requirement. Portada also announced the new partnership with Precision, the programmatic area of Publicis Media, in Latam. Teads is the fast-growing platform that invented outsream video marketing. Now, they are changing the game again on their way lower into the funnel. To find out more, we caught up with Eric Tourtel, SVP of Teads Latam. Here’s all you need to know about the special nature of this partnership. Plus, learn how the company gets the ball rolling when it comes to data and AI.

 

The Importance of Having Allies: The Teads + Precision Partnership

Teads works with all the agencies. However, the partnership with Publicis’ programmatic area is unusual because it has a more significant qualitative component. “We’re going deeper, sharing more information. We have enormous amounts of first-party data and a very strong insights team,” said Eric Tourtel to introduce Portada to the story. As he explained, Teads started at the top of the funnel with good branding results after the launch of the innovative InRead video ad format. then moved to engagement and consideration, but the company has just recently started to focus more on performance.

Not only do we see who the users are, but we also see what they’re reading.

Now, Teads is able to fully audit the consumer journey. In Latam, the company has grown so much that it now reaches 90% of Mexican internet users, for example (source). “We find them within our network from 15 to 20 times per month. Imagine the gargantuan proportions of information we get,” shared Tourtel. “Not only do we see who the users are, but we also see what they’re reading. More than noting which URLs they’re visiting, we’re paying attention to the content they look for in those websites.” Consequently, sharing such information with Publicis will make for a very strategic partnership. According to Tourtel, most of the other partnerships are about price, volume, and discount.

 

Sharing the Teads Potential

“What makes this partnership special,” remarked Tourtel, “is the openness with which Teads will share its platform which most agencies aren’t aware of.” Thus, he had to organize intensive training in Miami with the directors of Precision offices all over Latin America. “We had to make sure they understood our platform’s potential,” told Eric. “We’ll have at least one training session per quarter in order to hear their feedback and adapt to their needs. This doesn’t happen at any other Demand-Side Platform.”

As Tourtel mentioned during our conversation, Teads might not be a very complex company but it is a very complete provider. It used to focus solely on video, but it has now evolved lower into the funnel to offer performance solutions. “Teads’ platform is different from DSPs in that it’s exclusively designed exclusively for Teads’ transactions,” informed Tourtel. “It’s all connected at a data level, as well as at a reach level. We are full-stack: an ad-server, SSP, exchange, buying interface…” In short, partnering up with Teads sounds like a very good idea.

We’ve grown together, that’s why collaboration flows more easily than with other players.

The other special aspect of the partnership was the story behind it. There’s a bond with Publicis that goes way back. “We have a lot of history together,” shared Eric. “I started Teads Latam six years ago and the first agency that took a leap of faith and talked big numbers with their clients for us was Starcom Miami. We’ve grown together, that’s why collaboration flows more easily than with other players,” added Tourtel.

 

Guaranteeing Viewability is no Longer Impossible

The main problem video marketers face is that nobody wants to watch video ads. They’re invasive, annoying, and get in the way between consumers and content. This is a real problem for Facebook and YouTube, but Teads got rid of the invasion factor. And so innovation played an important part in Teads’ process of coming up with a new format that was entirely different from a pre-roll.

The result was outstream video advertising, and it revolutionized video marketing. More consumers are now voluntarily watching ads. “We invented the InRead format,” said Tourtel. “It started with a video between two paragraphs. It’s not covering any content, so it’s not an intrusion, you can skip it if you don’t want to watch.”

Marc Pritchard, CEO of P&G has recently declared that his company’s ads have an average exposure time of 1.6 seconds on Facebook, compared to 13 seconds on Teads,” pointed out Tourtel. ”That’s because we display ads exclusively in profesional articles. We’re not relying on people who scroll down their feed quickly to see if something grabs their interest.”

 

How Teads Does It

We’re not relying on people who scroll down their feed quickly to see if something grabs their interest.

If you have the right format and you display it in the right place, it has to work. However, if you add to that an artificial intelligence that gathers precise data and continually learns how to classify it, that’s a winning combo. “Five years ago we built a team that created our AI,” told Tourtel. “We gave it one single question. ‘Knowing what we know about this user, what are the chances that this impression will turn into a full view?’.

In fact, technology at this point is a must. “When we started we did all of this manually, but as we grew into the third biggest digital company in Latin America this became impossible, so we created our AI.” Every time there’s a full view, Teads’ AI team looked at their whole file and then looked for similar profiles. Then, the AI gets better after each completion and is able to predict conversions more accurately. 

 

Brand Safety Can Also Be Guaranteed

Teads is proud to say that, apart from offering very high viewability rates, the company has never faced any brand safety-related issues. Teads uses Grapeshot, a well-known software that scans pages to avoid placing ads next to unwanted content that could harm the brand. “But we know Grapeshot isn’t perfect, so we added our own technology on top of that,” told Tourtel. “Our AI helps us read and classify articles. We also avoid breaking news pages because that’s where they show the horrible stuff.” Furthermore, Teads’ ads only appear on reputable publishing media, where journalists submit articles to an editorial manager for approval before they’re released. “It’s not like we’re a social network with 400 hundred people posting every minute,” he added.

Facebook owns social. Google owns search. LinkedIn owns professional relations. We intend to own media and press.

Nonetheless, explained Tourtel, the tricky part is knowing where to stop, as the definition of brand safety is a very subjective matter. “Brand safety means something different to each brand,” he mentioned. “Sometimes a brand will choose not to appear near the word death, let’s say. So you block any instances where the Word death appears, even if it’s something positive that doesn’t harm the brand at all. Imagine a story about an airplane accident with zero deaths, that’s very good news, but you have blocked the word death and thus you have reduced your reach and increased the cost.”

 

What’s Next for Teads?

Where is the company going and how will it use this potential? “Last year, we decided to regroup a bit,” answered Tourtel. “We were diversifying too much, so we went back to our core: media and newspapers. “Facebook owns social. Google owns search. LinkedIn owns professional relations. We intend to own media and press.”

While Teads has relied on acquisitions in the past, it’s now focusing more on building a strong platform that places them closer to the bottom line. “We own all our inventory and all our data,” explained Tourtel. “This gives us enormous freedom and a great ability to adapt because we’re not depending on any other companies with other priorities that could slow us down.”

AI and Reach on Target

The buzzwords going around are AI and data. Analysts and researchers are preparing for how the future of the industry is resting on those two vast words. Therefore, Teads has a new deal in the works with Nielsen that will allow them to take their innovative offering a step further. “Right now, when you sell the segment of 18-42 year-old women, you’re charging for 30-50% of reach on target,” he explained. “Everybody strives for 100%, but that’s like the holy grail. But soon we’ll be able to charge only for those 18 to 42 year-old women Nielsen confirms we’ve impacted on.”

This product will solve most of the problems we’re facing in digital every day.

Just like the InRead format solved viewability issues, Teads’ will boost performance via look-alike modeling, machine learning and massive amounts of first-party data. “We noticed that CTRs of O.01% are normal in the market while our CTRs range from 1% to 3%. We said, ‘We should sell clicks!’ and we came up with this product that will solve most of the problems we’re facing in digital every day.”

 

See a Trend? Own It

The trends are clear: according to Eric Tourtel, clients want transparency, brand safety, and social responsibility. “Brands are pressuring social media to take responsibility for the content they show, to avoid fake news and hate speech,” he pointed out. “We already have these priorities under control. Now, data will help us offer a more precise product. You’ll no longer buy what you don’t need and you won’t lose anything.” This way, the company will offer a full-funnel view of users’ purchase journeys.

 

Roberto Muñoz, Head of Loyalty Travel at Puntos Colombia manages a joint program between Colombia’s largest bank Bancolombia and Latin American retailer Grupo Éxito. Prior to his current role, he was a strategist for Aeroméxico’s loyalty program Club Premier. The brand marketing leader shares key insights about digital channels for loyalty marketing with Portada including how tech and digital channels enable companies to engage and gain new customers and keep them happy coming back.

Interview conducted by Alejandra Velazquez

Roberto Muñoz, Portada, e-mail marketing
Roberto Muñoz, Puntos Colombia @puntoscolombia

Technology plays a crucial role in enabling marketers to do a better job. In fact, 84% of executives surveyed by Accenture agree that companies are using technology to weave themselves seamlessly into how people live today. 

“Technology helps us to segment audiences. It sparks activation” Muñoz says, adding “Technology provides us the data to develop the right targeting strategies. That way, we keep captive users interested and lure in new consumers via their passion points, like travel, fashion and entertainment. The challenge is recruiting customers that actually interact with the brand, not just sign their name on a list.” But nothing matters if the information isn’t properly documented. The challenge is tracking customer data and applying it correctly in order to serve your marketing strategy. A department that manages and filters big data correctly is always a must.

But nothing matters if the information isn’t documented properly. A department that manages and filters big data correctly is always a must.

Digital Channels: E-mail Marketing is Still an Effective Tool

“Digital channels are key to bring new customers into our loyalty programs. You can target specific audiences by sending key messages. 85% of our customers say they read our news through e-mail marketing. I’ve heard many experts talk about the death of e-mail marketing, but our numbers show the contrary,” Muñoz asserts.

Segmenting information via e-mail is the only thing that ensures the client remains active in your program.

According to Muñoz, segmenting information via e-mail is the only thing that ensures the client remains active in your program. Many strategists say “leave your most valuable customers alone, you don’t want them to get bored. I think when you’re really involved with a brand, you don’t mind how often they contact you. You know you’ll get relevant content eventually.”

…Social? Not so much

“Social network strategies are too focused on massive audiences. We address and recruit a very small percentage of users on social networks. Some programs only want users to click here and then to subscribe to a given program and get an immediate benefit. However, out of all users who sign up, a tiny percentage will actually become involved. You invest a lot of money and end up with a handful of users akin to your brand. One time in Aeroméxico we set a goal to sign up one million new customers onto our base. But in the end, less than 5% of those clients were actual travelers. The rest had been “bullied into it” by the hoards of ads we’d purchased on digital.” 

You invest a lot of money and end up with a handful of users akin to your brand.

Three Ways to Get Customer Feedback

Reliable customer feedback is also an important piece of Puntos Colombia’s strategy for using digital channels for loyalty marketing. Muñoz has developed three ways to approach customers:  direct meetings, focus groups, and surveys.

“High-profile customers get invited to breakfast or lunch to offer their feedback and opinions about the program. Nothing is as valuable as having customers tell you how they feel in person. We have a very direct style of approaching customers. The director of the program may have a sit down with customers and explain what they can and can’t do about their non-conformities.”

They also have focus groups conducted through third-party researchers. Because when consumers don’t know they’re speaking directly to a brand, it helps them give unbiased feedback. Last but not least, there’s surveys. Many valuable customers take the time to respond and are often rewarded with incentives like additional points. The incentives help ensure they are interested in giving their honest opinion.

Reliable customer feedback is also an important piece of Puntos Colombia’s strategy.

Roberto Muñoz, Head of Loyalty, Travel at Puntos Colombia, will be one of the dozens of brand marketing innovators present at Portada Miami on June 4, 2020. If you are interested in participating in Portada Miami and/or in Portada’s networking and knowledge-sharing platform with brand marketers please contact us here.

Out-of-home advertising continues to grow hand-in-hand with technologies that provide the consumer with an interactive experience. OOH is expected to grow at a booming rate in the next years, with the global share of ad expenditures reaching 24% by 2021. We talked about OOH to experts Jill Brooks (Business Development Director, U.S. at Latcom), Vanessa Hartley (Associate Media Director, Outdoor Media Alliance, Hearts & Science), Michael Lieberman (Co-Ceo, Kinetic, North America) and Leonor Palao (Creative Brand & Advertising Leader). 

 

out of home advertising in Times SquareOut of home advertising is one of those things that we can’t imagine ever not being in the world. Billboards and street furniture have accompanied consumers on the go for at least a couple of centuries. Today, street furniture (like bus shelters and telephone boxes), transit advertising (placed on buses and taxis, or anything that addresses travelers and commuters, and other media comprise 34% of total outdoor revenue in the U.S. Marketing “on the go” has grown more than anyone could have expected thanks to new technology and integrations with online marketing. In 2017, out-of-home advertising attracted 6% of global ad spending, and predictions indicate it will grow a yearly 4% to reach US $33 billion by 2021.

 

The King of Traditional Media

Moreover, digital billboards and furniture, as well as other alternative formats, have accounted for the explosion of OOH while other traditional media have continued to fall. According to Magna, DOOH already accounts for 22% of revenue in some markets like the UK and the global share is predicted to grow to 24% by 2021. Therefore, it makes sense to say that OOH is “booming”, and advertisers should seriously explore the opportunities it offers and include it in their multi-channel strategy, particularly now that emerging technologies allow consumers to interact with outside advertisements in ways that we haven’t seen before.

out of home advertising expert
Leonor Palao spent 8 years at OppenheimerFunds before it got acquired by Invesco

According to the OAAA, consumers spend 70% of their time out of home. Thus, outdoor advertising is a most convenient format, as it reaches consumers wherever they are at any moment of the day. We spoke about this to Leonor Palao, a former marketer at OppenheimerFunds. She says that the reason why OOH is growing so much is perhaps that people pay attention to well-crafted messages they see outside, as opposed to the ads they see online. “Brands are overwhelming their audience with online ads,” noted Palao. “People are becoming blind to ads on their phones and on the web. There is a lot of news about cookies and privacy, and as marketers, we have to think of smarter ways to deliver our messages so they make a greater impact.”

 

How Has Out of Home Advertising Evolved in the Latest Years?

Technology has allowed outdoor marketing to become digital. Digital out of home advertising, or DOOH, maximizes creativity and location possibilities. It’s not limited to roadside ads or furniture; it can be on a screen in a gym, elevator, airport, taxi, you name it. In addition, the power of online data allows marketers to tailor DOOH campaigns according to consumers’ location, time of day, weather, or other factors.

Brands are overwhelming their audience with online ads, […] as marketers, we have to think of smarter ways to deliver our messages.
Michael Lieberman

“Certainly, over the last 10 years, the proliferation of OOH formats and the overall volume and capability set of digital screens has evolved,” shared Michael Lieberman, Co-CEO, Kinetic, North America. “I am most excited about how we have evolved our understanding of OOH’s value in the media mix. Namely, our ability to measure and derive the true impact of OOH on business objectives and ROI is what will set OOH on its next phase of growth.”

In short, OOH isn’t static anymore. As Jill Brooks explained, “today OOH advertising has evolved with new dynamic digital assets. Thus, messages are more interactive and engaging for their target audience. Additionally, today’s OOH also offers new ways to measure the ROI of each campaign.” Consequently, technology is allowing brands to create more effective efforts overall. “Technology gives us better abilities to serve up unique creative based on what we know about the people who are exposed to OOH,” pointed out Leonor Palao.

OppenheimerFunds (with partner Captivate) placed ads on elevator screens, inside buildings where target consumers worked

 

How Does OOH Connect to Online Marketing?

out of home advertising expert
Latcom’s Jill Brooks

Marketers have started to realize the possibilities of integrating digital marketing with out of home advertising. More specifically, synergies with mobile marketing favor greater engagement with brands. “Studies have shown that when someone sees a billboard they are more likely to recognize the brand and click on a mobile ad,” said Jill Brooks. “We let the target get familiar with the brand. We awaken their curiosity so that when they see it on their phone or smart device, they will want to know more.”

As brands leave other more traditional advertising media and shift their investments to an unavoidable and measurable vehicle, OOH will inevitably play a more important role.

OOH and Mobile Working as One

“Social media and OOH also have a symbiotic relationship,” added Vanessa Hartley. “When social components are integrated with OOH campaigns, reach is amplified. Congruently, OOH is the most socially shared media format.” To that effect, Michael Lieberman pointed out that incorporating OOH into a campaign boosts pretty much any other channel. “Incorporating OOH into a campaign boosts the ROI of other channels,” he declared. “With mobile already established as the first screen for most consumer behaviors (and 5G on the way), OOH will continue to prove its value in driving mobile-based business outcomes such as downloads and m-commerce, while boosting results for related mobile activities such as search, social engagement and display/video CTR.”

out of home advertising and mobile QR codeWhen discussing her example of the ads in elevator screens, Leonor Palao also mentioned the opportunity to make synergy with the building’s wifi. “We could retarget wifi users who’d seen the ad by their IP address,” she explained. “Once familiar with their location, we hit them with a higher frequency. We hoped that the consumer would get familiar with the brand and recognize the message.”

 

Is OOH for Everybody? Which Categories Can Benefit the Most?

When we asked our experts about this, we received opposed opinions. Jill Brooks believes that OOH is a good idea for all categories. “As brands leave other traditional media and shift their investments to an unavoidable and measurable vehicle, OOH will inevitably play a more important role,” she told Portada.

Michael Lieberman, on the other hand, thinks that there’s one category that gets the value out of out of home advertising more than the rest. “Through OOH, entertainment really instigates behavior change,” he said. “Entertainment brands use OOH as a way to generate engagement on social media by implementing influencer strategies. Stars post photos of their OOH campaigns on their own social channels. Thus they are amplifying the reach and effectiveness of the OOH campaign.”

Finally, Leonor Palao considers that it’s not about categories, but rather about the message you are trying to deliver. “OOH exposure is a very quick lead. It needs to be a simple message,” she commented. “OOH is an excellent channel for brands that are investing in a brand campaign. Or for brands that have a continuous message that they’re trying to build among a specific audience. Depending on the message that you want to deliver, OOH should be part of your media mix but at a high level.

 

What’s in Store for Out of Home Advertising?

According to the OAAA, Q4 2018 was the strongest quarter in 10 years for OOH. Strongest Quarter in 10 Years for OOH.  Digitization is leading the growth for total OOH, and digital OOH represented 29% of the total in 2018. Of the top 100 OOH advertisers in 2018, one-quarter were from the technology sector. Apple assumed the top position for the first time.

As the OAAA explains, the success of OOH is largely due to innovation in technology and tools (digital units, audience measurement), plus more efficient sales and marketing efforts. OOH has also been largely immune from the decline in reach and/or consumption that affects television, print, radio and even digital display media to various degrees, especially among younger audiences. Magna forecasts steady growth through 2023.

 

A summary of the most relevant consumer insight research in the U.S. and U.S. Hispanic markets. If you’re trying to keep up with the latest happenings, this is your one-stop shop. This week, we looked at a few holiday season shopping insights and a couple more interesting research highlights.

 

  • Deloitte’s 34th annual holiday retail survey, which polled 4,410 respondents across the United States, found that the average household is planning to spend nearly $1,500 this holiday season. E-commerce sales are expected to grow by 14-18%, and 70% of smartphone users said they will use their device to make a purchase. 

 

  • RedPoint Global has announced the results of a survey that examines the opinions of over 1,000 U.S. consumers about holiday season shopping. According to the survey, nearly a third of respondents indicate that receiving irrelevant offers from brands is their primary frustration during the holidays. Brands should really pay attention to this, as 60% of survey participants said they are more likely to purchase from retailers who send them personalized content and offers.

 

  • According to Periscope By McKinsey’s “2019 Holiday Season Shopping Report”, 51% of consumers use smartphones to compare prices with competitors while in the physical store. In addition, 33% use smartphones to search for in-store discounts or coupons, and 30% leverage them to look up further product information.

 

  • According to the latest survey from Bankrate Credit Cards, six in 10 U.S. credit or debit cardholders (64%) say they have saved their card number online or in mobile apps despite safety concerns. The survey finds that more than half (56%) of U.S. adults save their credit or debit card information on a retailer or service’s website (like Amazon, Walmart or Netflix) while 32% save their credit or debit card information in a mobile payments app (like Apple Pay or Google Pay).

 

  • Research by BritePool and the USC Annenberg Center for Public Relations show that, among 1,004 U.S. adults, 87% would select a “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” option on any given website. The people most receptive to sharing were those in the 18-34 age category, only 49% of whom said they would choose “Do Not Sell.”

 

  • According to a survey by online coupon platform Shopper.com, 95% of U.S. respondents have used an online coupon at least once. One in three U.S. respondents search for a discount code almost every time they make an online purchase. Across all respondents (U.S. and U.K. consumers), 42% of women and 32% of men have helped a friend or family member find an online discount code, and 86% of all respondents feel frustrated at themselves when they miss the opportunity to make a saving on an online purchase, but one in three feel annoyed at the retailer for not making them aware of potential savings.

Check out the last report including other holiday shopping insights here

Accenture Interactive’s 2019 Consumer Pulse Survey, See People, Not Patterns, gained insight from 8,000 consumers in Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, the U.K. and the U.S. about the responsible usage of consumer data and the right strategies to avoid forcing invasive data collection methods onto reluctant users. 

Inventive vs. Invasive

It’s no secret that invasive brand promotion can be a double edge sword. On the one side, it undoubtedly increases visibility. On the other, it often makes users feel uncomfortable, annoyed or interrupted. This can greatly damage the coveted bond of trust brands strive to forge with their consumers. In fact, Accenture’s survey found that almost 69% of consumers would cut ties with a brand if data usage became too invasive. 

Glen Hartman, head of Accenture Interactive North America and global digital marketing lead, explains the need to draw a clear line between inventive and invasive. The whole point is to collect data in a responsible manner, with respect for the consumer’s preferences. In other words, by making a conversation and asking  for consent rather than, well, spying on them.

“The good news is there is a big opportunity for brands to take a thoughtful approach to data and create an impactful customer experience while doing so, building trust and an emotional connection customers crave,” says Hartman. 

There’s been a conversation going on for many years about transparency and accountability in the industry. Brands have to be open and straightforward about what they ask from customers, if only to serve them better. Accenture’s research shows a staggering 73% of consumers would gladly share information with their favorite brands as long as they’re honest about how they’ll put it to use. It’s a reassuring way of recognizing consumers’ concerns. 

Don’t be a [total] stranger

Perhaps the best way to understand their misgivings is to compare data collection to human interactions with strangers. “People expect someone they’ve never met not to recognize them and the same logic applies digitally”, explains the report. “Forward-thinking brands are finding ways to approximate how humans behave, in a humane and ethical way.”

No one would expect anyone to simply hand out information about their personal behavior to a total stranger. It’s no different for brands. “Many consumers report that brands don’t know them well enough to serve them in a way that makes them feel special”, reads the report. “When brands seem to know too much —and act on that knowledge— they can inadvertently lose consumers’ trust.” 

More than 75% of consumers say they are uncomfortable with data collection via microphone or voice assistants while 51% said invasive ads are on the rise. Nearly 30% of consumers said a brand had gotten “too personal”, and 69% of these consumers would stop doing business with a brand or reconsider their relationship because of this. Colloquially put, flatly avoid creepy tactics. 

What to do?

So, how can brands collect data in a respectful, consensual manner? Accenture Interactive recommends: 

  • Using fresh opt-in alternatives to track users, such as encouraging consumers to authenticate on websites and mobile applications;
  • Bringing ad tech contracts in-house to access more effective, transparent data collection methods; and
  • Building the data architecture of enterprise systems in a way that reflects current regulations.

This last point is crucial to observe, as regulators are increasing oversight and enforcement: Between May 2018 and January 2019, more than 140,000 complaints and queries were filed with authorities. Stay aware of privacy regulations like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to ensure an optimal bilateral experience. 

What: CommerceNext has published the results of a survey of 100 e-commerce decision-makers, meant to explore similarities and differences in the priorities of traditional and digital-first DTC brands.
Why it matters: The report is meant to be a benchmark that helps marketers evaluate their priorities in terms of how to distribute budget among different technologies and objectives.

 

E-commerce is unpredictable; it forces marketers to be on the lookout for what’s coming next and reacting if only a little bit late can turn out to be fatal. In order to be more ready, decision-makers have to decide what matters more in every step of their strategy, which means having to prioritize investments and objectives. With these challenges in mind, CommerceNext conducted a survey of 100 top marketing executives in traditional and digital-first direct-to-consumer brands.

The objective was to provide a useful benchmark for online retailers to measure their priorities and decide how to distribute budget in the most convenient way. According to the results, even though both traditional and digital-first online retailers point to an increase in marketing budget, digital-first brands are spending way more while also diversifying their strategies. Below are the key insights from the study, titled How Leading Retailers and DTC Brands Are Investing in Digital.

 

Which Investments Did Work in 2018?

In order to compete, marketers need to be quick to decide which investments can help them reach their objectives. According to the study, 65% of respondents said their 2019 e-commerce marketing budget increased over the previous year, while only 10% of marketers are reducing their budget. In 2018, the top marketing investment priorities were acquisition marketing (81%), retention and loyalty marketing (43%) and promotions (32%).

When asked about the results of those investments, acquisition marketing had the highest level of satisfaction rating: 53% of respondents said acquisition marketing met expectations in 2018, and 24% said it exceeded expectations. On the contrary, 52% of respondents said unified customer data (e.g. a single view of the customer) performed below their expectations. Almost the same number had similar levels of dissatisfaction in personalization investments (51%).

Source: CommerceNext

 

What Are the Priorities of Digital-First and Traditional Retailers?

According to the report, consumers have more than doubled the amount of time they spend on DTC brands’ websites over the last two years. Even though all the companies in the study have increased their e-commerce marketing budgets, digital-first DTC brands are spending more: 78% indicated that their 2019 budget is higher than the one they had in 2018, while 60% of traditional retailers said the same.

Because DTC brands are based on data-driven decisions and customer-centric operations, they are growing and evolving at an accelerated pace. As stated in the report: “fueled by venture capital investment, these brands have focused on growth vs profitability.” Therefore, the most significant challenge for this group of brands is “achieving profitability at scale”, with “Managing tech integrations” coming in second, with 33% of DTC brands identifying it as a barrier. This is a side-by-side comparison of what each group considers to be the most significant barriers, extracted from the study:

Source: CommerceNext

How to Make the Best of the 2019 Holiday Season

According to the NRF, the 2018 holiday retail season exceeded expectations. Over 165 million Americans reportedly shopped either in stores or online from Thanksgiving Day through Cyber Monday 2018, and online purchasing, in particular, experienced a 19% increase compared to the previous year. The NRF has forecasted that 2019 retail sales will increase by 3.8% compared to 2018, and the online sales growth rate will increase between 10% to 12%.

DTC brands are increasing their budgets at a higher rate than traditional retailers and spreading that budget more evenly. For example, digital-first DTC brands are increasing their budgets equally (70%) between acquisition marketing and retention/loyalty marketing. On the other hand, traditional retailers are emphasizing acquisition marketing, with 77% of respondents increasing their acquisition budget compared to 64% of traditional retailers increasing their retention budget.

 

 

All images by CommerceNext.

What: Multicultural Audience Measurement experts offer Portada insights around the problem of audience under-representation.
Why it matters: Measurement firms under-represent multicultural audiences by as much as 25%, which causes a negative impact in media investment and produces overall flawed results.

 

Audience measurement has never been more complicated, as cultural nuances and consumer behavior shift and change, and the proliferation of new technologies demands multi-channel strategies. The task is even more difficult when it comes to measuring multicultural audiences. Experts tell Portada major measurement firms under-represent these audiences by as much as 25%. If this is the case, the media budget for targeting multicultural audiences should be substantially higher than it is right now. Just for Hispanic marketing, Portada estimates overall expenditures of US 6.07 billion in 2019. However, if firms under-represent audiences by up o 25%, media expenses could increase by up to US 1.5 billion. Admittedly, this is a back-of-the-envelope calculation. Nevertheless, it highlights the importance of accurate multicultural audience measurement in satisfying clients’ needs, and its potential for the multicultural media industry.

The lack of a common audience measurement currency in multicultural audience measurement impacts media investment levels negatively.

Competition Rising

For many years now, companies like Nielsen and Kantar have offered advanced TV audience measurement. However, competition has increased. New players offer digital solutions that claim to be more comprehensive. This forces the bigger players to think of new ways to keep up with how audiences move and evolve. Inconsistencies between reported data reveal the lack of a common audience measurement currency in multicultural audience measurement. Hence, there’s a negative impact in media investment.

Furthermore, marketers’ biases lead to incorrect data interpretation. In turn, this leads to bad consumer experiences and negative overall results. How can we expect to move the needle if we can’t even tell where it is? In order to find out more about how to face these challenges, we talked to experts who understand how audience measurement impacts media planning and buying: Dana Bonkowski, SVP, Multicultural Lead at Starcom; Mebrulin Francisco, Managing Partner, Sr Director, MPlatform, GroupM; Nelson Pinero, Senior Digital Director, Senior Partner at GroupM; and David Queamante, SVP, Client Business Partner at UM Worldwide.

 

Audience Under and Over-Representation

All interviewees agree that multicultural audiences are still under-represented by major measurement firms. One of the reasons for this, explains Mebrulin Francisco, is the lack of insight into how audiences behave. Francisco mentions as an example all those times when data providers collected data on Hispanics. But once her team digged deeper, they realized the majority of Hispanics represented were English-dominant. This is a big issue because “it means the data is not representative of all the Hispanics in the U.S., creating a blind spot,” she says.

Mebrulin Francisco

The same has happened in the other extreme, where you can have over-representation of Spanish-dominant consumers, creating a blind spot for Bilingual or English-dominant Hispanics. “This is especially the case within sets that depend on cookie level data,” Francisco explained. “If this is true for the Hispanic segment, which is the largest among multicultural consumers, think about the under-representation of African-American or Asian segments. Many data providers do not even report on these multicultural sub-segments.”

 

Language preference won’t singlehandedly define and capture an audience. So, in many cases, a large portion of a given audience is not captured. 
Dana Bonkowski

Therefore, the first thing is having a representative sample of the audience. It might seem obvious, but in the words of David Queamante, “Unless measuring companies take the time to ensure they are gathering information from a representative sample of users, they will under-count multicultural audiences by default”. This represents a challenge. As Dana Bonkowski mentions, “engagement with culture-driven content is often the best signal to identify whether or not a person is ‘multicultural’. But language preference won’t singlehandedly define and capture an audience. So, in many cases, a large portion of a given audience is not captured.”

 

Multicultural Media Consumption is Elusive

Marketers have long assumed that a universal approach can reach audiences. However, “in doing so they fail to identify key nuances in motivations, attitudes, and behavior across consumer segments leading to an incomplete marketplace assessment,” explained Mebrulin Francisco. In the case of multicultural consumers, it’s even more complicated to hit the mark: Since datasets are limited, firms “do not flag multicultural consumers accurately and do not provide a holistic view of the brand’s performance, blurring meaningful insights,” said Francisco.

Multicultural media consumption is concentrated on certain outlets that [aren’t always] included on measurement companies’ surveys and reports. Therefore, multicultural media consumption may seem to ‘disappear’.
David Queamante

Moreover, multicultural audience measurement is rarely accurate. Why is that? As David Queamante explains, “Multicultural media consumption is concentrated on certain outlets that may not always be large or prominent enough to be included on the measurement companies’ surveys and reports. Therefore, multicultural media consumption may seem to ‘disappear.'” Besides, as Queamante mentions, not all measurement companies offer surveys in Spanish. This oversight considerably reduces the representation of Spanish-dominant Hispanic audiences, for example.

 

Privacy Issues Complicate Measuring Even More

This new era has brought significant advantages. For example, we can measure whatever happens as long as it happens online. However, the fact that it’s now easier to use and collect data as also brought up important privacy issues. Nelson Pinero predicts: “With audiences paying a little bit more attention to how and which personal data is being shared, it will become a bit more difficult to reach a diverse audience.”

Nelson Pinero

However, this is already a reality. Media buyers and agencies are working together around the problem of accurate audience measurement. But “what follows now is all part of the balancing act between data and the years of experience that allow the media buyers to react dynamically to market conditions and to, ideally, optimize plans,” adds Pineiro. “Audiences will take more control of how they are reached, and agencies trying to find the right audience will need to cross-reference their deterministic/probabilistic data to enhance plan performance.”

What Happens Now?

The obvious prediction is that data science will become even more important in the digital world. “Measurement is the new black,” declares Mebrulin Francisco. “As we push towards a data-driven age in marketing, science, quantification, and data are going to continue to be a cornerstone of decision making. If I cannot measure the impact of my investment, understand my audience impression on a site, or reach potential, it will be very hard to make a case for using a partner.”

Start building out multicultural and cultural expertise in house to accurately represent these audiences in your data streams.

Moreover, the immediate future is inescapably multicultural. Marketers need to use art to harness the power of all this data in order to represent audiences accurately. Experts like Mebrulin Francisco believe a good way to start is with first-party data. “If you are in the audience measurement space my recommendation is to start building out multicultural and cultural expertise in house to accurately represent these audiences in your data streams.”

When asked for her views on the future, Dana Bonkowski shared the hope that “marketers invest to better understand the business-building power of multicultural audiences. More than 30% of all Americans fall in one or more ‘multicultural’ audience buckets. The question should be “How can you afford not to invest against better multicultural audience measurement?”

 

What: For audience data analysis, CNN blends and analyzes multiple data streams that reveal its audience’s preferences. Thus, the world-renowned news organization produces content that keeps viewers coming back.
Why it matters:  CNN’s VP of digital research and analytics Seth Holladay outlines the challenge of finding the right data and analytical tools to ensure that content engages loyal viewers and attracts new ones.

 

Audience data analysis tools

Cookies are not enough when it comes to a complete understanding of your audience, according to CNN’s VP of digital research and analytics Seth Holladay. In other words, the bits of data stored on users’ web browsers provide only a partial picture of CNN fans’ interests and viewing habits.

To really know its audience, CNN turns to multiple data streams gathered from its own online properties and third-party data sources. For example, this includes Google and Alexa voice-activated speakers. Moreover, it analyzes users’ behavior on CNN’s websites, Holladay told Portada during a sit-down interview at Portada Miami.

CNN uses multiple sources of data and data analysis tools to inform its editorial, advertising, and content strategies. “We watch how people are interacting with our content,” Holladay said.

For instance, one tool CNN uses for audience data analysis is Adobe Analytics, to track users’ interaction with CNN’s websites. But cookies aren’t enough. Thus, CNN also uses third-party data sources, like Comscore, to better understand its audience demographics.

 

Third-party data and other data sources

“Across the CNN portfolio, we cover a lot of topics. Comscore for the U.S. market allows us to understand the demographics of our viewers,” Holladay told Portada. “We take a lot of our really granular Adobe-level data, users’ actions on our website, and within that we are blending in different types of data using a lot of third-party sources to enrich that data.”

Seth Holladay, CNN

Audience information drawn from third parties includes data from Alexa and Google Home smart speakers that, while not directly connected to CNN, still provides valuable insights, Holladay said.

We have increasing interest from Hispanic audiences across the world in what is happening in the U.S.

 

 

Connecting the dots with mobile

To further close gaps in audience data analysis, CNN looks at data drawn from consumers’ mobile advertising IDs.There is an ability to connect the dots with mobile advertising IDs, what people are doing and the online behavior data from Adobe, and then match those with the advertising side to create a richer picture of the audience,” Holladay explained.

CNN has a “number of initiatives underway” to deploy AI and machine learning to analyze the data it collects. But human decision making is still a key component of how CNN uses data to guide its content decisions.

“From a business perspective, at our core we are a news service. We have a lot of editorial oversight so that will remain the main driver in our decision making.”

 

Multi-cultural advantage

CNN en español allows CNN to isolate the Hispanic audience in a unique and discreet way, Holladay noted.

And the current political climate in the U.S. has turned into a plus for driving new Hispanic viewers to CNN’s properties.

We are blending lots of different data.

 

“What we have now is a platform for people that want to consume news in both languages. We have an increasing interest from Hispanic audiences across the world in what is happening in the US,” Holladay told Portada.CNN discusses audience data analysis

Moreover, CNN en español also allows the news network to draw a deep understanding of content preferences in the different countries in Latin America where it is available. This is also very useful for audience data analysis.

“One of the most basic things we collect is the geography of the user,” Holladay said.

 

Informing editorial decisions

First, CNN collects and analyzes “tons of signals” to understand its visitors. The company examines what digital properties they’re clicking on, what causes them to leave a site, and their digital touchpoints.

Then, it deploys a real-time dashboard to give its editorial professionals a true picture of the impact of content. In this way, they see “what types of topics and subjects resonate with different types of audiences,” Holladay said.

 

What: Undertone has partnered with TV data company Alphonso in an effort to create synchronized digital branding experiences that are personalized at scale.
Why it matters: Undertone and Alphonso expect to increase engagement with brands by scaling TV-retargeted ads across different display formats.

According to Perion Network Ltd, Undertone has signed a partnership with Alphonso, a TV data company. Their goal is to combine Undertone’s digital creative capabilities with Alphonso’s large-scale TV viewership data in order to provide brands with personalized digital branding at scale across platforms.

“Brands recognize that world-class customer experiences begin with personalization – which demands consistent experiences across screens and platforms,” said Raghu Kodige, Chief Product Officer of Alphonso. “That’s why we are partnering with Undertone, to give brands the ability to increase engagement by connecting real-time TV viewership data with Undertone’s high impact display ad formats and supply footprint. Together we expect to scale TV-retargeted ads across display formats.”

Research by eMarketer shows the average U.S. consumer watches 3 hours and 35 minutes of television per day, breaking that up with 6 hours and 35 minutes each day across different digital devices. Sophisticated marketers are well aware of this behavior, but struggle to create a consistent messaging experience. This is largely because the ability to connect user-level data – for seamless synchronization across TV to high-impact digital ad formats – has not been available.

“Undertone has pioneered Synchronized Digital Branding as the only real solution to the chaos of digital fragmentation,” said Doron Gerstel, CEO of Perion. “The integration of television viewership data from Alphonso is a significant, cross-platform step forward in our mission. We are thrilled to be partnering with them to combine the power of data, creative and broad reach across platforms.”

With this partnership, Undertone can now leverage user-level viewing and exposure data, powered by Alphonso’s Video AI, to intelligently sequence campaigns – using the optimum ad format – across hundreds of high-quality publishers and mobile apps. For consumers, this delivers a more seamless and strategic experience. Marketers can follow a TV exposure with the right digital message that is built on Undertone’s formats and developed by its internal Pixl Studio.

By activating Alphonso’s user-level television ad exposure data through its creative high-impact display ad formats, Undertone is delivering on the promise of true personalization and full-funnel effectiveness. This innovative channel harmonization will enable marketers to gain deeper insights into the value of their TV campaigns, thanks to enhanced dashboards and reporting tools.

The new capabilities resulting from this partnership are available for Undertone clients immediately. For more information go to: https://www.undertone.com/synchronization/#brand_solutions#tv_data_targeting

*Average Time Spent with Media in 2019 Has Plateaued (eMarketer, May 31 2019).

 

What: NAI has released the most recent update of its Code of Conduct, which expands on the rules and regulations around digital advertising, reinforces requirements for collection and use of data, and bans behavioral targeting of users younger than 16.
Why it matters: The Conduct Code, first published in 2000 and last updated in 2018, is meant to thoroughly encompass the products, technologies, and most recent ways of today’s digital advertising society.

 

Non-profit organization Network Advertising Initiative has announced its 2020 Code of Conduct. The document is meant to be an updated, more comprehensive version of the NAI Code, which was first published in 2000. The 2020 Code expands coverage to fully encompass all the new products and technologies relevant to today’s digital advertising industry and strengthens requirements related to the collection and use of NAI member companies’ data for digital advertising.

“The 2020 NAI Code expands the scope of coverage of modern digital advertising practices by formally including the use of offline data and advertiser customer database information to target ads across websites, applications, and television screens; something many of our members already proactively honor,” said Leigh Freund, NAI President and CEO, in a statement. “This Code further aims to future-proof and proactively fill potential gaps by including any other use of previously collected data about a particular user or device to target digital advertising.

Among the main updates included since the 2018 document, NAI goes further into collection and use of precise location data. “We are asking members to work with application publishers to provide additional notice regarding advertisers’ uses of data when obtaining consumer consent”. The code also imposes rigorous requirements for the collection and use of sensor information like that provided by cameras, microphones, and biometric sensors.

Moreover, to comply with the California Consumer Privacy Act, NAI’s 2020 Code bans behavioral targeting of users younger than 16, thus raising the minimum age from the 2018 document by 3 years.

“The Code also introduces requirements to increase transparency for political audience targeting, requiring NAI members to disclose the political audience segments they use for tailored advertising.”, said Freund.

The enforcement of the 2020 Code is planned for January 1st, 2020.

 

 

What: Marketing disruptors and innovators shared insights on the advance of marketing technology in Latin Markets at Portada Miami on April 12. Here are some of the takeaways that you missed.
Why it matters: In its twelfth annual edition, Portada Miami gathered over 100 decision-makers involved with major brands across all sectors, and provided a space for top quality networking and knowledge-sharing.

 

 

Rappi’s Carlos Leal and The Shipyard’s Kate Canel

This fragmented, hyper-connected world forces us to adapt to the new trends as soon as they appear. And even though data, the blueprint of this ship we’re all on, is there to guide us through the process, the fact is there’s too much of it available to even comprehend.

Technology is an enabler, but it demands early adoption. As demonstrated throughout the Portada Miami series of talks and panels last Friday, tools like AI are here to help, but there are barriers that have kept certain markets behind. However, both brands and service providers are getting ahead, and it is precisely spaces like Portada Miami that allow collective knowledge to grow.

Ana Laura Acevedo and Latam Airlines’ Pablo Chiozza at the Travel Marketing Board private meeting

During the private activities of the Portada Council System on Thursday, three of the council units, the Travel Marketing Board, the Americas Board, and the Brand Star Committee Latam discussed relevant topics like social media’s evolving role, knowing your customer in a multi-channel world, digital organization, brand differentiation, and strategic video use. Right after the meeting, Travel Marketing Board Ana Laura Acevedo, SVP, Marketing & Business Development at RCI Latin America, sent an email to her team to put in practice an idea that had come to her while talking to her peers.

Portada Meet-Up

Attendees could network with members of the Portada Council System the day after, and listen to the brilliant speakers on the Portada Miami agenda, who also discussed the role of the city and its future as a marketing hub. At the Portada Meet-Up session, ticket holders held one-on-one meetings with brand and agency executives of their choice. Here are some of the key takeaways of the #PortadaMIA panels.

 

 

 

“Contextual relevance is what earns you the right to engage with the multicultural consumer. We use data to vet that environment or content.”

(Ana Crandell, Group Account Director, OMD Multicultural)

 

 

“Have very clear goals and objectives, stick to your strategy and plan, and know it takes time to reach your objectives.”

(Christine Esteve, VP E-Commerce, Carnival Cruise Lines)

 

 

“Performance is something that has a very clear outcome. Make sure to understand your consumer, don’t do content for content’s sake.”

(Andrés Amezquita, VP Digital and Commercial Excellence, StanleyBlack&Decker Latin America)

 

 

“As marketers we need to understand consumers and identify what the barriers and frictions are, and only then look at how technology can help.”

(Andres Polo, Global Head of Innovation & Strategic Partnerships Marketing, Visa Inc.)

 

 

“The online consumer today is not determined by demographics but by their interaction with digital. “

(Carlos Leal, Marketing Director, Rappi)

 

 


“We started from the premise that especially in Latin America, when you really love something, you live it.”

(Carlo Espinoza, Senior Marketing Manager, Latin America Beverages

Pepsi)

 

 

“The diverse Miami workforce reflects what the United States will look like in years to come.”

(Joseph Roisman, EVP, Perry Ellis International & Jaap Donath, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Research & Strategic Planning, The Miami-Dade Beacon Council)

 

 

What: CNN’s Robin Garfield, Tecate’s Belen Pamukoff, and GroupM’s LaToya Christian kicked off the Portada Data and Content Marketing Forum with a panel titled How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising.
Why it matters: With 2.5 quintillion bytes of data created each day and 90% of the world’s recorded data being created in the last 2 years, the need to understand data is quite apparent.

By Dane C. Rogers

(L to R) Robin Garfield, Belen Pamukoff, LaToya Christian.

Wednesday’s Portada Data and Content Marketing Forum kicked off with a panel discussion on How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising. CNN en Español Anchor and Correspondent Guillermo Arduino moderated the panel which was composed of the following representatives from the network, brand, and advertising media agency areas: Robin Garfield, SVP of Research and Scheduling for CNN, who oversees consumer research and audience analysis in order to schedule programming for various channels and platforms across the network. Belen Pamukoff, Brand Director for Tecate (Heineken), specializes in building healthy brands and improving sales performance. LaToya Christian, Managing Partner, Marketing and Analytics at GroupM, has a 10-year track record of creating and implementing brand strategies for high-impact marking campaigns for various Fortune 500 companies (Target, Google, Unilever, NBCUniversal, and others).

CNN en Español and Portada will partner up again at Portada Miami to offer yet another perspective on the question addressed here. Christine Esteve, VP E-Commerce, Carnival Cruise Lines; Andrew W. Russo, VP Data Science, Starmark; Ana Crandell, Group Account Director, OMD Multicultural; and Seth Holladay, VP of Digital Research & Analytics for CNN will explain how content influences commerce and analyze how data determines their content strategies.

The question-and-answer format brought up a variety of topics that led to an illustrative discussion of the key issues facing media marketing professionals.

With 2.5 quintillion bytes of data created each day and 90% of the world’s recorded data being created in the last 2 years, the need to understand data is quite apparent.

62% of marketers feel that there is too much data out there and they don’t know where to start.

The first major question was: When you look at content and data what comes to mind first? From the network perspective, Robin Garfield said CNN considers data, “What people are watching, which platform they are coming from, and where they are going next. We use that information to program on a real-time basis and also over the long-term, to build products and programming to meet those demands.”

Belen mentioned that data is used in a two-part process to carry out a brand’s strategy. Brands can use data to first, make a message more relevant and, second, to inform that strategy of how to deploy and distribute its content to an audience.

LaToya shared the statistic that 62% of marketers feel that there is too much data out there and they don’t know where to start. The key is to “remember that each data point is an interactive event in which consumers are telling us their preferences” and reiterated the important to “humanize the data.”

When asked about how a news organization weighs discovering the truth with creating targeted content, Robin mentioned the importance of understanding that consumers are people first, and that delivering the news and information that people care about is core to the brand. CNN has been able to couple its user data with surveys and focus groups in order to figure out the interests of its audience to best present the most relevant facts.

LaToya reiterated the question that often arises, Whether data stifles creativity? Her belief is that “data and content live together and fuel one another.” She explains that data is able to present concrete facts that drive engaging stories. It can fuel opinions and grounds vibrant discussions in reality.

Also read CNN en Español: What Are the Ways Data Can Fuel the World of Advertising?

Robin added that in her experience, “people love to geek out on data,” especially when it comes to polling and tracking data involving political coverage. In fact, the consumers who really love data often move from television to digital platforms and those multi-platform consumers spend the most total time interacting with CNN, and are the most attractive to advertisers.

Belen opened up about some of the shortcomings of the data available to an alcohol brand that knows its customers primarily through their spending patterns. There are certain limitations that come from the absence of online shopping information, and the data Heineken gets is primarily where its Tecate customers shop and their zip codes. The brand knows it is playing without a full deck, as many suppliers are unwilling to share their sensitive customer data.

People will remain willing to share data, provided that a good value proposition exists for the consumer.

Belen also mentioned the importance of understanding the level of diversity that exists within the hispanic audience. A major distinction exists between acculturated and un-acculturated Hispanics, the former who may not even speak Spanish may respond to different tactics than those totally immersed in Hispanic culture. These differences are not often seen on paper, and many decision-making executives only know of the “power of the hispanic market” but oftentimes fail to understand the intricacies of the segment itself. Explaining those differences can sometimes be challenging to non-Hispanic managers. “Even within the LA market, there are significant differences between those who identify as chicanas vs cholos.”

Data, Content and Privacy

A hot topic for any consumer. Latoya said that as she considers things from both the customer and the marketer side, the importance is for those with access to data must act ethically with it, and those questions are being asked more frequently from consumers.

Robin presented the notion of a data exchange, an unwritten contract that exists between consumer and marketer. People will remain willing to share data, provided that a good value proposition exists for the consumer. She made the analogy of a patient being willing to share their health information if it could potentially save their life or offer better treatment. Marketers, too, should offer a benefit.

The panel ended with the major topic of granularity and the quest for a common currency when dealing with Hispanic audience measurement. LaToya said that while granularity may be important, there will always be gaps in data unless a multi-source approach can be reached. As for a common currency of data, Belen believes that it probably cannot be achieved, due to the complex nature of the audience. LaToya said that from a large marketer perspective, because trying to segment the market with only one data source is generally ineffective, it is unlikely that we will ever see one.

What: Leonor Palao (Assistant VP of Brand Marketing and Advertising, Oppenheimer Funds) and Annie Granatstein (Head of the Washington Post’s BrandStudio) had a conversation about branded content partnerships and data-driven content at the Portada Data & Content Marketing Forum in NYC. 
Why it matters: According to a study by McKenzie, data-driven organizations are more likely to acquire and retain customers.

By Dane C. Rogers

Leonor Palao (left) and Annie Granatstein (right)

Leonor Palao, Assistant VP of Brand Marketing and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds sat down with Annie Granatstein, head of the Washington Post’s BrandStudio, to discuss the branded content partnership that exists between the organizations and how data is used to drive content creation.

A research study by McKenzie showed that data-driven organizations are 23 times more likely to acquire customers, 6 times as likely to retain customers and 19 times as likely to be profitable. Leonor’s team at Oppenheimer Funds took note of this report, and in an effort to reach the niche financial advisor audience, partnered with the Washington Post.

Being an asset management company, certain data hurdles exist for Oppenheimer that caused it to lean heavily on its partners to drive growth. Fortunately, the Washington Post has the AI and data capabilities that can help Oppenheimer reach new potential customers.

Armed with the knowledge that 58% of marketers say that original written content is their most important digital asset, above video. Being viewed as a “thought leader” on relevant topics is at the core of their digital strategy.

With a talented in-house team of content creators that is capable of producing industry-leading pieces on finance and asset management, Oppenheimer had a goal to cut back on the quantity of articles (from 37 in 2017 to 7 in 2018) and focus its marketing strategy on understanding the types of articles that were most engaging and focused on creating great content and getting it on the proper platform.

Leonor mentioned the partnership Oppenheimer has with Nudge Analytics, an analytics company dedicated to standardizing the engagement metrics across the different media publication sites. Thanks to Nudge, Oppenheimer’s marketing team was able to overcome the rampant inconsistency of engagement metrics to determine the true “winners” of the 37 articles written in 2017.

With this more targeted approach, Oppenheimer has determined that year over year, custom content has had the biggest increase in effectiveness (over audio, display, social, videos, indicated content, and dedicated emails).

Oppenheimer’s branded content sees the Washington Post as the gold-standard in using data to drive content decisions. Annie runs the WP BrandStudio, which created branded content for advertisers. The content studio is a completely separate branch of the Post that has no overlap of personnel or reporting with the editorial staff.

Why is working with WP’s BrandStudio more effective than partnering with a standalone content creation agency? Because they are so much closer to the audience than any agency could hope to be. The level of interaction that a publisher has with its active users allows for a deeper understanding of their preferences.

The BrandStudio has segmented its audience into three subgroups: individual consumers, B2B (financial advisers like Oppenheimer) and thought leaders/influencers. Each segment has a separate list of the most engaging topics that they spend time on.

For example, the business client segment engages most with content related to cybersecurity, AI, and business transformation. They prefer to consume content on mobile and tablets and spend the most time on content with dynamic visuals and infographics. (Influencers, on the other hand, gravitate towards the environment, healthcare and smart cities, and visit websites on their computer browsers.)

The BrandStudio uses its internal “Clavis-targeting” algorithms (similar to Amazon’s search recommendations) to push its consumers to the content that each particular client is most likely to engage with. It does this through on-site, in-app, and external (paid social media and Apple News) recommendations.

Oppenheimer’s usage of partners like Nudge and the WP’s BrandStudio has helped it determine the most effective marketing to help it formulate a successful strategy that has show its best-recorded growth this past year.

What: In order to drive content strategy, brands need quality, granular data. As #PortadaLA panelists discussed, digital media allows gathering precise data that serves as a good starting point to make media, budget, and attribution decisions.
Why it matters: Content is one of the best ways to connect with consumers, but there is a need to develop better tracking methodologies and newer data tools that can be leveraged to reach the Hispanic audience more effectively.

By Ryan Orvis, guest Portada contributor.

 

The relationship between data and content formed the basis of ‘How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising’, a Portada Los Angeles panel discussion led by Guillermo Arduino, CNN Anchor and Correspondent for Encuentro (CNN en Español). Joining in the conversation were Caro D’Antuono, Vice President of Marketing for Northgate Markets; Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Manager for GroupM; Roxane Garzon, Media Director for Casanova; and Robin Garfield, Senior Vice President of Research and Scheduling for CNN.

Robin Garfield and Frances Rubio

A key takeaway from the panel was the need for quality, granular data to drive content strategy. This is particularly crucial for the Hispanic market, where there is a strong need for a common currency of audience measurement.

The panelists discussed utilizing data to construct a user profile as a starting point. “Who are we connecting with, and where is there an opportunity?” asked Caro D’Antuono. “Most of the time [content] resonates with a specific audience whether it’s male or female, a specific age group, or a language preference.”

Roxane Garzon explained how digital media allows us to hone in on a specific consumer to gather precise behavioral data. This data can then be leveraged to make decisions on media, budget, and attribution.

Roxane Garzon

For Frances, the process begins by looking at all data sources —including social, syndicated, and internal— to understand who the audience is. “There is no single source of truth,” she explained, describing the importance of a data-agnostic approach.

Robin discussed using real-time data to discern what people are thinking as opposed to what actions they are taking. “First we want to think about the people. Data is a representation of the audience and what people are doing. It’s one part of the research ecosystem. What’s really important is that we connect the data to audience insights.

Data is only as good as where you’re getting it from— especially in multicultural [marketing],” explained Roxane, outlining the challenges of attributing data to specific points in the sales funnel. This is especially difficult for smaller businesses, for whom multicultural audience data is expensive and relatively scarce.

Caro D’Antuono and Guillermo Arduino

Caro described content as one of the best ways for advertisers to connect with multiple users at different stages of the funnel, something that has become increasingly necessary with developments in media and technology. “The world is changing so much faster outside of our organization. Everything from the media landscape, to the consumer, to everything they have access to is changing so rapidly.”

Frances stressed the importance of developing better methodologies for tracking the Hispanic audience, especially as younger audiences grow increasingly diverse. This includes using multiple data sources to develop a fuller view of the audience and working with partners to develop new tools for data collection.

“It’s a fascinating time for us to be able to push the way forward,” she said. “[We] need to focus on speaking to growth opportunity segments, and those who don’t will be left behind.”

What: Caro D’Antuono, VP of Marketing at Northgate Markets, Robin Garfield, SVP of Research and Scheduling for CNNRoxane GarzonMedia Director at Casanova and Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Associate Director for GroupM gathered for a Portada Los Angeles panel presented by CNN en Español to discuss how How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising.  In this article, we present the panelists’ answers to questions they didn’t have time to answer at the event.
Why it matters: As we’ve known for a while, it’s all about data now. But the problem, rather than finding the data, is how to collect it and then make sense of it.

The word “data” is, without a doubt, a term we hear several times a day in our daily lives. A great part of our work is all about data now, and the future of the industry directly depends on understanding or trying as best as we can to understand what to do and how to deal with data. There are so many types of data, and so many different tools available that help companies make sense of it, that it’s easier than not to get it wrong.

Because it is part of our mission to help in this regard, after the panel titled How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising, we promised the Portada Los Angeles audience we would answer all their questions. And because we like to keep our promises, we got in touch with the panelists who kicked off Portada Los Angeles 10 days ago (Caro D’Antuono, Vice President of Marketing for Northgate Markets; Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Associate Director for GroupM; Roxane Garzon, Media Director for Casanova; and Robin Garfield, Senior Vice President of Research and Scheduling for CNN), and they set some time aside to answer the audience’s questions there wasn’t time for during the event.

Portada and CNN en Español will have two more opportunities to delve deep into the issue of How Data Continues to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising. Get tickets to Portada Data & Content Marketing Forum on April 3rd and Portada Miami on April 12 and get all your questions about data answered by experts.

Have you ever ignored data and gone with “gut feeling” or your own empirical experience?

Roxane Garzon (left) and Caro D’Antuono (right) speaking at Portada Los Angeles 2019

Roxane Garzon: Data is only as good as the way it is collected.  Many times the data does not “feel” right.  When that happens I ask the question about sample size and statistical reliability.  If there is no issue there, then I look for other sources to confirm my findings. This has happened a few times when creating profiles for target audiences, specifically bicultural millennials.

Frances Rubio: Even if we don’t have quantitative data, qualitative data can be just as important and in this, we can have a bit of a “gut feeling” further validated, whether it’s conducting focus groups or doing ethnographic research. We’ve often used quantitative data but sometimes we just don’t have the data to point to the “why” a trend is happening, and these qualitative methods can help to further guide us into unlocking directional psychological reasons behind the “why” of peoples’ behaviors and mindsets.

Caro D’Antuono: Yes. We recently produced a short video to support Women’s Day. We didn’t have historical data on an effort such as this.  However, we released it on Northgate social media pages and it has been very well received.  We are receiving more brand love than we ever expected.  We have to take calculated risks, especially when things have not been done before within an organization.

Is analysis paralysis a real symptom of the data age?

R.G.: It can be. We are fortunate to work in a time where data is much easier to collect. However, it can hinder marketers from making a decision if they don’t know how to think without numbers. Marketers can use data as a crutch instead of using it as a tool.

Frances Rubio (left) and Roxane Garzon (right)

F.R.: With all this data, there are so many opportunities to unlock valuable insights, and it’s important to separate the signal from all the noise! It’s really about focusing on the important business questions and what publishers/marketers are trying to uncover. From there, it’s looking at all data available, and strategically choosing which data is valuable in answering the business question. 

Where there’s room for improvement is in the data accuracy and integrity: we all need to be questioning where and how we get our data, understanding the methodology and recognizing any limitations (e.g. sampling, the methodology in it of itself, date ranges, etc.). Tools should be incorporated to tell a full story of our consumers, understand where the consumer is with the brand from a marketing funnel perspective;  from there, once we understand the opportunity, the psychographics and behaviors, it becomes easier to read their media consumption so we can speak to them with the right messaging and creative and reach them in the appropriate media channels.

What: We talked to brilliant members of Portada’s Council System to find out where they think the industry of marketing is heading in the immediate future.
Why it matters: In view of the accelerated pace at which the industry is evolving, companies need to get ready for what is coming in marketing.

The Age of Mobility

It is undeniable that we are living in an era of unprecedented change. Consumers have fully moved to digital and social media, and new technologies boost this transition. More personalized and targeted ad formats help create deeper engagement between brands and consumers,  and data is the main ingredient that allows companies to understand new opportunities.

As a new study on the State of the Media Industry by Ooyala states, “[Audiences] are now used to finding video content wherever and whenever they are looking for it, so mobile isn’t a novelty anymore— it’s the expectation.” Now, companies need to make sure to keep up with the consumer, and not the other way around. The Ooyala study found that mobile video and social video consumption are rising steadily; brands and media companies need to devote more effort to targeting consumers on those media.  “It’s about getting better targeting for the right consumer at the right time in their lives, that’s a big part of it,” says Rafael Lopez-de-Azua, Head of Media and Digital – Latam, Coty. “There’s always question marks specifically about how good is the data and the accuracy of that data, but there are really good solutions for the U.S. Hispanic market.”

Data, an Unavoidable Beacon

Recently, companies have begun to accept that the incorporation of new technologies and data-specialized teams is inescapable. Data-driven technologies like AI, Blockchain, and connected home and voice technologies are changing forever the way consumers relate to media and products, to the point that new realities are merging with ours.

“I guess not only the marketing but the whole world is going towards data, data, data,” comments Pablo Chiozza, SVP USA, Canada & Caribbean at Latam Airlines. “Nowadays no one runs a marketing campaign, no one launches a product if it’s not supported by hard data, so I guess in the present and the future, all the actions we’re taking are based on data, data, data, so it’s all about how you prepare, not only to gather data but then to read data and to take the most information out of it.”

Challenges of the Media Industry in the Near Future

“One of the biggest challenges we face nowadays is the fact that the old media hasn’t been brought up to speed in terms of data, and what I’d like to see is more integration,” shares Ana Lucía Soto, National Media Manager at JCPenney. “Some of the linear channels like radio and TV that have been continuing this challenge over the years with having data that’s actionable in the same time and manner as digital, I would like to see that come together so that we can deliver media plans in the time that we’re planning them.”

There’s always going to be the need for that human touch that highlights culture; that’s something that machines cannot do and it’s 100% human.

But when asked if she thinks this process could lose touch with humanity, Ana L. Soto explains that automated processes will never take away the human factor. “There’s always gonna be the need to have somebody addressing the human issues and even though things are getting more automated and data is present all around us, I feel like there’s always going to be the need for that human touch that will highlight the culture,” she says. “That’s something that machines cannot do and that’s 100% human. I think there’s always going to be a need to evolve with the times and to catch up with technology, but there’ll always be room for the human factor.”