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What: CommerceNext has published the results of a survey of 100 e-commerce decision-makers, meant to explore similarities and differences in the priorities of traditional and digital-first DTC brands.
Why it matters: The report is meant to be a benchmark that helps marketers evaluate their priorities in terms of how to distribute budget among different technologies and objectives.

 

E-commerce is unpredictable; it forces marketers to be on the lookout for what’s coming next and reacting if only a little bit late can turn out to be fatal. In order to be more ready, decision-makers have to decide what matters more in every step of their strategy, which means having to prioritize investments and objectives. With these challenges in mind, CommerceNext conducted a survey of 100 top marketing executives in traditional and digital-first direct-to-consumer brands.

The objective was to provide a useful benchmark for online retailers to measure their priorities and decide how to distribute budget in the most convenient way. According to the results, even though both traditional and digital-first online retailers point to an increase in marketing budget, digital-first brands are spending way more while also diversifying their strategies. Below are the key insights from the study, titled How Leading Retailers and DTC Brands Are Investing in Digital.

 

Which Investments Did Work in 2018?

In order to compete, marketers need to be quick to decide which investments can help them reach their objectives. According to the study, 65% of respondents said their 2019 e-commerce marketing budget increased over the previous year, while only 10% of marketers are reducing their budget. In 2018, the top marketing investment priorities were acquisition marketing (81%), retention and loyalty marketing (43%) and promotions (32%).

When asked about the results of those investments, acquisition marketing had the highest level of satisfaction rating: 53% of respondents said acquisition marketing met expectations in 2018, and 24% said it exceeded expectations. On the contrary, 52% of respondents said unified customer data (e.g. a single view of the customer) performed below their expectations. Almost the same number had similar levels of dissatisfaction in personalization investments (51%).

Source: CommerceNext

 

What Are the Priorities of Digital-First and Traditional Retailers?

According to the report, consumers have more than doubled the amount of time they spend on DTC brands’ websites over the last two years. Even though all the companies in the study have increased their e-commerce marketing budgets, digital-first DTC brands are spending more: 78% indicated that their 2019 budget is higher than the one they had in 2018, while 60% of traditional retailers said the same.

Because DTC brands are based on data-driven decisions and customer-centric operations, they are growing and evolving at an accelerated pace. As stated in the report: “fueled by venture capital investment, these brands have focused on growth vs profitability.” Therefore, the most significant challenge for this group of brands is “achieving profitability at scale”, with “Managing tech integrations” coming in second, with 33% of DTC brands identifying it as a barrier. This is a side-by-side comparison of what each group considers to be the most significant barriers, extracted from the study:

Source: CommerceNext

How to Make the Best of the 2019 Holiday Season

According to the NRF, the 2018 holiday retail season exceeded expectations. Over 165 million Americans reportedly shopped either in stores or online from Thanksgiving Day through Cyber Monday 2018, and online purchasing, in particular, experienced a 19% increase compared to the previous year. The NRF has forecasted that 2019 retail sales will increase by 3.8% compared to 2018, and the online sales growth rate will increase between 10% to 12%.

DTC brands are increasing their budgets at a higher rate than traditional retailers and spreading that budget more evenly. For example, digital-first DTC brands are increasing their budgets equally (70%) between acquisition marketing and retention/loyalty marketing. On the other hand, traditional retailers are emphasizing acquisition marketing, with 77% of respondents increasing their acquisition budget compared to 64% of traditional retailers increasing their retention budget.

 

 

All images by CommerceNext.

What: Multicultural Audience Measurement experts offer Portada insights around the problem of audience under-representation.
Why it matters: Measurement firms under-represent multicultural audiences by as much as 25%, which causes a negative impact in media investment and produces overall flawed results.

 

Audience measurement has never been more complicated, as cultural nuances and consumer behavior shift and change, and the proliferation of new technologies demands multi-channel strategies. The task is even more difficult when it comes to measuring multicultural audiences. Experts tell Portada major measurement firms under-represent these audiences by as much as 25%. If this is the case, the media budget for targeting multicultural audiences should be substantially higher than it is right now. Just for Hispanic marketing, Portada estimates overall expenditures of US 6.07 billion in 2019. However, if firms under-represent audiences by up o 25%, media expenses could increase by up to US 1.5 billion. Admittedly, this is a back-of-the-envelope calculation. Nevertheless, it highlights the importance of accurate multicultural audience measurement in satisfying clients’ needs, and its potential for the multicultural media industry.

The lack of a common audience measurement currency in multicultural audience measurement impacts media investment levels negatively.

Competition Rising

For many years now, companies like Nielsen and Kantar have offered advanced TV audience measurement. However, competition has increased. New players offer digital solutions that claim to be more comprehensive. This forces the bigger players to think of new ways to keep up with how audiences move and evolve. Inconsistencies between reported data reveal the lack of a common audience measurement currency in multicultural audience measurement. Hence, there’s a negative impact in media investment.

Furthermore, marketers’ biases lead to incorrect data interpretation. In turn, this leads to bad consumer experiences and negative overall results. How can we expect to move the needle if we can’t even tell where it is? In order to find out more about how to face these challenges, we talked to experts who understand how audience measurement impacts media planning and buying: Dana Bonkowski, SVP, Multicultural Lead at Starcom; Mebrulin Francisco, Managing Partner, Sr Director, MPlatform, GroupM; Nelson Pinero, Senior Digital Director, Senior Partner at GroupM; and David Queamante, SVP, Client Business Partner at UM Worldwide.

 

Audience Under and Over-Representation

All interviewees agree that multicultural audiences are still under-represented by major measurement firms. One of the reasons for this, explains Mebrulin Francisco, is the lack of insight into how audiences behave. Francisco mentions as an example all those times when data providers collected data on Hispanics. But once her team digged deeper, they realized the majority of Hispanics represented were English-dominant. This is a big issue because “it means the data is not representative of all the Hispanics in the U.S., creating a blind spot,” she says.

Mebrulin Francisco

The same has happened in the other extreme, where you can have over-representation of Spanish-dominant consumers, creating a blind spot for Bilingual or English-dominant Hispanics. “This is especially the case within sets that depend on cookie level data,” Francisco explained. “If this is true for the Hispanic segment, which is the largest among multicultural consumers, think about the under-representation of African-American or Asian segments. Many data providers do not even report on these multicultural sub-segments.”

 

Language preference won’t singlehandedly define and capture an audience. So, in many cases, a large portion of a given audience is not captured. 
Dana Bonkowski

Therefore, the first thing is having a representative sample of the audience. It might seem obvious, but in the words of David Queamante, “Unless measuring companies take the time to ensure they are gathering information from a representative sample of users, they will under-count multicultural audiences by default”. This represents a challenge. As Dana Bonkowski mentions, “engagement with culture-driven content is often the best signal to identify whether or not a person is ‘multicultural’. But language preference won’t singlehandedly define and capture an audience. So, in many cases, a large portion of a given audience is not captured.”

 

Multicultural Media Consumption is Elusive

Marketers have long assumed that a universal approach can reach audiences. However, “in doing so they fail to identify key nuances in motivations, attitudes, and behavior across consumer segments leading to an incomplete marketplace assessment,” explained Mebrulin Francisco. In the case of multicultural consumers, it’s even more complicated to hit the mark: Since datasets are limited, firms “do not flag multicultural consumers accurately and do not provide a holistic view of the brand’s performance, blurring meaningful insights,” said Francisco.

Multicultural media consumption is concentrated on certain outlets that [aren’t always] included on measurement companies’ surveys and reports. Therefore, multicultural media consumption may seem to ‘disappear’.
David Queamante

Moreover, multicultural audience measurement is rarely accurate. Why is that? As David Queamante explains, “Multicultural media consumption is concentrated on certain outlets that may not always be large or prominent enough to be included on the measurement companies’ surveys and reports. Therefore, multicultural media consumption may seem to ‘disappear.'” Besides, as Queamante mentions, not all measurement companies offer surveys in Spanish. This oversight considerably reduces the representation of Spanish-dominant Hispanic audiences, for example.

 

Privacy Issues Complicate Measuring Even More

This new era has brought significant advantages. For example, we can measure whatever happens as long as it happens online. However, the fact that it’s now easier to use and collect data as also brought up important privacy issues. Nelson Pinero predicts: “With audiences paying a little bit more attention to how and which personal data is being shared, it will become a bit more difficult to reach a diverse audience.”

Nelson Pinero

However, this is already a reality. Media buyers and agencies are working together around the problem of accurate audience measurement. But “what follows now is all part of the balancing act between data and the years of experience that allow the media buyers to react dynamically to market conditions and to, ideally, optimize plans,” adds Pineiro. “Audiences will take more control of how they are reached, and agencies trying to find the right audience will need to cross-reference their deterministic/probabilistic data to enhance plan performance.”

What Happens Now?

The obvious prediction is that data science will become even more important in the digital world. “Measurement is the new black,” declares Mebrulin Francisco. “As we push towards a data-driven age in marketing, science, quantification, and data are going to continue to be a cornerstone of decision making. If I cannot measure the impact of my investment, understand my audience impression on a site, or reach potential, it will be very hard to make a case for using a partner.”

Start building out multicultural and cultural expertise in house to accurately represent these audiences in your data streams.

Moreover, the immediate future is inescapably multicultural. Marketers need to use art to harness the power of all this data in order to represent audiences accurately. Experts like Mebrulin Francisco believe a good way to start is with first-party data. “If you are in the audience measurement space my recommendation is to start building out multicultural and cultural expertise in house to accurately represent these audiences in your data streams.”

When asked for her views on the future, Dana Bonkowski shared the hope that “marketers invest to better understand the business-building power of multicultural audiences. More than 30% of all Americans fall in one or more ‘multicultural’ audience buckets. The question should be “How can you afford not to invest against better multicultural audience measurement?”

 

What: For audience data analysis, CNN blends and analyzes multiple data streams that reveal its audience’s preferences. Thus, the world-renowned news organization produces content that keeps viewers coming back.
Why it matters:  CNN’s VP of digital research and analytics Seth Holladay outlines the challenge of finding the right data and analytical tools to ensure that content engages loyal viewers and attracts new ones.

 

Audience data analysis tools

Cookies are not enough when it comes to a complete understanding of your audience, according to CNN’s VP of digital research and analytics Seth Holladay. In other words, the bits of data stored on users’ web browsers provide only a partial picture of CNN fans’ interests and viewing habits.

To really know its audience, CNN turns to multiple data streams gathered from its own online properties and third-party data sources. For example, this includes Google and Alexa voice-activated speakers. Moreover, it analyzes users’ behavior on CNN’s websites, Holladay told Portada during a sit-down interview at Portada Miami.

CNN uses multiple sources of data and data analysis tools to inform its editorial, advertising, and content strategies. “We watch how people are interacting with our content,” Holladay said.

For instance, one tool CNN uses for audience data analysis is Adobe Analytics, to track users’ interaction with CNN’s websites. But cookies aren’t enough. Thus, CNN also uses third-party data sources, like Comscore, to better understand its audience demographics.

 

Third-party data and other data sources

“Across the CNN portfolio, we cover a lot of topics. Comscore for the U.S. market allows us to understand the demographics of our viewers,” Holladay told Portada. “We take a lot of our really granular Adobe-level data, users’ actions on our website, and within that we are blending in different types of data using a lot of third-party sources to enrich that data.”

Seth Holladay, CNN

Audience information drawn from third parties includes data from Alexa and Google Home smart speakers that, while not directly connected to CNN, still provides valuable insights, Holladay said.

We have increasing interest from Hispanic audiences across the world in what is happening in the U.S.

 

 

Connecting the dots with mobile

To further close gaps in audience data analysis, CNN looks at data drawn from consumers’ mobile advertising IDs.There is an ability to connect the dots with mobile advertising IDs, what people are doing and the online behavior data from Adobe, and then match those with the advertising side to create a richer picture of the audience,” Holladay explained.

CNN has a “number of initiatives underway” to deploy AI and machine learning to analyze the data it collects. But human decision making is still a key component of how CNN uses data to guide its content decisions.

“From a business perspective, at our core we are a news service. We have a lot of editorial oversight so that will remain the main driver in our decision making.”

 

Multi-cultural advantage

CNN en español allows CNN to isolate the Hispanic audience in a unique and discreet way, Holladay noted.

And the current political climate in the U.S. has turned into a plus for driving new Hispanic viewers to CNN’s properties.

We are blending lots of different data.

 

“What we have now is a platform for people that want to consume news in both languages. We have an increasing interest from Hispanic audiences across the world in what is happening in the US,” Holladay told Portada.CNN discusses audience data analysis

Moreover, CNN en español also allows the news network to draw a deep understanding of content preferences in the different countries in Latin America where it is available. This is also very useful for audience data analysis.

“One of the most basic things we collect is the geography of the user,” Holladay said.

 

Informing editorial decisions

First, CNN collects and analyzes “tons of signals” to understand its visitors. The company examines what digital properties they’re clicking on, what causes them to leave a site, and their digital touchpoints.

Then, it deploys a real-time dashboard to give its editorial professionals a true picture of the impact of content. In this way, they see “what types of topics and subjects resonate with different types of audiences,” Holladay said.

 

What: Undertone has partnered with TV data company Alphonso in an effort to create synchronized digital branding experiences that are personalized at scale.
Why it matters: Undertone and Alphonso expect to increase engagement with brands by scaling TV-retargeted ads across different display formats.

According to Perion Network Ltd, Undertone has signed a partnership with Alphonso, a TV data company. Their goal is to combine Undertone’s digital creative capabilities with Alphonso’s large-scale TV viewership data in order to provide brands with personalized digital branding at scale across platforms.

“Brands recognize that world-class customer experiences begin with personalization – which demands consistent experiences across screens and platforms,” said Raghu Kodige, Chief Product Officer of Alphonso. “That’s why we are partnering with Undertone, to give brands the ability to increase engagement by connecting real-time TV viewership data with Undertone’s high impact display ad formats and supply footprint. Together we expect to scale TV-retargeted ads across display formats.”

Research by eMarketer shows the average U.S. consumer watches 3 hours and 35 minutes of television per day, breaking that up with 6 hours and 35 minutes each day across different digital devices. Sophisticated marketers are well aware of this behavior, but struggle to create a consistent messaging experience. This is largely because the ability to connect user-level data – for seamless synchronization across TV to high-impact digital ad formats – has not been available.

“Undertone has pioneered Synchronized Digital Branding as the only real solution to the chaos of digital fragmentation,” said Doron Gerstel, CEO of Perion. “The integration of television viewership data from Alphonso is a significant, cross-platform step forward in our mission. We are thrilled to be partnering with them to combine the power of data, creative and broad reach across platforms.”

With this partnership, Undertone can now leverage user-level viewing and exposure data, powered by Alphonso’s Video AI, to intelligently sequence campaigns – using the optimum ad format – across hundreds of high-quality publishers and mobile apps. For consumers, this delivers a more seamless and strategic experience. Marketers can follow a TV exposure with the right digital message that is built on Undertone’s formats and developed by its internal Pixl Studio.

By activating Alphonso’s user-level television ad exposure data through its creative high-impact display ad formats, Undertone is delivering on the promise of true personalization and full-funnel effectiveness. This innovative channel harmonization will enable marketers to gain deeper insights into the value of their TV campaigns, thanks to enhanced dashboards and reporting tools.

The new capabilities resulting from this partnership are available for Undertone clients immediately. For more information go to: https://www.undertone.com/synchronization/#brand_solutions#tv_data_targeting

*Average Time Spent with Media in 2019 Has Plateaued (eMarketer, May 31 2019).

 

What: NAI has released the most recent update of its Code of Conduct, which expands on the rules and regulations around digital advertising, reinforces requirements for collection and use of data, and bans behavioral targeting of users younger than 16.
Why it matters: The Conduct Code, first published in 2000 and last updated in 2018, is meant to thoroughly encompass the products, technologies, and most recent ways of today’s digital advertising society.

 

Non-profit organization Network Advertising Initiative has announced its 2020 Code of Conduct. The document is meant to be an updated, more comprehensive version of the NAI Code, which was first published in 2000. The 2020 Code expands coverage to fully encompass all the new products and technologies relevant to today’s digital advertising industry and strengthens requirements related to the collection and use of NAI member companies’ data for digital advertising.

“The 2020 NAI Code expands the scope of coverage of modern digital advertising practices by formally including the use of offline data and advertiser customer database information to target ads across websites, applications, and television screens; something many of our members already proactively honor,” said Leigh Freund, NAI President and CEO, in a statement. “This Code further aims to future-proof and proactively fill potential gaps by including any other use of previously collected data about a particular user or device to target digital advertising.

Among the main updates included since the 2018 document, NAI goes further into collection and use of precise location data. “We are asking members to work with application publishers to provide additional notice regarding advertisers’ uses of data when obtaining consumer consent”. The code also imposes rigorous requirements for the collection and use of sensor information like that provided by cameras, microphones, and biometric sensors.

Moreover, to comply with the California Consumer Privacy Act, NAI’s 2020 Code bans behavioral targeting of users younger than 16, thus raising the minimum age from the 2018 document by 3 years.

“The Code also introduces requirements to increase transparency for political audience targeting, requiring NAI members to disclose the political audience segments they use for tailored advertising.”, said Freund.

The enforcement of the 2020 Code is planned for January 1st, 2020.

 

 

What: Marketing disruptors and innovators shared insights on the advance of marketing technology in Latin Markets at Portada Miami on April 12. Here are some of the takeaways that you missed.
Why it matters: In its twelfth annual edition, Portada Miami gathered over 100 decision-makers involved with major brands across all sectors, and provided a space for top quality networking and knowledge-sharing.

 

 

Rappi’s Carlos Leal and The Shipyard’s Kate Canel

This fragmented, hyper-connected world forces us to adapt to the new trends as soon as they appear. And even though data, the blueprint of this ship we’re all on, is there to guide us through the process, the fact is there’s too much of it available to even comprehend.

Technology is an enabler, but it demands early adoption. As demonstrated throughout the Portada Miami series of talks and panels last Friday, tools like AI are here to help, but there are barriers that have kept certain markets behind. However, both brands and service providers are getting ahead, and it is precisely spaces like Portada Miami that allow collective knowledge to grow.

Ana Laura Acevedo and Latam Airlines’ Pablo Chiozza at the Travel Marketing Board private meeting

During the private activities of the Portada Council System on Thursday, three of the council units, the Travel Marketing Board, the Americas Board, and the Brand Star Committee Latam discussed relevant topics like social media’s evolving role, knowing your customer in a multi-channel world, digital organization, brand differentiation, and strategic video use. Right after the meeting, Travel Marketing Board Ana Laura Acevedo, SVP, Marketing & Business Development at RCI Latin America, sent an email to her team to put in practice an idea that had come to her while talking to her peers.

Portada Meet-Up

Attendees could network with members of the Portada Council System the day after, and listen to the brilliant speakers on the Portada Miami agenda, who also discussed the role of the city and its future as a marketing hub. At the Portada Meet-Up session, ticket holders held one-on-one meetings with brand and agency executives of their choice. Here are some of the key takeaways of the #PortadaMIA panels.

 

 

 

“Contextual relevance is what earns you the right to engage with the multicultural consumer. We use data to vet that environment or content.”

(Ana Crandell, Group Account Director, OMD Multicultural)

 

 

“Have very clear goals and objectives, stick to your strategy and plan, and know it takes time to reach your objectives.”

(Christine Esteve, VP E-Commerce, Carnival Cruise Lines)

 

 

“Performance is something that has a very clear outcome. Make sure to understand your consumer, don’t do content for content’s sake.”

(Andrés Amezquita, VP Digital and Commercial Excellence, StanleyBlack&Decker Latin America)

 

 

“As marketers we need to understand consumers and identify what the barriers and frictions are, and only then look at how technology can help.”

(Andres Polo, Global Head of Innovation & Strategic Partnerships Marketing, Visa Inc.)

 

 

“The online consumer today is not determined by demographics but by their interaction with digital. “

(Carlos Leal, Marketing Director, Rappi)

 

 


“We started from the premise that especially in Latin America, when you really love something, you live it.”

(Carlo Espinoza, Senior Marketing Manager, Latin America Beverages

Pepsi)

 

 

“The diverse Miami workforce reflects what the United States will look like in years to come.”

(Joseph Roisman, EVP, Perry Ellis International & Jaap Donath, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Research & Strategic Planning, The Miami-Dade Beacon Council)

 

 

What: CNN’s Robin Garfield, Tecate’s Belen Pamukoff, and GroupM’s LaToya Christian kicked off the Portada Data and Content Marketing Forum with a panel titled How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising.
Why it matters: With 2.5 quintillion bytes of data created each day and 90% of the world’s recorded data being created in the last 2 years, the need to understand data is quite apparent.

By Dane C. Rogers

(L to R) Robin Garfield, Belen Pamukoff, LaToya Christian.

Wednesday’s Portada Data and Content Marketing Forum kicked off with a panel discussion on How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising. CNN en Español Anchor and Correspondent Guillermo Arduino moderated the panel which was composed of the following representatives from the network, brand, and advertising media agency areas: Robin Garfield, SVP of Research and Scheduling for CNN, who oversees consumer research and audience analysis in order to schedule programming for various channels and platforms across the network. Belen Pamukoff, Brand Director for Tecate (Heineken), specializes in building healthy brands and improving sales performance. LaToya Christian, Managing Partner, Marketing and Analytics at GroupM, has a 10-year track record of creating and implementing brand strategies for high-impact marking campaigns for various Fortune 500 companies (Target, Google, Unilever, NBCUniversal, and others).

CNN en Español and Portada will partner up again at Portada Miami to offer yet another perspective on the question addressed here. Christine Esteve, VP E-Commerce, Carnival Cruise Lines; Andrew W. Russo, VP Data Science, Starmark; Ana Crandell, Group Account Director, OMD Multicultural; and Seth Holladay, VP of Digital Research & Analytics for CNN will explain how content influences commerce and analyze how data determines their content strategies.

The question-and-answer format brought up a variety of topics that led to an illustrative discussion of the key issues facing media marketing professionals.

With 2.5 quintillion bytes of data created each day and 90% of the world’s recorded data being created in the last 2 years, the need to understand data is quite apparent.

62% of marketers feel that there is too much data out there and they don’t know where to start.

The first major question was: When you look at content and data what comes to mind first? From the network perspective, Robin Garfield said CNN considers data, “What people are watching, which platform they are coming from, and where they are going next. We use that information to program on a real-time basis and also over the long-term, to build products and programming to meet those demands.”

Belen mentioned that data is used in a two-part process to carry out a brand’s strategy. Brands can use data to first, make a message more relevant and, second, to inform that strategy of how to deploy and distribute its content to an audience.

LaToya shared the statistic that 62% of marketers feel that there is too much data out there and they don’t know where to start. The key is to “remember that each data point is an interactive event in which consumers are telling us their preferences” and reiterated the important to “humanize the data.”

When asked about how a news organization weighs discovering the truth with creating targeted content, Robin mentioned the importance of understanding that consumers are people first, and that delivering the news and information that people care about is core to the brand. CNN has been able to couple its user data with surveys and focus groups in order to figure out the interests of its audience to best present the most relevant facts.

LaToya reiterated the question that often arises, Whether data stifles creativity? Her belief is that “data and content live together and fuel one another.” She explains that data is able to present concrete facts that drive engaging stories. It can fuel opinions and grounds vibrant discussions in reality.

Also read CNN en Español: What Are the Ways Data Can Fuel the World of Advertising?

Robin added that in her experience, “people love to geek out on data,” especially when it comes to polling and tracking data involving political coverage. In fact, the consumers who really love data often move from television to digital platforms and those multi-platform consumers spend the most total time interacting with CNN, and are the most attractive to advertisers.

Belen opened up about some of the shortcomings of the data available to an alcohol brand that knows its customers primarily through their spending patterns. There are certain limitations that come from the absence of online shopping information, and the data Heineken gets is primarily where its Tecate customers shop and their zip codes. The brand knows it is playing without a full deck, as many suppliers are unwilling to share their sensitive customer data.

People will remain willing to share data, provided that a good value proposition exists for the consumer.

Belen also mentioned the importance of understanding the level of diversity that exists within the hispanic audience. A major distinction exists between acculturated and un-acculturated Hispanics, the former who may not even speak Spanish may respond to different tactics than those totally immersed in Hispanic culture. These differences are not often seen on paper, and many decision-making executives only know of the “power of the hispanic market” but oftentimes fail to understand the intricacies of the segment itself. Explaining those differences can sometimes be challenging to non-Hispanic managers. “Even within the LA market, there are significant differences between those who identify as chicanas vs cholos.”

Data, Content and Privacy

A hot topic for any consumer. Latoya said that as she considers things from both the customer and the marketer side, the importance is for those with access to data must act ethically with it, and those questions are being asked more frequently from consumers.

Robin presented the notion of a data exchange, an unwritten contract that exists between consumer and marketer. People will remain willing to share data, provided that a good value proposition exists for the consumer. She made the analogy of a patient being willing to share their health information if it could potentially save their life or offer better treatment. Marketers, too, should offer a benefit.

The panel ended with the major topic of granularity and the quest for a common currency when dealing with Hispanic audience measurement. LaToya said that while granularity may be important, there will always be gaps in data unless a multi-source approach can be reached. As for a common currency of data, Belen believes that it probably cannot be achieved, due to the complex nature of the audience. LaToya said that from a large marketer perspective, because trying to segment the market with only one data source is generally ineffective, it is unlikely that we will ever see one.

What: Leonor Palao (Assistant VP of Brand Marketing and Advertising, Oppenheimer Funds) and Annie Granatstein (Head of the Washington Post’s BrandStudio) had a conversation about branded content partnerships and data-driven content at the Portada Data & Content Marketing Forum in NYC. 
Why it matters: According to a study by McKenzie, data-driven organizations are more likely to acquire and retain customers.

By Dane C. Rogers

Leonor Palao (left) and Annie Granatstein (right)

Leonor Palao, Assistant VP of Brand Marketing and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds sat down with Annie Granatstein, head of the Washington Post’s BrandStudio, to discuss the branded content partnership that exists between the organizations and how data is used to drive content creation.

A research study by McKenzie showed that data-driven organizations are 23 times more likely to acquire customers, 6 times as likely to retain customers and 19 times as likely to be profitable. Leonor’s team at Oppenheimer Funds took note of this report, and in an effort to reach the niche financial advisor audience, partnered with the Washington Post.

Being an asset management company, certain data hurdles exist for Oppenheimer that caused it to lean heavily on its partners to drive growth. Fortunately, the Washington Post has the AI and data capabilities that can help Oppenheimer reach new potential customers.

Armed with the knowledge that 58% of marketers say that original written content is their most important digital asset, above video. Being viewed as a “thought leader” on relevant topics is at the core of their digital strategy.

With a talented in-house team of content creators that is capable of producing industry-leading pieces on finance and asset management, Oppenheimer had a goal to cut back on the quantity of articles (from 37 in 2017 to 7 in 2018) and focus its marketing strategy on understanding the types of articles that were most engaging and focused on creating great content and getting it on the proper platform.

Leonor mentioned the partnership Oppenheimer has with Nudge Analytics, an analytics company dedicated to standardizing the engagement metrics across the different media publication sites. Thanks to Nudge, Oppenheimer’s marketing team was able to overcome the rampant inconsistency of engagement metrics to determine the true “winners” of the 37 articles written in 2017.

With this more targeted approach, Oppenheimer has determined that year over year, custom content has had the biggest increase in effectiveness (over audio, display, social, videos, indicated content, and dedicated emails).

Oppenheimer’s branded content sees the Washington Post as the gold-standard in using data to drive content decisions. Annie runs the WP BrandStudio, which created branded content for advertisers. The content studio is a completely separate branch of the Post that has no overlap of personnel or reporting with the editorial staff.

Why is working with WP’s BrandStudio more effective than partnering with a standalone content creation agency? Because they are so much closer to the audience than any agency could hope to be. The level of interaction that a publisher has with its active users allows for a deeper understanding of their preferences.

The BrandStudio has segmented its audience into three subgroups: individual consumers, B2B (financial advisers like Oppenheimer) and thought leaders/influencers. Each segment has a separate list of the most engaging topics that they spend time on.

For example, the business client segment engages most with content related to cybersecurity, AI, and business transformation. They prefer to consume content on mobile and tablets and spend the most time on content with dynamic visuals and infographics. (Influencers, on the other hand, gravitate towards the environment, healthcare and smart cities, and visit websites on their computer browsers.)

The BrandStudio uses its internal “Clavis-targeting” algorithms (similar to Amazon’s search recommendations) to push its consumers to the content that each particular client is most likely to engage with. It does this through on-site, in-app, and external (paid social media and Apple News) recommendations.

Oppenheimer’s usage of partners like Nudge and the WP’s BrandStudio has helped it determine the most effective marketing to help it formulate a successful strategy that has show its best-recorded growth this past year.

What: In order to drive content strategy, brands need quality, granular data. As #PortadaLA panelists discussed, digital media allows gathering precise data that serves as a good starting point to make media, budget, and attribution decisions.
Why it matters: Content is one of the best ways to connect with consumers, but there is a need to develop better tracking methodologies and newer data tools that can be leveraged to reach the Hispanic audience more effectively.

By Ryan Orvis, guest Portada contributor.

 

The relationship between data and content formed the basis of ‘How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising’, a Portada Los Angeles panel discussion led by Guillermo Arduino, CNN Anchor and Correspondent for Encuentro (CNN en Español). Joining in the conversation were Caro D’Antuono, Vice President of Marketing for Northgate Markets; Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Manager for GroupM; Roxane Garzon, Media Director for Casanova; and Robin Garfield, Senior Vice President of Research and Scheduling for CNN.

Robin Garfield and Frances Rubio

A key takeaway from the panel was the need for quality, granular data to drive content strategy. This is particularly crucial for the Hispanic market, where there is a strong need for a common currency of audience measurement.

The panelists discussed utilizing data to construct a user profile as a starting point. “Who are we connecting with, and where is there an opportunity?” asked Caro D’Antuono. “Most of the time [content] resonates with a specific audience whether it’s male or female, a specific age group, or a language preference.”

Roxane Garzon explained how digital media allows us to hone in on a specific consumer to gather precise behavioral data. This data can then be leveraged to make decisions on media, budget, and attribution.

Roxane Garzon

For Frances, the process begins by looking at all data sources —including social, syndicated, and internal— to understand who the audience is. “There is no single source of truth,” she explained, describing the importance of a data-agnostic approach.

Robin discussed using real-time data to discern what people are thinking as opposed to what actions they are taking. “First we want to think about the people. Data is a representation of the audience and what people are doing. It’s one part of the research ecosystem. What’s really important is that we connect the data to audience insights.

Data is only as good as where you’re getting it from— especially in multicultural [marketing],” explained Roxane, outlining the challenges of attributing data to specific points in the sales funnel. This is especially difficult for smaller businesses, for whom multicultural audience data is expensive and relatively scarce.

Caro D’Antuono and Guillermo Arduino

Caro described content as one of the best ways for advertisers to connect with multiple users at different stages of the funnel, something that has become increasingly necessary with developments in media and technology. “The world is changing so much faster outside of our organization. Everything from the media landscape, to the consumer, to everything they have access to is changing so rapidly.”

Frances stressed the importance of developing better methodologies for tracking the Hispanic audience, especially as younger audiences grow increasingly diverse. This includes using multiple data sources to develop a fuller view of the audience and working with partners to develop new tools for data collection.

“It’s a fascinating time for us to be able to push the way forward,” she said. “[We] need to focus on speaking to growth opportunity segments, and those who don’t will be left behind.”

What: Caro D’Antuono, VP of Marketing at Northgate Markets, Robin Garfield, SVP of Research and Scheduling for CNNRoxane GarzonMedia Director at Casanova and Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Associate Director for GroupM gathered for a Portada Los Angeles panel presented by CNN en Español to discuss how How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising.  In this article, we present the panelists’ answers to questions they didn’t have time to answer at the event.
Why it matters: As we’ve known for a while, it’s all about data now. But the problem, rather than finding the data, is how to collect it and then make sense of it.

The word “data” is, without a doubt, a term we hear several times a day in our daily lives. A great part of our work is all about data now, and the future of the industry directly depends on understanding or trying as best as we can to understand what to do and how to deal with data. There are so many types of data, and so many different tools available that help companies make sense of it, that it’s easier than not to get it wrong.

Because it is part of our mission to help in this regard, after the panel titled How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising, we promised the Portada Los Angeles audience we would answer all their questions. And because we like to keep our promises, we got in touch with the panelists who kicked off Portada Los Angeles 10 days ago (Caro D’Antuono, Vice President of Marketing for Northgate Markets; Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Associate Director for GroupM; Roxane Garzon, Media Director for Casanova; and Robin Garfield, Senior Vice President of Research and Scheduling for CNN), and they set some time aside to answer the audience’s questions there wasn’t time for during the event.

Portada and CNN en Español will have two more opportunities to delve deep into the issue of How Data Continues to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising. Get tickets to Portada Data & Content Marketing Forum on April 3rd and Portada Miami on April 12 and get all your questions about data answered by experts.

Have you ever ignored data and gone with “gut feeling” or your own empirical experience?

Roxane Garzon (left) and Caro D’Antuono (right) speaking at Portada Los Angeles 2019

Roxane Garzon: Data is only as good as the way it is collected.  Many times the data does not “feel” right.  When that happens I ask the question about sample size and statistical reliability.  If there is no issue there, then I look for other sources to confirm my findings. This has happened a few times when creating profiles for target audiences, specifically bicultural millennials.

Frances Rubio: Even if we don’t have quantitative data, qualitative data can be just as important and in this, we can have a bit of a “gut feeling” further validated, whether it’s conducting focus groups or doing ethnographic research. We’ve often used quantitative data but sometimes we just don’t have the data to point to the “why” a trend is happening, and these qualitative methods can help to further guide us into unlocking directional psychological reasons behind the “why” of peoples’ behaviors and mindsets.

Caro D’Antuono: Yes. We recently produced a short video to support Women’s Day. We didn’t have historical data on an effort such as this.  However, we released it on Northgate social media pages and it has been very well received.  We are receiving more brand love than we ever expected.  We have to take calculated risks, especially when things have not been done before within an organization.

Is analysis paralysis a real symptom of the data age?

R.G.: It can be. We are fortunate to work in a time where data is much easier to collect. However, it can hinder marketers from making a decision if they don’t know how to think without numbers. Marketers can use data as a crutch instead of using it as a tool.

Frances Rubio (left) and Roxane Garzon (right)

F.R.: With all this data, there are so many opportunities to unlock valuable insights, and it’s important to separate the signal from all the noise! It’s really about focusing on the important business questions and what publishers/marketers are trying to uncover. From there, it’s looking at all data available, and strategically choosing which data is valuable in answering the business question. 

Where there’s room for improvement is in the data accuracy and integrity: we all need to be questioning where and how we get our data, understanding the methodology and recognizing any limitations (e.g. sampling, the methodology in it of itself, date ranges, etc.). Tools should be incorporated to tell a full story of our consumers, understand where the consumer is with the brand from a marketing funnel perspective;  from there, once we understand the opportunity, the psychographics and behaviors, it becomes easier to read their media consumption so we can speak to them with the right messaging and creative and reach them in the appropriate media channels.

What: We talked to brilliant members of Portada’s Council System to find out where they think the industry of marketing is heading in the immediate future.
Why it matters: In view of the accelerated pace at which the industry is evolving, companies need to get ready for what is coming in marketing.

The Age of Mobility

It is undeniable that we are living in an era of unprecedented change. Consumers have fully moved to digital and social media, and new technologies boost this transition. More personalized and targeted ad formats help create deeper engagement between brands and consumers,  and data is the main ingredient that allows companies to understand new opportunities.

As a new study on the State of the Media Industry by Ooyala states, “[Audiences] are now used to finding video content wherever and whenever they are looking for it, so mobile isn’t a novelty anymore— it’s the expectation.” Now, companies need to make sure to keep up with the consumer, and not the other way around. The Ooyala study found that mobile video and social video consumption are rising steadily; brands and media companies need to devote more effort to targeting consumers on those media.  “It’s about getting better targeting for the right consumer at the right time in their lives, that’s a big part of it,” says Rafael Lopez-de-Azua, Head of Media and Digital – Latam, Coty. “There’s always question marks specifically about how good is the data and the accuracy of that data, but there are really good solutions for the U.S. Hispanic market.”

Data, an Unavoidable Beacon

Recently, companies have begun to accept that the incorporation of new technologies and data-specialized teams is inescapable. Data-driven technologies like AI, Blockchain, and connected home and voice technologies are changing forever the way consumers relate to media and products, to the point that new realities are merging with ours.

“I guess not only the marketing but the whole world is going towards data, data, data,” comments Pablo Chiozza, SVP USA, Canada & Caribbean at Latam Airlines. “Nowadays no one runs a marketing campaign, no one launches a product if it’s not supported by hard data, so I guess in the present and the future, all the actions we’re taking are based on data, data, data, so it’s all about how you prepare, not only to gather data but then to read data and to take the most information out of it.”

Challenges of the Media Industry in the Near Future

“One of the biggest challenges we face nowadays is the fact that the old media hasn’t been brought up to speed in terms of data, and what I’d like to see is more integration,” shares Ana Lucía Soto, National Media Manager at JCPenney. “Some of the linear channels like radio and TV that have been continuing this challenge over the years with having data that’s actionable in the same time and manner as digital, I would like to see that come together so that we can deliver media plans in the time that we’re planning them.”

There’s always going to be the need for that human touch that highlights culture; that’s something that machines cannot do and it’s 100% human.

But when asked if she thinks this process could lose touch with humanity, Ana L. Soto explains that automated processes will never take away the human factor. “There’s always gonna be the need to have somebody addressing the human issues and even though things are getting more automated and data is present all around us, I feel like there’s always going to be the need for that human touch that will highlight the culture,” she says. “That’s something that machines cannot do and that’s 100% human. I think there’s always going to be a need to evolve with the times and to catch up with technology, but there’ll always be room for the human factor.”

 

What: Marketing and technology is the focus of our talk with Circus marketing CEO Bruno Lambertini.  He explained his priorities for marketing innovation and as a result how to survive through the digital revolution.
Why it matters: The world of marketing and technology is changing at an accelerated pace. As a result, agencies like Circus Marketing are willing to take risks and invest in a smart way. They will survive in the new economy.

In the world of business, innovation means quite simply the process of translating a new idea into a service that consumers will buy. Thus creating value. Innovating is vital to every business. Without it, companies need not even try to survive. Circus Marketing is a multicultural digital agency with 8 offices in the U.S., and Spain. It has a presence in 5 Latin American countries, and was founded in 2005. Circus strives to create high-impact advertising campaigns that engage consumers to an emotional degree. Portada talked to CEO Bruno Lambertini to find out more about Circus utilizes different tools, but mainly data analysis, to drive innovation.

Portada: What are the key tools for marketing and technology according to Circus?

Bruno Lambertini: Data combined with AI and Robotics, with a boost from 5G connectivity, is an explosive combo that opens a thousand opportunities in the world of marketing and communications. These are elements we’re exploring and experimenting with at Circus.”

Need for innovation

Portada: How does Circus Marketing understand the need for innovation?

B.L.: “Marketing innovation is not only about creative ideas. More than ever, clients today want to see ROI and demand effective campaigns. Every strategy of ours is based on deep knowledge of audiences through smart use of data. Not two days are the same at Circus, we never face a task the same way as the previous one, and that’s an essential part of the innovation process.

The only thing that really affects human behavior is a great idea that answers to data-driven consumer analysis. Ideas are the core of our business, as well as a neuralgic element of communication, but data provides context and new technologies boost distribution and impact on consumers. This combination is what makes innovation at Circus.”

Portada: How have marketing and technology changed in the last decade? What are Circus’ tools to address them?

A decade of change

B.L.: “The need for innovation has always been a part of communication and marketing’s DNA. In recent years, the industry has changed in an accelerated way, mostly because audiences have modified clients’ needs and expectations through new consuming habits. When we thought of ATL as ATL and we thought of digital as digital, many digital agencies were born, but they are also considered traditional today. Now, traditional ATL and traditional digital agencies need to innovate to survive.

Circus is an agency based on this new economy, it’s a hybrid model that takes the best of both worlds and adds data, tech-driven ideas, and content-generation tools in order to tackle new challenges. At Circus, the data and planning areas work closely together to generate actionable insights that favor creativity in order to generate an emotional connection with audiences, which translate to unique, powerful results.”

 

Portada: Competition is tough. What would you say are today’s most important values and skills in order to succeed as marketing and technology change?

As part of Circus’ campaign to promote Netflix’s House of Cards, a mural showing the female lead was placed 600 meters away from the original Eva Perón mural in Buenos Aires.

A new economy

B.L.: “The companies that belong in the so-called ‘New Economy’ are the ones that are completely rethinking whole industries, and they have three things in common: 1) they base their business on the intelligent use of data and technology, 2) they use a collaborative work scheme, and 3) they have teams composed of diverse profiles, but always sharing the same mindset and allowing for disruptivity. Circus is a new economy agency because it has these three components, which are very attractive to brands and talent. The companies we work with, Netflix, Uber, Spotify, and WeWork, among others, show a communion of our culture and theirs.”

Portada: How does Circus make sure to reach its clients’ goals?

B. L.: “We combine our own in-house generated data with reports from various consulting agencies and information sources. Also, working with new economy organizations like Netflix, Uber, Spotify, and WeWork among others allows us to constantly update and Exchange disruptive ideas. Our goal in terms of client relationships is to build partnerships that include information mobility. They provide knowledge of the industry and we provide knowledge of this hybrid marketing/communication world, and about how the new economy Works. When we achieve this collaboration, that’s when we have executions that impact positively on campaigns’ ROI.”

Innovation obstacles

Brands need to be willing to take risks.

Portada: What are the main obstacles to innovation?

For mole Doña María, Circus designed an edgy spot featuring a mole hamburger and a millennial girl with a tattoo of her mom’s face.

B.L.: “There are many challenges, but let’s highlight two. One from the agencies side. And consequently one from the advertisers’ side, which can be found to a lesser or greater extent depending on the market. But at the end of the day they’re there. For agencies, the main challenge is investing in data. With all the transformations in the digital world, as well as in media consumption habits, investing in in-house data generation is a must to survive. Communication strategies need to be based on data analysis to generate impact effectively. On the other hand, brands need to be willing to take risks.”

What’s next

Portada: In a nutshell, where do you see marketing and technology going in the next years?

B.L.: “The world is changing really fast. As a result, there is a revolution in the way we think about marketing. And this is caused by the smart interpretation of data together with artificial intelligence and robotics. This combination will allow us to be more precise and creative. As a result it will take us to places we can’t even imagine right now.”

Check out the stars of Portada’s Council of the Americas, who will meet at Portada Miami on April 18-19. Save your spot here!

 

What: Mobile Fraud: Marketers’ Massive Hidden Threat, a Forrester Consulting “thought leadership paper” commissioned by AppsFlyer, looked at how CMOs are tackling the ever-evolving challenge of ad fraud, and the cost that ineffective prevention has for businesses.
Why It Matters: The study found that while investment in mobile ads is increasing, only one in five advertisers said they’re able to systematically combat fraud with the right tools and expertise. Why aren’t marketers taking this growing risk head-on?

For the study Mobile Fraud: Marketers’ Massive Hidden Threat, Forrester and AppsFlyer conducted an online survey with 250 marketers whose companies spend at least $1 million dollars a month on digital advertising and found that mobile is attracting more and more ad spend: 70% of the enterprise marketers surveyed for this report are increasing their budgets for mobile advertising over the next 12 months.

But with ad fraud eating up a bigger chunk of many organizations’ budgets, a more focused and deliberate approach to prevention is needed. Why aren’t organizations doing more to better equip themselves to fight this growing threat?

Despite Risk of Fraud, Marketers Increasing Investment in Mobile Ads

The data from Forrester reveals that resistance to ad fraud is sub-par across the board, as 69% of marketers cite that at least 20% of their budgets are exposed to fraud on mobile web ads. But this doesn’t correspond with lower investment in mobile ads.

According to the report, over the next 12 months, 70% of firms that spent over $1 million per month in digital advertising in 2017 said mobile ad spend budgets will increase in the coming year, and 39% of companies that spent over $5 million per month on digital advertising plan on increasing their budgets by more than 30%.

In the meantime, too many organizations are left completely vulnerable: the study found that only 19% of enterprise marketers claim to have systematic fraud prevention in place. The reasons for this are quite simple: a lack of access to transparent data and a lack of knowledge about programmatic buying.

Almost half (45%) said they lack the understanding of mobile ad frauds that exist and then lack the types of solutions that exist to combat those mobile fraud types, and 51% of marketers cite a lack of data transparency. Marketers also seem to believe that many distort data in this complex ecosystem for their own benefit, with 46% of marketers reporting that “players in the media buying ecosystem benefit from artificially inflated KPIs.”

As a result, a huge slice of the market is left accepting fraud’s impact as a given, unable to keep up with the way approaches to fraud evolve and become more difficult to shut down. But the study suggests that marketers know they must change their ways if they are to stay afloat: 92% of advertisers and agencies cited fraud prevention as a critical or high priority over the next 12 months.

CMOs Don’t Think They Can Keep Up with Ad Fraud

The research from Forrester seems to suggest that many CMOs simply don’t believe there is a way to keep up. Ari Rosenstein, Senior Marketing Director at AppsFlyer asserted that often, organizations “accept fraud as ‘the cost of doing business’ because they don’t believe they can effectively protect themselves against all types of ad fraud.” The data supported this assumption, as 40% of those surveyed agree that “those who try to combat fraud are faced with a fast-evolving problem which makes it hard to identify and often even just understand.”

And since these CMOs are often ill-equipped in the data analytics department, they have a hard time even estimating how much of their budgets they are really losing to fraud, often estimating around 1-2% when the average, Rosenstein suggested, is more like 10%.

Mobile Enables Novel Approaches to Ad Fraud Prevention

The benefits of investing in a solid ad fraud prevention plan are varied: the study asserted that benefits include improved ROI, better campaign insights, easier optimization, and increased user engagement.

And luckily, Rosenstein argued, mobile is offering CMOs some of the most user-friendly, flexible fraud prevention tools ever: “As mobile fraud has continued to evolve — with the emergence of install hijacking, click flooding, device farms, DeviceID Reset Fraud, etc. — so have the technologies and processes to identify fraud.” But CMOs must make fraud a significant priority through investing in data transparency and education for their teams.

Marketers ‘Must Become More Educated’ and ‘Demand Increased Transparency’

 A common practice is for marketers to turn to legacy technology tools and platforms for help instead of seeking experts: 48% of those surveyed reported using enterprise marketing software vendors for help with measuring and combatting fraud, and 38% reported relying on ad verification vendors. The suggestion is that CMOs should recognize that fraud prevention merits its own investment, and that specific expertise in fraud is necessary for fighting such a serious threat.

For 53% of marketers, a basic strategy is to assign fraud-related KPI’s to their agency or ad networks. But the study reminds us of the importance of following up and ensuring that those KPIs are met. While 60% of advertisers and agencies cite better campaign insights from improving mobile ad fraud prevention, the study provides evidence that “prevention” must mean educating internal teams about the latest strategies in fraud prevention and asking for more information and collaboration from vendors. It is also essential that organizations add “independent, mobile-first tools” to their arsenals, the report suggests.

Those who are serious about lessening the impact that fraud is having on their business should be deliberate in pursuing a fraud prevention plan that works for their organizations. For AppFlyers’ Rosenstein, education and transparency must take on central roles in all marketing departments. “Marketers must become more educated on the topic and demand increased transparency and data visibility from their vendors and partners,” he said. “Through these mobile insights, marketers can become more informed and make better decisions for their businesses.”

What: Social media — particularly Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram — has emerged as a key component in supporting sponsorship activations among a great majority of marketers, according to a new study by the ANA (Association of National Advertisers).
Why it matters: The study revealed that 85 percent of the marketers surveyed use social media to support sponsorships before, during, and after the sponsorship.Additionally, almost half (44 percent) employ a range of “advanced technologies” such as 360-degree photography, beacons, virtual reality, and RFID (radio-frequency identification) as support for their sponsorship activations.

The study, “Use of Social Media and Advanced Technologies for Sponsorship,” indicated that the primary reasons marketers use either social media or advanced technologies to support a brand’s sponsorship activations were the same:

  • Generate awareness
  • Connect with customers during the event
  • Improve brand perception

“Sponsorships are becoming an increasingly important part of the marketing mix, and with good reason,” said ANA CEO Bob Liodice. “Giving those activities a boost via the aggressive use of social media and other new technologies makes sense because of the ROI it provides.”

Sponsorships are becoming an increasingly important part of the marketing mix, and with good reason.

Sponsorship spending in North America is projected to be $23 billion in 2017, according to ESP/IEG, a consultancy that tracks sponsorship spending and trends. Sports events dominate the list of all sponsorship spending, accounting for about 70 percent, followed by entertainment at 10 percent.

Preferred social media platforms used to activate sponsorship included:

  • Facebook (92 percent)
  • Twitter (87 percent)
  • Instagram (70 percent)
  • YouTube (47 percent)
  • LinkedIn (41 percent)
  • Facebook Live (27 percent)
  • Snapchat (27 percent)
  • Pinterest (13 percent)

The study noted that internal resources are most often used for the management of social media and/or advanced technologies to support a brand’s sponsorship activations; external agency resources are also used (e.g., digital/social agency and sponsorship agency), but to a lesser extent.

In addition, the amount of social media exposure generated was the top choice, by a wide margin, for measuring the effectiveness of a brand’s social media sponsorship activity. For advanced technologies, on-site activity tracked at the sponsorship event and the amount of social media exposure generated were the two top choices for measuring effectiveness.

METHODOLOGY

The survey was conducted in June 2017. In total, 119 ANA corporate members participated. Of those, 55 percent were characterized as “senior marketers” (director level and above) while 45 percent were “junior marketers” (manager level and below). Forty-nine percent of respondents had 15 years or more experience in marketing/advertising. Seventy-seven percent work at organizations with an annual U.S. media budget of less than $100 million; the other 23 percent work at organizations with an annual U.S. media budget of $100 million or more. Those organizations are primarily B-to-C (38 percent) with some B-to-B (20 percent), and B-to-C/B-to-B for the remainder.

For purposes of the survey, the term sponsorship was defined as “a cash and/or in-kind fee paid to a property (typically sports, entertainment, non-profit event, or organization) in return for access to the exploitable commercial potential associated with that property.” A property was defined as “a unique, commercially exploitable entity, typically in sports, arts, events, entertainment, or causes.”

What: Entravision is buying digital advertising company Headway.  The transaction has been financed by cash on hand and is expected to close in the early second quarter, Esteban Lopez Blanco, Entravision’s Chief Strategy Officer, tells Portada. Entravision’s Pulpo Media and Headway will continue to serve clients on a stand-alone basis. Entravision’s stock was up 12% in early trading this morning in the New York Stock exchange.
Why it matters: With this acquisition Entravision, who bought Pulpo Media in 2014, substantially rounds up its suite of ad-tech services both in the U.S as well as Latin America. The company has stated that it intends to increase the share of digital revenues to 20% of total revenues.  The transaction also reflects consolidation in the Latin digital marketing space.

Image result for Entravision Communications CorporationEntravision Communications Corporation is acquiring Buenos Aires, Argentina headquartered marketing-tech firm Headway. Headway has 18 offices around the world that work and provide services including DMP (with its DataXpand unit), mobile branding and performance for app downloads (MoBrain), to programmatic trading, Mediamath representation in Spanish-speaking Latin America, and video and native advertising (Headway recently launched an exchange for Spanish-language native advertising). Bringing in Headway into the Entravision umbrella should help Entravision/Pulpo Media expand the programmatic marketing capabilities through Headway’s strong relationship with MediaMath, which combines advanced marketing software with global reach and scale.  The transaction, which will be funded from the Entravision’s cash on hand, is expected to close early in the second quarter. Additional terms were not disclosed.

Esteban Lopez Blanco
Esteban Lopez Blanco, Chief Strategy Officer at Entravision.

“This purchase will provide synergies with our more than 300 local and national sales team members in the U.S., and the Latin America region. It brings huge opportunities as digital ad spend, e-commerce, internet and smart phone penetration will continue to grow at accelerated rates for many years as compared to the U.S. market,” says Esteban Lopez Blanco, Chief Strategy Officer at Entravision.

The key strategic driver in for this transaction is in the product frontend and data backend integration opportunities which we believe will enhance both Pulpo’s and Headway’s offerings.

Both Pulpo and Headway will continue to serve their clients on a stand-alone basis. Blanco notes that “Headway and Pulpo are strong brands in their own right and provide their clients with a broad portfolio of solutions to proactively engage consumers. The two companies will continue to serve their clients on a standalone basis and each will benefit from the integration of their combined products data and inventories to the benefit of their respective advertisers, agencies and publishers. According to Entravision’s Chief Strategy Officer, Esteban Lopez Blanco,  Headway provides “professionally managed services that enable agencies to advance their programmatic capabilities. Headway and Pulpo are highly complementary and each will benefit from the integration of their combined data and inventories.”

Stronger Footing in Latin America

Image result for headway mediaLopez Blanco tells Portada that, “with Pulpo and Headway we are able to provide marketers a more comprehensive footprint, reaching the entire US and Latin America marketplace. Pulpo Publishers network is ranked in the top 5 in reach as rated by comScore in Argentina, Mexico, Columbia, Chile and Peru and the addition of Headway will allow us to expand our combined reach and better serve clients of both companies.

Founded in 2010, Headway is headquartered in Buenos Aires, Argentina and has 152 employees in 18 offices principally located in North and South America.  Following the closing of the transaction, Martin Kogan will continue to lead the company as Chief Executive Officer, with Agustin Echavarría Coll continuing to serve as Chief Revenue Officer.

What: More than 80 percent of advertisers currently use data to help them manage agency relationships, especially in the area of managing media budgets according to the new survey “Using Data to Manage Agency Relationships: What’s Important to Marketers,” from the ANA (Association of National Advertisers).
Why it matters: Data is most important and most heavily used in managing media and billing/budgets, and least important and least used in the areas of creative and production.

More than 80 percent of advertisers currently use data to help them manage agency relationships and they expect the use of such data will grow because of the overwhelmingly positive results they have achieved, especially in the area of managing media budgets, according the new survey “Using Data to Manage Agency Relationships: What’s Important to Marketers,” from the ANA (Association of National Advertisers).

The survey explored the use of data in broad categories of the client/agency relationship, including agency performance evaluations, tracking of agency hours, copy/creative testing, production costs, and media efficiencies/budgets. “Data helps build better relationships between the client and agency, helping both parties focus on outcomes,” said ANA Group EVP Bill Duggan. “And at a time where there are transparency issues in the industry, the use of data enhances trust.”

KEY FINDINGS

  • Data is frequently used for managing agency relationships, with 80 percent of respondents indicating that they “often or always” use data to manage agency relationships.
  • Use of data to manage agency relationships is increasing, with 84 percent of respondents seeing it growing in their organization and none seeing usage declining.
  • Use of data for managing agency relationships delivers strong outcomes:
    • 82 percent of respondents saw it contributing to better overall client/agency relationships.
    • 90 percent saw it improving agency efficiencies.
    • 78 percent saw it improving internal efficiencies at the client’s organization.
  • Data is most important and most heavily used in managing media and billing/budgets, and least important and least used in the areas of creative and production.
  • Among the 37 performance metrics evaluated in this survey, media-related metrics account for seven of the 10 highest-rated metrics for importance.
    • The specific media-related metrics that rated highest were efficiency of media buys, delivery of total campaign audience goals, and media quality assessment.

“Data enhances the conversations between clients and agencies, providing a solid foundation for mutual collaboration,” said Richard Benyon, CEO of Decideware. “As the legendary statistician W. Edwards Deming once said, ‘Without data you’re just another person with an opinion.’”

IMPLICATIONS

  • Data Should Be Seen as a “Force for Good” in Client/Agency Relationships: The widespread and increasing use of data to help manage agency relationships is leading to more informed decision-making and improved efficiencies at both clients and agencies. Furthermore, the increased use of data is improving transparency and accountability.
  • Data Use in Media Is Critical: Data in media is the most important and most utilized of any category. With media transparency currently a major issue in the industry, the ANA encourages advertis­ers to assume greater internal stewardship of their media investments and to set up metrics to track performance.
  • Data in Creative Warrants More Attention: Clients should pay more attention to the processes for briefing and copy approvals, and use data to track progress, as the implications of not doing so include increased rework and potentially increased agency fees. Specific suggestions include tracking the number of rounds of revision that work undergoes prior to final approval, the average length of time that each approval step takes, and even “soft” metrics like the quality of the brief.
  • Clients Should Leverage Data to Improve Their Internal Efficiencies: Seventy-eight percent of respondents work at companies whose use of data for managing agency relationships helps improve internal efficiencies at the client. Meanwhile, 90 percent work at companies whose use of data for managing agency relationships helps improve agency efficiencies. Certainly, both numbers are high, yet the double-digit gap between the two warrants consideration and suggests that there may be a potential opportunity for clients to further improve their internal efficiencies and processes.
Data in media is the most important and most utilized of any category.

METHODOLOGY

In total, 92 client-side marketers were represented in the survey. Of those, 61 percent were “senior marketers” (director level and above) and 39 percent were “junior marketers” (manager level and below). On average, respondents have 18.3 years of experience in marketing/advertising. Fifty-three percent of respondents work at organizations which have an annual U.S. media budget of $100 million or more, while 47 percent work at organizations which have an annual U.S. media budget of less than $100 million. Those organizations are primarily B-to-C for 42 percent of respondents, primarily B-to-B for 13 percent, and equally B-to-C/B-to-B for the remainder.

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What:MediaMath has announced the launch of Helix™, a new business unit offering proprietary data to customers.
Why it matters: Built on top of MediaMath’s Adroit Shopper Co-op, Helix will commercialize the large scale data sets MediaMath’s partners and its clients provide, build predictive audiences and actionable insights, and evolve how programmatic buyers utilize data to drive real results.

helix-logoMM_Facebookv3_400x400MediaMath has announced the launch of Helix™, a new business unit offering proprietary data to customers. Helix will commercialize the large scale data sets MediaMath’s partners and its clients provide, build predictive audiences and actionable insights, and evolve how programmatic buyers utilize data to drive real results. With Helix, MediaMath adds to its stable of industry leading offerings to continue to deliver market-leading solutions to its clients.

Sources from Mediamath told Portada that Helix is currently active in the USA and Canada only. However, plans are in the works to roll out Helix in other markets in the future (2016-2017 timeframe). In addition, Helix is available to advertisers in the USA, including to those targeting US Hispanic audiences.

Back in 2013, MediaMath bought content delivery network Akamai’s ad business and added it to its Adroit business unit. Now, Adroit Digital’s Shopper Cooperative is being spun off into Helix, and the Adroit name and operations will be merged into MediaMath, according to Marketing Land. Jacob Ross, who headed Adroit Digital, has become president of the new Helix. Helix has access to an important  load of shared first-party data from about 300 company members hat had been the Adroit Shopper Co-op. About a third of the top 100 largest retailers in the US are members.

Those members will share their customer info with others in the Co-op. There are almost 500 million active user profiles and monthly data on about US$10 billion worth of e-commerce transactions, Marketing Land has reported . First-party data is said to be considered the highest quality, because it’s a company’s own customers.

According to Ross, advertisers could previously only use this Co-op data if they employed Adroit’s services as a media buyer. Now, anyone who uses MediaMath’s demand-side platform for ad buying — and is a member of the Co-op — can employ the data.

Joe Zawadzki, CEO of MediaMath, suggests that in the three years since the acquisition, MediaMath has been “replatforming it in a couple of different dimensions” and integrating it with MediaMath’s ad-buying tools and data — now it’s unveiling the results of that work.

What Makes Helix Different

There are a few areas that make Helix truly different. Helix starts with real-time, transactional, anonymized data, from one-third of the top 100 largest retailers in the U.S. and hundreds of other member’s data. Helix augments this with the vast data footprint MediaMath is able to command in order to drive true scale. And finally, Helix is seamlessly integrated with MediaMath’s award-winning buying platform, the TerminalOne OS to evolve buying.

Helix is built on the foundation of the Adroit Shopper Co-op, a part of the MediaMath family since 2013 and the largest online shopper data asset in the industry. With the launch of Helix, this data will be further enriched with other assets from MediaMath and its partners to build comprehensive, anonymous customer profiles to drive better marketing results.

“Programmatic’s success is built on the back of data – it is the fuel and exhaust of our industry,” said Jacob Ross, President of Helix. “Even after shifting significant budget, and making investments in and around programmatic strategies, advertisers still struggle with the limited scale of their own customer data and unreliability of third-party data. Helix is MediaMath’s answer to this problem: pooling high quality data that truly helps drive business outcomes.”

“Despite the resounding success of programmatic as a key tenet of marketers’ paid media strategies, using data is still mostly a manual and difficult process – and sometimes it just doesn’t work,” said Joe Zawadzki, CEO of MediaMath. “We’re bringing Helix to the market to help solve that problem. We believe there’s a better way to take advantage of valuable signal that is truly predictive in driving outcomes, and seamlessly tied to media planning and media buying.”

Helix has been working with a limited selection of brands and agencies in a beta phase over the last six months to prepare for today’s launch. “We have a lot of data about our own customers,” said Rachel Silva, AVP of Marketing at Pep Boys, “but that data is limited in scale. Being a member of Helix enables us to tap into a much wider pool of shoppers, many of whom are perfect customers for our brand. These are users we wouldn’t be able to reach without leveraging a powerful aggregated source of shopper behavior data like Helix. We have seen dramatic improvement in campaign performance since joining Helix, and it has become an integral part of our audience targeting strategy.”

“iProspect believes in the power of fresh, quality data to drive effective marketing results and insights for our clients to enable them to accelerate real business outcomes,” said Benjamin Flecha, Director, Data & Insights: Activation & Attribution at iProspect. “We’ve already seen the results, and we’re thrilled to work with Helix as MediaMath doubles down on its commitment to evolve data-driven buying to the next level with a data offering built on a powerful foundation.”

Features and benefits of Helix include:

* Predictive Audiences. Helix leverages high quality transactional data from 300 merchants comprising one-third of the Internet Retailer Top 100 brands, combined with MediaMath’s vast data footprint and deep integrations with global data partners, to deliver predictive audiences to clients.

* Unique and Actionable Insights. Members will be able to access proprietary insights to get a more holistic view of their target audiences, more effectively understand performance and benchmark against the market as a whole.

* Integration with TerminalOne. Helix is deeply integrated with MediaMath’s TerminalOne Operating System, which provides end-to-end programmatic buying capabilities, and which create a seamless feedback loop to ensure maximized performance.

Marketers and agencies who are current MediaMath clients in the U.S. can opt in to access Helix today, other regions will be announced in stages going forward. Interested clients should contact their MediaMath representatives, it’s easy to join and realize immediate benefits.

 

oded_madrid2010Oded Lida Greiss (photo) is the founder and CEO of Digital Ventures Europe, a company founded in 2013 and based in Barcelona, Spain, whose mission is to help technology companies obtain scalable solutions to expand into global markets, including ventures like Datorama, Innovid and SparkFlow. We interviewed Oded in order to find out more about the services his company provides to technology companies in Latin America and the U.S.

Lorena Hure contributed to this article.

Portada: Can you please explain who backs Digital Ventures Europe?
Oded Lida Greiss, CEO: “Digital Ventures is privately owned and backed by private investors.”

Portada: What companies does Digital Ventures invest in and work with?
OLG : “Digital Ventures portfolio is composed of two kinds of companies: partners and young startups.Partner companies, in an advanced stage, are where Digital Ventures helps to expand their business to international markets.
In This group you will find the following companies:
Datorama – Digital Ventures is their partner for expanding their business into Spain, Portugal and Latin America.
Innovid – Digital Ventures is their partner for expanding their business into Spain and Portugal.
Spark Flow – Digital Ventures is their worldwide partner for expanding their business into International markets (Excluding Latin America)
The other group is made up of young startups, where we perform as Angel investors and tutors.In this group you will find the following companies:

mmuze, Hyper contextualize marketing – a young and promising company, which uses semantic algorithm to identify which products people are talking about across the web and where.
Tuisy, Planning and Social Shopping App – a Very interesting App, which could change the way we plan our leisure activity.
Mobeac, Beacon based micro localization marketing platform.
Digitaland – High end production agency, specialized in Rich Media and experts on technology

Portada: In what areas of the Latin Digital Marketing World (namely, Latin America, U.S. Hispanics and Spain) do you see the most growth potential (from an investment perspective)?
OLG: ‘Data, Video, Mobile (cross screen) and RTB are the current trends in digital Marketing, which will keep growing and fast. Localization based marketing is yet to come, but when it does, it will change dramatically all aspects of our lives.”

Data, Video, Mobile (cross screen) and RTB are the current trends in digital Marketing, which will keep growing and fast.

Portada: In what areas of the Latin online video sector do you see the most growth potential in?
OLG: “I think online video has still long way to go in Latin America, as main players just started exploring this market. Interactive video will surely grow and DCO (Dynamic Creative Optimization) in Video.”

Portada: Please explain a bit about the background of Datorama and what problems it tries to solve for agencies and brand marketers?
OLG: “Datorama was created by two main product owners in MediaMind (currently Sizmek), Ran Sarig and Efi Cohen, who joined forces with Katrin Ribant who used to lead the Arthemis project within the Havas group.The main idea was to create a disruptive technology, which could change the way marketing professionals access and manage their data.

Smartphone with cloud of application iconsIn today´s landscape agencies and brand marketers are forced to use multiple platforms and environments such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Adwords, DFA, Sizmek, Mediamath etc.Each platform generates huge amounts of data, but each one of them uses different reporting system, different data models, etc.As a result, modern marketers find themselves “drowned” in huge amounts of siloed data, in which they cannot make effective usage. The Datorama platform helps them integrate data from all these different sources and many others, into one coherent model enabling them to own their data, process and improve it, visualize it and effectively use it on a day to day basis.Being 100% focused on marketers, Datorama saves the typical headaches, usually related to the implementation process of general BI tools.”

The main idea behind Datorama was to create a disruptive technology, which could change the way marketing professionals access and manage their data.

Portada: When you invest in a company, what do you like to see regarding the sector, features of entrepreneurs etc.?
OLG: “First of all, we look at the team! A company is never more, than the people who form it. Then we look for innovation and an idea which could fit into our portfolio, complementing the other technologies we deal with.Even if Digital Ventures Europe is less than two years old, technology companies in Latin America willing to expand their operations internationally, will be able to benefit from the broad experience of team behind this company, who (according to their web site) consider themselves as pioneers in the Digital Marketing arena.”