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Portada has officially launched its Council System. The five different council units already met once virtually during the first quarter and in-person at Portada Miami in mid-April. The next in-person meetings will be at Portada New York (Sept. 24-25) and Portada Mexico (Oct. 30). Check out what the brand marketing member executives have to say about the experience so far!

 

“I think that Portada has been doing a great job, I’m really excited about all the things we’ve been working on during these meetings and understanding, not only inspiring but really taking action, so for me it’s very interesting.”

Perla Patricia Aragón, Digital Marketing Director MX, at L’Oréal (Council of the Americas Member)

 

 

“I am honored to be part of Portada’s Agency Star Committee. Driving growth through multicultural audiences is no longer a ‘nice to have’, but instead a key component of realizing full growth potential for our clients. Portada helps promote deeper marketplace understanding of that essential principle.”

Dana Bonkowski, SVP, Multicultural Lead, Starcom Worldwide (Agency Star Committee Member)

 

 

“Having a Brand Star Committee and getting marketing people to share their experiences is a great idea. The idea of having an opportunity to really link with people who have the same challenges as you, who maybe have had the same launching opportunities… and really just share.”

Margie Bravo, Multicultural Champion, Nestlé USA (Brand Star Committee Member)

 

 

“I’m in the Travel Marketing Board, a very good opportunity to share different visions among different industries, we are airlines, car rentals, hotels… and it’s amazing how, even though it’s the same industry, it’s different pillars, and it’s amazing how we all share the same challenges and it’s interesting to see how everything is related.”

Pablo Chiozza, Senior VP US, Canada, Asia & Caribbean, Latam Airlines Group
(Travel Marketing Board Member)

 

 

“Being a part of the Brand Star Committee has been really interesting so far. I think that part of the challenges that we all face as marketers are actually really similar to one another even across industries, across brands…  I’m grateful that Portada has created a forum to share and reapply, to not just talk about the successes, but talk about the challenges so that we can help one another.”

Marissa Fernandez, Director, Marketing Strategy and Fan Development, NFL
(Brand Star Committee Member)

 

 

“I think it’s a great thing that Portada has put together, it’s given me a chance to really interact with some folks that I’ve known in the industry but maybe we hadn’t gotten together around the specific unique targeted approach like multicultural Hispanic marketing through the lens of sports and sports marketing, so it’s been very engaging for me.”

Dan Keats, Director Consumer Marketing-Sponsorships, Allstate Insurance
(Sports Marketing Board Member)

 

 

“The Brand Star Committee has been great. We’ve had great discussions about real-life problems in marketing we’re having today, and solutions, and part of it is because we had a great group of marketers and marketing practitioners. Even though I get invited to this kind of things all the time, the executives we had at the table, this time it was top-notch, great quality people that could really get to a deeper level of discussion than I’ve had at other places.”

Rafael Lopez-de-Azua, Head of Media and Digital, Latam, Coty
(Brand Star Committee Member)

 

 

“I think it’s a great idea, I really liked that we were able to get together in a group yesterday and just talk peer-to-peer about the things we’re struggling with, or things we’re finding challenging, and see what other people have learned from their experiences.”

John Sandoval, Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager, Intuit

(Brand Star Committee Member)

 

“It has been a great experience so far, we’ve meet twice and it’s great to have the access to all these people in the marketing world that have the same type of issues that we do and discuss these matters, try to find solutions and interact that way, so it’s great networking with your peers. It’s a great opportunity to get access to different technologies, different ideas, and in a great setting.”

Ana Lucía Soto, National Media Manager, JCPenney (Brand Star Committee Member)

 

 

“I am proud to be associated with Portada’s exciting new Council System, and am eager to partner with other industry leaders to move multicultural advertising forward.”

David Queamante, SVP, Media Director, UM Worldwide (Agency Star Committee Member)

 

 

 

“The Council System is very unique for us at Mastercard. It allows us to better understand what the Hispanic market is doing and we can leverage that with a lot of our properties. That’s the biggest feature and the benefit. And bringing our knowledge as it relates to Mastercard to this business and the Hispanic community is very important to us.”

Mike Tasevski, VP, North America Sponsorships, MasterCard
(Sports Marketing Board Member)

 

 

For further information about Portada’s Council System, head to our Frequently Asked Questions section.

In addition to the more than 70 brand marketing executives who integrate Portada’s expanding Council System, Council System integrations are available to an elite group of marketing services vendors. To discuss opportunities and find out more about how Portada’s content and networking platform can help your brand’s marketing objectives, please contact Portada Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda.

Last Thursday at Portada Los Angeles, select speakers got together to discuss how all marketing is now multicultural marketing. Panels included varied topics ranging from taxes to Hollywood, attendees got a glimpse of what’s next for the Latino market.

Weeks after Portada Miami, top-notch speakers got together again at the Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel on May 10 to discuss key topics surrounding the Latino community in the U.S. After an introduction by the president of Portada Marcos Baer, Melissa Rodriguez, founder and CEO of Mel Rodriguez & Co, introduced Intuit’s Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager John Sandoval, who provided the audience with interesting insights on marketing to Latinos when it comes to taxes. Benjamin Franklin said “Latinos are unfamiliar with the income-taxes category,” said Sandoval. “Even if you speak English, this whole tax language is very challenging to understand.” TurboTax found that in the Latino market the “Do it yourself” portion is very small, while non-Hispanics prefer the DIY approach. This means a gap and a business opportunity that TurboTax is tapping into by helping Latinos to do their taxes themselves.

At 10:30am, Nelson Peña, VP of Latcom U.S., took over the stage to present one of Latcom’s most successful case studies. With thousands of out-of-home advertisements, Latcom’s campaign designed for Fox Entertainment managed to create awareness of Fox’s new OTT app, recently launched in Mexico. When asked about targetting U.S. Hispanics, Peña shared that even though the biggest opportunity for out-of-home is in the entertainment category, campaigns are tailored depending on brands and locations, such as the campaign Latcom did for Nestlé, in which the creatives were specifically designed to target Hispanics in southern Texas, Arizona, and California.

Unless you grow with multicultural audiences, you cannot grow.

A deep discussion about what it takes for brands to communicate with Latino audiences got everyone thinking about the future of multicultural marketing. Moderated by Zach Rosenberg, president of MBMG, the panel gathered decision makers like Mobvious’ CEO Isabel Rafferty, Gallegos United’s Strategic Planning Director Caterina Goncalves and Chief Strategy & Engagement Officer Andrew Delbridge, and Natalia Gutierrez, Category Sales Development Manager, Global Foods at Nestlé. With each panelist bringing their own experience with multicultural marketing over the years to the table, the conversation spurred engagement among the audience. A good example to understand cultural attunement according to Caterina Goncalves is what she called “the Despacito phenomenon”, in which a non-Hispanic singer, Justin Bieber, appropriated the song and embraced the Spanish language. “Not enough brands are doing are doing enough to really be culturally attuned,” commented Andrew Delbridge. “As someone who comes from the general market side, I’ve probably learned more in the last 6 years than I’ve learned in the previous 20 years of my career about what I didn’t know about marketing to Hispanics, or to America, really; unless you grow with multicultural audiences, in most categories, you cannot grow.”

There are more boys walking around in Messi or Ronaldo jerseys than in U.S. soccer jerseys.

At 11:45am, the stage received a selection of brilliant speakers with experience in the soccer business industry. Brendan Hannan, VP of marketing and communications for the LA Galaxy; Jason Howarth, VP of marketing at Panini America; and Steve Pastorino, VP of Corporate Partnership at Las Vegas Lights FC, answered questions posed by Joe Favorito, Portada’s Head of Sports Content, about the great potential marketers can tap on now that Fifa’s World Cup is almost here… and Team U.S.A. is not going. “For a country that is not participating in the World Cup, the U.S. market is fortunate of having a wide demographic of people supporting multiple countries,” asserted Jason Howarth. “On the men’s side there’s always been this default of ‘who else am I going to root for”, there are many more boys walking around in Messi or Ronaldo jerseys than in U.S. soccer jerseys.”

Finally, Portada LA got to a conclusion that was very ad hoc with the setting: in a panel titled Hollywood and Latin Audiences, Pongalo’s CEO Rich Hull talked to Adriana Trautman, VP, Marketing Latin America at 20th Century Fox, about marketing entertainment to Latin Americans. When asked about how traditional brands are using content online, and what works in the entertainment industry, Trautman answered that “Consumer behavior is completely different online; from a Hollywood perspective is probably easier for us than for more traditional brands because people are looking for that content, but more and more it is about interaction, about creating a relationship with characters, actors, and with the talent behind it… It takes a lot of work, but once you do it, it keeps the conversation going.”

As you can see, the room was packed. Where were you?

What: TurboTax has added a Hispanic-oriented ad in Spanish to its “Nothing to be afraid of” campaign. “The objective of the campaign is to increase awareness, product consideration, and trial,” says John Sandoval, Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager at Intuit.
Why it matters: The 360 degree marketing campaign addresses the fear of doing taxes. It is aimed at giving confidence to Latinos and ensuring relevance of TurboTax among acculturated and unacculturated consumers.

 

As Intuit TurboTax knows, marketing to Hispanics is not that easy. For the third consecutive year the company has launched a 360-degree marketing campaign dedicated to Hispanic consumers. “TurboTax is committed to educate and empower consumers to file their own taxes,” said John Sandoval, Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager at Intuit Inc. With the slogan No hay por qué tener miedo (There’s nothing to be afraid of), TurboTax addresses the fear of the unknown some people get when the time to file taxes approaches. The campaign tries “to communicate ease of use, in-language support and the fact that with TurboTax they are not alone while filing their taxes”, explains Sandoval.

The ads in English, launched on January 1st, revolve around the idea that commonly scary things such as a ghost in the attic, a possessed teddy bear, or a hairy monster in the woods are not as scary as people might think, just like taxes. Similarly, the ad in Spanish shows a traditionally scary creature, famously known in the Hispanic world as “Chupacabra”, presented in a rather comical way. In the midst of shadows and goats bleating, a narrator starts, “We are usually more afraid than necessary of certain things… and then we do our taxes with TurboTax”. We notice ‘El Chupacabra’ is speaking while he picks up a goat… to pet. Everything is easy for Mr. Chupacabra as he consults with a CPA on his phone, in Spanish, all while petting his goat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9W-eMoislWY

“Multicultural agency Gallegos UNITED leveraged the legendary creature ‘Chupacabra’ that exists in the folklore of various Latin American countries and brought it to life with a twist”, asserted Sandoval. TurboTax is taking into account the nuances of the Latino population, and so they plan to approach the audience from a bilingual perspective: “We are taking a bilingual approach to reach consumers through Spanish and English language content created by prominent social influencers,” added Sandoval. “For us, Spanish is a tactic, not a strategy. We speak to our Latino consumers in the language they prefer based on receptivity and context.”

For us, Spanish is a tactic, not a strategy. We speak to our Latino consumers in the language they prefer.

Multichannel-Effort

To ensure maximum reach, Intuit has planned a multi-channel effort, including community events, influencers, and social media. “The objective of the campaign is to increase awareness, product consideration, and trial,” said Sandoval. “Our newly launched TurboTax Live offering, which allows customers to have a credentialed CPA or EA review their tax return before they file, in the language of their choice and from the comfort of their living room.”

TurboTax is confident users will feel as at ease as Mr.Chupacabra, and they are invited to join the conversation on social media and share their tax experience using the hashtag #ConTurboTaxPuedes during the tax season, which runs through April 17th, 2018.

 

In today’s article of our CONTENT MARKETING  series presented by Skyword, we examine how three major companies, two major CPG’s (P&G and Clorox) and one Beverage Company (Tampico)  target the Hispanic demographic via Content Marketing activities. In all cases the content marketing effort in owned media properties (websites and social media) is complemented with paid, mostly but not only, digital media advertising. In addition, these marketers put a lot of emphasis in having multiple touch points with the consumer (e.g. desktop, mobile, social media and in-store).

1. P&G´s Orgullosa Programm

John Sandoval Senior Multicultural Marketing Manager at Procter&Gamble
John Sandoval, Senior Multicultural Marketing Manager, Procter & Gamble

Late in 2012 P&G announced a marketing investment in non-traditional media. As John Sandoval Senior Multicultural Marketing Manager at Procter&Gamble told Portada at the time: “We are starting to significantly invest in non-traditional media to respond to “ethnic consumer media usage trends when and where they are receptive.”

The cornerstone of P&G’s content marketing initiative is the Orgullosa program. Orgullosa  targets bicultural Hispanic woman between their early twenties and their late forties. John Sandoval, heads the Orgullosa initiative and leads Procter & Gamble’s Multicultural Center of Expertise.

Orgullosa is all about celebrating the inspiration and the pride of Latina women.

In addition to the website, other Orgullosa digital properties include Facebook (www.facebook.com/Orgullosa), Twitter (www.Twitter.com/Orgullosa), and YouTube (www.YouTube.com/MiOrgullosa). These are all  engagement points that surround Orgullosa’s different activities, such as the Board of Faldas announcements, and the P&G Orgullosa “Skirts Only” Fashion Show which celebrated” mujeres con la falda bien puesta.”

“This is something that was developed from the ground up with specific  consumer insights about the bicultural spectrum and targeting the Bicultural Latina,” says Sandoval.  “Right now the language used to connect  with the bicultural Latina is Spanish. There will be an English-Spanish toggle.  Even if we are targeting the bicultural Latina, even if she can speak English, we know that we want to provide her with the relevant topics interest areas in Spanish. We use language as a tactic, not a strategy.”

How it is produced…

orgullosaOrgullosa is produced in-house by P&G, with the support of a wide array of P&G brands . “We have lots of P&G brands behind us,” says Sandoval.

It is just as simple as looking to our brands and see what have you done on your website, translate and develop a more relevant tone.

P&G also draws from the expertise of copy writers across agencies to develop content. Agencies  include Fleishman Hillard (PR), Citizen Relations (PR), Starcom (Media) and Dieste (Creative). Most importantly, a substantial part of the content is produced by the community itself (posts, polls) and a blogger network as well as the Orgullosa Board. Board of  Faldas, or Board  of Skirts, members provide content ideas.   Board of Faldas members includes lifestyle expert Evette Rios; international motivational speaker, Maria Marin; and entrepreneur and chocolatier, Maribel Lieberman. Belinda C. Voice, Editor and P&G Community Manager coordinates contributions. Social media is also  pushed via a partnership and integration with the Despierta America show (Univision).

As Sandoval puts it, “Orgullosa is about authentic content and authentic conversations. It is integrated and seamless.” The mostly digital content marketing driven orgullosa platform has also a real life extension through the “Entre nosotras” parties where P&G Hispanic women consumer gather to party.

…and promoted via paid media

In addition to owned and earned media , Orgullosa is also promoted through media buys. “We are investing more in digital including mobile for both Hispanic and General Market as we continue to follow the media habits of the consumer.  By brand, the role of digital in the marketing mix varies, but we are continuously seeking the best ways to interact with consumers in social media, online, in-store and across touch points,” Sandoval notes. Orgullosa has also been promoted via ads in Top-Spanish-language magazine buys.

 

2. Clorox’s Always on Principle

cloroxIn an earnings call two weeks ago Benno Dorer,  Clorox’s EVP  and COO of Cleaning, International & Corporate Strategy, said that a key principle enabling the company’s success is the “Always on Principle” which is applied through digital technology.

The  principle that we’re pursuing here is called Always On.

According to Dorer, “wherever the consumer is on her shopping path, we are going to be there with dedicated engagement managers.” “So if she’s looking for Disinfecting Wipes, so searching Disinfecting Wipes on babycenter.com, we have an opportunity to deliver a custom ad. If she’s on Facebook chatting with friends or being exposed to a product on Facebook, we are there with her. We can send her, through Amazon.com, to buy our products. If she’s on a retailer app like Safeway, we can engage with her. Even in-store, we will engage with her. We are Always On. We’re always there with her. ”

Another insight that Dorer talked about is consumer fragmentation and how it applies to target the Hispanic demographic. “The world is getting more fragmented. So we’ve added Hispanic, and now we’re also adding millennials, ” he said.  Last year Clorox announced a Spanish-language marketing platform targeting Hispanics called Clorox Fragancia. to promote the following three product lines: Floors –  (Multipurpose Cleaner), Toilets & Bathrooms (Liquid Rim hanger), Aircare: Aerosols (Air fresheners).Dorer,  Dorer cited the Fraganzia program as an effort  that is expanding.

When targeting the  Hispanic consumer, as you can imagine, it is very important to have very tailored, very targeted marketing plans.

Dorer added that technology helps him reach the desired demographic: “With help from our partners at Google and together with our customer target, we designed a program that allows us to target consumers who live within 5 mile’s radius of a Hispanic-designated target store. And then if you live there, if you’re Hispanic and if you engage in content either on your favorite website or on a mobile app, we can send you an online coupon. So that’s geo-targeting and an example of our capabilities as they evolve with digital technology.”

 

3. Tampico’s Brand Engagement programm

tampicoBeverage Company Tampico has an active content marketing program targeting the Hispanic consumer . related to its Act-on-Impulse campaign.

According to Marta Gerdes, VP of Marketing at Tampico Beverages, the  “objective of the #Act-on-Impulse campaign is to continue Brand Engagement efforts with the Young Adult consumers.

” The campaign has a strong social media component which is all about real-time interactions.

According to Gerdes, the “brand’s relevance is increased  through multiple digital touch-points and key field marketing events that are relevant and “irresistible” to young adult consumers.

Our content marketing strategy centers on a combination of Brand, Curated and Promotional initiatives that tap into consumers’ habits and “impulsive” tendencies.

“We support the content marketing strategy with art cards that visually support the content, as well as we visually brand our Facebook wall.” ,  Gerdes says.

Tampico also activated an offline and online  national paid media campaign over the  last Summer until the end of September. POS (Point of Sales) media were  also bought “to maximize synergies as the impulsive acts are extended to many of the field marketing activities implemented throughout our core markets,” Gerdes notes.

This series of articles about “Content Marketing” is brought to you by Skyword. Skyword provides a wide range of services so that companies may connect with their audiences and generate a higher degree of engagement via top-quality contents for online search and social networking, currently the two main sources for content consumption.

Other articles of the CONTENT MARKETING SERIES:

CONTENT MARKETING: What do we mean when we talk about “content marketing”?

CONTENT MARKETING: Flying Through the Fog: A Marketer’s Guide to Navigating Search After Google Keywords Were Encrypted

CONTENT MARKETING: What we can learn from Iron Mountain, IBM and Autotrader

CONTENT MARKETING: Should Media Firms become Content Marketing Agencies?

CONTENT MARKETING: Spanish Language: What opportunities does it afford?

CONTENT MARKETING: How P&G, Clorox and Tampico engage Hispanic audiences

CONTENT MARKETING: How Pepsi’s “Cultural Fluency” concept translates into Content Marketing executions