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While demand side platforms (DSPs) continue to propagate across Latin America, major supply side platforms entering the region experience some resistance from publishers or at least are not fully understood by them. So, are Latin American publishers really adopting SSPs or not? Lorena Hure, a digital marketing expert in our editorial staff, asked several major players to answer the above question.

14271338940_ddbbaf7a55_oAccording to experts interviewed by Portada, publishers are undergoing a paradigm shift, which calls for a period of training and adaptation to this relatively new technology.

On the one hand, supply side platforms seem to aid publishers in their selling process; however, on the other hand, as these platforms introduce the concept of cost-efficiency and automation, publishers are faced with the challenge of redefining their operations and business models.

According to Lucio Grimaldi, Managing Director for Latin America at Publicitas, “the main obstacle still remains a cultural and business shift in the way that publishers have been monetizing their digital inventories. Working with a SSP platform implies a completely different business model and this has been the major challenge for publishers, who have been working differently and relying on traditional digital sales for a long time. I also believe there is still a fear from publishers that the SSP model will ‘cannibalize’ traditional digital sales and reduce CPMs significantly. Thus, it’s key for publishers to have the right SSP partner/approach and a clear inventory and monetization strategy in order to be successful in this transition.”

The enormous opportunities and the evolution of Advertising technologies in Latin America will be examined in-depth by major experts of the brand marketing, agency, media and measurement world at the Portada’s Latam Summit on June 3 -4 in Miami (part of #Portadalat.)

The fact that some LatAm publishers consider the entrance of supply side platforms as potential threats to the level of their  eCPMs, is reflective of another important factor when it comes to challenges in the region: Lack of education. As Fernando Narcio, Regional Manager Latin America at PubMatic puts it “I think that the biggest obstacle for programmatic adoption in Latin America is education. Given the rapid change in the industry, many publishers need to be brought up to speed in terms of what programmatic is, what are the roles of the different players in the eco-system (DSPs, SSPs, Exchanges, DMPs, etc.) , and how  programmatic can  help them maximize the value of their digital assets.”

Even if Brazil often has its own logic, the situation is similar to the one experienced in the rest of Latin America. According to Rafael Pallarés, Manager Director at Aunica, “the Brazilian market faces several challenges regarding programmatic advertising, and the low levels of acumen among the digital community and loose guidelines are the greatest among them. As secondary challenges, publishers need to better organize and package data in order to take more value out of their assets, and players in the ecosystem should define their roles with more clarity – many players claim to be DMPs, DSPs or SSPs, for instance, without carrying the core expertise and technologies to claim so.”

 Publishers need to better organize and package data in order to take more value out of their assets.

SSPs platforms challenged

6969804173_e4651ecd8b_oAs we have seen, in order for publishers to incorporate supply side platforms across the board, not only training and education will be needed. Additionally, the lack of confidence in this technology needs to be overcome. This is quite a challenge for SSPs willing to gain new markets in the region.

 In order for publishers to incorporate supply side platforms across the board training and education is needed, this should help to overcome the lack of confidence that still exists in the technology.

Patrizio Zannatta, Managing Director Latin America at Rubicon Project, suggests that “ it’s certainly not for a lack of willingness to experiment or innovate. I think Latin America is in a similar position to Italy when I began working there for Rubicon Project: the only thing lacking was perhaps a little understanding and confidence in what is still a relatively new technology. In Italy, we saw the majority of the top 50 sellers embrace automated advertising within a matter of months. Every market is of course different and the way we have seen sellers using the technology in different, and often creative ways to suit their individual businesses could be especially interesting. Global media agency Magna Global predicted that programmatic will make up between 60 and 70% of digital ad revenues in the three major Latin American markets by 2018”.

When asked about the challenges being faced by publishers, Guido Conterno, executive director at GDA, stated that as for “supply side platforms, there is the fear of use of the cookie re-targeting the SSP can do, whereas as for programmatic buying, contextual audiences via programmatic are sold at low prices; user audiences and private deals have higher prices. Once these Private Marketplaces are set and there is no spillage of the Publisher’s Users cookies outside the market place, programmatic will grow in the region”.

The real challenge is not only on the part of the publishers who should implement this technology, but also on SSP service providers.

The adoption of Supply side platforms in LatinAmerica, even if not yet widespread, seems to be imminent. It is all a matter of seeing how 2015 develops, considering that there is a promising outlook for programmatic buying in the years to come. The real challenge is not only on the part of the publishers who should implement this technology, but also on SSP service providers who should work hand in hand with publishers in order to help them incorporate it.

The Latin America media and advertising markets are almost ruled by huge TV budgets. In this context, non-linear TV properties (e.g.  native digital properties as well as digital properties of magazines and newspapers ) have a tremendous opportunity to capture some of these TV advertising monies.

Lorena Hure contributed to this article.

GC_2008_400x400Guido Conterno, executive director at GDA, a consortium of major Latin American newspapers including Argentina’s La Nacion and Mexico’s El Mercurio,  says that  “newspaper and print based sites are rapidly incorporating video as a substitute of photos; once the processes are in place, and  robust webTV sites set, they will get a share of those investments.”

An important aspect that will greatly contribute to channel TV ad investment to the digital environment, is the technology provided by supply side platforms (SSPs).

2a39571According to Jorg Nowak, Head of Latin America at YuMe “This is certainly a global trend that is an important topic in LatAm as well.  Reason being is that clients request a faster turn around time to measure the ROI of the campaigns and that puts pressure on everyone in the campaign life cycle to work faster, as well as becoming even more detail oriented when it comes to categorizing the inventory by the various demographics. The latter can only be achieved by automating the process”.

An important aspect that will greatly contribute to deriving TV ad investment to the digital environment, is the technology provided by supply side platforms (SSPs).

However in Latin America, not so much in the U.S., it may take a while until traditional TV advertisers decide to transfer their budgets to digital video. For now, other experts tell Portada, most of the growth of online video comes from monies exiting display advertising (banner ads). Free TV ad and Pay-TV ad budgets, while much bigger budgets, are only threatened by online video in the medium and long terms.

066e2d4 As Carly Bellis, Co-Founder & CSO at Impaktu suggests: “I do not see this happening in the short-term, but it is possible that the shift will happen in the medium term, most likely via private marketplaces.  Right now the SSPs with inventory available in Latin America tend to have lower quality, non-local content at lower prices. From recent studies we also know there is a high incidence of fraudulent sites.  Local LatAm publishers with high quality, brand safe content do not want to lump in their content with the existing content and seemingly devalue their inventory.  The same is true in the U.S. with most premium publishers.  However, I do think that private marketplaces will be more readily adopted in the medium term, giving publishers more control over the buyers, the pricing and how their inventory is bought.”

Programmatic Video’s Latin American Infancy

Manny_0165(1)Manny Montilla, sales director at Adapt.tv (photos left), takes a similar position to Bellis: “I do see publishers adopting sell side platforms. However, I think it will happen in the medium term. Programmatic video is still largely in its infancy in Latin American markets. Right now there’s a lot of ‘toe dipping’ happening where publishers are brokering deals for their video inventory with a multitude of 3rd parties (mostly ad networks) who in-turn are trying to activate that inventory across programmatic partnerships and attract significant demand volume. As the comfort and education around transacting video increases and reasonable understanding is attained I think publishers (especially the larger ones) in Latin America will be losing out on major revenue if they don’t consider partnering with programmatic video solutions directly. The advantages of doing so are too compelling to ignore, especially as publishers establish their own private exchanges and start offering buyers more interesting slices of their inventory than would be available in a public market place.”

Major publishers in Latin America will be losing out on major revenue if they don’t consider partnering with programmatic video solutions directly.

What lies ahead?

The fact that implementing this technology would contribute greatly to deriving investment to the digital environment is confronted with the resistance publishers are confronted with.

iWl5-mjI_400x400As Eric Tourtel, General Manager for the Latin American market at Teads.tv (photo), says: “We also see some publishers that are a bit concerned about losing control of their inventory or their pricing, with some people incorrectly thinking that programmatic means ‘bought cheaply’ when in fact it means ‘bought automatically’. It is, however, simply a matter of training and sharing experiences”.

Programmatic does not mean ‘bought cheaply’ but ‘bought automatically’.

In short, even if everything shows TV ad investment will eventually be derived to the digital environment, there are a few challenges to be overcome first. So far, users are giving a positive sign to publishers with regards to their consumption habits; however, the implementation of the right technology to enable digital advertising in lieu of TV, might take some time.

The enormous opportunities and the evolution of the Latin American online video landscape will be examined in-depth by major experts of the brand marketing, agency, media and measurement world at Portada’s Latin Online Video Forum on June 3 in Miami (part of #Portadalat.)

CHECK OUT: 10 things you need to know about the Latin American Online Video Advertising Market

scott.dadichWired’s Scott Dadich’s answers are in! His answers to questions asked by Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine, Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America, Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8, Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA), Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural and Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester.

Scott Dadich, the keynote Speaker at #PortadaLat (the Latin Online Video Forum and Latam Advertising and Media Summit) taking place on June 3 -4 in Miami responded to questions from our audience. See what he has to say.

Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine:

QUESTION: From a design and editorial perspective, what is the secret to be succesful on the web?
Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief-Wired: “Authenticity is paramount. At Wired, we employ a team of journalists–writers, editors, designers–who report and write and create stories about how tomorrow is being realized. On WIRED.com, these stories typically fall into one of two buckets, brand new information or thoughtful analysis about existing information. New information has a lot of value, so in some cases it is most important to be first in breaking a story. But there is a lot of value to adding context to existing information, and those kinds of stories form the bulk of our publishing stream. We spend a lot of time getting those stories right, from hiring crazy talented writers and best-in-class editors to building technology systems that serve our readers and producers. There is no easy answer, I’m afraid.”

Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America:

QUESTION:How do you see Millenial’s content consumption (themes, time spent, sources) impacting media?”
“Folks of this age group expect content to be instantly available, in all places, embedded socially, all of the time–largely for free. Those kind of consumption behaviors mean we have to be much more nimble, and we have to think of ourselves much more like a network. For consumers, that means they can have a Wired experience inside of a Facebook post, or on a Pinterest Pin, or in a Kindle single. It means we can’t take anything we make for granted. That’s a lot more work, but it also expands our reach and impact measurably.”

Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8

QUESTION: Brands as publishers? Do you think this makes any sense, or isn’t it the role of an editorial product publisher based on his/her independence and credibility?
“I believe the majority of readers know the difference between quality journalism produced by credible, trustworthy professionals and content produced with marketing as the goal. They are different products with different goals.”

Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA)

QUESTION: As an Editor, how do you deal with “Content Marketing”, e.g. working with advertising and
editorial to produce editorial products?

“I don’t. Editorial and advertising are church and state. My publisher is my business partner, and together we are tasked with making Wired a successful business, but my job falls strictly within the bounds of Wired editorial. Any content created for a brand partner or advertiser ofWired falls within the bounds of the company’s marketing arm, and my editors and I are not involved with that work–at all.”

Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural

QUESTION: What is your view of the future of apps? Will they, because of their high engagement  be more valuable than other media vehicles e.g. TV, Radio and Digital?
“Apps occupy a very substantial position in today’s media landscape. This shouldn’t be news to anyone–in fact, Wired wrote a cover story about this phenomenon in the summer of 2010. But there is no universal truth in this category. Sometimes a native app is the best outlet for putting content in the hands of an audience. Sometimes, the web does a better job. The difference comes in the quality of the product itself–how delightful and essential is the experience? How easy is it for a consumer to become an integrated member of a community?”

Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester

QUESTION: Explain some things you have done to integrate your print and digital products, and what has worked the best and why? “
“This integration is an ongoing process. It happens all day, every day. But I’ll tell you the best thing we did at Wired. We moved everyone into one space. Science editors sit next to science editors, no matter the platform. Digital producers sit next to print designers. Budget analysts sit next to fact checkers. It’s all one space and everyone gets to see the work that their counterparts do, regardless of how directly they collaboration. That was a big move for us, but hugely important because it places equal value on all of the efforts of our team. It’s not always the most convenient solution, but the transparency this arrangement affords has been a big part of our growth over the past two years.”

QUESTION (Anonymous): Is there a future for print magazines?
“Unequivocally yes. But not for all brands. And likely not in form factors we appreciate today.”

Wired’s Scott Dadich’s keynote at the upcoming Portada Latam Summit on June 3- 4 will be on “The Future of Technology by Design“. Hear first-hand insights from the Editor-in-Chief of the iconic magazine about the interaction of design and technology and its impact on media and marketing. What does design mean to technology? What’s next for Technology? Register here to attend!

scott.dadichWired’s Scott Dadich’s answers are in! His answers to questions asked by Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine, Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America, Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8, Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA), Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural and Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester.

Scott Dadich, the keynote Speaker at #PortadaLat (the Latin Online Video Forum and Latam Advertising and Media Summit) taking place on June 3 -4 in Miami responded to questions from our audience. See what he has to say.

Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine:

QUESTION: From a design and editorial perspective, what is the secret to be succesful on the web?
Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief-Wired: “Authenticity is paramount. At Wired, we employ a team of journalists–writers, editors, designers–who report and write and create stories about how tomorrow is being realized. On WIRED.com, these stories typically fall into one of two buckets, brand new information or thoughtful analysis about existing information. New information has a lot of value, so in some cases it is most important to be first in breaking a story. But there is a lot of value to adding context to existing information, and those kinds of stories form the bulk of our publishing stream. We spend a lot of time getting those stories right, from hiring crazy talented writers and best-in-class editors to building technology systems that serve our readers and producers. There is no easy answer, I’m afraid.”

Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America:

QUESTION:How do you see Millenial’s content consumption (themes, time spent, sources) impacting media?”
“Folks of this age group expect content to be instantly available, in all places, embedded socially, all of the time–largely for free. Those kind of consumption behaviors mean we have to be much more nimble, and we have to think of ourselves much more like a network. For consumers, that means they can have a Wired experience inside of a Facebook post, or on a Pinterest Pin, or in a Kindle single. It means we can’t take anything we make for granted. That’s a lot more work, but it also expands our reach and impact measurably.”

Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8

QUESTION: Brands as publishers? Do you think this makes any sense, or isn’t it the role of an editorial product publisher based on his/her independence and credibility?
“I believe the majority of readers know the difference between quality journalism produced by credible, trustworthy professionals and content produced with marketing as the goal. They are different products with different goals.”

Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA)

QUESTION: As an Editor, how do you deal with “Content Marketing”, e.g. working with advertising and
editorial to produce editorial products?

“I don’t. Editorial and advertising are church and state. My publisher is my business partner, and together we are tasked with making Wired a successful business, but my job falls strictly within the bounds of Wired editorial. Any content created for a brand partner or advertiser ofWired falls within the bounds of the company’s marketing arm, and my editors and I are not involved with that work–at all.”

Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural

QUESTION: What is your view of the future of apps? Will they, because of their high engagement  be more valuable than other media vehicles e.g. TV, Radio and Digital?
“Apps occupy a very substantial position in today’s media landscape. This shouldn’t be news to anyone–in fact, Wired wrote a cover story about this phenomenon in the summer of 2010. But there is no universal truth in this category. Sometimes a native app is the best outlet for putting content in the hands of an audience. Sometimes, the web does a better job. The difference comes in the quality of the product itself–how delightful and essential is the experience? How easy is it for a consumer to become an integrated member of a community?”

Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester

QUESTION: Explain some things you have done to integrate your print and digital products, and what has worked the best and why? “
“This integration is an ongoing process. It happens all day, every day. But I’ll tell you the best thing we did at Wired. We moved everyone into one space. Science editors sit next to science editors, no matter the platform. Digital producers sit next to print designers. Budget analysts sit next to fact checkers. It’s all one space and everyone gets to see the work that their counterparts do, regardless of how directly they collaboration. That was a big move for us, but hugely important because it places equal value on all of the efforts of our team. It’s not always the most convenient solution, but the transparency this arrangement affords has been a big part of our growth over the past two years.”

QUESTION (Anonymous): Is there a future for print magazines?
“Unequivocally yes. But not for all brands. And likely not in form factors we appreciate today.”

Wired’s Scott Dadich’s keynote at the upcoming Portada Latam Summit on June 3- 4 will be on “The Future of Technology by Design“. Hear first-hand insights from the Editor-in-Chief of the iconic magazine about the interaction of design and technology and its impact on media and marketing. What does design mean to technology? What’s next for Technology? Register here to attend!

2014numberPortada asked 15 major panregional marketing and media executives, the so-called cream of the cream in Latin American-panregional decision making, about what to expect for 2014, what countries and ad categories will be the leading ones and where they see the main challenges and oportunities for the industry. The wide gamut of opportunities and challenges cited include Programmatic Buying, Taking the most advantage of the World Cup, getting more bidders at Mobile RTB exchanges, Social Media advertising, Integrated TV-Mobile Campaigns, Social Media & Video,Content Curation and Creation and more. Below 15 points of view every panregional marketer and media professional should be in the know about.

The questions:

1 )Where do you see the main opportunities for panregional advertising growth in 2014?

1a) What ad categories do you see growing the most?

1b) What countries do you see growing the most?

2 ) What are the main challenges?

3) Where do you see the main room for improvement for Latin American agencies?

Alejandro_Campos_Carles (1)Alejandro Campos Carles – Co – Managing Director & Founder – StartMeApp

1)We are receiving requests from global agencies and some specific brands for the Brazilean market mainly.

1a) Services, Entertainment, Technology, Games and Corporate presence.

2) For StartMeApp 2014 challenge is to become the absolute leader as mobile RTB exchange in the Latam and Hispanic market. Our challenge for this year is to activate a seat on our “self service, demand side platform” for at least 5.000 global bidders.

3) Agencies will need to accept and adapt mobile as a part of media mix and promote mobile budgets and technology value for their brands.

guido-conterno

Guido Conterno – Director Ejecutivo – GDA

1) Knowing how to extend before and after the Brazilian 2014 Cup.

1a)  Tourisms and Technology.

2) Balancing in Latam the print and digital media mix and design 360 campaigns that are not a copy paste among different ATL & BTL platforms.

3) Learning how to integrate ATL & BTL platforms to maximize the audience behavior not the basic ROI index.

Leandro Cruz de Paula

Leandro Cruz de Paula – Chief Revenue Officer – US Media Consulting

1) One area with panregional growth potential in Latin America is programmatic buying. While larger markets like the US will lead the growth in this region, Latin American advertisers are also well aware of its potential and in fact we’re helping a number of brands through MediaDesk, our online ad buying platform. Programmatic has appeal due to the potential to target audiences more precisely and at market prices, and this was partly why we created MediaDesk in the first place. From an advertising standpoint, social media also has huge potential for growth in Latam. Brands now appear to be much more willing to invest in social media advertising and now understand the high level of engagement that Latin Americans have with social media. For instance, we’ve noticed strong interest and investment ever since we launched our Facebook Exchange retargeting partnership with Triggit. The advertisers know that Facebook takes up 94% of the time Latin Americans spend on social media and are now seeing that heavy engagement translate into strong response.
Another growth area that we think could surge in 2014 is the integrated TV/mobile campaign. We’ve noticed a sharp uptick in business once we started selling Shazam in Brazil and other countries in Latin America. This speaks to the fact that more and more Brazilians are watching TV with their smartphones or tablets—or both. As such, it makes sense to try to reach consumers with a campaign that blends mobile and TV the way that Shazam does.

1a) With the recovering of the world economy and some big events scheduled to happen in Latam this year, global brands will turn their dollars to Latam to maximize the returns and protect or expand their market share. The Internet penetration will keep growing steadily as portable (tablets and mobile) access become ubiquitous both in high population and rural areas. With that we tend to see most of the consumer products brands investing in 360 campaigns that would combine the power/penetration of TV/Radio to the interactiveness of the Internet and the multiplying factor of the social nets.
We’re running campaigns for a variety of ad categories and currently there isn’t one particular category that brings us more business than others. That said, based on our market observations, it seems like tech products have great potential for growth in Latam, particularly mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. Travel also seems to have potential because Latin Americans seem to be leisure traveling more than ever before and many are making their travel arrangements online. Finally, clothes are one of the top products that Latin Americans purchase online through e-commerce, suggesting that we could see many more fashion brands step up their investment levels.

2) Some political and economical instabilities are still in place in the region and not all the main brands have learned how to overcome those barriers. Partnering with local players that have the expertise in doing business in several currencies and with different taxes models will be key to succeed.

3) Agencies must be able to concentrate their investments and resource in what is their core expertise and have an ecosystem of partners in the region to operate all the rest locally. With a vast amount of local media companies, some specific laws about content production and localization and even the ability (or lack of) to move investment from one country to another, agencies must rely on partners that are able to fulfill that operation smoothly, helping them to getting even better in their core businesses.

alfonso.cueto.espn Alfonso Cueto – ESPN – Sr Director – Multi Media Sales

1) We’re finding growth centered around advertising partnerships based on a foundation of customized content development. These type of partnerships thrive with scale on our television networks and engagement in our digital and social platforms.

1a) Technology, personal care products, travel/hotels, telecommunications, and movie studios.

1b) In a general sense Mexico and Brazil. From ESPN’s perspective we have a strong focus to grow Colombia as we’ve introduced localized content and talent, as well as opening up an ESPN Colombia office at the end of 2013. The company is extremely excited about our potential for growth in that market.

2) More options for advertisers to spend, such as search and social media. Additionally, limitation of minutes in certain markets such as Mexico and Argentina force us to be smarter with the management of our inventory and pricing.

3) We’re seeing some of this already but it is crucial to move away from a low cost, rotator type mindset, and continue to improve and mature towards multi platform engaging sponsorships centered around a creative idea that is editorially relevant for our fans but connects with the brand in a unique and powerful way.

heber Diaz IPG-Portraits4762Helber Díaz – Director – MediaBrands Miami

1) Many opportunities in the pan regional market, the main stream could be:

  • Social Media & Video will remain with higher growth , tied to this trend Content -curators and creators- have a great opportunities ahead. Due to increasing media vehicles , (more tv channels , apps, web pages, social page , etc) the demand for multi platform tools/software focused quality performance and efficiency will be an opportunity. Additionally, Analytics – is key as a part of the pan regional service , delivering take aways for more marketing areas.
  • Emerging brands for pan regional media and agencies represent great opportunities. Many of them will have an start up mindset, this means a new business model for these projects will be essential.

1a) Telecommunication & Technology, Ecommerce & Social Commerce, Tourist, Beverages, Education.

1b) Tier I Brazil and Mexico. Tier II Colombia & Chile.

2) The Business model between media, agencies and clients is changing , buying performance will move from price to engagement or ROI metrics, this means a mutual commitment between all industry players. A new generation of workers (Millennials) with new aspirations and priorities will have an effect on agencies talent retention policies and/or this agencies will create new structures in order to fit with the new workers culture. An Advertising market raising on Programatic buying and performance , will need a new currency based on trust and transparency. Big Data, Mobile apps and Social networks are reading the consumer changes , agencies will manage those tools to give the brands real advantage , this means adjust or renew knowledge , tools and staff.
Content Becomes a “Channel” , brands will acquire or create their own content to support long term media actions and/or social media. Media vehicles/channesl are raising, maintain the same reach is not affordable anymore.

3) Companies’ marketing departments are transitioning to a data-driven approach, in order to deliver tangible effects on ROI results. Agencies will need to improve their analytics tools and staff in place , allowing measurement of the effectiveness through multi platform sources.

Cynthia EvansCynthia Evans – MEC Latin America

1) Online and video, TV plans are becoming video plans that include traditional linear TV plus online video a la YouTube, and a host of other video streaming and download offers – from Netflix and Crackle to Glu.

1a) Personal care, telecom, automotive and the media themselves are leading in nearly every market.

2) Commercializing offers, of whatever kind, from messaging to data; and uncertainty related to government regulation and evolution of media offer.

3) Back to basics of communication investment now that the messaging portfolio is more than main broadcast TV vendors.

Lucio_GrimaldiLucio Grimaldi – VP, Managing Director – Publicitas Latin America & US Hispanic

1) I believe pan-regional advertising is going through an evolution and transformation from the traditional perception associated with it. In these terms, we see digital, mobile and video as the main opportunities for growth in 2014 and the near future. We are also seeing the first signs of growth in the automation field, which will also have a big impact in the way that “pan-regional” buys have been perceived and done.

1a) Technology, Travel & Tourism, and Entertainment.

1b) In terms of growth I see Mexico, Colombia and Peru. Also, despite a recent slowdown in the economy, Brazil will obviously remain as the key and largest market in the region.

2) The main challenges are given by specific political and economic scenarios is key markets as Argentina, Venezuela (and Brazil) to a certain extent. Some of the policies adopted in these markets completely challenge pan-regional buys and force many brands to act or have operations at a local level (or in some cases leave these markets).

3) I am a big advocate for integration and presenting integrated solutions to clients and agencies. I have seen many agencies taking a very positive step in this direction and adopting an integrated mindset, especially during the last year. I see this as the biggest opportunity for improvement in this region, not only for agencies but also for brands, publishers and content-related companies.

carlos.gutierrez

Carlos Gutierrez – CEO Miami McCann

1) Main opportunities are in the digital space. By its very nature, digital (in whatever expression: display, search, social media, microblogging, digital production, etc. is the ideal medium for a centrally managed origination.

2) It is difficult not to fall for the usual cliches that affect the entire industry and not just the panregional community. If I try to zero IN on a specific pan regional challenge I’ll go for appropriate versioning. Regardless where the material was originated it has to truly sound (and be perceived as) Brazilian to Brazilians, Mexican to Mexicans and so on and so forth. That requires a lot of effort to do it right. We still see some centrally-managed communication efforts that by attempting to be “regional” end up sounding foreign in every country and local in none. We have to keep in mind that “Latin americans” don’t exist. What we have is Argentineans, Brazilians, Mexicans, Colombians, etc. The only ones who pursue a regional view are regional marketers and agencies. Local consumers care only so much about what’s going on in the other countries, so the communications must still feel local to them.

3) Metrics and accountability. LatAm agencies in most cases still have a long way to provide the level of analysis and intelligence that the current volume of performance information available can potentially deliver. That could translate in enormous productivity gains for agencies and clients, but still (as an overall industry) we have not put our finger on it.

Fernando Marionene 3x4 (547x640)Fernando Maroniene – Group Manager Marketing, Latin America & Caribbean – Adobe

1) The shift to digital is inevitable, as it is can be measured and monetized. Adobe understand this trend as 75% of the Adobe WW ad spend is currently digital. Some areas of opportunities are:
· Digital Magazines and Apps : Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) solution is powering significant circulation growth and reader engagement in digital magazines. Since the launch of Adobe DPS, less than three years ago, more than 150 million digital publications have been downloaded on mobile devices (tablets and phones). Those magazines offer a better reading and interactive experiences, to the point that DPS created apps have three times as many unique monthly readers than this time last year. It also gives publishers powerful analytics capabilities to maximize reach, engagement, conversion and retention.

· TV everywhere : Customers want’s to watch TV like experiences content across multiple devices, from TVs to tablets and smartphones. The popularity of consuming broadcast TV online continues to grow dramatically. Adobe Digital Index has seen the number of authenticated streams increase by 400% in the first six months of the year compared to the same period in 2012. The average number of unique visitors to sites with online TV content grew nearly seven fold in the first six months of the year compared to same period in 2012. In addition, Primetime’s authentication technology is now used by more than 50 TV channels powering more than 100 apps and web sites across all major device platforms including iOS, Android, Windows 8, Xbox, Roku, Apple TV and SmartTVs. Customers of Adobe Primetime authentication technology include Disney, TBS, Inc., Viacom, Fox, NBCU, Scripps, A&E and others.

1b) The countries we see the biggest growth in the above cited technologies are Brazil and Mexico.

2) The main challenge for companies is to define a viable business model for the new technologies. About TV everywhere, the challenge is the same: How to define a sustainable business such as increasing viewer engagement and boost revenue with dynamic ad insertion that seamlessly blends with live or on-demand TV content across devices.

3) The agencies needs to set the pace with technology and understand the new opportunities it brings. For digital magazines for example, is not a matter of replicating the paper magazines on a digital device, but how to create a digital version that enriches the experience making the most of the technology such as incorporating animated info graphics, videos and other resources that are not available in the paper version. In other words, the agencies needs to re-think the way the create ads for the mobile devices.

 

Fernando Mariano 2Fernando Mariano – President Multimedia Inc.

1) With the Word Cup being held in Brazil it seems for me that there will be opportunities for pan regional advertising related to the games, mainly at the participating countries.

1a) Information Technology, Travel.

1b) Brazil, Argentina, Mexico.

2) Competitive pricing.

3) Digital media opportunities.

Fernando Monedero colorFernando Monedero – SVP, Head of Middle Office & Digital Specialties of Havas Media Miami

1) Thanks to the technology evolution in pan-regional markets, the consumer is getting more connected and they are using multiple platforms, so marketers and sellers are finding new and better ways to connect and target them. Because of these developments, I see “mobile” as one of the main advertising trends, the brands will use this to approach the consumers closer to the moment of purchase via geo-targeted activities. We will continue keeping growth in buys through “Real-time bidding (RTB)” models, making faster and more effective marketing strategies, implementations, and optimizations. And “Social Media” will become the link with the experience of multiscreen usage where the advertisers will be more confident than before.

On the other hand, cable TV will remain as the “king” for marketers looking for branding and reach, but they will mix it with online video strategies, to maximize their results. Other “off line” channels, such as print, cinema, radio or OOH, will continue decreasing their usage relevance for marketers, except for brands looking for specific location or seasonality advertising goals.

1a) With the advent of cookies and tags technologies, marketers are getting very specific consumer data information regarding behaviors and activities which is resulting in the deeper analysis of results, helping them to confirm the success of their advertising investments. This technology is going to be key for “Retail” sellers and it will be the reason why the category will grow significantly in 2014.

Other important subject to consider this year is the “Soccer World Cup”; this classic event will dramatically increase, the advertising activity of categories such as “sports” and “entertainment”. The right brand content development will be key for them.

1b) Local politics and currency fluctuation normally has a strong influence on the Latin American Region. While the outlook is favorable it can change quickly. I would hope for a recovery in Argentina and continued growth in Mexico and Chile, but other than those countries, the country with the biggest growth potential will be Brazil because of the “World Cup”, which is a major international event. Brazil has the largest population in South America, an expanding economy, and a reasonably stable political outlook.

2) The overall marketplace is rather crowded. The challenge is to make a difference, using the various scenarios of marketers, agencies, channels, and devices, which continue to increase and evolve. To be successful it is essential to innovate and update.
On the other hand, the capacity of strategy and effective results measurement will be key to generating “Trust”, which is the fundamental bond among brands and consumers, marketers and clients, etc. etc.

3) I think Latin American agencies are very creative but this year will must improve their usage of technology, a little far from other neighbor markets as US.

Foto Alberto Pardo

Alberto Pardo – CEO Adsmovil

1) In the past 2-3 years, panregional advertising has changed dramatically , in part because of political and economic situations in countries like Argentina and Venezuela and the emergence of Mexico and Brasil in the Latin context.

I see opportunities for TV and Digital at the most:

Cable Tv will grow this year because of the soccer world cup and regional sponsors wanting to reach large amount of people. I see opportunities on mobile which is the fastest growing segment in the advertisement world today and also in Video formats. On the other hand I see a couple of opportunities: the first one is related to companies coming to LATAM to do business because of the great economic moment in most of the countries and panregional advertising becomes a great product for them.

The second one, is the large amount of local companies opening operations overseas that can leverage panregional advertising.

1a) Cable and Digital will grow the most. Cable TV will grow again partly because of the world cup in Brazil.

Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Uruguay , Ecuador , some central American countries and Brazil are going to play the world cup and it is the first time Latin America has so many countries playing the World cup. This will have a huge impact in advertisement investment this year in many countries.

Digital also will experience double digit growth. Mobile will be the key for the growth, Video will also experience growth in all countries.

2)I think there are so many challenges in the panregional advertising. Local budgets still very important for brands specially in Mexico and Brasil, so they compete with regional resources. The variety of types of media, and the complexity of the digital world are really some of the challenges I see.

3) The digital economy has changed dramatically the role of the agencies. There’s a lot of room to improve and to innovate on this regard.

pedro.quinzañosPedro Quinzaños – President & Managing Director – Virket.

1) We think that in 2014 we will see noticeable growth in digital media advertising that will outgrow television, radio and graphic media advertising. According to ZenithOptimedia, throughout this year and into the year 2015, online advertising will increase by 15%, meaning an overall 66% increase in the region of the global advertising share.  That means that online advertising will demonstrate the highest growth.

Online advertising has many advantages for the advertisers. Unlike the traditional advertising methods of TV or graphic media publishing, where it is only possible to calculate the delivery of message but not the viewer’s attention, online advertising can be tracked and measured 100% with every click, which permits for comprehension of the advertising’s impact, as well as the calculation of profit from the advertising investment.

Furthermore, traditional advertising of the old publishing methods is very intrusive. For example, while watching a television program, a consumer could be forced to watch a product advertising that doesn’t interest him, considering that the advertising space of these media is segmented by large consumer group profiles. Online advertising, however, can be directed at users individually, and, thanks to the user activity registry, it’s possible to use its information to submit announcements that are of their interest without bothering the user with promotions that may not be of his interest.

Advertising is facing a paradigm shift from the outdated and costly advertising (above-the-line), with its massive and doubtful impact, to advertising that is personalized and pinpointed to every individual user, while also completely measurable using ROI (return on investment) methodology. Additionally, the online advertising has its benefits by being cheaper than the mass media advertising. Meanwhile, the consumer also benefits from this shift, since online advertising reduces SPAM and replaces it with announcements of interest.

1a) The fastest advertising will be the kind that is directed at the users of mobile devices, such as tablets and cell phones. According to a study made by eMarketer, by 2016 Latin America will see the largest growth in mobile device advertising, a total of 39%, making it the second region with the most growth in the world. It’s estimated that by 2014 mobile device users in Latin America will reach 430 million, with Brasil, Mexico and Argentina (in the descending order) comprising the regional trend. The online advertising will grow and sustain itself in conjunction with the growing use of mobile devices. This is the year of “retargeting”. The target audience will become more segmented. The key to the marketing is in the user and advertising that is automated accordingly. Using such analysis as Big Data and Predictive Data, it will become possible to get to know the clients better and offer announcements according to their personalized profiles based on the use of cell phones and tablets.

2) The biggest challenge will be to be able to know how to reach and capture the audiences. Internet users are not passive people that can stay for hours in front of the same screen. Instead these users constantly move from one screen to the other, from the screen of their cell phone, to the screen of their computer and to the screen of their smart TV. This highlights the importance of online advertising, since it’s more adaptable and allows announcements to appear on any screen with access to the Internet. It’s crucial that the Latin American businesses understand these circumstances of change and turn to the local production of quality content that will satisfy the growing demands of the users. Consequently, advertising has to be specifically designed for the Latin American market, and not copied from the content of the United States or Europe.

3) According to the analysis of Comscore, 4 out of 5 consumers in Latin America search for products and services online. Nevertheless, many small and midsize businesses let this opportunity pass, since 35% of businesses don’t even have a website. The best opportunity for these businesses is to turn to the digital media. This means that businesses must have a website, where clients can search for products and prices. Businesses also must invest into mobile device advertising, and finally, businesses have to participate in social networks in order to create interactive platforms that can capture potential and future clients.

Latin American companies will have to open themselves to all online platforms in order to maintain their competition levels. They no longer can disregard the digital media, particularly, that of the mobile advertising, due to its expected growth that will become an exceptional opportunity.

Roberto RicossaRoberto Ricossa – Avaya

1) The digital market in Latin America is increasingly fragmented with data that confirms that brands should have a presence on all possible platforms, with a current PCs and notebooks domain, but with a rapid and uniform growth in smartphones and tablets use. On the other hand, social media and online content video should be an important part of the advertising strategy of companies, without neglecting ads Display type, where Mexico and Brazil outstand for its large number of users connected. After all, Social Networks and Video Files are presented as the main opportunities to develop files segmented marketing campaigns and reach the target audience.

1a) Advertisers face substantial opportunities in the mobile advertising segment, which will have much larger growth than segments, powered by the number of users with an age range between 15 and 34, which account for more than 50 % of Latin America’s digital population.

2) On the other side, it is extremely necessary to integrate advertising generated content for social media, online video channels and e-commerce, where the analysis of real-time data is one of the most important tools for understanding the rapid change of people’s consumer trends.

3) The main challenge that brands and advertising agencies face is to understand the digital world and to keep up with technological advances that directly impact the paradigm shifts of consumption by people. The digital education, both for work teams and customers, is critical to create successful campaigns. Implementation of data analysis tools in real time outstands within the wide range of possibilities open at this point, which quickly allows detecting trends and changes of consumption. In addition, the fact that content marketing campaigns are being generated is ideal to have a presence in all channels.

As well as the brand’s challenge is to identify people’s consumption behaviors, agencies must redouble their efforts to make this happen. At this point, is worth noting the generation of content marketing strategies with increasingly local and segmented guidance, the Big Data necessary concepts implementation and data analysis constitute the horizon digital agencies and Latin American advertising should lead their eyes to.

With the addition that the latter, the ones specialized in traditional ads, have an obligation to incorporate Online Marketing departments in the short and medium term. Finally, agencies with clients whose brands operate in the entire region have a wide spectrum in Brazil to develop their best advertising works. Not only because of the number of inhabitants and its growing markets, but because in just two years, the country will host major sport events in the world: the FIFA 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Latin American markets have far to go, is right there is the main challenge for agencies and brands. In this way that offers endless opportunities, to discover and take advantage of some of them is the only way to achieve success.

(Sources of numerical data: Digital Future in Latin America 2013 by ComScore, Portada Latam Summit, U.S. Digital Consumer vs Latam)

Gaston Taratuta – CEO IMS

1) The main opportunity for pan-regional advertisers, agencies and publishers is the Brazil World cup that take place during June-July 2014.
This event allows advertiser to connect with 500M fans, Miami, as a connecting point for Latin America can help advertisers to send one message across several countries.

1a) All categories who want to relate or be linked to the World cup, official sponsors, those who are not sponsors but are willing to do some ” guerrilla” marketing, etc

Digital advetising will see most of the growth considering most of broadcaster players at the Pan-egional ecosystem do not own world cup rights, but ESPN some how. It will be a bad year for the other players such as Disc, Turner, Sony, etc.

2) The #1 challenge is the compensation model that today does not benefit agencies at all. ” Its a buyers market “, and without a fair compensation for services I do not see agencies equiping themselves with multidisciplinary teams who can understand, for example, new media formats such as, Waze, Spotify or Twitter.

3) Years ago (12) the point of entry to the internet were portals, then moved to search, today in my opinion they are App’s and it will continue to evolve, to keep up with the speed you need dedicated teams and the adequate client to be able to develop these new platforms. So, clients and agencies have a great , great opportunity to extract value that today is on the table.

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