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Portada presents the highest level unit of Portada’s Council System: the Council of the Americas, a group of highly regarded C-level executives that share their enthusiasm for Marketing, Tech and Media in the Americas. The Council of the Americas also serves as an advisory unit steering Portada’s editorial output.

Marcos Baer, president of Portada, will chair the Council of the Americas, whose first in-person meeting will take place during Portada Miami (April 18-19, 2018, EAST Miami Hotel). 

The four objectives of the Council of the Americas are:
1. To provide U.S. and Latin American C-level leaders a platform for high level, informal gatherings.
2. To advance the marketing communications discipline as a key way to connect with consumers throughout the Americas.
3. To discuss major challenges and opportunities in marketing, tech and media.
4. To provide relevant input for Portada content (event programming, digital and print magazine communication).

Ricardo Arias Nath, CMO, PepsiCo Latin America
Andres Amezquita, VP Commercial Excellence, Latin America Stanley Black & Decker
Peter Amaro, VP, Raine
Marcos Baer, president, Portada (Board Chair)
Gonzalo del Fa, President Multicultural, GroupM
Ana Ferrel, SVP, Marketing and Corporate Communications, MasterCard
Adriana Bellinatti Grineberg, Regional Director, Panregional Latam, CENAM & Caribbean, Facebook
Bruno Lambertini, CEO, Circus Marketing
Alberto Pardo, Founder & CEO, Adsmovil
Julian Porras, Chief Executive, Latin America Omnicom Media Group
Juan Manuel Romero, CEO, Metro International
Juan Saldivar, CEO & Founder, SWS (Board Coordinator)
José Maria Sanabría, CEO, GroupM Latin America

Most Council of the Americas members will be available for one-on-one meetings with Premium Level ticket attendees of  Portada Miami on April 18-19.

Portada’s Council membership is an exclusive by invitation only experience. Members are selected from an elite group of brand marketing, tech and media thought leaders.To find out more about how Portada’s content and networking platform can help your brand’s marketing objectives, please contact Portada Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda.

What: Seven in 10 of the 58 million U.S. Hispanics now use a smartphone, and more are bypassing desktop and laptop computers completely in favor of tablets and mobile.
Why It Matters: With some help from their expertise in Hispanic mobile behavior, mobile ad network Adsmovil topped the latest comScore Mobile Metrix® in both the Hispanic Mobile and Total Mobile Audience reach categories. Could Adsmovil be the long-awaited viable alternative to the Facebook/Google duopoly? And what does a Hispanic ad network’s continued success with total audiences say about the key role that Multicultural plays in any mobile campaign’s success?

Since 2000, Hispanics have accounted for more than half of the population growth in the United States: According to the Pew Research Center, the number of Hispanics in the country reached 58 million in 2016. And with seven in 10 U.S. Hispanics now using a smartphone, this means that advertisers hoping to win in the United States must prioritize reaching this dynamic and tech-savvy demographic.

More and more advertisers are questioning the assumption that they can operate a successful campaign within the confines of Facebook and Google’s walled gardens.

“Taking into account that Hispanics are heavy mobile users and even use their mobile devices as their primary access to the internet, we always include mobile in all our communication strategies. In fact, we always recommend clients having a mobile-first approach when implementing any digital campaign,” Gonzalo del Fa, President of GroupM Multicultural (photo) asserted.

With this in mind, ad network Adsmovil launched Programmatic Mobile Hispanic solutions in 2015. In recent years, the network has become a leader in Hispanic targeting, coming up with award-winning programmatic creative and location-based targeting initiatives informed by a thorough understanding of their clients’ targets. And now, October 2017 data from ComScore has Adsmovil coming in at the top of the lists of Total Internet and U.S. Hispanic reach for Mobile:

 

 

Mobile Metrix Key Measures

MediaTotal Unique Visitors(000)
Total Internet(total audience: Mobile)196,705
1Adsmovil Network-Potential Reach87,886
2Pulpo Media67,665
3Univision Digital Network25, 474
4Primia Digital – Potential Reach22,146
5Mobvious20,956
6Fullscreen Mexico – Potential Reach18,385
7H Code Media12,333
8ImpreMEDIA IMPOWER!5,613

SOURCE: U.S. Hispanics Mobile Only, Comscore, October 2017.

MediaTotal Unique Visitors(000)
Total Internet: Hispanic All: (Mobile…)32,711
1Adsmovil Network-Potential Reach17,457
2Pulpo Media15,109
3H Code Media8,620
4Univision Digital Network7,839
5Primia Digital – Potential Reach6,397
6Mobvious 6,161
7Fullscreen Mexico – Potential Reach 5,354
8ImpreMEDIA IMPOWER!4,960

SOURCE: Total Audience Mobile Only, Comscore, October, 2017.

The voices demanding alternatives to the “duopoly” of Facebook and Google are growing louder, suggesting that Adsmovil could emerge as a leader at just the right time. While Google and Facebook took over 77% of the US$12 billion-dollar increase in global online ad spend in 2017, more and more advertisers are questioning the assumption that they can operate a successful campaign within the confines of Facebook and Google’s “walled gardens.”

AdsMovil Credits Success to Unique Understanding of Hispanic Behavior

In today’s landscape, marketers are being forced to reckon with the fact that consumers cannot be reduced to simple profiles determined by gender, age, and ethnicity. AdsMovil’s targeting solutions are focused on helping advertisers reach Hispanic users, looking at mobile users through an ethnographic lens that identifies specific Hispanic audiences according to the following factors: generation, acculturation, language and country of origin.

Hispanics’ acculturation levels lead to different attitudes toward language: those that are acculturated were typically born in the United States, prefer to speak in English, and can “toggle between Latino and American culture.” They are typically tech-savvy and have at least a high school education. Non-Acculturated Hispanics may or may not have been born in the United States, may have immigrated recently and typically hold a high school degree or less.

The benefits of understanding and appreciating these drivers of Hispanic mobile behavior make all the difference, pushing Hispanic marketing shops like Adsmovil at the top of Total Audience measurement on comScore’s Mobile Metrix in October 2017.

It is important to not only recognize the diversity that exists within Hispanic American population but also find a team with the know-how to build campaigns that really reach such a diverse demographic.  “Mexicans have different taste and buying habits than Dominicans or Argentinians. Adsmovil helps you deliver more effective media because we realize the differences and can target more appropriately. As a result, you will have better-performing campaigns,” said, Adriana Daantje, Global Product Director at Adsmovil.

It is important to not only recognize the diversity that exists within Hispanic American population but also find a team with the know-how to build campaigns that really reach such a diverse demographic.

Acculturation, Generation, Language, Country of Origin Key Factors in Determining Hispanic Behavior

In focusing on factors like acculturation, generation, language, and country of origin, Adsmovil can create targeted solutions for profiles of users with very distinct behavioral patterns: For example, non-acculturated Latinos are less comfortable using technology and slower to adopt new devices and functions, tend to use older mobile devices, and often have their browsers set in the Spanish language. They also consume more Spanish-language content, often from their countries of origin.

Mobile use among US Hispanics also varies greatly based on generation, as first-generation Hispanics are not only more likely to speak Spanish, but also more likely to look for online content in-language, and to browse ethnically relevant news, entertainment and food content. Hispanic Millennials, on the other hand, care more actively about technology and “want to stand out and be noticed,” according to Adsmovil. While they incorporate many Hispanic music, family, and culinary traditions, they are more open-minded than older Hispanic Americans, and tend to evolve with the rest of the younger Millennial Americans in terms of political and cultural beliefs and practices.

Adsmovil’s key differentiator is how it builds and identifies audiences within the Hispanic community based on the content that Hispanics consume (language, keywords, context), instead of relying solely on targeting via location, app install or purchasing history. It has direct relationships and preferred access to Hispanic premium publishers offering qualifying traffic, and offers 100% SOV, and sponsorship and content integration opportunities with exclusively Hispanic publishers.

 

What: GroupM Multicultural appointed Nelson Pinero as Senior Digital Director, Senior Partner.
Why it matters: Pinero will help brands engage multicultural audiences across all digital platforms. Pinero will be based in New York, and report to Gonzalo del Fa, President, GroupM Multicultural.  GroupM manages billions of dollars in media spend targeting multicultural consumers through agencies including Mindshare, MEC, Mediacom, Maxus and Xaxis.

362584GroupM, the global media investment management company, has announced that GroupM Multicultural, the unit charged with integrating and negotiating multicultural business across GroupM’s umbrella of companies, appointed Nelson Pinero as Senior Digital Director, Senior Partner.

Pinero’s role will be wholly devoted to digital, representing multicultural interests across all investment and programmatic teams both internally at GroupM and its agencies including Mindshare, MEC, Mediacom, Maxus and Xaxis.

Pinero joins GroupM Multicultural from MEC, where he serviced several industries and accounts including retail (IKEA), QSR (KFC), and travel (Marriott). Prior to MEC, he spent three years on the Sprint team at Mindshare where he served on the digital team to lead geo-targeted and behavioral targeting campaigns, as well as the early adoption of programmatic solutions. Pinero also held roles at at DMB&B (Mediavest) where he gravitated towards technology based accounts (TheStreet.com and Epic Games), as well as Dentsu where he managed media planning for Canon Digital Cameras and Computer Solutions for over three years.

Pinero is based in New York, and reports to Gonzalo del Fa, President, GroupM Multicultural.

External and Internal Digital Voice

“As our role in the market expands, we had an immediate need for someone who could focus on digital specifically, able to act as GroupM Multicultural’s point person and digital voice both internally and externally,” said Gonzalo del Fa, President, GroupM Multicultural. “Nelson has a passion for finding culturally nuanced digital solutions that enhance message delivery among multicultural audiences. His new role will assist negotiations with key digital partners within programmatic, video, social and search.”

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

Even bilingual Hispanics sometimes search in Spanish, while Spanish-language searchers may need localized landing pages. Search and multicultural experts explain best practices for SEM.

PHOTO: Jenny Downing
PHOTO: Jenny Downing

With the growth in the number of bilingual and English-dominant Hispanics in the United States, search marketing cannot simply be a matter of translation. Even someone who is very comfortable in English may switch to Spanish for some searches, according to Gonzalo del Fa, president of GroupM Multicultural.

“Even though digital overall has been growing extremely fast against Hispanics, I still feel search is not there yet and … the biggest barrier is language,” he says.

More evidence for the importance of getting the language question right: A recent survey by One Hour Translation found that more than 75 percent of consumers are more likely to buy from a website written in their native language.

Lior Libman, One Hour Translation
Lior Libman, One Hour Translation

The most common mistake marketers make, according to Lior Libman, president of One Hour Translation, is assuming that a simple translation is enough. He says marketers often think, “If a campaign is working in English, I’ll hire a translator, and it’s good to go.” Especially in search, where a tiny difference in wording can result in huge changes in clicks, copy should be fine-tuned and tested by local, native speakers.

The translators need to understand the objective of each keyword, as well, according to del Fa. He points out that there can be many more keywords in Spanish that can express a single product or idea. “Think about ‘furniture,'” he says. “In Spanish, we have five ways of saying it. Often, with search campaigns, the client comes in with 50 keywords, and when we put it into Spanish, it becomes 120.”

Doug Platts iCrossing
Doug Platts, iCrossing

Localization involves more than translation, as Doug Platts, iCrossing’s head of SEO, points out. He says that translators should not only be local to the campaign, they should also “be on top of what the trends in that culture are.”

Nuance becomes even more important when marketing products that have more emotion attached to them, such as insurance, finance or healthcare. “I don’t want to make a mistake in those cases,” del Fa says.

But it’s even more complicated! Many Hispanics switch between English and Spanish when searching. In a July, 2014, blog post, Lisa Gevelber, Google’s vice president of Americas marketing, pointed to a Google consumer survey that found that the majority of U.S. Hispanic mobile users typically search in English or a mix of English and Spanish. At the same time, the number of Google searches that included common Spanish-language question words had nearly doubled since 2011.

Del Fa says that 65 percent of Hispanics know how to search for something in English; if they don’t find what they’re looking for, they switch to Spanish.

Landing the deal

Finessing the language doesn’t stop with the search campaign: How marketers handle landing pages is equally important. According to research by GroupM, the majority of consumers who consider themselves bilingual can operate at work in English but are more comfortable speaking Spanish in their personal lives – including while using search.

In the best of all possible searches, someone who searched for a Spanish keyword would get results leading to pages that were in Spanish and appropriate for his or her region. In the real world, every site can’t offer all its pages in English and Spanish. At iCrossing, the advice is to build some core landing pages at the product or service level.

Another good practice, according to del Fa, is to deliver search results in the language in which the landing page is written. “If results are in Spanish, but clicking on one takes them to a website that is not in-language, it will throw the person off,” he says.

If it’s not possible to create a landing page in Spanish, he advises that it’s better to return English-language search results for an in-Spanish search. “If the results are in English, I know the page will be in English, so it’s not an issue,” he says.

In global campaigns, Spanish-language landing pages need to be localized, as well as the search campaigns themselves, Platts advises. Using hreflang tags to denote the correct regional URL in search results ensures that searchers find what they need. “We don’t like to create a Spanish page and that will cover everybody,” Platts says. He also notes that paid search paid is an excellent way to test whether a larger digital campaign should be launched in English or Spanish, before a brand invests larger assets.

Gonzalo del Fa
Gonzalo del Fa, GroupM

Finally, search marketers need to remember that language is a tactic, not a strategy, del Fa says. “Let’s put a strategy together. Then, when we are down the road planning the tactics, then language will kick in.”

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

Are you ready for today’s Webinar (April 23 2pm EST/ 11 am PST) on “The New Multicultural: Hyperlocal Digital Strategies for National Advertisers”?

If you did not register yet (free). REGISTER NOW!

webinar_banner160x600Learn how to leverage hyperlocal digital advertising to reach a complex and nuanced multicultural audience across the nation.

Hear how Gonzalo del Fa, President, GroupM Multicultural
and Susan Lee, VP Corporate Development, MaxPoint:

– Assess the challenges multicultural marketers must overcome to reach digitally minded audiences
– Explore how hyperlocal digital advertising reaches multicultural consumers in neighborhoods across the country
– Discover how multicultural marketers are currently using hyperlocal digital advertising and measuring success

If you did not register yet (free). REGISTER NOW!

The New Multicultural: Hyperlocal Digital Strategies for National Advertisers

APRIL 23, 2015
2:00 pm ET, 11:00 am PT

OVERVIEW:

Digital advertising has moved from a nice-to-have to an essential part of every multicultural marketer’s communication strategy. But as multicultural consumers become more digitally minded and media budgets shift to mobile, display, and video advertising, marketers find themselves asking the same question: how can I leverage digital strategies in a meaningful way for my consumers without sacrificing precision and efficiency?

In this panel discussion, we explore how marketers who now rely on traditional publishers’ digital channels can also take advantage of an often overlooked approach—hyperlocal digital advertising—to reach a complex and nuanced multicultural audience across the nation. REGISTER HERE (free)!

Attendees will:

  • Assess the challenges multicultural marketers must overcome to reach digitally minded audiences
  • Explore how hyperlocal digital advertising reaches multicultural consumers in neighborhoods across the country
  • Discover how multicultural marketers are currently using hyperlocal digital advertising and measuring success
    REGISTER HERE (free)!

 

2014 just started and we say it’s going to be a banner year for Hispanic marketing. GroupM expects U.S. overall advertising expenditures to increase by 2.9% to US $161 billion. eMarketer expects a 3.8% increase to US$ 171.33 billion. We say that Hispanic advertising will grow substantially more than eMarketer’s and Group M projections for the general  market. Below 7 growth drivers, and some challenges, for marketing, advertising and media executives to take into account.

1. Total Market? Yes but with culturally “fluent” Messaging

2014
Photo: Jens Rost – Creative Commons

One thing is clear by now, the “Total Market approach” has been adopted by the majority of Corporate America as the appropriate approach to target the U.S. consumer. The latest example of this is T2 or Total Toyota. The automaker just announced that its longtime ad agency Saatchi & Saatchi will take the lead over three other Public is Groupe agencies that currently handle multicultural marketing duties—Conill Advertising (Hispanic), Burrell Communications (African-American) and Zenith (Broadcast and out-of-home media buying), along with InterTrend Communications (Asian-American marketing). The new unit will be called T2 (Total Toyota). It is crucial though that the Total Market approach includes  culturally appropiate messaging that deeply resonates with a brands different constituencies. Carlos Saveedra, director of Multicultural Marketing at Pepsi, and a speaker at last year’s ANA Multicultural Marketing Conference uses the term Cultural Fluency:”Cultural Fluency means to market at intersection of interests (e.g. Fashion, Sports etc), rather than to one group in particular.” “It is about being inclusive about the entire texture of multicultural consumers.” Pepsi transitioned from having a multicultural team to have multicultural marketing objectives be included in each brand’s goals.  “Brand managers are accountable to connect with the multicultural consumer. They need to know the multicultural consumer as well as general market consumers.” Saavedra said and added that Hispanic focused executions are not necessarily wrong. But he said that by taking a cross cultural approach, Pepsi discovered that the NFL is very attractive to Hispanics. Before Pepsi obtained this insight, Hispanic campaigns only revolved around soccer.

Brand Managers are now accountable to connect with the Hispanic consumer.

2. The 2014 Soccer World Cup and the Conversation around it

Photo: Milas Page. Creative Commons.
Photo: Milas Page. Creative Commons.

Advertising related to the 2014 Soccer World Cup can increase ad-sales of major Hispanic media properties by up to 40% compared to a non-World Cup year, say executives of Hispanic media properties interviewed by Portada. World Cup right holders (English and Spanish-language TV, online and Radio) are working hard to monetize these rights. But the World Cup offers also other media properties plenty of opportunities (see for example special digital and print editions around World Cup matches and or non directly soccer oriented content such as culture and history content around World Cup host country Brazil.)
“World Cup is big, but I think what can be as important is the conversation around the World Cup – teams, players, host cities, stadiums, etc… We are really pushing to make sure that the brands we manage have a strong presence in these conversations and that these brands become fibers within organic conversation,” Yousef Kattan Fernández President/CEO at Dallas based TruMedia, tells Portada.
(Look out for “Portada’s 2014 Soccer Marketing Guide in partnership with Soccer.com” to be published on www.portada-online.com on January 28th!)

3. Focus on the scalability of digital channels

To Marla Skiko, SVP, Digital Innovation at SMG Multicultural, “the greatest challenge facing Hispanic media is to power the growth of digital media.  As those of us in the Hispanic media space are keenly aware, Hispanic consumers are at the forefront of technology and digital consumption.  We need to see growth in scale across channels from video to social to mobile.”

The greatest challenge facing Hispanic media is to power the growth of digital media.

…with programmatic helping to solve native’s scale issue

ALEMANIA TECNOLOGÍAProgrammatic digital advertising buys are an important tool to solve the scalability issue in digital marketing and advertising. A few months ago Skiko told us that the use of programmatic audience buying technologies can be very efficient, particularly when it comes to target segments of the Hispanic demographic.” Several players including Batanga, Alcance Media, Pulpo Media and in the video space Videology, Adap.tv., Yume and others are trying to capitalize on the catch up potential the Hispanic market has versus the general market in this regard.
(Watch out for “Portada’s Latin Audience Buying Guide“, a new custom branded section to be published on Portada’s English and Spanish-language sites in the next few weeks!).

Programmatic Trading can also help solve another important marketing challenge: How to scale native advertising. While the concept of native advertising, or branded content programs that take advantage of the interactivity of the digital medium (see The New York Times recent implementation),  has been the darling of the industry for the past two years, it has yet to truly take off due to its inability to scale. That is poised to change as native will start to be offered programmatically through new technologies that help publishers display sponsored content at scale. For the ‘right ad at the right time’ to finally become the ‘right content at the right time’, content marketing will need to become seamlessly integrated and distributed through advanced targeting technology via ad exchanges and RTB platforms.

Challenge: Finding ways for brands to stand out…

“One of the  greatest challenges marketers face  in 2014 is finding ways to help their brand stand out,”  TruMedia’s Kattan Fernández tells Portada.  “There are so many advertisers saying similar things in similar places. Messaging is important but understanding where your brand fits contextually is as important.  Finding creative media touch points, whether those be digital, social, mobile, offline are key to creating some sort of awareness and developing that engagement with viewers, listeners or online patrollers,” Kattan adds. He notes that “digital and social continues to be a big focus for our agency and growing those 1 to 1 consumer relationships where we can. ”

Understanding where your brand fits contextually is crucial

…it’s all about Content Marketing! (Driver 4)

Content Marketing

Finding the right context and context through digital and social media will continue to be key. In other words, it’s all about Content Marketing. Content Marketing strategies which succesfully integrate paid, owned and earned media are crucial for brand marketers.

Content marketing can particularly benefit brands who invest in creating culturally relevant content and scale it across screens and devices.

SMG’s Skiko says that “because Latinos are super users of technology and digital media, we expect to focus squarely on the digital space as we look to grow our clients’ business in 2014.” According to Skiko, “there is a strong opportunity to create engaging, socially powered experiences that are grounded in Hispanic consumer insights.  Another opportunity to make that connection is for marketers to develop content tailored to the Hispanic audience.  Content marketing is a growing arena and can particularly benefit brands who invest in creating culturally relevant content and scaling it across screens and devices. We see a strong opportunity to create engaging, socially powered experiences that are grounded in Hispanic consumer insights.”

…and here is where Data comes in (again). (Driver 5)

Customer Insights and Data represent another major driver for Hispanic marketing in the year that just started.  “I think the opportunity is about data. Not only to have it but actually to know how to find insights through it,” says Gonzalo del Fa, president of Group M Multicultural and Portada Editorial Board Member. (Big) Data can not only be used to substantially increase advertising effectiveness but also for content marketing purposes. For brands and agencies the issue is not so much about producing enough content but about creating enough usable content. That is where Data and dynamic content recommendation engines come in. They enable marketers and media to present the right content to the right visitor at the right time without the visitor having to discover it themselves. Machine learning does that discovery for them. The future of content marketing is all about data-driven content origination and curation that are optimized for organic SEO , highly relevant and targeted.

6. Mobile

In 2013 mobile marketing expenditures took off, although perhaps not as much in the Hispanic market. Experts interviewed by Portada note that 2014 will be a very important year for Latam and USH in the mobile industry. Gaston Bercun, Founder & Co-CEO at mobile ad network Hunt Mobile Ads, says  that “a lot of what is going on in the US and Europe will start to be seen in the Latin markets.”  Bercun adds that “we will start to see important growth of investment of brands in their mobile and mobile advertising strategies and this will push the market to a new level. Programmatic and new devices will also help in the process of increasing the smart phone and tablet penetration.” Major platforms like Google, YouTube and Facebook, provide advertisers
access to mobile and don’t need to recreate any mobile platform creative or invest in it. As Sylwia Makarewicz-Liszka, Mobile and Digital Planner at Starcom Media Vest, said during Portada’s 7th Annual Hispanic Advertising and Media Conference last September “not having mobile assets should not be an excuse for not making a mobile campaign.”

7. Digital Video continues to expand

Hispanic Online VideoRelated to the trend of digital expansion and content marketing is the almost explosive growth of digital video in the Hispanic market.  2014 will be the year of video in content marketing and Hispanic advertising. Platforms like Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, are allowing or will soon allow video ads in consumer content feeds. With videos becoming cheaper to produce even small businesses can produce high quality videos. SMG’s Skiko notes that the increased focus on the Hispanic opportunity by mainstream digital publishers is a win for marketers.  Key players such as Google, Facebook and Twitter are ramping up their Hispanic capabilities with dedicated resources and a focus on content creation and improved targeting.  This should help develop more and richer audiovisual media including digital video.  (Join us on June 3rd in Miami when major marketers and digital video experts from the U.S. and Latin America will gather at Portada’s Latin Online Video Forum)

As leading marketing, media and advertising executives gather in New York City for #Portada13 – Portada’s flagship Annual Hispanic Marketing and Media Conference this Thursday Sept. 26 and the Hispanic Sports Marketing Forum  on Wednesday Sept. 25 – let’s review the key issues they will explore in order to move Hispanic Marketing and media forward.   Below, a discussion of the 8 main topics  to be explored by the best and brightest in Hispanic marketing and Hispanic sports marketing this Wednesday and Thursday.

1. Marketing in a Multicultural Nation means that Corporate America faces three set of challenges. The first is organizational…

Hispanic Marketing

Marketing in the twenty-first century United States means to market in a multicultural nation; NOT to market to  a multicultural audience and to a general market audience. The identity of the different multicultural groups composing  the U.S. ,  and the interdependence between them, is the very fabric of U.S. society. In most cases, to market in a multicultural nation means to embrace the total market principle.  While a good portion of Corporate America seems to understand this conceptually, it faces major challenges to reflect this new reality in the way their marketing organization should be organized.  Should the Hispanic marketing team still work in a silo vs. the general market team? Definitely not. But other open questions remain such as: Should there be an integrated team and different strategies or both integrated teams and integrated strategies? What is the emotional component when targeting Hispanics in a multicultural nation? Should Hispanic marketing initiative work with  brand ambassador?

 

2. The Measurement/Accountability Challenge

Related to the organization of the marketing unit are the metrics that need to be set up to test how efficient it is.  Corporations need to ask themselves the following questions: What Key Performance Indicators should a total market strategy be tied to? Is there even enough reliable data to determine these KPIs? For advertising and media executives the key is to demonstrate a high return on investment for advertising spend against the Hispanic demographic. First,  “we need to make sure that we are talking about media ROI, not business ROI,” says Gonzalo del Fa, president of Group M Multicultural and #Portada13 speaker  says,  When it comes to media ROI, it is important to work with a model that is accurate. As del Fa puts it: “Hispanics living in Harlem (NYC) may get a lot of Hispanic specific advertising and media. However, many of these Hispanics do not do all their purchases in Harlem. For larger purchases they may go to major retailers in Yonkers. The zip code – proximity based ROI models do not capture this and, therefore, sales to Hispanics get attributed to general market ad campaigns and not to Hispanic advertising.” For advertisers to recognize the tremendous force of Hispanic advertising, Hispanic consumer expenditure needs to be attributed to Hispanic directed advertising in an accurate way through proper media ROI models.

3. How should Content and Advertising reflect the realities of a multicultural nation?

For media properties (and not just the purely Hispanic oriented ones!) and advertising agencies  the challenge lies in how to  reflect through content the reality of a Multicultural nation. The jury is still out whether major new media launches like Univision and Disney’s joint venture Fusion will be succesful, as well as so many new English-language Hispanic oriented new digital media properties. 4 key questions content producers at media and agencies need to address:
-Is it all about being “inclusive” or are there other factors that need to be considered?
– How to develop and place content in order to engage the different ethnic groups?
– Are bilingual ads (i.e.: Tide, Target, etc.) the right solution?

4. The mandate of successfully engaging local audiences…

The succesful engagement with local audiences is the be all and end all of Marketing, particularly for Hispanic media, where a substantial part of the players (e.g. radios and newspapers), are mostly  community oriented platforms.  Advertising Technology providers  have also made it easier to target local audiences on a razor-sharp level.  This is particularly important in the Hispanic market where language and cultural issues make the use of language and behavioural data particularly compelling for marketers.

5. …should be fulfilled by a substantial increase in Mobile Advertising expenditures

Mobile MarketingThe main value proposition of mobile media is that it can marry real world data (location-based) with behavioural data.  That is why mobile advertising is growing in leaps and bounds. In the “general market” mobile advertising is expected to increase by  95% to US$ 8.5 billion this year to account for 20.1% of all digital ad spending, and 5.0% of total media ad spending. In the U.S. Hispanic market mobile advertising volume is nowhere near that ratio. This is surprising if we take into account that Hispanics clearly over-index in mobile adoption rates. The main issue is that many large brand marketers have not yet tapped into the Hispanic mobile opportunity.  Attendees to Thursday’s 7th Annual Hispanic Advertising and Media Conference will be able to hear from key decision makers about the tipping points that made Disney and P&G invest in Hispanic mobile advertising.

6. Media properties face monetization challenges….

Most Hispanic specific and general market  media face substantial challenges to monetize their media vehicles..The emergence of  new advertising technologies offers advertisers solutions to make their media buys substantially more efficient, but this does not necessarily translate into higher advertising revenues for media companies. CPMs (cost per thousand impressions tend to be lower in digital media compared to off-line media. While broadcast media has been somewhat barred from this phenomenon, the phrase “from print dollars, to digital dimes, to mobile pennies.” reflects a tough reality for newspaper and magazine advertising executives.”  However, having offline properties can be an advantage: as Alex Barnishin, Senior Advertising Manager for Al Dia Texas recently told us: “Clients generally see a 30% lift in response when digital banners and/or search are  added to a print campaign.” To keep marketers happy, media properties need to be more creative than ever and include content marketing, event, and  cross-platform initiatives in their proposals.

7….and Online Video can help them.

For digital and print media properties in particular, the rapidly growing online video advertising market offers revenue opportunities. Particularly because Online Video CPM’s (cost per thousand viewers) are the highest in digital advertising, usually three to four times as high as display advertising CPM’s. This is also an opportunity for mobile media as video completion rates have been increasing on smartphones and tablets. Hispanics consume a lot of video entertainment on the mobile phone. However, for online video really to become a revenue driver for Hispanic media properties it is crucial that it does not just become a way to repurpose broadcast content.

8. Shout Gooooooooool! The 2014 Soccer World Cup

SoccerWith the 2014 Soccer World Cup taking place next June Sports Marketing is the largest opportunity in Hispanic marketing. The World Cup is the most important news event for Hispanics every four years. It’s the Superbowl, World Series and NBA Finals all in one.  What advertisers love about the World Cup is that it is DVR proof. Sports programming is a better bet for network broadcasters than almost anything else. With the rise of time shifting technologies audiences have unprecedented choices about what they watch and when they watch it. That is why ratings for most TV networks have fallen sharply. The big exception is sports, which has been practically unaffected by the general ratings declines. According to a Nielsen study, viewers watched 97% of sports programming live in 2012, down slightly from 98% in 2008. Those same viewers watched just 75% of non-sports programing live in 2012, down sharply from 93% in 2008.

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What:Marketers are gearing up early in anticipation for 2014’s Fifa World Cup, in Brazil. It is seen as the most important news event platform for Hispanics. Many marketers, including Gonzalo del Fa, president Group M Multicultural in New York City, began conversations with their clients in 2012 and have already closed some of those deals. Digital media has increased tremendously since 2010’s Fifa World Cup.

Why it matters: 3.2 billion people around the world watched the 2010 World Cup. In addition, as Group M’s del Fa puts it, the World Cup is “DVR proof: 90% of views are live.” That is attractive to marketers as viewers are less likely to skip commercials. Also, because of the many options people have to watch their favorite television shows after originally airing – YouTube and Netflix, as well as digital recording devices – sports programming is seen as a better bet.

The 2014 Soccer World Cup to take place next summer in Brazil will be a major factor in Corporate America’s marketing plan towards the U.S. Hispanic population. Already at the end of 2012, major agency executives started to discuss with their clients their involvement in next year’s major event.

“We started the conversations with our clients at the end of 2012 and we have already closed deals for some of them. We have only few negotiations left that we expect to finalize in the next weeks,” Gonzalo del Fa, president Group M Multicultural in New York City tells Portada®. Group M’s clients include major marketers like AT&T, Macy’s, Subway and Ikea. “We started looking at partnerships for our beer client for 2014,” says Oury Tamboura, Senior Media Manager at Horizon Media in Los Angeles, where she plans and buys Hispanic media for clients including Crown Imports (Corona). “We have been talking about how to approach the World Cup with many of our clients. Given the scope and scale of the event, there are many ways to get involved and integrate a World Cup strategy as part of a client’s holistic approach from now through the games next year,” says Marla Skiko, VP and Director of Digital Innovation for SMG’s Multicultural Division.

“The World Cup is the most important news event for Hispanics every four years. It’s the Superbowl, Final Four, World Series and NBA Finals all in one,” claims Penni Barton, publisher of the Spanish-language newspaper Al Día Texas.

“As we all know, World Cup is a huge event for the Hispanic community because ‘fútbol’ is part of our lives,” says Group M’s del Fa. Del Fa, who is based in NYC but was born in soccer-crazy Argentina, notes that the World Cup is also a truly global event as 3.2 billion people watched the 2010 World Cup around the world. “That is why many clients are looking at this asset as a global initiative, not just a local effort. Even in the U.S., the World Cup is not just a Hispanic event – over 24 million people saw the final between the Netherlands and Spain in 2010. Almost 9 million of them watched it on Univision and almost 16 million did so on ABC.

The Soccer World Cup is ‘DVR proof: 90% of views are live.’

One question mark remains in the midst of all the excitement. In mid-June millions of Brazilians took to the streets all over the country in social protests for more education, health and transport services. Protesters armed with screwdrivers and slingshots clashed with police near Rio’s legendary Maracana football stadium where Brazil defeated Spain to win a third successive Confederations Cup. According to many of the protesters, the Brazilian government cares more about the FIFA World Cup and Olympics than about education and healthcare. Despite the social turmoil, polls have shown more than two-thirds of Brazilians support their country hosting the World Cup for the first time since 1950. Sports media entrepreneurs do no foresee major disruptions during the 2014 World Cup. “We have full confidence in Brazil’s infrastructure and security, as well as the coming together of the people of Brazil in delivering a successful World Cup,” says Félix Sención, CEO and Founder of The Mundial Group.

For many brands sports marketing budgets can take a share of more than three quarters of overall marketing budgets. One such example is NAPA Autoparts, whose Hispanic Advertising Agency is Atlanta-based PM Publicidad. Napa Autoparts is the official sponsor of the Méxican Soccer Federation as well as of the Tour of the Méxican Soccer National team in the U.S.

One publication that receives mostly men oriented advertising is Fútbol Mundial. A publication exclusively devoted to soccer, it has a circulation of 904,000 and is published as an insert in the leading Spanish-language newspapers coast-to-coast. “For 2014, we are expanding circulation and are receiving bids to be part of the larger distribution during World Cup year,” says publisher Félix Sención. Sención also leads a digital ad network called Mundial Sports Network. “Mundial Sports Network is offering fully integrated digital sponsorships for the World Cup across all 4 screens. We reach millions of Hispanic sports fans across our network of affiliates, and we produce and publish original, branded sports content for our advertisers including full brand integration within our coverage,” Sencion adds.

Most importantly, as Group M’s del Fa puts it, the World Cup is “DVR proof: 90% of views are live,” says del Fa. In the era of time shifting technologies, this is extremely attractive to marketers, who know that live viewers are less likely to skip commercials.

Sports programming is a better bet for network broadcasters than almost anything else. The rise of online video providers – such as Netflix and YouTube, as well as the increasing use of digital recording devices – are giving audiences unprecedented choices about what they watch and when they watch it. That is why ratings for most TV networks have fallen sharply. The big exception is sports, which has been practically unaffected by the general ratings declines. According to a Nielsen study, viewers watched 97% of sports programming live in 2012, down slightly from 98% in 2008. Those same viewers watched just 75% of non-sports programming live, down sharply from 93% in 2008.

ESPN, which has aired every World Cup except one in 1982, has the English-language TV rights to the 2014 Soccer World Cup in Brazil. Fox won the rights to the 2018 and 2022 World Cups. Univision holds the 2014 Soccer World Cup Spanish-language broadcast rights. However, in 2011, Telemundo won the Spanish-language rights to air the 2018 and 2022 Soccer World Cups over Univision, which has aired every World Cup tournament since 1978.

Soccer World Cup broadcast rights belong to the most coveted content properties. Interestingly the rights to air in Spanish-language are worth more than the rights to air in English: Telemundo paid more than US $600 million for the Spanish-language rights to air the global soccer tournament in 2018 and 2022, more than the US$ 400 million Fox paid for the English-language rights.

While the networks sell TV ad space inventory to national advertisers, other organizations often sell to local and regional advertisers. This is the case of Time Warner Cable which sells local advertising into ESPN properties, including the 2014 Soccer World Cup.

While broadcasters usually get the lion’s share of marketer’s World Cup investment, digital and print media properties also typically boost their offerings during the World Cup and the weeks leading up to it. Al Día Texas’ Penni Barton, notes that the World Cup represents a tremendous opportunity for Al Día. “We’ll explore expanding our portfolio of print offers via special supplements, insertion campaigns, themed-content sponsorship’s and magazines. Likewise, we’ll explore leveraging opportunities for digital, mobile channels and events.”

‘It will be one of the largest sports events of the century: Time zone is just 1 hour difference from U.S. EST.’

Digital at the Core
The Soccer World Cup takes place every 4 years and the media and advertising landscape has changed since the 2010 South Africa World Cup, particularly digital media.

“The amount of digital viewers has grown robustly since 2010 and the digital inventory is broader across platforms and now includes online, mobile and tablets,” says Francisco Morillo, Digital Media Buyer and Planner at Hispanic Group in Miami. He adds that, nowadays “rich media provides a wide variety of creative ad units and online video ads retain the audience at one site for longer period of times.”

SMG’s Skiko notes that “as the use of digital media continues to grow across multiple screens and devices, it is important we approach any plan or program with digital at the core. The Soccer World Cup is no exception as we know engagement will be happening on many devices and in real time. We believe social and mobile will be especially crucial. Advertisers need to find the best ways for an overall integrated approach that capitalizes on how people will be not only watching, but also discussing, sharing and commenting on all aspects of the games and their teams.”

The Local World Cup: Grassroots Soccer Leagues
Grassroots amateur soccer events are a great way for many media properties to connect with the local community as well as to increase revenue streams from sponsorships. Copa Al Día, organized by Dallas/Ft. Worth Al Día, features 136 teams for approximately 1,500 local youth players, ages 5-14 years old, and is open to both select and recreational teams. Copa Al Día 2013 is presented by The North Texas Chevy Dealers Association in partnership with Burger King, MetroPCS, Azteca Dallas 55, and ESPN Deportes Dallas 1540 AM. New York City’s Spanish-language daily newspaper Diario de México USA organizes a similar league in the New York Metropolitan area.

Another grassroots soccer league organizer is Alianza de Fútbol Hispano, an organization exclusively focused on the organization of soccer leagues. Founded in 2004 by Brad Rothenberg and Richard Copeland, Alianza de Fútbol Hispano is one of the largest grassroots soccer programs in the United States, hosting amateur, soccer clinics, and access to pro scouts from the Liga MX, Major League Soccer (MLS) and American colleges and universities. Alianza de Fútbol Hispano recently struck a deal with LeadDog Marketing through which Alianza de Fútbol will launch the Alianza U program, in partnership with Verizon. The program is designated to help Hispanic players and their families understand and navigate through the college recruiting and admission process. Alianza U provides year-long access to students, helping them with the college application process, college recruitment requirements, financial aid and scholarship information.

LATAM Websites
Hispanics love to go to Latin American sports websites to follow major sports events. Journalists at these websites cover soccer matches with a lot of knowledge, passion and resources. Major sports sites include México’s mediotiempo.com, published by Time Inc. owned Grupo Editorial Expansion and Argentina’s canchallena.com (published by La Nacion) and ole.com.ar (owned by Clarin). Spain’s Marca.com (Unidad Editorial) and As.com (Grupo Prisa) also attract substantial U.S. Hispanic audiences.

Miami based Medula Network, an online ad network that targets the U.S. Hispanic and Latin American space, that grew out of PAL (Periodicos Asociados Latinoamericanos) offers U.S. Hispanic impressions and customized packages in the online sports sections of its Latin American newspaper affiliates. Medula CEO Vicente Jubes notes his network also sells U.S. Hispanic audiences that visit 100% sports oriented sites such as Marca.com, Ole.com.ar, Diez.hn, Sport.es, As.com, Libero.pe and Laaficion.com.

A CRM Tool and Media Vehicle
One company that has been able to develop a very strong database of Hispanic and non-U.S. Hispanic U.S. soccer fans is Sports Endeavors. It is known to many as Eurosport, the title of its soccer catalog, which has a circulation of 1 million a year and is dropped nationally 14 times a year.

Based in Hillsborough, North Carolina, Sports Endeavors, Inc. was founded in 1984 by the Moylan family to provide American soccer players with equipment and information. In almost three decades it has developed into an Amazon.com of soccer related items such as equipment, apparel, footwear etc…. Sports Endeavors has benefited from the fact that the U.S. has one of the most diverse soccer fan bases in the World. This fan base includes constituencies as diverse as Major League Soccer Fans, Hispanic Fans, European Fans as well as Amateur Soccer Players.

“Sports Endeavors sales to Hispanic consumers amount to approximately 20% of its overall sales volume,” says Vicente Navarro, Hispanic Market Director at Sports Endeavors. The company’s database includes more than 100,000 addresses of Hispanic active buyers and 6 million different data points on Hispanic households. Most of these clients receive the Eurosport catalog, which has an average page count of 100 pages.

85% of Sports Endeavors sales occur over its different websites (e-commerce). Its main website is soccer.com which according to Navarro receives more than 4.5 million unique users every month. Soccer.com showcases a selection of top of the line soccer merchandise used by world-class players and teams. It carries brands including Adidas, Diadora, Nike and Puma.

The U.S. Has One of the Most Diverse Soccer Fan Bases: MLS Fans, Hispanic Fans and Amateur Players.

Another feature of Soccer.com is that consumers can shop by players, countries or famous soccer clubs. Soccer.com also hosts official online stores for apparel and equipment of many famous international soccer clubs, including Real Madrid, F.C. Barcelona and Bayern Munich.

While Sports Endeavors Inc’s primary objective is to sell soccer and other sports related items, it has developed a large client database which it offers to marketers interested in reaching the U.S. and U.S. Hispanic soccer fan. The digital and print media Sports Endeavors offers includes Package Inserts, Inserts and ROP ads in the Eurosport catalogue, e-mail marketing as well as display and rich media advertising on soccer.com. Sport Endeavors clients include American Airlines, Budweiser, Lowe’s. ESPN Deportes magazine has been inserted in the past in packages that Sports Endeavors mails out to its Hispanic clients. Notmusa’s Record Magazine has also been inserted in the Eurosport catalog.

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

Univision Communication announced the appointment of industry veteran Gustavo Ordóñez to the position of SVP of Programming Research. In this role,  Ordóñez will make programming and content recommendations for all of Univision’s platforms based on research regarding the preferences of Univision consumers. He will also work collaboratively across Univision to help drive new business by providing insights on ratings trends. Based in Miami, Ordóñez will report to both Alberto Ciurana, president of Programming and Content, and Elizabeth Ellers, executive vice president of Corporate Research.

Gonzalo del FaGroup M has created a new unit designed to help beef up the operation’s multicultural offering. It will be led by Gonzalo Del Fa, currently managing director of MEC Bravo and a Portada Editorial Board Member, the Hispanic specialist unit at GroupM media shop MEC. The new unit is called GroupM Multicultural. Effective immediately, the heads of the individual multicultural operations at GroupM shops Mindshare, MEC, MediaCom and Maxus will report to Del Fa. As part of a broader expansion of its multicultural practices GroupM said it would be adding both staff and new resources to help multicultural specialists at its agencies serve clients better. Del Fa will oversee that expansion.

Charlie Etcheverry, MitunetworkMiTú is putting some of the money it got in its recent Chernin Group financing into getting ad sales “muscle”. The multichannel YouTube network is hiring Charlie Etcheverry as a Sales Consultant. Echevery most recently served as EVP/CRO of Univision Interactive overseeing national, local and international advertising activities across all of Univision’s digital, mobile and social properties.  In his new role, Echeverry will help shape and provide insight into Mi’Tú’s brand relationships and advertising partnerships, along with supporting the company’s marketing strategy. He will work closely with company partners Beatriz Acevedo, Roy Burstin and Doug Greiff.

The Monitor (A daily newspaper in Mc Allen, TX)  has hired a Texas-Mexico border native and veteran journalist to lead its editorial coverage. Carlos Sanchez, managing editor of the Baton Rouge, La., bureau at the New Orleans Times-Picayune, is set to begin his new position in early May.

MasonBaronet, a marketing communications firm located in Dallas, Texas, announced the hiring of Hunter James as director of business development. James will lead and manage the development and growth of new business and maintain key agency relationships. James is based in Austin, Texas expanding MasonBaronet’s presence in the Austin business community.

Learn more about the enormous role Online Video can play in the Latin (Latin America and U.S. Hispanic) marketing space. Book now for our Latin Online Video Forum, a required event for any marketing professional.