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What: A summary of the most relevant consumer insight research in the US, US Hispanic, and Latin American markets.
Why it matters: If you’re trying to keep up with the latest happenings, this is your one-stop shop.

 

  • According to Packaged Facts in the report The Financial Services Market: African Americans and Hispanics, as of 2018, some 70% of U.S. adult consumers say they don’t like the idea of being in debt—a response rate has held relatively steady since 2009, even as consumers have gradually added debt to their balance sheets. African American consumers are 28% less likely than the average U.S. consumer to feel financially secure, but at the same time, they are 16% less likely than average to view the idea of being in debt negatively. Likewise, Hispanic consumers are 15% less likely than the average U.S. consumer to feel financially secure, and they are also more likely than average to say they are no good at saving money.

 

  • US organic sales surpassed US $21 billion in sales in the 52-week period ended Nov. 24, 2018, which was up nearly 9% from the previous 52-week period, according to Nielsen Homescan household projected data. Millennials spent 14% more on organic products compared to the previous 52-week period, and Hispanic consumers spent over 13% more.

 

  • More and more Mexicans are willing to try online grocery shopping, as demonstrated by recent Comscore data. 4.5 million users buy on Walmart, followed by Soriana (1.1 million) and Superama (992,000 users). Bearing in mind that Mexico’s total population reaches over 65 million users, the market of online grocery shopping has great potential in this country.

 

  • The latest findings from MRI’s Cord Evolution research show that Americans watch TV or video in groups almost half (48%) of their total viewing time. Over half (58%) of co-viewing time is spent watching with a “significant other,” while children account for 19%; adult family members, 16%; and friends, 9%. Preferred genres for watching with others change depending on who else is in the room; while Movies come in first or second in all four co-viewing situations, and Comedy TV Shows consistently place in the top three, Sports score highest when friends are the co-viewers.

 

  • According to a report by Pew Research Center, the views of Gen Z – those ages 13 to 21 in 2018 – mirror those of Millennials. Only about three-in-ten Gen Zers and Millennials (30% and 29%, respectively) approve of the way Donald Trump is handling his job as president. This compares with 38% of Gen Xers, 43% of Boomers and 54% of Silents. Similarly, while majorities in Gen Z and the Millennial generation say government should do more to solve problems, rather than that government is doing too many things better left to businesses and individuals, Gen Xers and Boomers are more evenly divided on this issue. For their part, most Silents would like to see a less activist government.

 

What: A new Packaged Facts report shows more than half of Hispanics mainly buy natural/organic when grocery shopping.
Why it matters: Hispanics’ interest in buying more organic and natural foods creates opportunities for shops and grocery stores to reach that segment of the population more effectively.

Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, has announced the results of a new report titled  Organic and Clean Label Food Consumer in the U.S. According to its findings, Hispanic consumers are widely interested in buying organic and clean label products, even more than other demographic segments.

“People hear the words natural, organic, or clean label and typically think of yuppies browsing health food store aisles. And to some extent that is accurate, except these so-called yuppies are consumers in a rainbow array of shades, ethnicities, ages, and even economic backgrounds,” says David Sprinkle, research director for Packaged Facts.

The rising influence of organic and clean label products have permeated virtually every segment of the food and beverage industry, from kids foods to adult beverages. But beyond store shelves, the impact of the organic and clean label movement is also increasingly taking root within ever more diverse segments of the American consumer population. This is especially true among Hispanic consumers, who wield a buying power of more than $1 trillion.

As the report reveals, more than half of Hispanics mainly buy natural/organic when grocery shopping. While just over 60% are buying more natural/organic foods than ever.

Furthermore, a store’s organic vegetable and fruit selection is an especially important factor to nearly 4 in 10 Hispanic adults when choosing where to shop for groceries, while the store’s selection of organic packaged foods and beverages is a deciding factor for nearly about third. In each of these cases, Hispanics are 15% or more above the average for all adults.

Packaged Facts research also found that consistent clean label consumerism is also high among Asian-Americans.

What consumer categories are seeing increased demand from Hispanics? We talked to Packaged Facts’s Daniel Grandson, Ana Crandell of OMD Multicultural and Isabella Sanchez of Zubi Advertising to find out.

1.Latinos Are Increasingly Adopting Financial Tools 

A recently published study by research firm Packaged Facts has revealed data that should serve as further incentive to allocate significant time and money to targeting Hispanic consumers. One of the biggest takeaways from the report is that Hispanic consumers are increasingly adopting financial tools like credit packageddcards. Packaged Facts analyst Daniel Granderson noted that “Hispanic consumers have recently registered an exceptionally high increase in credit card ownership, when historically they had a below-average tendency to own and use credit cards.”

US-Hispanics are also buying life, health and automobile insurance at a faster rate than non-Hispanic households. In fact, “Latino households were responsible for 65% of the growth in the number of households with automotive insurance, 52% of growth in the number of households with health insurance and 31% of growth in households with life insurance,” Granderson added.

2. Hispanics Buying More in ‘Nesting,’ Less in Household Products Categories

Ana.CrandellWhen it comes to allocating effort and budgets to reaching Hispanic consumers, Ana Crandell, Group Account Director at Optimum Media Direction (OMD) Multicultural (foto), asserts that she has seen increased interest in prioritizing Hispanic consumers across a wide range of sectors: “It really has been across the board, though I would say the retail and CPG categories seem to be the ones that are starting to allocate more of their marketing dollars toward this segment.”

Crandall’s observations go along with the Packaged Fact’s study findings, as Granderson highlighted that a “noteworthy pattern in recent spending shifts on the part of Hispanic households is an increase in spending on goods and services, such as furniture and in-home entertainment equipment, that fall in the category of ‘nesting.’”

Hispanics have also increased spending on personal services like childcare, and are buying new instead of used cars at an increasing rate, reversing a long-standing trend.

3. Hispanic Americans’ Households Are Growing – Quickly 

If we look at the math, Granderson says, it’s easy to understand why the Hispanic consumer has become a priority for any marketing strategist.

I would consider 2010 to represent the tipping point, when marketers finally started to proactively acknowledge the business opportunity this segment represents to their respective brands.  This latest set of data just further validates this.

“Hispanic households have had and are likely to continue to have an outsize impact on growth in consumer spending in a wide variety of areas,” Granderson says, because Hispanic households are growing at a faster rate than non-Hispanic households, at 8.1% vs. 3.0%.

This is also true of the rates of spending when we look at Hispanics vs. non-Hispanics: while Hispanics still spend less than non-Hispanics, on average, between 2012 and 2015 average annual consumer expenditures by Hispanic households grew at a higher rate (9.7% vs. 8.6%). So this translates into a higher rate of growth in aggregate spending among Hispanics vs. non-Hispanics.

Crandell adds, “We started seeing a substantial increased interest in this particular segment immediately following the release of the last census, 6 years ago.  In fact, I would consider 2010 to represent the tipping point, when marketers finally started to proactively acknowledge the business opportunity this segment represents to their respective brands.  This latest set of data just further validates this.”

Check Out: First half 2016 recap: 11 marketing and media developments you need to know about

4.Luxury Brands Want in on the Action

Isabella Sanchez_Zubi_BWIsabella Sanchez, VP of media integration at Zubi Advertising (photo), affirmed that there is usually “renewed or refreshed interest” in Hispanic consumers whenever a census comes out. This particular report, Sanchez says, and its focus on Hispanics’ increasing income, “is great affirmation to the diversity of the Hispanic market.”

But that increasing income also means that luxury brands, which had operated under the assumption that Hispanics could not afford their products, have started singing a different tune.

The Hispanic market is not such a minority market anymore. Hispanics are the dominant market for the population segment in certain cities, and as companies look to grow their business, they’ve reached a point of saturation in the general market and may be as penetrated as they’re going to be. So the Hispanic market is the most logical…that’s where the growth is in every industry.

Sanchez highlights the case of Lincoln Motors, who turned to Zubi for support in a Hispanic marketing strategy to support their general campaign to compete with popular German brands like Mercedes-Benz and BMW.

Zubi’s work for Lincoln has been “very successful,” and serves as proof of the fact that Hispanic consumers are now a crucial demographic in the luxury market. Before, “luxury was under the impression that Hispanics could not afford these types of things, and that if they could, they could be reached with the general market advertising,” Sanchez remembers. Not anymore.

Are Marketers Really Paying Attention?

4880265002_5bf1a62db3_zWhile marketing professionals, agencies and brands have generally recognized that the Hispanic consumer represents a key demographic, it has been difficult to keep up with the evolution of Latinos in America today.

Marketing professionals that target Hispanics still seem to have an incomplete understanding of who those in this demographic really are and how they make their purchasing decisions, which is why marketers that specialize in multicultural or Hispanic targeting find significant demand for their services.

Zubi Advertising’s Sanchez points out that the interest in the Hispanic consumer is nothing new, but that the key is that “the Hispanic market is not such a minority market anymore.” Today, Hispanics comprise “the dominant market for the population segment in certain cities, and as companies look to grow their business, they’ve reached a point of saturation in the general market and may be as penetrated as they’re going to be. So the Hispanic market is the most logical…that’s where the growth is in every industry.”

Crandell echoes that sentiment: “This is a very dynamic segment that is unlike any other and marketers are therefore continuously looking for a way to get a full grasp of what exactly it is that makes them so – and, more importantly, how to best engage with them.”

But she adds: “That said, I have definitely witnessed increased willingness among marketers to spend the necessary resources to gain a better understanding of them.”

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