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What: We speak to Alejandro Roman Fuster, the Head of Sales Planning and Order Management at Pulpo Media, about how media planning agencies have begun to collaborate with political campaigns looking to target of Hispanic audiences.
Why It Matters: Today, both brands and political campaigns that have strategies for making use of Big Data and analytical tools for targeting win big. Roman Fuster explains why targeting a consumer is similar to targeting a voter.

In this day and age, every campaign needs a digital partner. The world is as connected as ever, and data is constantly being generated through the many available platforms users are plugged into. To capitalize on this, Pulpo Media has created tools that aid in the analysis of that gargantuan mass of ever-expanding data to create clear insight about consumer and user behavior and preferences. For better or worse, these tools have become handy for political campaigns looking to understand their voters as well.

Media Planners: the ‘Right Match’ for Political Clients?

Pulpo Media, which specializes in online Hispanic media and audience targeting, may not have originally envisioned becoming involved in political planning, but has found that its data and targeting abilities work just as well for voters as they do for consumers. Typically, brands approach Pulpo for assistance in reaching very targeted audiences through their digital properties as well as parent company Entravision’s radio stations and television channels. Part of their jobs is to stay close to advertising agencies, who often hire them to execute their campaigns for clients.

A few years ago, during commercial conversations with advertising agencies they pitched Hispanic services to regularly, agencies wondered whether Pulpo might be a “right match” for some of their political clients. It turns out that they were.

Media companies that have specialized in Hispanic targeting are finding themselves in demand in the face of a large, thriving Hispanic-American population of 50 million people. But as that population has grown, many fail to understand how much it has evolved in terms of its makeup, education, consumption preferences and behavior. This is also very true of the Hispanic voter.

The Shifting Landscape of Hispanic-American Voters

Alejandro Roman Fuster, the Head of Sales Planning and Order Management at Pulpo Media, asserts that much of Pulpo’s success has had to do with its deep understanding of the complex, varied and evolving Hispanic voterid_500x279culture. “The Hispanic population has been drifting from a first-generation consumer to a second-plus generation consumer who is much more acculturated, and understands American society much more than their parents and grandparents did,” Roman Fuster says. “When looking at these new generations, they are hybrids comfortable in both Hispanic settings and general market settings.”

Two years ago, campaigns acted like recording an ad in Spanish was enough.

When it comes to politics, it’s too easy to assume that all Hispanics care about is immigration, or that they will always vote Democrat. “Two years ago, campaigns acted like recording an ad in Spanish was enough,” Roman Fuster says. Pulpo’s love of data has allowed it to create a strategy that works just as well for political campaigns as it does for brands.

In the end, Roman Fuster believes that “voters are also consumers.” While the “data is not necessarily similar, the process is.” When a political client approaches Pulpo, a similar technique is used to develop a media proposal as the one they use for their regular clients. In both cases, Pulpo strives to develop data-based KPIs that are as specific as possible to drive the campaign. The variables can be treated almost interchangeably, as candidates and geographical regions “functions as a market, and voters are the consumers.”

Roman Fuster continues: “Political candidates, like brands, will have characteristics and must generate a representation of the voter/consumer that requires the same analysis as planning for a brand.” Campaigns know what they ultimately want: votes. But Pulpo’s job, as is that of any agency that targets specific demographics or audiences, is to find the best path to those votes.

Putting Data to Work

For its political clients, Pulpo actually does assign each traceable follower a specific cost to help measure ROI. In establishing KPIs, the team grapples with questions like whether or not it should focus on interactions with the banner or event attendance and whether or not there is time to develop complex benchmarks, or if cost-effectiveness will take front seat (sometimes political campaigns give them just 24 hours to create a plan). Instead of looking solely at Hispanics’ political leanings, Pulpo helps its clients look at transversal messages that cross party affiliations.

The audience team pulls public and private data from censuses, housing surveys and external data it pays to access. Then the data intelligent team crosses online behavior with offline behavior to identify trends and create propensity models that generate different profiles and potential buyer info within the target audience.

“The goal is to help our clients understand the power of data” in order to “construct a story” about these voters and their lives that can be used to create campaign messages that truly resonate. For example, “new voters may not be as ‘brand loyal’ as their more seasoned counterparts and even older voters are being more flexible in terms of whom they vote for,” says Roman Fuster. Younger Hispanics are completely mobile dependent and conduct almost all browsing on their phone.

Hispanic voters are now 60% bilingual and bicultural, so targeting through a Spanish-language ad may not be the best way to target them after all. This kind of data helps agencies know where their audience lives and target their messages and plans appropriately.

Leveraging Entravision’s Properties

Pulpo’s data analysis expertise is only one its secret weapons. Entravision’s 56 television stations and 49 Spanish-language radio stations are powerful tools for Pulpo in terms of granting clients exclusive exposure on platforms that are sure to reach Hispanic audiences.

When working with political clients, Pulpo can and does make use of some of Entravision’s premium programs, among them popular personalities like Eddie ‘Piolin’ Sotelo, El Erazno and Alex ‘El Genio’ Lucas. A Pulpo proposal for a political candidate sometimes includes interviews on Entravision’s different shows, accompanied by corresponding social media campaigns on the programs’ accounts. Not all agencies can offer this kind of exposure.

New voters may not be as ‘brand loyal’ as their more seasoned counterparts and even older voters are being more flexible in terms of whom they vote for.

Pulpo is just one example of an agency that is catering to the high demand for insight on Hispanic voters, and while it may have gotten a head start, others are probably not far behind, as they have undoubtedly found that they need to develop similar tools to keep up. Every campaign needs to be better, more micro-targeted, than the last, and with access to so much data, those willing to organize it have found that a miraculous level of detail can be attained in terms of what truly motivated human behavior – and voting habits.

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Ronald.GeskeyRonald Geskey is CEO of Marketing Communications LLC and author of “Media Planning & Buying in the 21st Century.”  Geskey has over 30 years of experience at major advertising agencies. He has a B.S. and M.S. from Southern Illinois University, doctoral work at Texas Tech University, and Executive Education at Wharton School of Business, Northwestern University, Michigan State University.

A media planner is like a writer who creates the screen play for a film. A media buyer is like the actor who brings the film to life. A politician with a good message who fails to get out the vote loses the election. And a good media idea, poorly executed, might as well have been a bad idea. Sometimes execution is everything.

A media plan might be brilliant, but will it be executed with equal zeal? Will the plan be executed on budget with the right media vehicles, in the right place, at the right time and with maximum communications impact? If not, the plan might not look so brilliant any more. Media planning, media buying, and media selling are all equal communications partners in driving ROI.

Why is Buying Underestimated?

Since all of the disciplines (planning, buying, selling) are all of roughly equal in importance, I have always wondered why media textbooks dedicate only a few pages to the art and science of media buying and no pages to media selling. Clients probably place the highest importance on the cost effectiveness of the buys negotiated on their behalf.

Agencies can lose clients on the basis of poor media buying performance, but I don’t think I can ever remember an agency losing an account because of a media simulation model.

Perhaps some academics believe that media planning is more conceptual, more creative, more research oriented, and provides better mettle for the mind. But these assumptions aren’t necessarily so. Media buying at its best requires honed negotiation skills which could be a course in psychology. Buying also it requires an understanding of the communications process that rivals media planning. And media buyers need a knowledge of the research documenting how different media variables, such as commercial affect performance and advertising effectiveness.

It is ironic that so many clients have the opposite belief where buying is more important than planning. After all, that is where the rubber hits the road and the dollars are spent.

In the 21st century, media buyers won’t just be responsible for buying TRPS or clicks at the lowest possible price, but must learn how to “buy communication, not TRPS, according to many experts. Beyond CPM, how can a buy’s communications effectiveness be maximized? Program involvement, attention levels, contextual considerations, commercial positioning and a host of other factors have a greater impact on communications effectiveness than media weight and CPMs. TRPS are not TRPS.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6362453

Ronald.GeskeyRonald Geskey is CEO of Marketing Communications LLC and author of “Media Planning & Buying in the 21st Century.”  Geskey has over 30 years of experience at major advertising agencies. He has a B.S. and M.S. from Southern Illinois University, doctoral work at Texas Tech University, and Executive Education at Wharton School of Business, Northwestern University, Michigan State University.

A media planner is like a writer who creates the screen play for a film. A media buyer is like the actor who brings the film to life. A politician with a good message who fails to get out the vote loses the election. And a good media idea, poorly executed, might as well have been a bad idea. Sometimes execution is everything.

A media plan might be brilliant, but will it be executed with equal zeal? Will the plan be executed on budget with the right media vehicles, in the right place, at the right time and with maximum communications impact? If not, the plan might not look so brilliant any more. Media planning, media buying, and media selling are all equal communications partners in driving ROI.

Why is Buying Underestimated?

Since all of the disciplines (planning, buying, selling) are all of roughly equal in importance, I have always wondered why media textbooks dedicate only a few pages to the art and science of media buying and no pages to media selling. Clients probably place the highest importance on the cost effectiveness of the buys negotiated on their behalf.

Agencies can lose clients on the basis of poor media buying performance, but I don’t think I can ever remember an agency losing an account because of a media simulation model.

Perhaps some academics believe that media planning is more conceptual, more creative, more research oriented, and provides better mettle for the mind. But these assumptions aren’t necessarily so. Media buying at its best requires honed negotiation skills which could be a course in psychology. Buying also it requires an understanding of the communications process that rivals media planning. And media buyers need a knowledge of the research documenting how different media variables, such as commercial affect performance and advertising effectiveness.

It is ironic that so many clients have the opposite belief where buying is more important than planning. After all, that is where the rubber hits the road and the dollars are spent.

In the 21st century, media buyers won’t just be responsible for buying TRPS or clicks at the lowest possible price, but must learn how to “buy communication, not TRPS, according to many experts. Beyond CPM, how can a buy’s communications effectiveness be maximized? Program involvement, attention levels, contextual considerations, commercial positioning and a host of other factors have a greater impact on communications effectiveness than media weight and CPMs. TRPS are not TRPS.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6362453

Carol Thompson is a media planner and buyer executive in Ad Cetera, Inc. , a Dallas, TX advertising agency.

Media planners and media buyers don’t just focus on radio, television, magazines, billboards or newspapers anymore. In fact, with a few exceptions, magazines and newspapers are becoming obsolete. There’s a host of new options available to advertisers, and professional media planners and buyers must stay on the cutting edge of an ever-changing media landscape. Expertise and business connections can be leveraged to not only stay abreast of technology, but to also get prime placement and the best rates.

Over the past several years, newer forms of media have emerged on the scene, including satellite television, cable television, satellite radio and digital (or online) media. Digital/online media may include social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook, email blasts, search engine marketing, referral linking campaigns, web portals, YouTube video ads, banner ads, interactive games and more.

As technology moves at the speed of light, when it comes to media planning and buying, the saying “You snooze, you lose” has never been more relevant. However, with so many choices, there’s never been a better time for a media planner or buyer to be able to truly target the right audience with the right advertising medium(s). If the budget allows, most media planners and media buyers will strive for a balanced “media mix” in which all forms of advertising work harmoniously to achieve optimal results.

Where traditional media is concerned, television still remains among the top choices for most advertisers, depending on their target audience and needs. Why? Because it works. When a media buyer is looking for “reach,” (targeting as many people as possible at one time), television can’t be beat for certain audiences. That’s especially true when you want to reach your target market with particular dayparts (certain multiple hours of day) and/or specific programming. People will always watch television, although it is becoming more and more difficult to hold the attention of a younger audience who is texting, tweeting and viewing their favorite show at the same time.

Radio can also be a highly effective traditional form of media, depending on how it’s utilized and what clients are selling. Radio is considered a “frequency” medium (targeting a specific demographic as many times as possible). Often radio will be used as a supplement to television, but not always. What can really enhance radio’s effectiveness is endorsements by on-air personalities, which holds especially true for sports and talk show personalities, who tend to have much more of a loyal following than the average DJ.

Savvy media planners and buyers must thoroughly understand each client’s target demographic, and determine the best media mix to achieve both maximum brand awareness and increased sales. They will then develop a strategic media buying plan based on several factors to ensure the client receives a maximum ROI. Most importantly, they will negotiate the actual media buy based on the particular medium’s standard measurement of audience. For example, with television, that measurement can be determined by CMP (cost per thousand), CPP (cost per point), etc. The ultimate goal is not to just reach the masses, but to reach the as many people who comprise the client’s target market as possible, as many times as possible, for as the best price possible.

While the media landscape is changing and evolving, some of the traditional methods of advertising are still bringing in fantastic results. Media planners and media buyers must not only keep the traditional methods in mind, they also have to stay on the cutting-edge and keep their client’s goals in the forefront of their minds to succeed.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7543149

Carol Thompson is a media planner and buyer executive in Ad Cetera, Inc. , a Dallas, TX advertising agency.

Media planners and media buyers don’t just focus on radio, television, magazines, billboards or newspapers anymore. In fact, with a few exceptions, magazines and newspapers are becoming obsolete. There’s a host of new options available to advertisers, and professional media planners and buyers must stay on the cutting edge of an ever-changing media landscape. Expertise and business connections can be leveraged to not only stay abreast of technology, but to also get prime placement and the best rates.

Over the past several years, newer forms of media have emerged on the scene, including satellite television, cable television, satellite radio and digital (or online) media. Digital/online media may include social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook, email blasts, search engine marketing, referral linking campaigns, web portals, YouTube video ads, banner ads, interactive games and more.

As technology moves at the speed of light, when it comes to media planning and buying, the saying “You snooze, you lose” has never been more relevant. However, with so many choices, there’s never been a better time for a media planner or buyer to be able to truly target the right audience with the right advertising medium(s). If the budget allows, most media planners and media buyers will strive for a balanced “media mix” in which all forms of advertising work harmoniously to achieve optimal results.

Where traditional media is concerned, television still remains among the top choices for most advertisers, depending on their target audience and needs. Why? Because it works. When a media buyer is looking for “reach,” (targeting as many people as possible at one time), television can’t be beat for certain audiences. That’s especially true when you want to reach your target market with particular dayparts (certain multiple hours of day) and/or specific programming. People will always watch television, although it is becoming more and more difficult to hold the attention of a younger audience who is texting, tweeting and viewing their favorite show at the same time.

Radio can also be a highly effective traditional form of media, depending on how it’s utilized and what clients are selling. Radio is considered a “frequency” medium (targeting a specific demographic as many times as possible). Often radio will be used as a supplement to television, but not always. What can really enhance radio’s effectiveness is endorsements by on-air personalities, which holds especially true for sports and talk show personalities, who tend to have much more of a loyal following than the average DJ.

Savvy media planners and buyers must thoroughly understand each client’s target demographic, and determine the best media mix to achieve both maximum brand awareness and increased sales. They will then develop a strategic media buying plan based on several factors to ensure the client receives a maximum ROI. Most importantly, they will negotiate the actual media buy based on the particular medium’s standard measurement of audience. For example, with television, that measurement can be determined by CMP (cost per thousand), CPP (cost per point), etc. The ultimate goal is not to just reach the masses, but to reach the as many people who comprise the client’s target market as possible, as many times as possible, for as the best price possible.

While the media landscape is changing and evolving, some of the traditional methods of advertising are still bringing in fantastic results. Media planners and media buyers must not only keep the traditional methods in mind, they also have to stay on the cutting-edge and keep their client’s goals in the forefront of their minds to succeed.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7543149

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