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What: Leonor Palao (Assistant VP of Brand Marketing and Advertising, Oppenheimer Funds) and Annie Granatstein (Head of the Washington Post’s BrandStudio) had a conversation about branded content partnerships and data-driven content at the Portada Data & Content Marketing Forum in NYC. 
Why it matters: According to a study by McKenzie, data-driven organizations are more likely to acquire and retain customers.

By Dane C. Rogers

Leonor Palao (left) and Annie Granatstein (right)

Leonor Palao, Assistant VP of Brand Marketing and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds sat down with Annie Granatstein, head of the Washington Post’s BrandStudio, to discuss the branded content partnership that exists between the organizations and how data is used to drive content creation.

A research study by McKenzie showed that data-driven organizations are 23 times more likely to acquire customers, 6 times as likely to retain customers and 19 times as likely to be profitable. Leonor’s team at Oppenheimer Funds took note of this report, and in an effort to reach the niche financial advisor audience, partnered with the Washington Post.

Being an asset management company, certain data hurdles exist for Oppenheimer that caused it to lean heavily on its partners to drive growth. Fortunately, the Washington Post has the AI and data capabilities that can help Oppenheimer reach new potential customers.

Armed with the knowledge that 58% of marketers say that original written content is their most important digital asset, above video. Being viewed as a “thought leader” on relevant topics is at the core of their digital strategy.

With a talented in-house team of content creators that is capable of producing industry-leading pieces on finance and asset management, Oppenheimer had a goal to cut back on the quantity of articles (from 37 in 2017 to 7 in 2018) and focus its marketing strategy on understanding the types of articles that were most engaging and focused on creating great content and getting it on the proper platform.

Leonor mentioned the partnership Oppenheimer has with Nudge Analytics, an analytics company dedicated to standardizing the engagement metrics across the different media publication sites. Thanks to Nudge, Oppenheimer’s marketing team was able to overcome the rampant inconsistency of engagement metrics to determine the true “winners” of the 37 articles written in 2017.

With this more targeted approach, Oppenheimer has determined that year over year, custom content has had the biggest increase in effectiveness (over audio, display, social, videos, indicated content, and dedicated emails).

Oppenheimer’s branded content sees the Washington Post as the gold-standard in using data to drive content decisions. Annie runs the WP BrandStudio, which created branded content for advertisers. The content studio is a completely separate branch of the Post that has no overlap of personnel or reporting with the editorial staff.

Why is working with WP’s BrandStudio more effective than partnering with a standalone content creation agency? Because they are so much closer to the audience than any agency could hope to be. The level of interaction that a publisher has with its active users allows for a deeper understanding of their preferences.

The BrandStudio has segmented its audience into three subgroups: individual consumers, B2B (financial advisers like Oppenheimer) and thought leaders/influencers. Each segment has a separate list of the most engaging topics that they spend time on.

For example, the business client segment engages most with content related to cybersecurity, AI, and business transformation. They prefer to consume content on mobile and tablets and spend the most time on content with dynamic visuals and infographics. (Influencers, on the other hand, gravitate towards the environment, healthcare and smart cities, and visit websites on their computer browsers.)

The BrandStudio uses its internal “Clavis-targeting” algorithms (similar to Amazon’s search recommendations) to push its consumers to the content that each particular client is most likely to engage with. It does this through on-site, in-app, and external (paid social media and Apple News) recommendations.

Oppenheimer’s usage of partners like Nudge and the WP’s BrandStudio has helped it determine the most effective marketing to help it formulate a successful strategy that has show its best-recorded growth this past year.

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

Burson-Marsteller has announced Jonathan Stern‘s arrival as Managing Director and Market Leader of the firm’s Miami office, a key component of the firm’s Latin America business.  Stern will lead a team serving diverse clients, will be responsible for the strategic growth of the Miami operation, and provide senior counsel to key clients.

 

 

 

 

 

Adsmovil has announced the appointment of Alejandro Leyva as (CDO) Chief Data Officer. Based in Miami, he’ll be in charge of developing the data area for the Latin American and US Hispanic markets.

 

 

 

 

 

Dataxu, a software provider for marketing professionals, has announced the promotion of Tiffany Mosher to Chief People Officer. In this newly created role, she will expand upon her previous role leading global human resource operations and initiatives for the team of more than 350 employees.

 

 

 

 

Spanish Broadcasting System, Inc. has named Geraldo Arriaga as Vice President, Digital Media Sales of SBS, LaMusica App. In this role, Geraldo will spearhead all of the Company’s digital revenue efforts at the national scale and ensure SBS’s Digital Media programs are fully integrated into the network’s growing “Original Content Strategy.”

 

 

 

 

Luis Solis is now Director, Integrated Sales (Eastern Seaboard) at Meredith Corporation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Strober, previously VP of client strategy and ad innovation at Turner, is leaving the company. He has also been an integral member of OpenAP, the consortium developed by Turner, Fox and Viacom last year to help standardize audience buying on TV that goes beyond traditional, basic demographics.

 

 

 

 

The New York Times has promoted Gilbert Cruz, previously television editor and an innovative digital journalist in the world of entertainment and the arts, to Culture Editor of The Times. In the years ahead, Gilbert’s primary task will be to build and expand a powerful digital culture report to complement the journal’s print sections.

 

 

 

 

Ingrid Ciprian-Matthews has been promoted to Executive Vice President at CBS News, starting this month. She’ll continue to work directly with CBS News President David Rhodes overseeing day-to-day news coverage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chiqui Esteban is the Washington Post’s new Graphics Director. The paper’s Executive Editor Martin Baron and Managing Editor Emilio Garcia-Ruiz announced his promotion, praising Esteban’s skills an influence as department head for a year and a half.

 

 

 

 

Nuno Teles, a 14-year Heineken veteran who has been U.S. chief marketing officer since early 2014, is departing to take over as the president of Diageo’s beer division, which includes Guinness, starting in March. His replacement as of April 15 is Jonnie Cahill.

 

 

 

 

Marta Fontcuberta has announced her departure from The Coca-Cola Company, where she was global head of marketing communications based in Atlanta. She was distinguished by Adlatina and AdAge as one of the 14 Women to Watch when she was head of marketing communications in Latin America.

 

 

A summary of the most exciting recent news in advertising technology in the US, US-Hispanic and Latin American markets. If you’re trying to keep up, consider this your one-stop shop.

US-US HISPANIC MARKET

YuMe is partnering with private exchange software provider StickyADS.tv to help publishers get a handle on programmatic video. YuMe’s DSP, YuMe for Advertisers, and StickyADS.tv’s SSP are set to ease access to premium online inventory.

A new survey by video app provider Magisto indicates that small and medium businesses are, indeed shifting ad budgets to social media and online video. Millennial marketers were 84% more likely to promote their businesses through social media than print, and 136% more likely than baby boomers to create videos for social media.

Google Maps will be offering ad space that allows users look through products and menus for nearby businesses. The ads will be featured on both Google Maps and Google.com, and drivers will see them along their driving route.

Confirming rumors that swirled since November, Facebook has announced that it is closing down its ad exchange, FBX, which allows third-party ad technology companies to buy ads on the social network.

YuMe has new capabilities that improve brand safety and viewability for its programmatic video ad platform, YuMe for Advertisers, through integration with Integral Ad Science’s Bid Expert and SDK-driven technology to maximize efficiency and fight bad traffic.

Data from Standard Media Index shows that broadcast TV spending went up 6% in April, while cable spending went up 7%. Top networks were FOX, ESPN, AMC, HGTV and Bravo, all with double-digit gains.washpost

The Washington Post has launched “Fuse,” a new proprietary technology that allows the ad to instantly load within the content being viewed.

Univision Communication Inc. has launched Mosaico Trading, a programmatic ad and analytics solution to provide business partners with data and insights for targeting diverse audiences.

A survey by analytical firm PageFair found that ad blocking software on mobile devices has increased by 90% in the past year, and almost all ad blocking users use browsers with automatic ad blocking.

The Latin Online Video Forum, part of #PortadaLat on June 8-9 in Miami’s Hyatt Regency Hotel, is bringing all of the big players in online video in the Americas together, including key brand marketers such as Nestle, 3M, Volaris, Fallabella, Best Western and many more.

LATAM MARKET

German mobile marketing firm glispa announced the acquisition of Mobils, a 10-person mobile agency based in Sao Paulo. Mobils’s employees will continue with the company, as will CEO Paulo Maia. Mobils will also bring its Brazilian clients, like Webmotors, Netshoes and iFood.

appsflyer-logo-prAccording to a report by Cheetah Ad Platform, Brazil, Mexico and the United States have the most competitive app markets in the world. The study looked at data from 52 million Android smartphone users and found that users use an average of 27 apps and engage with an average of 39 per month. Brazil has the highest user engagement and app competition, as users use an average of 29.23 apps and engage with an average of 53.62 per month.

AppsFlyer, the global marketing analytics company, is opening an office in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Daniel Junowics, who led the company’s efforts in China, will be in charge as managing director.

Portada takes a look at the latest developments in big publishers’ monetization strategies in Latin America. How can general monetization efforts align effectively with approaches to winning over Latin American readers?

By Gretchen Gardner, a member of Portada’s Editorial Staff

Jeff-BezosBig publishers have been grappling with how to monetize and take advantage of the huge opportunity that Latin American audiences, particularly the wealthy and educated, represent for over a decade. But as technology and people’s interactions with the digital world evolve, so do the best strategies.

In recent years, those looking to monetize the LatAm market have prioritized investing in new technology, making good use of social networks and adapting content to mobile. And the biggest publishers know that they need help: many are hiring specialized firms with knowledge of particular LatAm audiences and geographical regions to create different pages for people with certain interests and even develop different financial models for the monetization of this growing demographic.

But some big publishers seem to be focusing more on changing the way their consumers as a whole interact with and read the news. The Washington Post has undergone major  changes since Jeff Bezos acquired it in 2013.

Diana Backlund, International Brand Strategic Advertising Manager at the Washington Post WASHINGTON POST REDISEÑA PÁGINA WEB PARA HACER MAYOR ÉNFASIS EN VÍDEOCompany, implied that the publisher is more focused on the Big Picture, “expanding editorial coverage, audience and influence and amplifying engineering for experimentation and invention.” New in the newsroom are engineers that work side-by-side with journalists to find the best way to stimulate growth and reader engagement.

Publishers like The Guardian have followed suit, creating teams of editors and journalists that work exclusively with data to track site visits, bounce rates, devices used, comments and search terms in different audiences. This kind of technical approach to journalism has proven successful for the Post as well.

“In two years our USA audience has grown to 59 million uniques and another 18 million internationally. We were also named the Most Innovative Media Company of 2015 by Fast Company. We’ve introduced innovations like Project Rainbow and technologies such as Clavis, which is our own first-party data on readers,” Backlund notes.

Clavis is an industry leader providing analytics in the form of data, analysis and insights on different markets to help clients optimize performance and engagement. Interestingly, Clavis is more associated with consumer goods brands, with a roster of clients like Unilever, Procter & Gamble, Nestlé, Mondelēz and Mars, which speaks to the importance of branding in today’s media climate, and the shift from publishers identifying as simply providers of content to providers of value.

comScore recently reported that these changes at the Post have increased its audience by 59% and page views by 95% – and for the first time, it came in ahead of The New York Times (and only 13 million unique visitors less than Buzzfeed.) Clavis helped the Post do this by identifying common denominator interests among readers across different demographics.

Today, major publishers are well aware of the importance of advertising to priority audiences. The Washington Post’s Backlund acknowledges that there was “no question that Latin America is a primary focus for The Washington Post for audience and, as a result, advertising.” But developing targeted, valuable content seems to be the number one priority.

If a video does better on Facebook leave it there: give people something to talk about; give them something extra.

“We continue to develop content that is relevant and important for business and government leaders not only in the United States, but in Latin America and across the globe,” Backlund says. But is that content targeted to the Latin American consumer in Spanish or Portuguese? “Not yet,” Backlund says. In fact, regardless of their geographical location, the type of audience that the Post covets has advanced English skills.

Aligned Interests, Regardless of Geographical Location

Instead of targeting particular demographics, the Post has found that its readers can be characterized as global thought leaders whose interests may be aligned regardless of geographic location. In terms of defining ad categories, Backlund says that their readers are “affluent, educated, professional and world travelers.” The publication chooses to offer “audience solutions” for a broad range of needs, such as “branding solutions, tourism, advocacy,” among others.

The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal

Other major publishers have catered to unique LatAm audiences with supplements and magazines to appeal specifically to their affluent, educated Latino readers. In many cases this has meant publishing in Spanish and/or Portuguese. The Wall Street Journal began publishing two new versions of its luxury magazine WSJ Magazine: WSJ Magazine Brasil and WSJ Magazine América Latina, in October 2014.  The New York Times started publishing a bi-monthly version of its New York Times T Style Magazine, T Mexico, in 2014. Both the Times and the WSJ publish international supplements with curated content from its regular coverage in Latin American newspapers.

Spain’s Grupo Prisa and Unidad Editorial

At a 2015  Digital Media LatAm conference in Mexico City, some other valuable strategies for monetizing the Latin Latinoamerica3-246x290American growing audience were introduced. Mobile strategy is king, as users are increasingly connected to their smartphones as opposed to laptops or PCs. Digital platforms that facilitate the best mobile experience possible keeps users coming back for more. Need proof? Antonio Caño, director of Spain’s El País, recently pointed out that the base of the publication’s readership now came from smartphone users. BTW: Spain’s El Pais, owned by Grupo Prisa, has a substantial Latin American and U.S. Hispanic digital readership, including editions in Brazil and Mexico. And Grupo Prisa-owned sports newspaper, As, also has Latin American digital editions, as does its competitor Marca, which is owned by Unidad Editorial.

Newspapers must think of themselves as brands to survive in today’s media climate. Mariana Marcaletti, the international news coordinator at Buzzfeedcommented that brands need to “connect and adapt: don’t ask people to go to your site; go to them.” And gone are the days of print media, so publishers must let their consumers dictate how they like to get their news. “If a video does better on Facebook leave it there: give people something to talk about; give them something extra.”

Marc Lavelle, director of interactive news at The New York Times  agreed, adding that digital media gives journalists the tools to integrate a story with text, video, graphic and photos, all of which give the reader added value. And in such a competitive arena, added value and effective alignment of content with technology will determine the winners and losers in monetizing Latin America’s informed readers.

 

What:Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO plans to turn the Washington Post into a national publication using his Amazon product the Kindle through an effort dubbed “Project Rainbow.”
Why it matters:The project consist of a new application that will initially be free for Kindle owners and eventually require a paid subscription available for Apple and Android products.

images (1)A bit more than a year after buying The Washington Post and its Spanish-language sister paper El Tiempo Latino, many observers are getting an answer to a key question: Namely whether Tech billionaire Jeff Bezos,would have his The Washington Post asset and his e-commerce giant Amazon working together.  The answer is a resounding yes. Bezos wants to turn the Washington Post into a national publication. To do so, he’s planning to use his Amazon product the Kindle to aid in the newspaper’s needed growth.

We now got an answer to a key question: Namely whether Bezos will have its The Washington Post asset and his e-commerce giant Amazon working together.

Bezos’ plan, basically, consists of using Amazon.com to bring the Post into more people’s hands.Through a new application, which will initially be free for Kindle owners and require a paid subscription in a download later available for Apple and Android products, Amazon’s founder will create ties between the newspaper and the e-commerce giant he started 20 years ago.

Over the  last few months, a group inside the Washington Post has been working on a new application that will offer a curated selection of news and photographs from the daily newspaper in a magazine-style, tablet-friendly format. The application will come preinstalled on Amazon’s newly updated Kindle Fire tablet, expected to be launched later this fall, according to Bloomberg.

Inside the Post, the effort was led by former editor-in-chief of Salon.com Kerry Lauerman, Lauerman joined the newspaper as a senior editor in July to work on mobile initiative, has been named Project Rainbow. Lauerman reports to Cory Haik, the Post’s executive producer for digital news.

Project Rainbow

imagesEver since Bezos bought the Washington Post, media observers have been speculating how he would resuscitate a franchise with old-media challenges, such as declining print advertising and an increasing online/mobile readership.

But Bezos has outstanded for focusing on growth instead of profit margins. His first move at the Post, too, was “a substantial expansion of the budget,” resulting in the hiring of more than 100 people so far in 2014.In September, meanwhile, Bezos dismissed the Post’s longtime publisher, Katharine Weymouth, and replaced her with Frederick J. Ryan Jr., a former aide to President Ronald Reagan.

Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablets and its new Fire Phone lag in popularity behind competing tablets and phones from Apple, Samsung Electronics and others. But Amazon is betting that editorially produced content, such as Amazon-published books, Amazon-produced TV shows, and now perhaps Washington Post-published news, can attract additional users.

 

What:Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO plans to turn the Washington Post into a national publication using his Amazon product the Kindle through an effort dubbed “Project Rainbow.”
Why it matters:The project consist of a new application that will initially be free for Kindle owners and eventually require a paid subscription available for Apple and Android products.

images (1)A bit more than a year after buying The Washington Post and its Spanish-language sister paper El Tiempo Latino, many observers are getting an answer to a key question: Namely whether Tech billionaire Jeff Bezos,would have his The Washington Post asset and his e-commerce giant Amazon working together.  The answer is a resounding yes. Bezos wants to turn the Washington Post into a national publication. To do so, he’s planning to use his Amazon product the Kindle to aid in the newspaper’s needed growth.

We now got an answer to a key question: Namely whether Bezos will have its The Washington Post asset and his e-commerce giant Amazon working together.

Bezos’ plan, basically, consists of using Amazon.com to bring the Post into more people’s hands.Through a new application, which will initially be free for Kindle owners and require a paid subscription in a download later available for Apple and Android products, Amazon’s founder will create ties between the newspaper and the e-commerce giant he started 20 years ago.

Over the  last few months, a group inside the Washington Post has been working on a new application that will offer a curated selection of news and photographs from the daily newspaper in a magazine-style, tablet-friendly format. The application will come preinstalled on Amazon’s newly updated Kindle Fire tablet, expected to be launched later this fall, according to Bloomberg.

Inside the Post, the effort was led by former editor-in-chief of Salon.com Kerry Lauerman, Lauerman joined the newspaper as a senior editor in July to work on mobile initiative, has been named Project Rainbow. Lauerman reports to Cory Haik, the Post’s executive producer for digital news.

Project Rainbow

imagesEver since Bezos bought the Washington Post, media observers have been speculating how he would resuscitate a franchise with old-media challenges, such as declining print advertising and an increasing online/mobile readership.

But Bezos has outstanded for focusing on growth instead of profit margins. His first move at the Post, too, was “a substantial expansion of the budget,” resulting in the hiring of more than 100 people so far in 2014.In September, meanwhile, Bezos dismissed the Post’s longtime publisher, Katharine Weymouth, and replaced her with Frederick J. Ryan Jr., a former aide to President Ronald Reagan.

Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablets and its new Fire Phone lag in popularity behind competing tablets and phones from Apple, Samsung Electronics and others. But Amazon is betting that editorially produced content, such as Amazon-published books, Amazon-produced TV shows, and now perhaps Washington Post-published news, can attract additional users.