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Headway Digital has appointed Sebastián Yoffe as SVP, Business Development. Moving from Buenos Aires to New York City, he’ll be responsible for the firm’s business development in the U.S.

 

 

 

 

Oath has named Steve Guillén as new Account Director, U.S. Hispanic. In this role, Guillén will oversee Oath’s sales portfolio for the West Coast region.

 

 

 

 

 

Walton Isaacson has promoted Christine Villanueva to Chief Strategy and Brand Officer. In this newly-created position, Villanueva is charged with leading and building out a next-generation global strategy function at the agency as well as overseeing all branding efforts on behalf of clients.

 

 

 

 

Irwin Gotlieb, executive leader and former CEO at WPP media agency GroupM is stepping down as global chairman. He will become a senior advisor to GroupM parent WPP. He served as GroupM’s CEO from its 2003 founding until 2012, when he transitioned to the global chairman role.

 

 

 

 

Haymarket has appointed Lindsay Stein as editor of Campaign U.S. The industry veteran joins Campaign after two and a half years at Ad Age as an agency reporter.

 

 

 

 

Andrew Mortimer, Sky’s director of media, has moved from the marketing group to the newly-created role of director of client strategy for Sky Media. In this role, he will be tasked with building “deeper relationships” with clients.

 

 

 

 

 

Arc, Leo Burnett’s retail and shopper marketing agency, has announced that Soche Picard has joined the company as chief executive officer for North America. In her new role, Picard will develop the commerce pillar of the agency’s positioning platform, culture, context, and commerce.

 

 

 

 

Quantcast, owner of the world’s largest AI-driven audience behavior platform for the open Internet, has announced the appointment of Sam Barnett as its first Chief Product Officer to oversee the development and growth of the company’s product portfolio.

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic creative shop Swift has announced that it is repositioning its chief operations officer and 10-year vet of the agency, Maren Elliott, into a new role as chief talent officer. She will now be responsible for overseeing retention, recruitment and employee development strategies.

 

 

 

 

New York-based creative agency SS+K announced today that it has named Feh Tarty as its new chief creative officer.

 

 

 

 

 

USA Today has announced that Maribel Perez Wadsworth will become the publisher of the daily publication, effective immediately. Wadsworth has replaced John Zidich, who announced his planned retirement in November.

 

 

 

WPP out-of-home (OOH) and experiential-focused agency Kinetic North America is reshaping its leadership team. With CEO David Krupp leaving at the end of the month to pursue an unspecified new role, Kinetic North America promoted Michael Lieberman (right) and Cedric Bernard (left) to roles as co-CEOs.

 

 

 

What: According to Zenith’s Online Video Forecast, viewers will spend an average of 47.4 minutes a day watching videos online this year, up from 39.6 minutes in 2016. This is partly driven by a 35% increase in viewing on mobile devices, for a total of 28.8 minutes a day. We spoke to industry experts from The Story Room, Walton Isaacson, Havas Media, and the community about how they are tackling video.
Why It Matters: Zenith predicts that by 2019, 72% of all online viewing will occur on mobile devices. In contrast, viewing on desktop PCs, laptops, and smart TVs will only increase by 2% to 18.6 minutes a day, and then shrink by 1% in 2018 and 2% in 2019. 

What does this mean for how brand marketers and media buyers will be distributing their ad spend? And how is the United States leading the global marketing industry in shifting budgets from fixed devices and television to mobile?

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The United States Accounts for 44% of Global Mobile Expenditure

U.S. ad spend has reacted more strongly to this trend than other global markets: The U.S. accounts for 44% of all global mobile expenditure this year, while its share of overall global ad market is just 35%.

To those in the industry, this isn’t such a surprise. Jacqueline Hernandez, Digital and Social Media Strategist at the community, said, “The U.S. has had a tendency to be a trendsetter in social and digital behaviors and, as a result, has also led the charge in how we approach those behaviors as marketers.”

Hernandez attributed this greatly to the large numbers of younger users pushing US mobile adoption: “While all age groups are watching more online video, the younger the demographic, the greater the propensity for online video consumption.” She added that “generation Z, which will be a key adult target in 5-10 years, already shows a significant preference for watching longer format video (even feature length films) on handheld devices.”

The native experience in some mobile apps/platforms require a different delivery mechanism but can be just as effective.

Diego Prusky, Co-Founder and Chief Strategist of digital marketing agency The Story Room agreed, noting that the United States is driving US mobile video growth because US consumers were early smartphone and video adopters, and also because “smartphone penetration in the US is now over 80% and the millennial plus generation Z digital natives account for over 40% of the population.”

Albert Thompson, Digital Strategist at Walton Isaacson, also reminded us that American content is not heavily censored: “You must remember, content is less censored here than in other countries so consumption is endless with very little constraints and often, as a result, there is an over-abundance of it.” 

Fixed Devices Vs. Mobile: Which Is More Effective?

While trends indicate that mobile video is the future, the study argued that fixed devices are still “more effective at conveying brand messages, and so command a price premium from advertisers” due to fact that fixed devices are displayed on larger screens, in less distracting environments, than those viewed on mobile devices. Not everyone agrees here.

Jessica Richards, EVP, Managing Director of Socialyse at Havas Media argued that mobile has its own advantages: “The native experience in some mobile apps/platforms require a different delivery mechanism but can be just as effective.”

The sheer number of variables involved in measuring the effectiveness of a mobile ad means that standardization will be important, Richards argued, in order to determine “the value of a view with so many disparate factors to manage for: decrease in attention, distinct mechanisms for content delivery (i.e. a Snap, Messenger, Roku), and differing measurement solutions across platforms.” She pointed to the challenges associated with getting a “true read on performance” as a major roadblock, and admitted that in the end, “it is difficult to state that one channel/size truly delivers the best performance across all audiences, especially younger demographics.”

Prusky of The Story Room also noted the ways that younger generations’ habits and preferences are forcing marketers to adjust their strategies. “Younger generations will much rather interact with a digital video or an influencer video than watch a 30-second commercial,” Prusky explained.

Prusky highlighted the importance of user experience, and delivering the right content to customers on the devices they are using: “When our foodie / Food Network consumer is on the subway checking Instagram, we need to have a quick Food Hack video or a review, and when they are leaning back on their sofa checking Facebook we need to have a hands and pans video or an influencer video that will entertain them and drive them to try our recipes.”

Richards of Havas Media agreed that the device is secondary to adjusting content to consumer needs. “Most smart advertisers have started to evolve their marketing approach to more naturally align to how the consumer behaves.” Brand marketers must think like their customers and anticipate not only what their needs are and when those needs are most urgent, but also the devices that consumers will use to resolve them.

“This means brands/agencies are beginning to take a stance that video content should be delivered agnostic of device/channel,” Richards elaborated, “using data to segment appropriate audiences, which leads to an increase video distribution in digital environments, primarily mobile.”

Regardless of whether mobile is less effective than fixed video, it is important to recognize that consumers interact with mobile differently than they do with a fixed device. “Remember, video displayed on mobile devices are often consumed while in transit, minor stopping points again while in transit, or while multi-tasking,” Thompson of Walton Isaacson explained. “Video content via mobile devices has to take into account the ‘mobility’ of the consumer.”

Global Budgets Set to Shift Toward Video

If Zenith’s predictions are any indication, the industry is starting to embrace the power of video. According to the study, fixed video ad spend is estimated to reach $15.2 billion this year, while mobile ad spend is still only at $12 billion. But next year, mobile video ad spend will surpass fixed video ad spend at $18 billion compared to $15 billion. 

There is nothing more personal than video on your phone that’s done in the right way: original, customized and relevant creative made for mobile viewing in a vertical style.

Andy Amendola, Senior Director of Digital Strategy and Media at the community, argued that “mobile is the first screen now” because “the mobile device is the distraction so if can reach your target there you win.” Aside from the fact that many of us spend the majority of our days looking at our phones is the fact that the phone adds an added element of personalization because you speak directly to an individual through the screen.

Amendola added: “There is nothing more personal than video on your phone that’s done in the right way: original, customized and relevant creative made for mobile viewing in a vertical style.”

Limited by Time, Lack of Creative Development, but Rich Source of Marketing Data

Despite its popularity among consumers, mobile video is still an imperfect tool for marketers in many ways. Richards of Havas Media noted that “limitations on creative/content development (time to create, number of pieces available, etc.) lead to a lot of brands and advertisers still using a limited or single piece of content or creative across multiple platforms, without variation in message, testing of content (length, animation, imagery), or pure understanding of consumer interest on platform.” This leads to the “oxymoron” that native ads really aren’t so native at all. “Additionally,” Richards continued, “while measurement is improving dramatically, it is not 100% and there are still a lot of platforms that remain ‘walled gardens’ which inhibits a truly agnostic video strategy.”

While measurement is improving dramatically, it is not 100% and there are still a lot of platforms that remain ‘walled gardens’ which inhibits a truly agnostic video strategy.

But others embrace the alternatives that video presents. Prusky from The Story Room said that digital video was “the highest priority for our clients due to the consumption and possibilities across the digital ecosystem.” He mentioned that The Story Room created a mix of pre-produced, on-site, 360, live and real time video that is distributed through Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, website, and an app. “These add up to millions of video views, but also to valuable marketing data that allows us to segment consumers and better understand who they are and what they are interested in,” Richards said in defense of the new marketing format.

Despite the roadblocks, Richards, at least, is optimistic that the industry will work out the kinks: “Video will continue to being a growing market because technology, brands, advertisers and platforms are investing heavily in solving the core challenges in media delivery, content and measurement.”

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What: Miami-based music production company Animal Music has expanded its presence with a new studio in Los Angeles, California.
Why It Matters: Advertisers and marketers looking to connect with young Multicultural audiences are looking for new creative vendors to add flavor and authenticity to their campaigns. We spoke to Animal Music’s Executive Producer Alberto Farinas and Creative Producer Agustin Mas about how West Coast agencies are experimenting as they work hard to connect with Multicultural audiences.

 Multicultural Vendors in Demand at West Coast Agencies

As Multicultural Millennials become the hot target, agencies across the US are struggling to inject authentic diversity into their Total Market campaigns. As a result, some creative production houses are finding an opportunity for growth in Los Angeles, where agencies are particularly open to experimentation.

Production house Animal Music, which offers customized commercial composition, sound design, audio post-production, and full music supervision and third party licensing services, was originally launched in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1986, successfully entering the U.S market through opening a Miami office in 2000. Now, they enter new territory again as they open their first office in Los Angeles to meet the growing need for Multicultural-inspired content.

Animal’s team of composers and producers, the majority of which are of Latin American descent, has worked with a broad range of global clients like Saatchi & Saatchi LA, BBH LA, Designory, BBDO NY, Ogilvy Mexico, LatinWorks, Dieste, and Zubi. They have traditionally focused is on providing music for creative productions, collaborating mostly with agency creatives and producers.

Agustin Mas, Creative Producer at Animal Music
Agustin Mas, Creative Producer at Animal Music

But around 2015, Executive Producer at Animal Alberto Farinas remembered noticing a shift beginning to occur in the advertising industry: “Some of the agencies we had been working with were hiring talent from Hispanic agencies, taking productions abroad, filming with multi-media production companies, and we noticed that the Total Market approach was taking off.” By the beginning of 2016, Farinas started to notice “actual movement” at agencies.

Some of the agencies we had been working with were hiring talent from Hispanic agencies, taking productions abroad, filming with multi-media production companies, and we noticed that the Total Market approach was taking off.

Today, the multicultural consumer has gradually taken center stage as America’s demographics began to shift, and consumers are starting to expect and embrace more diverse depictions of American life. With such deep roots in Latin culture, production houses like Animal are uniquely equipped to take on this growing need for Multicultural collaborators in the advertising world.

LA a Breeding Ground for Digital Experimentation

Animal’s decision to open a studio in Miami in 2000 proved to be smart: business started booming as they found that having operations in two timezones and international networks of talent allowed music to “keep up to the beat of our clients,” Farinas explained.

Alberto Farinas, Executive Producer at Animal Music
Alberto Farinas, Executive Producer at Animal Music

As Animal now enters a third time zone with LA, they feel confident that their hybrid approach, infused with a “less produced” South American sound, will satisfy what Farinas described as agencies desire for a “different flavor.”

While Animal has traditionally focused on music, West Coast agencies today are turning to collaborators like them to help infuse all aspects of their campaigns with Multicultural authenticity. This way, production houses like Animal Music are now able to transition from providing mainly music-related services to participating in the more general creative strategy: “Now they see us not only as a music house but a creative house, and music just happens to be how we communicate it,” Mas explained.

The growing influence of the Multicultural Millennial is intimidating to many marketers who feel that they do not have the resources or backgrounds to connect effectively with this diverse demographic. Mas and Farinas insist that in their case, all they had to do was be themselves (they do happen to be Multicultural Millennials themselves, which doesn’t hurt), and in return, the agencies have demonstrated complete trust in their visions. “The Multicultural approach that we have had is very organic and was never forced,” Mas said.

There are so many angles from which to attack a production in Los Angeles. We were used to a method of procedure where the agency contacts vendors and gets it done, but here it comes from everywhere.

Mas added that while most of their staff was trained at similar US institutions like Berklee School of Music, they originally come from all over Latin America and infuse their own culturally-driven backgrounds into their work. That kind of authenticity is priceless to agencies today.

LA’s ‘Open Artistic Community’ is the ‘Perfect Storm’ for Creatives

In Los Angeles, traditional advertising models like 30-60-second commercials are being pushed aside as agencies are encouraging production houses like Animal to break paradigms through digital experimentation. For example, Mas explained that when they worked with Walton Isaacson for a Lexus campaign, they were blown away by the way that Lexus “let us jump on board, go to the shoots — things that we would never get to do if we followed a different, less collaborative model.”

The city has proven to be a breeding ground for experimentation that creative producers like those at Animal are diving into. “There are so many angles from which to attack a production in Los Angeles,” Mas said. “We were used to a method of procedure where the agency contacts vendors and gets it done, but here it comes from everywhere.”

“People here love to exchange ideas and play,” Mas continued. “It’s an open artistic community.”  For creative professionals with a unique and authentic vision, it is the perfect storm,” Mas said.

Toyota is perhaps the automaker most committed to U.S. multicultural audiences. One example is the Toyota opportunity exchange which took place last Monday and Tuesday in Covington, Kentucky. But is Toyota’s overall marketing strategy about to change in the U.S. as it recently did in Europe? In that continent Toyota announced a plan to create a more customer-centric business model by moving its creative, digital, content and media business from Publicis Groupe to WPP-backed The&Partnership. If Toyota were to make changes in the U.S., where it spent US $1.4 billion in advertising in 2015, what agencies and decision makers would be impacted? Let’s take a look.

“Our ambition is to strengthen Toyota’s brand image in Europe by producing ever better cars, communicating a clear brand purpose and maximizing the effectiveness of our media investments. We believe a new business model is required to achieve this – one that is more integrated and customer-centric – with digital transformation at its heart,” Karl Schlicht, executive vice president of Toyota Europe, said in a statement. As a result Toyota Motor Europe moved its creative, digital, content and media business from Publicis Groupe to WPP-backed The&Partnership, which will create a network of dedicated hubs called &Toyota for the auto maker. Media will be done by m/Six, a UK media planning and buying agency backed by WPP. The European account, estimated  at over US $300 million, was previously at Saatchi & Saatchi and Zenith.

Who Would be Impacted in the U.S.

So will this happen in the U.S? We don’t know, perhaps some of it may already have happened when in 2013 Jack Hollis Group Vice President, Marketing called for a more integrated “Total Market” approach between Toyota’s multicultural agencies and its general market agency. The new team, called “Total Toyota” was created so that the general-market advertising traditionally handled primarily by Saatchi would have more input from Toyota’s African-American agency Burrell Communications, Hispanic-market agency Conill and InterTrend Communications, which handles Asian-American advertising for the automaker, Hollis said.

Zenith, part of Publicis Media, is the media buying agency for Toyota in the U.S., Mexico and Puerto Rico and also for Lexus (general market).

Hispanic marketing agency Conill Advertising has Toyota Motor Sales among the agency’s roster of clients. Among the executives working on Toyota at Conill is  William Formeca,  Director Communication Strategies and is part of the Toyota Media Team.

Toyota brand Lexus works with agency Walton Isaacson, where Liz Palato and Alvaro Salinas are both media leads on the business. On the other rhand, Mike Marinero is in charge of the Hispanic marketing efforts.

Find out more on all the decision makers behind the Toyota and Lexus brands in Portada’s Interactive Database of Marketers targeting U.S. consumers.. Plus detailed contact information on more than 2,000 Corporate Marketers and Agency Executives targeting U.S. consumers. GET YOUR FREE TRIAL to PORTADA’s Interactive Database! Contact Sales Research Manager Silvina Poirier if you have questions: silvina@portada-online.com.

Additional Key Toyota Brand Marketers

David Chung Director, Advertising & Marketing Management

Mia Phillips is National Manager of Brand, Multicultural & Crossline Marketing Strategy of Toyota USA

Lisa Materazzo Corporate Manager, Media Strategy & Digital Engagement

 

Find out more on all the decision makers behind the Toyota and Lexus brands in Portada’s Interactive Database of Marketers targeting U.S. consumers.. Plus detailed contact information on more than 2,000 Corporate Marketers and Agency Executives targeting U.S. consumers. GET YOUR FREE TRIAL to PORTADA’s Interactive Database! Contact Sales Research Manager Silvina Poirier if you have questions: silvina@portada-online.com.

When it comes to media buying for video, there is no shortage of targeting options in terms of platforms and portals. While Facebook and YouTube are the big players, Connected TV, Programmatic TV, and Native are emerging as effective alternatives, offering agencies a wide range of options. But much must change in order for agencies to truly embrace these alternatives instead of resorting to “juggernauts” Facebook and YouTube.

Facebook, YouTube Are Simple, Cost Efficient and Visible

For those who have been in the industry for a while, the easiest way

Albert Thompson, Director, Digital Strategy at Walton Isaacson
Albert Thompson, Director, Digital Strategy at Walton Isaacson

to describe Facebook and Google in the age of online video is through the past. Albert Thompson, the director of digital strategy at ad agency Walton Isaacson, says: “Remember the era of ‘portals’ deals?  FB and Google are the new portals,” he says, because “they have the most marketplace visibility and their audience scale and understanding is almost unparalleled.”

In terms of audience reach, Thompson describes the two players as the industry “juggernauts”: but they have earned that spot because “they are the most easily understood,” and “their DIY and managed service approach integrates rather seamlessly into client planning.”

And Thompson adds that the efficiency in the cost per engagement structure allows agencies (and brands) to “keep the overall cost down, which has always been a ‘favorable’ currency for buying agencies.”  And CTV, PTV, and Native are still relatively new, which means more risk in testing, and “many agencies are surprisingly risk averse.”

Range of Formats Afford Solid Media Mix

It’s not that all agencies are so risk-averse: for example, Walton Isaacson uses Connected TV, PTV, YouTube TruView (video ads that can be created in AdWords using YouTube videos) and Native Video alongside FB Video to create a “solid media mix.”

They see FB Video as an important player, but it is still just one among many targeting alternatives.  The CTV, PTV, and Native Video partners like YUME, VDOPIA, TUBEMOGUL, and TEAD.tv offer additional unduplicated reach against key target audiences they are targeting for the brands they represent in environments where there is less competitive presence.

Walton Isaacson hasn’t stopped at just measuring clicks and visits. The agency also started to tag CTV buys with store visit tracking “to see who makes it to a Lexus dealership after being exposed to TV ads on their mobile device.”  In the future store visit behavior will be the new currency for the measuring ad effectiveness digitally.

Just think about the possibility of leveraging the TV experience with the measurability of digital advertising accompanied by store visit data.

Thompson noted that the agency is in similar conversations with Google and FB about store visit tracking capabilities.

Whether we acknowledge it or not we are all adopting and enforcing a mobile-first world. The ability to have instantaneous access to media content within seconds that is curated for you is, not only powerful, but a tremendous opportunity for advertisers and content creators.

Walton Isaacson hasn’t stopped at just measuring clicks and visits. The agency also started to tag CTV buys with store visit tracking “to see who makes it to a Lexus dealership after being exposed to TV ads on their mobile device.”  In the future store visit behavior will be the new currency for the measuring ad effectively digitally.

Just think about the possibility of leveraging the TV experience with the measurability of digital advertising accompanied by store visit data.

Thompson notes that the agency is in similar conversations with Google and FB about store visit tracking capabilities.

Stats Suggest Connected TV, Mobile Are Catching Up

Studies have shown that certain demographics are using smartphones as much as they watch TV. For example, Nielsen has reported that in the second quarter of 2016, 18-34 consumers in the United States averaged 18 hours and 27 minutes of TV usage per week, while they used smartphones for an average of 14 hours and 36 minutes.

So it’s no surprise that the biggest threat to TV may be the small screen on people’s cell phones. “Whether we acknowledge it or not we are all adopting and enforcing a mobile-first world,” says  Mike Villalobos,VP of Sales at FuelX, a direct response video distribution platform. “The ability to have instantaneous access to media content within seconds that is curated for you is not only powerful but a tremendous opportunity for advertisers and content creators.”

Mike Villalobos, Vice President of Sales, FuelX
Mike Villalobos, Vice President of Sales, FuelX

And mobile isn’t the only force changing the way we watch video. Consumer marketing firm GkF claims that four in 10 consumers have a smart TV, and that more than a third (36%) own a digital media player like Roku, Google Chromecast, Amazon Fre TV and Apple TV. According to eMarketer, programmatic TV has seen solid growth increasing by 127% YoY.

Villalobos says that “key to all of this is its ability to leverage data that goes beyond a general demographic and enables marketers to get an affinity understanding of the consumer.”

But the emerging alternatives already offer qualities that Facebook and YouTube do not. When it comes to Connected TV, Thompson says, it “sits under the Addressable TV umbrella, meaning the ability to ‘address’ an ad down to the household level. In that sense, “CTV melds the best of both worlds – TV viewing experience on familiar devices with digital metrics (impressions, clicks, down stream click actions).” And AdAge reports that natively posted videos are getting better organic reach than posts featuring videos that are hosted elsewhere.

Innovation Comes with Challenges

But as consumer behavior and technology evolves, the industry will need to catch up, agree on standards for buying processes, metrics, and privacy. Villalobos explains: “With every innovation comes challenges and with PTV it’s the need for an effective and efficient buying process and access to limited inventory, which inherently brings scaling issues.” And while PTV will grow and budgets will start to shift as a result, “this may take a decade’s time due to its large contingency on consumer adoption of smart TVs.”

You have to carry a mantra of being willing to ‘disrupt’ yourself constantly.

And while online video is exploding, it “is constantly under the microscope for fraudulent traffic, incentivized actions, misreporting, “Black Box” solutions, antiquated attribution models (digital marketing as a whole), and questionable data platforms.” In this sense, “it shouldn’t come as a surprise when Facebook and YouTube are the de facto video solutions for most advertisers and agencies.”

PTV’s growth has also been slowed by legislative restrictions to real-time bidding: in the US, ads must be approved by the network, scripts are vetted, and revision for legal notification texts and evidence to support claims must occur before airing. While the powerful combination of third-party, offline consumer data and real-time TV viewing data is changing targeting approaches, there are also privacy concerns, as personally identifiable information (PII) is heavily regulated in many countries.

Looking at programmatic TV, targeted inventory is delivered through multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs), but only two minutes out of 15 total hours of advertising content are left as programmatic inventory. This is mostly because broadcasters do not want to lose revenue as CPMs go down under programmatic. And the industry has yet to discover a way to implement anything like traceable cookie IDs in linear TV.

But Facebook and Google are Convenient and Scalable 

In the end, Facebook and Google are still the most convenient options. “Facebook not only has terabytes of self-reported profile data that is continuously updated, but also creates a customized experience for the user by providing accurately curated content,” Villalobos says. “This user-centric experience has yielded a ton of success as Facebook averages over 8 billion views per day.”

“Facebook’s daily video consumption rate inherently makes them a powerhouse. Their data, campaign customizations, and ability to deliver a ROAS makes them a safe bet for video advertisers no matter what the company size,” he adds.

If ad tech companies can deliver a transparent solution that yields value beyond standard soft metrics such as viewability/view rate, advertisers will feel much more comfortable testing outside the two media juggernauts that are Facebook and YouTube.

And YouTube, on the other hand, has Google, whose parent company, Alphabet Inc., “enables savvy advertisers to not only host their video on the world’s largest online video repository, but also leverage the Google environment full circle and get the transparency of data they want,” Villalobos explains.

In the end, “If ad tech companies can deliver a transparent solution that yields value beyond standard soft metrics such as viewability/view rate, advertisers will feel much more comfortable testing outside the two media juggernauts that are Facebook and YouTube,” Villalobos predicts.

Essentially, anyone in this industry “has to carry a mantra of being willing to ‘disrupt’ yourself constantly,” says Thompson.

Just how important is social advertising to running an effective multicultural campaign? We spoke to Rochelle Newman-Carrasco, the Chief Hispanic Marketing Strategist at Walton Isaacson, an agency with a long-running reputation for creating multicultural social advertising campaigns, to learn more.

Social advertising employs the use of networks in creating, targeting and delivering marketing messages. When strategizing to reach key markets within the U.S., big advertising agencies can no longer ignore the significance of Latinos, especially on social media, as they have become the group with the highest rate of early adopters” of new technology among U.S. demographics.

Some big agencies are embracing this, investing heavily in developing social advertising campaigns that connect with Latino audiences and generate long-lasting relationships with this active demographic. What’s more, they take advantage of the fact that activity on social networks allows agencies to gather important data about certain targets in order to better understand their behavior and priorities.

Rochelle Newman-Carrasco has almost 30 years in the field, developing business strategy, traditional and non-traditional campaigns and conducting research and product development for blue-chip clients. She reiterated that when it comes to building an effective social advertising campaign, “social isn’t a question of right and wrong. Everything informs you and brings you opportunities to use knowledge from real time activities to get closer to your consumer.” Social advertising gives brands a unique opportunity to engage with consumers in less traditional ways, see what works and what doesn’t, adjust strategy quickly and segment for different targets.

Pili Montilla at Té Para Tres (Photo via Zimbio.com)
Pili Montilla at Té Para Tres (Photo via Zimbio.com)

“What would be wrong is not getting into the marketplace because of the paralysis of perfection. Social isn’t about perfecting anything, it’s about engaging with consumers and shaping the narrative based upon what’s really being said and done—not what you think might get said and done,” Newman-Carrasco adds.

Social isn’t about perfecting anything, it’s about engaging with consumers and shaping the narrative based upon what’s really being said and done—not what you think might get said and done.

Lexus Partnership

When asked about specific social advertising campaigns that stood out, Newman-Carrasco points to WI’s partnership with Lexus, through which they have “been innovating in the space for a number of years which has been invaluable in staying ahead of this ever-changing and dynamic methodology for truly targeting desirable consumers.”

An example of this is “Verses & Flow,” produced by WI and aired on TV One, which was a “spoken word and musical program supported by several social media programs” from bloggers to celebrities to live events that are documented through social media coverage before, during and after.

WI also conducted Hispanic marketing initiatives through a partnership with Pili Montilla on the production of Té Para Tres, which won an Emmy Award. This was a perfect example of making use of both traditional and non-traditional platforms in reaching key audiences:  “The program itself airs on a traditional media format (aka TV), (and) the eco-system of social advertising is where the consumer engagement takes place – be it the blogosphere, live events with embedded social media journalists and opportunities for on-line consumer interaction and more.”

Why did these campaigns stand out to Newman-Carrasco? Because “they are strategically aligned with the brand’s core values as well as with the consumer’s interests.” Using a strategic foundation, social media can be used to empower the messages delivered on campaigns featured on other platforms while targeting “more precisely,” giving the minds behind the campaign “access to data that is analyzed from a behavioral standpoint, a look alike standpoint, as well as other angles of relevance to driving bottom line sales.”

To Newman-Carrasco, multicultural campaigns and social advertising go hand-in-hand. When asked when social advertising is considered an important element of a multicultural campaign, Newman-Carrasco says: “One word. Always.” Why? To Walton Isaacson, social advertising is “as valuable for branding as it is for conversion,” because social advertising “isn’t one thing. It can take the shape of brand building creative and dissemination tactics as easily as it can be specifically developed to combat competition and convert consumers.” Spoken like an advertising veteran.

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There’s no question that multicultural targeting has become a priority for every brand. We spoke to Martin Cerrí, group creative director at advertising agency Walton Isaacson about their new Hispanic-targeted campaign for Lexus’s RX Crossover, “Meet the Unexpected.”

isaacsonUpon watching the spot, there is no question that it was inspired by a sense of other-worldiness. A man wakes up in a desert with a key to the Lexus RX in his hand. After getting into the car, he drives through gorgeous mountain scenery until a woman appears out of nowhere and gets in with him.

So when Cerrí told us the ad was inspired by Latin America’s beloved magical realism (think Gabriel García Márquez), we were pleasantly surprised, but it certainly made sense: “Magical Realism” is reality magnified by a touch of something unexpected; it is somewhat supernatural or fantastical, but it’s still rooted in reality,”  said Cerrí, who added wanted to take something that “goes beyond literature and influences other creative forms such as art and film” and use it as a tool to connect to sophisticated Latino audiences.

How would you describe this potential Lexus RX driver? According to Cerrí, this ad speaks to a savvy person who “truly appreciates it when a brand recognizes their intelligence and impact.” What’s more, Walton Isaacson wanted to connect the Lexus RX brand with the “family-focused, entrepreneurial” qualities we associate with this ambitious, inventive target.LEX-RXG-MY16-0048 (1)

Brands know that connecting with Latinos through targeted communications has become mandatory for overall brand success.

The Latino buying a luxury car is also proud of his or her heritage and culture, but tired of the typical, cliche approaches to Hispanic-targeted advertising. They are “contemporary, even future-forward,” said Cerri.

Campaign Foundation

And those tired and overused stereotypes are even more ineffective when designing a campaign for a luxury product. “This is why ‘Magical Realism’ became the foundation of our campaign as it is deeply rooted in Latino identity and culture but hasn’t been leveraged in a luxury context,” Cerrí asserted.

Walton Isaacson is handling all the media buying and was also responsible for the entire concept and production of the spot. Cerrí was enthusiastic about the work that goes into multicultural advertising, and highlighted that “brands know that connecting with Latinos through targeted communications has become mandatory for overall brand success.”

This isn’t their first rodeo with Lexus, either: they’ve created Latino-targeted campaigns for the automotive brand since 2009, and according to Cerrí, Lexus “has consistently achieved business growth in an increasingly competitive category.” He added, “In the case of other categories and potential clients, Walton Isaacson is receiving more invitations to be a part of pitches for brands that are realizing that they can’t stay on the sidelines when it comes to reaching out to the Latino audience.”

 

What: Advertising and marketing agency Walton Isaacson has appointed Alice Rivera as Vice president, Hispanic Marketing.
Why it matters: Rivera takes on the role previously held by Rochelle Newman-Carrasco, who will continue to work with the agency in an advisory position.

79IfH0B9_400x400Walton Isaacson , an independently held, minority owned, full-service advertising and marketing agency, has bolstered its strong multicultural client offerings with the addition of Alice Rivera as Vice president, Hispanic Marketing.

In her new position, Rivera reports to Walton Isaacson partners and co-founders Aaron Walton and Cory Isaacson.Rivera takes on the role previously held by Rochelle Newman-Carrasco, who has led WI’s charge in Hispanic marketing for the past seven years and will continue to work with the agency in an advisory position as she completes her MFA.

Rivera joins WI from Hispanic marketing agency Accentmarketing, where over the past 12 years she moved up to executive vice president/group director and managing partner.  In that time, she led Hispanic marketing efforts for clients including Farmers Insurance, Kaiser Permanente, So Cal Edison and Chevrolet, and expanded her responsibilities to oversee all business in the LA office.  Prior to that, Rivera served in account and management supervisor positions at Muse Cordero Chen & Partners and Enlace Communications, two agencies with pioneering roles in multicultural marketing.

Alice Rivera’s experience helps to fuel her passion for the kind of work that WI stands for across all segments as we recognize the role that diversity — of ideas and of ideators — plays when it comes to innovation,” said WI co-founder Aaron Walton.

Walton noted, “Latinos in the US are a diverse and vibrant community of innovators and influencers, and our clients have seen our Hispanic marketing counsel in areas such as strategy, creative, media, promotions and public relations have a direct impact on results. We look forward to Alice taking a leadership position in this critical and growing area.”

Isaacson added, “Alice’s understanding of multicultural marketing, particularly the Latino segment, twinned with her client experience and knowledge of best practices, will help the agency to continue to innovate in the Hispanic marketing efforts of major brands.”

 

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