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Headway Digital has appointed Sebastián Yoffe as SVP, Business Development. Moving from Buenos Aires to New York City, he’ll be responsible for the firm’s business development in the U.S.

 

 

 

 

Oath has named Steve Guillén as new Account Director, U.S. Hispanic. In this role, Guillén will oversee Oath’s sales portfolio for the West Coast region.

 

 

 

 

 

Walton Isaacson has promoted Christine Villanueva to Chief Strategy and Brand Officer. In this newly-created position, Villanueva is charged with leading and building out a next-generation global strategy function at the agency as well as overseeing all branding efforts on behalf of clients.

 

 

 

 

Irwin Gotlieb, executive leader and former CEO at WPP media agency GroupM is stepping down as global chairman. He will become a senior advisor to GroupM parent WPP. He served as GroupM’s CEO from its 2003 founding until 2012, when he transitioned to the global chairman role.

 

 

 

 

Haymarket has appointed Lindsay Stein as editor of Campaign U.S. The industry veteran joins Campaign after two and a half years at Ad Age as an agency reporter.

 

 

 

 

Andrew Mortimer, Sky’s director of media, has moved from the marketing group to the newly-created role of director of client strategy for Sky Media. In this role, he will be tasked with building “deeper relationships” with clients.

 

 

 

 

 

Arc, Leo Burnett’s retail and shopper marketing agency, has announced that Soche Picard has joined the company as chief executive officer for North America. In her new role, Picard will develop the commerce pillar of the agency’s positioning platform, culture, context, and commerce.

 

 

 

 

Quantcast, owner of the world’s largest AI-driven audience behavior platform for the open Internet, has announced the appointment of Sam Barnett as its first Chief Product Officer to oversee the development and growth of the company’s product portfolio.

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic creative shop Swift has announced that it is repositioning its chief operations officer and 10-year vet of the agency, Maren Elliott, into a new role as chief talent officer. She will now be responsible for overseeing retention, recruitment and employee development strategies.

 

 

 

 

New York-based creative agency SS+K announced today that it has named Feh Tarty as its new chief creative officer.

 

 

 

 

 

USA Today has announced that Maribel Perez Wadsworth will become the publisher of the daily publication, effective immediately. Wadsworth has replaced John Zidich, who announced his planned retirement in November.

 

 

 

WPP out-of-home (OOH) and experiential-focused agency Kinetic North America is reshaping its leadership team. With CEO David Krupp leaving at the end of the month to pursue an unspecified new role, Kinetic North America promoted Michael Lieberman (right) and Cedric Bernard (left) to roles as co-CEOs.

 

 

 

What: Tribune Publishing board of directors rejected USA Today owner Gannett’s US$815 million offer to acquire the company. In addition, Tribune adopted a “limited duration Shareholder Rights Plan.” Under the plan, known as “Poison Pill” in financial circles,  Tribune’s shareholders can double their holdings in the event that another party — in this case Gannett — acquires more than 20 percent of the company.
Why it matters: Tribune Publisher, owner of Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune and nine other daily newspapers, said Gannett’s “opportunistic” proposal understates the company’s true value and is not in the best interests of its shareholders. A potential acquisition, would make Gannett’s position, already the largest newspaper publisher in the U.S., even more hegemonic.

7slgoGr4_400x400 descargaTribune Publishing’s board of rejected USA Today owner Gannett’s US$815 million “opportunistic”offer to buy the company, arguing the proposal understates the company’s real value and is not in the best interests of its shareholders.

In addition, Tribune disclosed that its board has adopted a “limited duration Shareholder Rights Plan.” Under the plan, Tribune’s shareholders can double their holdings in the event that another party — in this case Gannett — acquires more than 20 percent of the company.In common corporate parlance, that’s a “poison pill,” a way to essentially protect corporate insiders from shareholder activism (like Gannett’s intent to buy Tribune).

Tribune publishing is the owner of  Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune and nine other daily newspapers.Gannett wanted to buy Tribune Publishing with the view of expanding its Network and uniting USA Today with its more than 100 local daily newspapers.

Last month, Gannett offered US$12.25 in cash for each Tribune share plus the US$390 million Tribune’s debt, bringing the total value of the bid to us$815 million. The owner of USA Today publicly announced the proposal two weeks after unsuccessfully making a private offer.

On the other hand, Tribune  is in the midst of  an strategic plan that includes creating digital subscription services and expanding the LA Times brand globally, which will include opening seven international bureaus this year, including outposts in Hong Kong, Seoul and Mexico City..In addition, the publisher plans to break out the Times’ revenue and profit as a separate segment from the rest of the company, which could boost the sale price and put pressure on Gannett to raise its offer.

“Tribune Publishing is in the early stages of a compelling transformation, with a well-defined strategic plan to drive increasing monetization of our important brands, capitalize on the global potential of the LA Times and significantly accelerate our conversion of content to revenue through an enhanced digital strategy,” Dearborn said in a statement Wednesday.

“Tribune Publishing’s board has unanimously determined that Gannett’s opportunistic proposal understates the company’s true value and is not in the best interests of its shareholders,” Tribune said in a statement.

 

 

What? Gannett will add 12 to 14 pages of USA Today content each day to 35 newspapers. It is expected that the company will  eventually expand the plan to its 81 local newspaper markets.
Why it matters: The move highlights the huge weight  local community newspapers have when it comes to connect with local audiences.

gannettContent may be king but local content is the emperor. Gannett just announced that it will add 12 to 14 pages of USA Today content each day to 35 newspapers including The Journal News in White Plains, N.Y., The Tennessean in Nashville and The Cincinnati Enquirer. It is expected that the company will  expand the plan to its 81 local newspaper markets.

The move highlights the huge weight  local community newspapers, many of them Hispanic, have when it comes to connect with local audiences. While national and metro dailies’ ad revenues are clearly declining, most local newspapers, particularly in second and third tier markets, are growing.

By inserting an abbreviated version of the USA Today into Gannett  newspapers, circulation will increase to 2.5 million readers on Sundays (from 1.5 million).
Photo: Yon Garin. Creative Commons License.
Photo: Yon Garin. Creative Commons License.

The plan is to introduce USA Today into local newspapers websites as well. Larry Kramer, USA Today’s publisher said to The New York Times that “as fewer readers buy or subscribe to both a local newspaper and a national one, the inserts enable Gannett to offer a single product that provides wider coverage.” Gannett has been testing this project since October in 4 papers in Indianapolis; Rochester; Fort Myers, Fla.; and Appleton, Wis.

According to the Alliance for Audited Media, USA Today currently has 2.876 million weekday readers for both the print and digital editions, with just over 1.3 million of those for the printed paper.

At the UBS Global Media and Communications Conference yesterday  Bob Dickey, president of U.S. Community Publishing  at Gannett explained that the program has been embraced enthusiastically by subscribers. Dickey also discussed a recent pilot program, in which a USA TODAY edition was integrated into print and e-editions of four local newspapers.As a result, he announced that the program will be expanded to 35 markets in early 2014. The new initiative, which is an extension of Gannett’s successful all-access content subscription model, will provide local consumers with an enhanced news product that leverages Gannett’s unique ability to generate and distribute national content while at the same time, enhancing its ever-important local hometown coverage.

Dickey also discussed enhancements to the all access content subscription model, as well as the positive impact of G/O Digital, Gannett’s comprehensive approach to digital marketing services, which will continue to help diversify the Publishing segment’s revenue stream.