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In December we introduced the Portada Buzz Barometer for Advertisers. Today we are introducing the Portada Media Buzz Barometer. While there should be more than  “buzz”, “buzz generation” can be very important for marketing and PR strategies. In this first release of our monthly analysis,  Univision, Telemundo, Azteca America, ImpreMedia and EZ Target belong to the media companies with the most positive change in “Buzz”. ESPN and CBS are the entities with the most negative change. We are not comparing the level of buzz of one company compared to the other companies, but comparing a given media company with its own performance over time.

The figures published below show the monthly change in the amount of searches in  Google for each of the media companies names. The scale is from 1% to 100% as measured since 2004 until November  30,2012. 0% means no searches and 100% represents the highest amount of searches  for the term throughout  the whole period.

strong>Below the Portada Buzz Barometer-Media (USH) representing percentage” buzz” changes from October to November 2012 (see Methodology below)

Below the development of each media company measured during the last 11 months measured against itself.
The  chart below shows the history of each of the national advertisers during the  January-November period of  2012.

Performance during January-November 2012

* Data in %

JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAgoSepOctNov
Univision6966677073746774687690
Telemundo52495548435275100595955
Fox5854535353535354617192
ABC8078766873696761688678
TeleFutura7860453755343936353027
CBS5953835447374049828672
NBC2123192020194654252929
Azteca America5153586666424645454068
ESPN75597762596657639810081
People en Espanol5046455059494751484345
Meredith3843383940424339383836
Televisa2221242426272933232327
ImpreMedia4139353723372320222543
Entravision3129303333342425222822
Google8080818283797880859897
Yahoo!2222202623192621181517
Terra4840383434323232343129
MSN Latino7466616665675957595753
AOL Latino9184677466544136353634
Orange93909191939410090838180
Batanga3533333335342929302627
EZ Target Media5355514148424243444365
Hola6060605962666769686266
Networks3537343334323132333331
Audience Science3262474349473355525346
Tribal Fusion3241323332323230312528

 

Methodology: How we measure “Buzz”

Our Barometer  measures the monthly percentage change in influence (buzz) that the top  Hispanic media companies  generate on a monthly basis on the Internet.  Buzz is measured by the amount of times the name of the media company was  used in Google searches during a given month, compared to the amount of searches  it generated a month before.  The measure does not compare the media companies between them, but a given media company with its own past performance. Again, this is is not a comparison between the  companies but of the same company versus its own performance the month  before. The study was made with data from Google Trends. The performance of  each media company has been tracked since 2004 until November 30, 2012.

Portada Buzz Barometer February 2012 Data  to be released in two weeks.

From old-fashioned telenovelas to action-packed series and reality shows featuring bikini-clad reporters, Spanish-language producers, broadcast and cable networks gathered this year at the Fontainbleau Hotel in Miami Beach to pitch their content at the annual National Association of Television Program Executives (NATPE) convention, which this year turned 50. A review of the different deals that were struck.

Hispanic TV and CAbleWhile organizers failed to give out specific figures, NATPE President and CEO Rod Perth said the percentage of attendees from the Spanish-speaking world was “huge,” and reaffirmed the importance of Miami as a hub for Hispanic content. “Miami is a Latin American city in many ways,” Perth told journalists at a Wednesday press conference wrapping the 3-day gathering.

Indeed, most companies offering Spanish-language content to audiences in the U.S. and Latin America were present at NATPE, whether on the Exhibitor floor (almost 40 of the 300 exhibitors offered Spanish-language content) or at the executives suites, including heavyweights like Globo TV, Televisa, Telemundo, TV Azteca and Venevision International. And while many of the deals closed during the gathering involved sales to Latin America, there was a lot of action involving buyers and sellers targeting U.S. Hispanic audiences.

2013 Natpe
Manuel Perez (VP & CFO, Venevision International), Miguel Somoza (Dir. Sales, VVI), Hector Beltran (Dir. Sales, VVI), Irán Castillo, Cristobal Ponte (Ind. Rep., VVI), Cesar Díaz (VP of Sales, VVI), Daniel Rodriguez (Dir. Sales, VVI)

“Latin America is our backyard; but we definitely see the U.S. Hispanic market as the next big hub,” says Cesar O. Diaz, vice president of sales at Venevision International, which was also a prominent NATPE sponsor. “Everyone is now focusing on this market.”

Hosting potential buyers at a suite on the 30th floor of the Tresor Tower, Venevision came to NATPE armed with a few new launches, including telenovelas Rosario and Los Secretos de Lucía and reality show Mi vida en Sayulita, focusing on a group of teenagers living in a laid-back beach resort near Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

Among the deals announced on or around the conference, MundoFox renewed Minuto para ganar for a second season and it is planning to relocate production to New York City. The show will be produced by Shine Americas. Telemundo struck a deal with Television Nacional de Chile that gives Telemundo U.S., Puerto Rico and Mexico rights for TVN’s telenovela script library. FreemantleMedia Enterprises and Discovery Networks Latin America/U.S. Hispanic signed a deal to bring Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide to more than 44 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico. Sierralta Entertainment closed several deals for Latin Angels Special, a “travel and beauty series that follows top bikini models, film and telenovela actresses as they travel around the world.”

Catering to a Changing Audience

Hispanic television was also the subject of a crowded panel on Wednesday morning called “The Ever Expanding Opportunities in Spanish-language Television.” It featured top executives from MundoFox, Univision and Telemundo, who discussed mostly about the opportunities –and challenges- of targeting a young audience who doesn’t watch TV anymore.

Marcos Santana (Presidente de Telemundo Internacional), Mauro Valdés (Director Ejecutivo TVN) , Joshua Mintz (Vicepresidente Ejecutivo del Area de Programación de Ficción y Gerente General de Telemundo Estudios), Ernesto Lombardi (Gerente de Negocios Internacionales de TVN)
Marcos Santana (Presidente de Telemundo Internacional), Mauro Valdés (Director Ejecutivo TVN), Joshua Mintz (Vicepresidente Ejecutivo del Area de Programación de Ficción y Gerente General de Telemundo Estudios), Ernesto Lombardi (Gerente de Negocios Internacionales de TVN)

In addition of its telenovelas, Telemundo, for instance, has gone beyond traditional formats and is rapidly embracing reality shows and producing more web-only series targeting a young demo. “It’s all about reflecting the evolution of our audience and staying relevant,” said Jacqueline Hernandez, COO of Telemundo, who shared a panel with Univision programming chief Alberto Ciurana; MundoFox evp of programming Adriana Ibañez and Creative Artists Agency exec Christy Haubegger.

Also in an effort to cater to young, U.S.-born Latinos, Univision is preparing for the fall launch of an English-language “news and lifestyle” cable network in a partnership with ABC News. The still-unnamed network is expected to launch in September, though Univision programming chief Alberto Ciurana declined to disclose specifics about its programming content or even its name.

Hispanic TV network execs also touched on the growingly diverse subsegments of the market, which is no longer a monolithic bloc of people who immigrated from Latin America and speak Spanish. There are the Spanish-dominant, the English-dominant, the bilingual and the “assimilated” ones, those who “speak English but curse in Spanish,” joked Harris Whitbeck, the Guatemala-born journalist who moderated the panel.

Language constraints apart, one thing panelists seemed to agree on was the fact that Hispanic audiences are starving for good, relevant content, whether they get it on TV, online or on their mobile devices. “It’s exciting to see that we’re moving from Spanish-language programming to programming to Hispanics,” said Haubegger.