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A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clients are moving into the market and/or targeting Multicultural consumers right now.

For prior Sales Leads editions, click here. 

  • Nintendo

Nintendo, a Japanese multinational consumer electronics and video game company headquartered in Kyoto, has launched a media review in the U.S., according to Adage.com. The gaming giant´s incumbent on the account is Publicis Media’s Blue 449 and will defend in the pitch.Nintendo Co. spent an estimated US$73.8 million in measured media in the U.S. in 2017, according to Kantar Media.Nintendo has hired External View Consulting to manage the search process.

 

  • Sling TV

Sling TV, the only streaming TV service to provide Spanish-language content by region, announced the launch of three Argentine channels in its “Sudamérica” regional pack, making Sling TV the leader in South American content among streaming TV providers in the United States. Telefe Internacional, El Trece Internacional and Todo Noticias join 10 other South American channels in Sudamérica, featuring content from countries like Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela and more.Sudamérica is available for US$10 per month when purchased on a standalone basis, or US$5 per month when combined with “Sling Orange,” “Sling Blue” and/or any Spanish-language service from Sling TV.In addition to these channels, Sling TV’s Sudamérica package offers TyC Sports, an Argentine sports channel that covers soccer, volleyball, tennis and basketball. Other channels in Sudamérica include Caracol, Nuestra Tele, NTN24, RCN Novelas, TV Venezuela, Ecuavisa Internacional, Bolivia TV, Canal Sur and Estudio 5. For more information on Sling TV’s Spanish-language offerings, visit www.sling.com/latino.

 

  • JOHNSON’S®

JOHNSON’S® is relaunching its entire lineup of baby care products globally – starting in the U.S. in late July. JOHNSON’S Baby US Hispanic team at CCOM Group is behind this effort. The iconic baby brand that our abuelitas loved will no longer look the same with a big transformation from the inside and out. For years, JOHNSON’S® has been listening to and responding to parent feedback about their products and with their latest restage the brand put modern parents at the center of the reformulation to make sure they live up to the expectations of today’s millennial parents and tomorrow’s Gen Z families. JOHNSON’S® has engaged 26,000 parents to help them create the new products.The brand has redesigned all of their washes, lotions and haircare products and reduced the number of ingredients in its portfolio by more than 50%, including removing sulfates and dyes. Their products have been free from parabens and phthalates for years—but now 96% of the ingredients in our leading products are naturally-derived. Not only is the design on the bottles changing but they’re also introducing new ergonomic bottles with pumps for convenient, one-hand use which makes bath time easier. JOHNSON’S USH media efforts as it relates to the relaunch include: dedicated Hispanic spend has increased +14% YOY; consistent, weekly presence on Hispanic National TV networks – like Univision, Telemundo, & UniMas; 70% digital plan is focused on channels that overindex against USH, like social & mobile video; branded presence on BabyCenter en Español to maximize reach amongst new moms and premium, high impact positioning in endemic Print, like Parents Latina.

 

  • Anheuser-Busch’s

As part of its ongoing Elevate initiative, Anheuser-Busch has launched two collections of downloadable stock photography featuring properly served beer, diverse consumers and brewers, myriad beer styles, and contemporary settings—for free. Anheuser-Busch says the images will be available royalty-free through photo sites Pexels and Unsplash, and feature four of the craft breweries now owned by Anheuser-Busch: Four Peaks in Tempe, Arizona; 10 Barrel in Bend, Oregon; Karbach in Houston; and Veza Sur in Miami. In 2017, 39 percent of beer drinkers identified as female, according to Mintel’s Beer and Craft Beer report, while 32 percent identify as African-American, Hispanic, Asian, or otherwise non-white according to Anheuser-Busch market research. A good number of beer drinkers who weren’t typically finding themselves represented in mainstream beer photography, marketing materials, and design. And it’s not because photo service users were indifferent: Pexels says diversity-related searches increased increased by 180 percent from 2016 to 2017.When consumers see people like themselves reflected in these beer images, this aligns Anheuser-Busch’s craft brands with young, diverse drinkers who are going to make up larger and larger portions of the beer-consuming market in the coming decades.

 

2018 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada’s new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the below campaigns, please contact our Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda at Isabel@portada-online.com.

 

  • Smirnoff / Absolut Vodka

Smirnoff and Absolut,rival vodka brands, are both out with new limited-edition bottles. Smirnoff parent Diageo has begun releasing limited-edition bottles with designs inspired by specific North American cities.The first two bottles, for California and Chicago, will be available at retail through November.Each design features a locally resonant image on the front and references to local language and customs on the back.Absolut has released an “Absolut World” version that “aims to bring people together by defying the distances between us and carving out new connections across international borders,” according to the brand. “Absolut World” is part of a global campaign from parent Pernod Ricard encouraging people around the world to take selfies and share tips about the hotspots and hangouts they love within their home cities.Once uploaded, the selfies become part of a mosaic of faces of participants, along with their names, locations, and hotspot recommendations.“The platform will connect travelers from all around the world and unlock experiences that bring people together,” explained Lisa McCann, brand director, Pernod Ricard Global Travel Retail.Pernod Ricard Global Travel Retail is promoting the bottle and campaign in airports in key global markets.

2018 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada’s new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the above campaigns, please contact our Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda at Isabel@portada-online.com.

What: Streaming sports platform FuboTV secured US $55 million funding to a total of US $75.6M raised to date.
Why it matters: The startup is looking to use this investment to expand its channel lineup and improve its technology.

Led by venture-capital firm Northzone, FuboTV has managed to raise US $55 million with the participation from 21st Century Fox, Sky and Scripps Networks Interactive.

Going from a US $10 a month soccer package, the streaming platform currently sells a US $35 a month, which includes channels from Fox, NBCUniversal and A+E Networks but not Scripps, which owns HGTV and Food Network. But FuboTV is not alone in the market. At the moment the startup faces competition from bigger and more experienced companies such as Sling TV, PlayStation Vue, DirecTV Now, YouTube and Hulu LLC, all with similar prices.

This is not the first time Fox and Sky decide to support FuboTV’s project. Last year the broadcasters helped raise a US $15 million funding round, they most see something big in the 3-year-old company.

The company will be increasing its marketing spend and use the funding also to develop new products that are designed specifically for people watching sports matches and related content.

According to CEO David Gandler, the company will be increasing its marketing spend and use the funding also to develop new products that are designed specifically for people watching sports matches and related content.

 

What: This week, à la carte live streaming service Sling TV launched a new marketing campaign, “Get Picky,” starring award-winning actor Danny Trejo.
Why It Matters: The five different spots — some in Engish, some in Spanish — are aimed at both the general and Latino markets — a new strategy that Sling TV has found to be better aligned with the behavior of their consumers.

This week, à la carte live streaming service Sling TV, whose services go for as little as $10 a month, launched a new marketing campaign, “Get Picky,” starring award-winning actor Danny Trejo. The campaign features Trejo helping consumers embrace the pickiness (like ordering coffee or choosing a perfect vacation rental) and use it to get the TV they want.

Trejo, a beloved figure who has amassed a cult following due to his roles in “Breaking Bad,” “Machete,” “Machete Kills” and “From Dusk Till Dawn,” was featured in Sling TV’s last campaign, “Who’s Bad!?” and returns this year for a multimedia campaign that will include digital, mobile, social, print and new media platforms.

The fie different spots — some in Engish, some in Spanish — are aimed at both the general and Latino markets — a new strategy that Sling TV has found particularly effective, especially with a star like Trejo. Sling TV’s Chief Marketing Officer Glenn Eisen explained, “Danny was someone who could reach across the aisle; he was someone who was extraordinarily appealing to both market, and we fell into it very serendipitously.”

Eisen recalled how in the first shoot, Trejo asked one of the producers to play Patsy Cline for him, an unexpected but welcome request. “It really showed you how he really truly represented Americana,” Eisner said. “Americana is a patchwork quilt of people from the variety of different backgrounds and his appeal to both of those market segments has been great and sustainable.”

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSjt1RM4rrg?ecver=1]

Sling TV traditionally considered the Latino and general markets separately, and had only planned to work with IMG agency Society for the Latino-oriented campaigns. But after brainstorming about how to take full advantage of a personality like Trejo, they realized that he had a uniquely universal appeal to all audiences.

“I can think of nobody better than Danny Trejo for both marketing segments,” Eisen explained. “We have such an important marketing message to share, and with him, we got to break through the clutter.” They decided to merge their Latino and general market efforts into one campaign.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HnCfSsKfTU?ecver=1]

This decision came after a great deal of market research that yielded an unexpected truth: In the case of OTT service providers, Eisner explained, target audiences tends to be defined more by their tech-savvy behavior and level of technological efficiency than the language they speak or where they are from. This kind of behavior — not necessarily a connection to culture or ethnicity — is what connects consumers to brands like Sling TV.

“As chord cutting continues to accelerate, and you see defection from pay TV, you are going to see that audience get more mainstream than it is today, but for now, our audience is defined by their behavior,” Eisner said.

While the new campaign with Trejo is designed to have mass appeal, it would be inaccurate to assume that Sling TV’s goal is to lump everyone into one category. Eisen highlighted the importance of how well Sling TV understands what its consumers want: “Sling TV continues to communicate something that Pay TV has prevented since its inception: providing its consumers with meaningful customization of their tv service.”

In a market where consumers expect everything to be customized and on-demand, Sling TV has been able to “bring an à la carte model to our consumer, who is used to being able to choose from a bigger or exceptionally bloated choice of channels, which is so disconnected from consumers’ behavior, wants, and needs,” Eisen said.

Eisen emphasized that Sling TV’s service includes highly customized packages for different demographics like Mexican Americans, and regions or countries like Latin America, Spain, and the Caribbean. “This is part of the à la carte scene that we are so committed to and deliver on in such an exceptional way that doesn’t exist in the marketplace today,” Eisen said.

Agency: 

Society

Client: 

Sling TV
EVP, Managing Director:

Rob Bernstein

Chief Creative Officer:

Nick Childs

Executive Creative Director:

Roberto Alcazar

Executive Creative Director:

Josh Greenspan

Associate Creative Director:

Sarah Dennis-Browne

Art Director:

Brooks Hess

Graphic Designer:

Ilyssa Mooney

Copywriter:

Fernando Diaz-Morlet

Copywriter:

Courtney Harris

Campaign Producer:

Rob Farber (Rogue)

Head of Production:

Jeremy Mack

Executive Producer:

Alicia Calderon

Dish’s Sling TV promises to “take back TV” for $20 a month through live programming from your computer screen. But when it comes to catering to increasingly important Hispanic viewers, Sling TV is forming a strategy to make sure its advertising targeting capabilities and programming are finely tuned.

We spoke with Jose cuba-max-tvRomero, general manager of Sling Latino, about how the platform will be tailoring its content and ad capabilities to Latino viewers, and the launch of CUBAMAX TV, its curated channel for Cuban American audiences. It is the first American channel of its kind to offer content filmed and produced on the island.

Introducing Addressable Capabilities to Ad Inventory

While Romero asserts that at the moment, Sling does not have its own ad sales force for selling to Hispanic audiences, he says that the company expects “to introduce addressable capabilities to Sling TV ad inventory in the coming months, enabling us to reach individual Hispanic subscribers across a variety of networks.”

The company has admitted that this type of targeting is key to the platform’s business model, as they are more valuable than broadcast ads. And since ads are not exactly popular with viewers, especially on paid content, these targeting capabilities should help the company get closer to its goal: more relevancy, less advertisement.

SlingTV admits that targeting is key to the platform’s business model.

Sling Launches CUBAMAX TV 

One of Sling TV’s latest announcements in the realm of Hispanic targeting is the launch of the CUBAMAX TV channel, which, in Romero’s words, will “create a cultural exchange that will both provide a window into life on the island and connect Cuban-Americans with content from their home country.”

60 percent of CUBAMAX TV’s content is generated by Cuba’s state agency RTV Commercial, while the other content consists of documentaries created by young, independent filmmakers. The channel has acquired the rights to 200 Cuban movies and will be showing two movies and as many as three telenovelas per day. Programming on CUBAMAX TV such as “Sonando en Cuba” and “Vivir del Cuento” will showcase the unique perspective of the people of the island.

The relationship between the United States and Cuba has evolved greatly since President Obama fully restored American diplomatic relations with Havana in December 2014. And the effect of this announcement was as cultural as it was political, encouraging a deeper connection between the countries, who have always been tied by the significant Cuban-American population in states like Florida.

Commenting on the effect of these developments on Sling’s decision to develop content for Cuban-American audiences, Romero says: “Since President Obama’s announcement in late 2014, we, like many companies, have been exploring a greater level of cultural engagement between the U.S. and Cuba.”

He continues to explain that the channel provides an outlet for Cuban voices and talent that had been somewhat stifled due to the previously tense diplomatic relations. “We think normalization has created a tremendous opportunity that is yielding benefits, in this case for our customers, for the Cuban population living in the U.S., and for the entertainers whose work is aired on CUBAMAX TV.”

And while this shift has already undoubtedly created many opportunities for American tourism on the island, channels like CUBAMAX TV will hopefully shed light on the magic of Cuban culture for those that cannot travel there themselves. “While not everyone gets the opportunity to visit the island, our customers can now turn on our TV and get a feel for the culture and entertainment the Cuban people have worked to cultivate,” Romero adds.

Programming for Hispanics: Not So One-Dimensional

Sling Latino has gotten one thing right already: developing programming for Hispanic audiences is no easy task, as those that fall into the ‘Hispanic’ category are by no means uniform in language preferences or taste. For that reason, Romero says that Sling has developed a variety of programming packages: “Sling offers a suite of standalone and add-on Spanish-language programming packages tailored to English-dominant, bilingual and Spanish-dominant U.S. households.”

Best of Spanish TV packages are priced at $5 more per month when combined with either Sling Orange (single-stream) or Sling Blue (multi-stream) services. They are $10 when purchased as standalone packages.

What’s more, the platform is taking regional variations into account: “We recently announced that Sling Latino is the first to launch regionally focused programming packs, beginning with CARIBE, which includes content from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and coming soon, the Dominican Republic.”

And they’re not stopping there. Romero adds: “We plan to add new regional packs in the coming months, and look forward to delivering the regional content that our customers crave in a way that allows for flexibility, mobility and personalization in their entertainment.”

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

 

sands-floor-sm As weary ad execs wandered home from CES 2015, we took a look at what this mother of all consumer electronics shows revealed about the future of advertising. We identified five trends that we think will matter for advertisers in the years to come, and checked in with three smart executives to get their thoughts.

1. Connected Watches

They show no sign of going away, with twice as many wearable exhibits as at CES 2014. But ads on them? Really? Probably, according to Jeremy Sigel, director of mobile, North America, for digital agency Essence. “Similar to mainstream mobile ad formats, it is easy to envision a full-screen interstitial ad or even a 15-second video on a smartwatch,” Sigel says. He points out that while a watch face may seem small, the dimensions would be similar to a Facebook mobile newsfeed ad. “While smartwatch ads may start there, the bigger opportunity will be highly contextual push notifications that strive to be additive, and branded applications that are inherently helpful to keep a brand top-of-mind.”

smart-watches-sm

If you think people won’t accept ads on their smartwatches or fitness devices, just remember that in the early days of mobile, people said the same thing about their phones. In fact, some of us, ahem, are old enough to remember when advertising on the World Wide Web was frowned upon.

2. OTT TV:

Dish’s SlingTV streaming service gave another push to over-the-top video, enabling subscribers to watch live TV, video-on-demand and 12 cable channels on a variety of devices. It also could open the way for better targeting and tracking of TV ads. Sling did not immediately respond to an email about its ad plans, but third-party ad networks may start salivating now.

Pat McKenna, CEO of Strike Social, says Sling and other OTT services will help marketers get a more accurate comparison of the performance of video ads on TV and digital. Strike Social is a third-party TrueView advertising, targeting and analytics platform that tracks video-ad performance across YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. The key to achieving this, according to McKenna, is for OTT services to provide APIs and consistent data to allow ad servers and analytics platforms to consume their data. “The opportunity for us is to marry performance data across all platforms, and then provide the report to [advertisers],” he says.

David Santana, art director at global, digital marketing agency Deep Focus, says that Sling TV’s $20 monthly subscription, no-contract deal will be attractive to Hispanic consumers, who are gravitating to other companies like T-Mobile that don’t demand customers lock themselves in. He says a bigger win will be if Sling TV develops content packages for Hispanics, the way that DirectTV does. (In December DirecTV introduced OTT Video Service Yaveo targeting the Hispanic population.) “The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow,” Santana concludes.

The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow.

3. Connected and autonomous cars

Internet-connected cars have been around at least since BMW introduced ConnectedDrive in 2011 – and CES 2014 seemed to be the CES of the Car. This year, more than a dozen cars were on display, many of them highlighting current or concept connected-car technology. With Google powering or at least participating in several of these offerings, you have to wonder: Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls. There’s also a strong –someday – play for ads on the so-called infotainment screens, the ever-larger digital dashboard screens that show everything from what’s playing on the sound system to your navigation route to use Facebook.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyCox6In5bg&w=560&h=315]

How about sending the driver a McDonald’s coupon when she’s approaching the restaurant? Actually, TeleNav has been doing that since 2010. The problem has always been, and continues to be for now, getting enough scale to make it worthwhile for national advertisers to bother. Maybe someday …

Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls?

 

Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball

4. Virtual Reality

Volvo, Dos Equis, Marriott, HBO, Tourism Australia and a handful of movie marketers have already released branded apps. VR is cool and fun, but hampered by the need to use a headset. Joining the fray among the expensive and still-in-beta Oculus Rift and the adorably crafty – and cheap – Google Cardboard headsets, Avegant and Samsung demonstrated virtual reality at the show. In the short term, VR marketing will live at trade shows and special events, where staffers can be on hand to manage the hardware and software.

Deep Focus’ Santana gives kudos to Volvo for it’s VR campaign that sent consumers who registered a Google Cardboard viewer kit. “That make it inclusive,” he says. “You don’t need a lot of money or to be in a major market to experience virtual reality. That’s important for the Hispanic community.”

Eventually, Digital Agency Essence’s Sigel thinks, that these virtual-reality “experiences” could contain ad units, in much the same way ads have been inserted into TV broadcasts, as well as into video and console games. He gives the example of a VR experience that lets you sit court-side at an NBA game. “In addition to traditional signage, the t-shirts of patrons, concessions, chants from the crowd, a comment from a court-side celebrity and shouts from players may all be sellable units,” he says.

By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?

5. Big data gets ginormous with connected-everything

The Internet of Things was one of CES 2015’s Top Tech Trends, along with wearables and autonomous cars. All these devices will generate data either all the time or a lot of the time. Location-based data combined with behavioral and contextual data could make ad targeting incredibly more complex – and possibly better. The quantified self, continuously tracked by wearables, could alone generate unprecedented amounts of usable personal data. The possibilities – futuristic as they are – are fascinating. By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?  Would his anonymous personal profile include the information that he’s more likely to respond to ads 20 minutes after he’s completed a run? How about a tweet from New Belgium Brewing after that run? Now, that’s the future of advertising.

sands-floor-sm As weary ad execs wandered home from CES 2015, we took a look at what this mother of all consumer electronics shows revealed about the future of advertising. We identified five trends that we think will matter for advertisers in the years to come, and checked in with three smart executives to get their thoughts.

1. Connected Watches

They show no sign of going away, with twice as many wearable exhibits as at CES 2014. But ads on them? Really? Probably, according to Jeremy Sigel, director of mobile, North America, for digital agency Essence. “Similar to mainstream mobile ad formats, it is easy to envision a full-screen interstitial ad or even a 15-second video on a smartwatch,” Sigel says. He points out that while a watch face may seem small, the dimensions would be similar to a Facebook mobile newsfeed ad. “While smartwatch ads may start there, the bigger opportunity will be highly contextual push notifications that strive to be additive, and branded applications that are inherently helpful to keep a brand top-of-mind.”

smart-watches-sm

If you think people won’t accept ads on their smartwatches or fitness devices, just remember that in the early days of mobile, people said the same thing about their phones. In fact, some of us, ahem, are old enough to remember when advertising on the World Wide Web was frowned upon.

2. OTT TV:

Dish’s SlingTV streaming service gave another push to over-the-top video, enabling subscribers to watch live TV, video-on-demand and 12 cable channels on a variety of devices. It also could open the way for better targeting and tracking of TV ads. Sling did not immediately respond to an email about its ad plans, but third-party ad networks may start salivating now.

Pat McKenna, CEO of Strike Social, says Sling and other OTT services will help marketers get a more accurate comparison of the performance of video ads on TV and digital. Strike Social is a third-party TrueView advertising, targeting and analytics platform that tracks video-ad performance across YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. The key to achieving this, according to McKenna, is for OTT services to provide APIs and consistent data to allow ad servers and analytics platforms to consume their data. “The opportunity for us is to marry performance data across all platforms, and then provide the report to [advertisers],” he says.

David Santana, art director at global, digital marketing agency Deep Focus, says that Sling TV’s $20 monthly subscription, no-contract deal will be attractive to Hispanic consumers, who are gravitating to other companies like T-Mobile that don’t demand customers lock themselves in. He says a bigger win will be if Sling TV develops content packages for Hispanics, the way that DirectTV does. (In December DirecTV introduced OTT Video Service Yaveo targeting the Hispanic population.) “The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow,” Santana concludes.

The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow.

3. Connected and Autonomous Cars

Internet-connected cars have been around at least since BMW introduced ConnectedDrive in 2011 – and CES 2014 seemed to be the CES of the Car. This year, more than a dozen cars were on display, many of them highlighting current or concept connected-car technology. With Google powering or at least participating in several of these offerings, you have to wonder: Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls. There’s also a strong –someday – play for ads on the so-called infotainment screens, the ever-larger digital dashboard screens that show everything from what’s playing on the sound system to your navigation route to use Facebook.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyCox6In5bg&w=560&h=315]

How about sending the driver a McDonald’s coupon when she’s approaching the restaurant? Actually, TeleNav has been doing that since 2010. The problem has always been, and continues to be for now, getting enough scale to make it worthwhile for national advertisers to bother. Maybe someday …

Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls?
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball

4. Virtual Reality

Volvo, Dos Equis, Marriott, HBO, Tourism Australia and a handful of movie marketers have already released branded apps. VR is cool and fun, but hampered by the need to use a headset. Joining the fray among the expensive and still-in-beta Oculus Rift and the adorably crafty – and cheap – Google Cardboard headsets, Avegant and Samsung demonstrated virtual reality at the show. In the short term, VR marketing will live at trade shows and special events, where staffers can be on hand to manage the hardware and software.

Deep Focus’ Santana gives kudos to Volvo for it’s VR campaign that sent consumers who registered a Google Cardboard viewer kit. “That make it inclusive,” he says. “You don’t need a lot of money or to be in a major market to experience virtual reality. That’s important for the Hispanic community.”

Eventually, Digital Agency Essence’s Sigel thinks, that these virtual-reality “experiences” could contain ad units, in much the same way ads have been inserted into TV broadcasts, as well as into video and console games. He gives the example of a VR experience that lets you sit court-side at an NBA game. “In addition to traditional signage, the t-shirts of patrons, concessions, chants from the crowd, a comment from a court-side celebrity and shouts from players may all be sellable units,” he says.

By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?

5. Big Data Gets Ginormous with Connected-Everything

The Internet of Things was one of CES 2015’s Top Tech Trends, along with wearables and autonomous cars. All these devices will generate data either all the time or a lot of the time. Location-based data combined with behavioral and contextual data could make ad targeting incredibly more complex – and possibly better. The quantified self, continuously tracked by wearables, could alone generate unprecedented amounts of usable personal data. The possibilities – futuristic as they are – are fascinating. By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?  Would his anonymous personal profile include the information that he’s more likely to respond to ads 20 minutes after he’s completed a run? How about a tweet from New Belgium Brewing after that run? Now, that’s the future of advertising.