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What: Pulpo, the digital division of Entravision Communications recently embarked on a rebranding effort to improve how it communicates its broad digital services in the market place, beyond just paid media.
Why it matters: The Pulpo rebranding goes well beyond a new creative, it’s about a go-to-market strategy.

 

For the 4th year running, AdAge has ranked Pulpo as the number one Hispanic Ad focus Network reaching 30 million monthly unique visitors. Founded a decade ago, Pulpo employs over 100 employees and has helped nearly 1500 brands achieve their Hispanic marketing goals.

Pulpo has been working on a rebranding effort that will allow the company to better position its full range of digital services that go well beyond just paid media. We talked in exclusive to Oscar Padilla, Senior VP of Digital Media Marketing and Insights at Pulpo, about how this repositioning came to place and what it means for brands.

The company has been evolving since its inception. However, when it became a part of the Entravision family in 2014, it became part of a much larger media ecosystem. As a response to the nature of the advertising industry, Pulpo has been organically expanding its portfolio of services well beyond paid media. This new rebranding is all about conveying the full set of offerings Pulpo brings to the table in an even more intuitive manner.

Pulpo will be taking a step further by delivering clear distinctions across three core offerings: Pulpo Media, Pulpo Solutions, and Pulpo Engage. For Media, whose role is to engage audiences across the full digital spectrum (web, mobile, video, and connected TV), the rebranding includes an upcoming fresh podcast and audio offering. Pulpo Solutions will be getting the exposure it needs and deserves to fully perform as a one-stop-shop for digital marketers seeking to drive awareness, convert customers, and drive growth results. And last but not least, Pulpo Engage will be leveraging O&Os content properties, personalities, influencer, and content partners to deliver audience engagement through compelling content experiences. “Pulpo is in a unique position to offer our clients much more than just an audience and CPM offering”, says Oscar Padilla.

Oscar Padilla is a new member of the Agency Star Committee, one of the six units of Portada’s Council System. The Council System’s next in-person meeting will be at Portada Los Angeles on March 14 at Santa Monica’s Loews Hotel.

The ultimate goal for Pulpo is to be loud and clear for audiences to profit from what they do best. It took them a lot of self-searching to accurately describe their potential to boost their clients and work with their needs. Vanessa Moldin, Head of Branding, led the strategies to help the brand sculpt a new look and feel and architect the service offerings in a way that made sense with their core values. “We’re an integrated digital solutions company that can provide robust digital marketing and media services, plus we bring to the table the backing of Entravision Communications giving us unparalleled opportunities to deliver 360 media campaigns to our clients”, says Moldin. The task was not easy, but it was necessary.

The rebranding also delivered a new tagline that, in a simple phrase, encapsulates Pulpo’s core benefit: Your source for Latino fans. But what does the “Latino” difference do for brands? Brands look to have a strong, impactful relationship with their audience, well beyond just impressions and clicks. A Latino Fan is someone that connects with brands at all levels; they’re passionate about their services and products, they share their enthusiasm with their communities and connect with them at a deeper level. The tagline honors the profound relationship brands are thankful to have with their customers.

Consumers engage with a brand through a plethora of touch points and experiences that organically combine media, content, and performance, and Pulpo seeks to deliver on this promise.

The timely renovations come at a moment in which digital advertising is much more fluid and integrated. Consumers engage with a brand through a plethora of touch points and experiences that organically combine media, content, and performance, and Pulpo seeks to deliver on this promise. The company wants brands and advertisers to have an integrated vision of what it can achieve for them; a one-stop-shop partner for all their digital needs.

We are excited to announce that Oscar Padilla, VP of Digital Media Marketing and Insights at Pulpo Media, is joining the Portada Agency Star Committee, one of the six units of Portada’s Council System. The Council System’s next in-person meeting will be at Portada Los Angeles on March 14 in Los Angeles’ Loews Hotel.

Oscar currently serves as Pulpo’s Senior VP of Digital Media Marketing and Insights, an Entravision Communications company. Oscar has held diverse roles within his 6+ years at Entravsion including founding partner of Luminar Insights; the first Big Data company squarely focused on the US Hispanic Market delivering advanced analytics solutions. Before Entravsion, Oscar launched the digital business unit of Vertis, focused on developing and executing digital direct response strategies for Fortune 500 big box retailers. With over 20 years of digital media under his belt, Oscar has worked across a wide range of diverse businesses – from start-up ventures to digital agencies to established media companies.

We are thrilled to welcome Oscar to the Agency Star Committee, and we asked him to tell us more about Pulpo and what he’ll bring to the table.

Portada: What are Pulpo’s main objectives?
Oscar Padilla: Simply stated, Pulpo’s objective is to continue to be the #1 digital media company servicing the US Hispanic market. But at the end of the day, it’s not our leadership position that client’s care about, they’re interested in results and that’s what motivates us to evolve continuously. It’s the result of years of developing a deep cross-cultural understanding of the Hispanic market, leveraging our vast data assets, and our people that allow us to deliver results for our clients.

 I’m thrilled to be a new member of Portada’s AGENCY Star Committee. This committee has a strong mission of advancing how we target Hispanic consumers, I think my deep analytical background market plus my digital media experience brings a unique perspective to the group.

Portada: How do you intend to accomplish these objectives? 
Oscar Padilla: We couple our scale with advanced data.  This is the fuel that allows us to build our targeting and advance Hispanic segmentation models. We’ve been gathering and maturing our first-party data for years, but we’re also working with a variety of third-party partners that can support our needs and those of our clients.
We’re actively involved in expanding our Hispanic audience reach well beyond the “traditional’ digital web, mobile environment. Our audience reach should be channel agnostic, and this consists in leveraging many of the vast resources of our parent company, Entravsion, brings to the table. Finally, our people are essential to accomplishing our goals. Pulpo has built a solid team dedicated to supporting our mission and delving into what our clients need.

 

What: Laura Willis, who was formerly Senior Sales Director at Pulpo Media, has returned to the company as VP of Digital Sales.
Why it matters: With her experience in advertising and media planning, and specifically in the multicultural space, Willis is a great addition to Pulpo Media’s Digital Sales team.

Pulpo Media, an online ad network with access to proprietary data and technology that allows for the placement of ads specifically targeted at Hispanics across different channels, recently announced the appointment of Laura Willis as VP of Digital Sales. This marks Willis’ return to Pulpo; after fulfilling the role of Senior Sales Director in 2017, she filled the position of Director of Integrated Sales at Meredith/People en Español for almost a year before Pulpo tapped her as Digital Sales VP. At Portada, we sat down with Willis in order to find out more about her perspective for the next year and what she brings to the table at the company.

Portada: It’s an exciting time for Pulpo in that it’s launching new products and adding new staff, how was it that the decision was made for you to come back to the company? 

Laura Willis: The decision was easy, and I’m thrilled to be joining the team. I’ve been on both sides of the “fence” with Pulpo in that I’ve been a client working with their media team and I’ve also worked for the company. I’ve been following their progress and seeing how the company has continued to evolve and adapt to the marketplace; with new products, stepping up to meet ever more restrictive industry needs, and expanding its team with great people. You couple all this with the fact that Pulpo is recognized by Ad Age for the 4th year in a row now as the largest Hispanic network, and I see the potential for great things for Pulpo and our clients.

If you don’t have the scale, you can’t have an impactful campaign—that’s media 101.

Portada: What do you think you’ll be bringing to the table to help Pulpo advance its growth? What makes you uniquely qualified in the space?

LW: Foremost, I consider myself as a Hispanic marketing advocate, and I bring a true passion to my career. I feel that this is a really crucial time for our industry, and brands need to take an active role to show that the Latinx consumer is valued and appreciated.

Most of my career was spent on the agency side, and I’ve helped brands develop their Hispanic communication strategy. I get to continue that here but working at a larger level to make sure that our advertisers are able to get their message out at scale – something that has been a challenge in the past.

Portada: What sets Pulpo apart from its competitors?

LW: Pulpo delivers Hispanic audiences at a scale that is unparalleled. Our next largest competitor reaches half the size we do. That’s really important because it allows us to get granular with our targeting, whether that’s targeting a Type 2 Diabetic Hispanic for a pharmaceutical advertiser or a new mom for a retailer. If you don’t have the scale you can’t have an impactful campaign – that’s media 101. And soon we’ll be making it even easier for our advertisers to reach vertical audiences with the rollout of specific content verticals and some other offerings we’ll be bringing to market in the upcoming months.

The most important thing is to be culturally relevant because cultural passion points will transcend language.

Portada: Recent studies indicate mobile will account for over 72% of all digital ad spend by 2020, how do you see Pulpo preparing for this?

LV: Because our focus is the Hispanic market, we reached 70%+ mobile delivery a few years ago. What happened is that we started recommending to our partners that if they have desktop and mobile, to put it on as a blended line so we can optimize to the best performing units—and of course mobile was outperforming. That said, we are investing heavily so we can make sure that our offering is keeping up with the latest advertiser needs and channels.

Portada: Given today’s environment where Hispanics are becoming more acculturated, how do you target them effectively across different levels of acculturation?

LV: We feel that the most important thing is to be culturally relevant – because cultural passion points will transcend language, and I’ve seen throughout my career when marketers talk about acculturation what they are really asking is: what’s the right language? And there is not an easy answer because the Latinx consumer lives on a spectrum: there is not a prototypical Hispanic, there are generational differences, nuances from country of origin, and regional differences in where one lives in the U.S. At the core of what we do, we’ve developed a data-driven targeting platform that allows us to reach Hispanics in a precise and relevant matter. The more relevant we become, the less waste we have for clients which in turn allows us to deliver the best ROI. So focus on the commonalities and be relevant.

Portada: What do you like to do when you’re not thinking about marketing?

LV: I’m in two book clubs and I recently started taking cello lessons- which I love despite how cumbersome it is to get around the New York City subways with it! I guess I would describe myself a life-long learner. I love being curious and developing new skills and learning new things.

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

Dataxu has announced the appointment of Raymond Dooley as Vice President of Corporate Marketing. Dooley will oversee a global team focused on bringing dataxu’s solutions to agencies, advertisers and media sellers. He will be based in dataxu’s New York office and report to Aaron Kechley.

 

 

 

 

Entravision announced it has rehired Mark Garcia as SVP of Integrated Marketing Solutions. Garcia, who was most recently Director of Sales at Nexstar Broadcasting in El Paso, will be based in McAllen and report to Lilly Gonzalez.

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Willis has returned to Pulpo Media as VP of Digital Sales. Willis will be based in New York and report to Solange Curutchet. She’ll be responsible for managing national sales in the U.S. She was most recently Director of Integrated Sales at Meredith/People en Español in New York. Before that, she was Senior Sales Director at Pulpo Media.

 

 

 

R/GA announced in an all-staff meeting that its founder, executive chairman and CEO Bob Greenberg, will officially step down from his position on Jan. 2. Sean Lyons, a company veteran who has served as U.S. president since 2015, will succeed Greenberg.

 

 

 

 

Rapha Vasconcellos has been named the leader of Facebook’s Global Creative Shop. He has been with Facebook for six years, heading up the company’s Creative Shop in two of its fastest-growing regions, Latin America and most recently, Asia Pacific. As head of Creative Shop, he’ll work closely with Facebook’s chief creative officer, Mark D’Arcy.

 

 

 

 

Twitter has hired ad-agency executive God-is Rivera as global director of culture and community, a new post created to help engage, spotlight and market to informal user groups. Twitter said Ms. Rivera will help advertisers connect effectively with various communities on the platform driving influential conversations under banners such as Feminist Twitter, Asian-American Twitter, Black Twitter, and NBA Twitter.

 

 

 

Vice’s creative agency Virtue is teaming with noted filmed director Robert Rodriguez and his El Rey Network for La Reyna, an agency designed to connect brands with U.S. Hispanics. Rodriguez himself will serve as creative chairman of the agency, supported by a team of creative directors pulled from the combined networks of Virtue and El Rey.

 

 

 

Does the degree Hispanics share apps depend on their acculturation level? According to the white paper  “Mobile App Diversity across Total Hispanic Market”, this is clearly the case. One key insight of the study, the result of the collaboration between ThinkNow Research and Entravision, is the importance of ‘collectivism’ in app downloads/usage.  Of those who share apps across acculturation: two statistically
significant findings were secured: 69% of low acculturated users share apps, more so than the medium and
higher acculturated segments.

Survey respondents downloaded apps to share and use with other people, while 39% have downloaded an
app for the sole usage of someone else. Of those who share apps across acculturation: two statistically
significant findings were secured: 69% of low acculturated users share apps, more so than the medium and
higher acculturated segments; and, 42% of medium acculturated Hispanics download apps for someone else.

For more information download the white paper!

What: We speak to Alejandro Roman Fuster, the Head of Sales Planning and Order Management at Pulpo Media, about how media planning agencies have begun to collaborate with political campaigns looking to target of Hispanic audiences.
Why It Matters: Today, both brands and political campaigns that have strategies for making use of Big Data and analytical tools for targeting win big. Roman Fuster explains why targeting a consumer is similar to targeting a voter.

In this day and age, every campaign needs a digital partner. The world is as connected as ever, and data is constantly being generated through the many available platforms users are plugged into. To capitalize on this, Pulpo Media has created tools that aid in the analysis of that gargantuan mass of ever-expanding data to create clear insight about consumer and user behavior and preferences. For better or worse, these tools have become handy for political campaigns looking to understand their voters as well.

Media Planners: the ‘Right Match’ for Political Clients?

Pulpo Media, which specializes in online Hispanic media and audience targeting, may not have originally envisioned becoming involved in political planning, but has found that its data and targeting abilities work just as well for voters as they do for consumers. Typically, brands approach Pulpo for assistance in reaching very targeted audiences through their digital properties as well as parent company Entravision’s radio stations and television channels. Part of their jobs is to stay close to advertising agencies, who often hire them to execute their campaigns for clients.

A few years ago, during commercial conversations with advertising agencies they pitched Hispanic services to regularly, agencies wondered whether Pulpo might be a “right match” for some of their political clients. It turns out that they were.

Media companies that have specialized in Hispanic targeting are finding themselves in demand in the face of a large, thriving Hispanic-American population of 50 million people. But as that population has grown, many fail to understand how much it has evolved in terms of its makeup, education, consumption preferences and behavior. This is also very true of the Hispanic voter.

The Shifting Landscape of Hispanic-American Voters

Alejandro Roman Fuster, the Head of Sales Planning and Order Management at Pulpo Media, asserts that much of Pulpo’s success has had to do with its deep understanding of the complex, varied and evolving Hispanic voterid_500x279culture. “The Hispanic population has been drifting from a first-generation consumer to a second-plus generation consumer who is much more acculturated, and understands American society much more than their parents and grandparents did,” Roman Fuster says. “When looking at these new generations, they are hybrids comfortable in both Hispanic settings and general market settings.”

Two years ago, campaigns acted like recording an ad in Spanish was enough.

When it comes to politics, it’s too easy to assume that all Hispanics care about is immigration, or that they will always vote Democrat. “Two years ago, campaigns acted like recording an ad in Spanish was enough,” Roman Fuster says. Pulpo’s love of data has allowed it to create a strategy that works just as well for political campaigns as it does for brands.

In the end, Roman Fuster believes that “voters are also consumers.” While the “data is not necessarily similar, the process is.” When a political client approaches Pulpo, a similar technique is used to develop a media proposal as the one they use for their regular clients. In both cases, Pulpo strives to develop data-based KPIs that are as specific as possible to drive the campaign. The variables can be treated almost interchangeably, as candidates and geographical regions “functions as a market, and voters are the consumers.”

Roman Fuster continues: “Political candidates, like brands, will have characteristics and must generate a representation of the voter/consumer that requires the same analysis as planning for a brand.” Campaigns know what they ultimately want: votes. But Pulpo’s job, as is that of any agency that targets specific demographics or audiences, is to find the best path to those votes.

Putting Data to Work

For its political clients, Pulpo actually does assign each traceable follower a specific cost to help measure ROI. In establishing KPIs, the team grapples with questions like whether or not it should focus on interactions with the banner or event attendance and whether or not there is time to develop complex benchmarks, or if cost-effectiveness will take front seat (sometimes political campaigns give them just 24 hours to create a plan). Instead of looking solely at Hispanics’ political leanings, Pulpo helps its clients look at transversal messages that cross party affiliations.

The audience team pulls public and private data from censuses, housing surveys and external data it pays to access. Then the data intelligent team crosses online behavior with offline behavior to identify trends and create propensity models that generate different profiles and potential buyer info within the target audience.

“The goal is to help our clients understand the power of data” in order to “construct a story” about these voters and their lives that can be used to create campaign messages that truly resonate. For example, “new voters may not be as ‘brand loyal’ as their more seasoned counterparts and even older voters are being more flexible in terms of whom they vote for,” says Roman Fuster. Younger Hispanics are completely mobile dependent and conduct almost all browsing on their phone.

Hispanic voters are now 60% bilingual and bicultural, so targeting through a Spanish-language ad may not be the best way to target them after all. This kind of data helps agencies know where their audience lives and target their messages and plans appropriately.

Leveraging Entravision’s Properties

Pulpo’s data analysis expertise is only one its secret weapons. Entravision’s 56 television stations and 49 Spanish-language radio stations are powerful tools for Pulpo in terms of granting clients exclusive exposure on platforms that are sure to reach Hispanic audiences.

When working with political clients, Pulpo can and does make use of some of Entravision’s premium programs, among them popular personalities like Eddie ‘Piolin’ Sotelo, El Erazno and Alex ‘El Genio’ Lucas. A Pulpo proposal for a political candidate sometimes includes interviews on Entravision’s different shows, accompanied by corresponding social media campaigns on the programs’ accounts. Not all agencies can offer this kind of exposure.

New voters may not be as ‘brand loyal’ as their more seasoned counterparts and even older voters are being more flexible in terms of whom they vote for.

Pulpo is just one example of an agency that is catering to the high demand for insight on Hispanic voters, and while it may have gotten a head start, others are probably not far behind, as they have undoubtedly found that they need to develop similar tools to keep up. Every campaign needs to be better, more micro-targeted, than the last, and with access to so much data, those willing to organize it have found that a miraculous level of detail can be attained in terms of what truly motivated human behavior – and voting habits.

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

Pulpo, a Hispanic digital platform, and a business unit of Entravision Communications Corporation,  a diversified media company serving Latino audiences and communities, announced that it has promoted Oscar Padilla to Senior Vice President of Marketing, Digital Media & Insights. Padilla was previously the Vice President of Strategy for Entravision’s Luminar Insights, a “big data” analytics and modeling provider focused on delivering insights on U.S. Latino consumers. Padilla succeeds María Lopez-Knowles, who was recently promoted to Chief Marketing Officer of Entravision.

We conducted an interview with Padilla to ask him about his new position and his plans.

How are Pulpo and Luminar Insights aligned? Why is it that they have the same person to manage their marketing?
Oscar PadillaOscar Padilla, Senior Vice President of Marketing, Digital Media & Insights, Pulpo.:“Pulpo (#1 comScore ranked in both Hispanic Reach and Bicultural Audience Network) is a digital media company that offers analytical services powered by Luminar, and it’s essential that we drive one marketing message to advertisers interested in effectively targeting the online Hispanic, or (i)Hispanic market. The alignment of Pulpo and Luminar is a synergistic match in a media environment where data plays an increasingly critical role. Luminar enhances Pulpo’s ability to reach online Hispanic audiences across all acculturation levels and digital devices through its analytics and insights solutions. Today, many advertisers deploy campaigns with limited consumer knowledge and an incomplete picture of the marketplace. Pulpo can offer clients the ability to gain greater empirical knowledge of their target markets and consumers. We can address questions that will drive increased targeting precision and relevancy with consumers, which in turn delivers greater return on our customers’ media investment.”

The alignment of Pulpo and Luminar is a synergistic match in a media environment where data plays an increasingly critical role.

What are your main objectives leading the marketing for both companies?
O.P.:
 “To communicate to the marketplace that Pulpo is a Hispanic digital media, data and consumer insights organization committed to both reaching and touching the online or (i)Hispanic market across acculturation levels and digital platforms. The result will benefit brands targeting the Hispanic market by offering a one-stop solution that leverages both Luminar’s offline transactional and behavioral data, and Pulpo’s extensive online expertise, ensuring a more holistic view of each (i)Hispanic consumer.We understand that Pulpo and Luminar primarily target the U.S. Hispanic market, but do they also target Latin America?Pulpo is already operating in Latin America and Spain. Pulpo opened a Mexico office last quarter and this office will serve as a hub to continue to grow our presence in LatAM.”

What place do Pulpo and Luminar have in Entravision Corporation overall?

O.P.:  “Entravision is a dynamic media company that provides an integrated platform of solutions, services and assets to connect marketers with the growing Latino consumer market. Through its diversified assets, Entravision reaches Hispanics across all screens making it unique in its ability to execute multimedia campaigns. Pulpo and Luminar bring extensive and complementary digital and analytical expertise to Entravision and will play a critical role in the continued growth and future success of the company.”

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

What: Entravision Communications Corporation has promoted Pulpo Media CMO María Lopez-Knowles to lead Entravision’s integrated marketing across its radio, television and digital properties, also as CMO. (UPDATED with Maria Lopez-Knowles comments below).
Why it matters: Appart from overseeing Entravision’s multimedia marketing efforts , she will develop and manage Entravision’s corporate marketing strategy in order to achieve the company’s strategic objectives. Lopez-Knowles will report directly to Walter F. Ulloa, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Entravision.

Entravision Communications Corporation, a diversified media company serving Latino audiences and communities, has announced that it has promoted María Lopez-Knowles from Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) of its Pulpo Media business unit to the newly created position of CMO of Entravision.

MariaLopez-KnowlesLopez-Knowles will oversee Entravision’s multimedia marketing efforts across its diverse broadcast, radio and digital properties, as well as develop and manage Entravision’s corporate marketing strategy in order to achieve the company’s strategic objectives. Lopez-Knowles will report directly to Walter F. Ulloa, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Entravision.
Lopez Knowles tells Portada that her marketing strategy going forward is “definitely going to leverage our unparalleled Hispanic market acumen and insights, relative to acculturation and media preferences, to drive greater cultural and linguistic relevance across all media platforms and content, both above-the-line and online.”. “We are going to continue to embrace the Total Hispanic Market with deep respect for the nuances across the sectors, and remain true to our Entravision mission of service to the Latino community,” she adds.

How does a modern Media Company market itself?

According to Lopez Knowles in a data driven marketing world. “You leverage the comprehensive consumer data sets you have across your marketplace, and the behaviors and knowledge you continue to secure from your portfolio of media assets (offline and online), to better serve your respective targets – simple as that. You use data as your arsenal and make your business intelligence, actionable.”

You use data as your arsenal and make your business intelligence, actionable.

Lopez-Knowles was previously a Pulpo Advisory Board member and joined Pulpo Media full time in August 2013 as CMO in charge of Marketing and Sales Planning. Before Pulpo, Lopez-Knowles served as President of GlobalHue Latino, a leading multicultural agency, and prior to that was at McCann Worldgroup (an Interpublic Company), where she founded and led a division of its MRM (McCann Relationship Marketing) Unit, exclusively focused on targeting acculturated Hispanics digitally. Lopez-Knowles has been the recipient of the ADCOLOR® Innovator award. A graduate of Loyola University of the South, and the University of New Orleans, she holds an undergraduate degree in Psychology and a graduate degree in Mass Communications, with a specialty in Film and Television. She is a second-generation Hispanic and is bilingual and bicultural.

“We’re pleased that Maria will expand her role at Entravision and lead our marketing efforts,” says Ulloa. “Her strong foundation in multicultural segmentation and in-depth Latino market insights across generations brings a unique skill set to this role. María’s over 30 years of advertising and marketing expertise make her the ideal candidate to further strengthen Entravision’s integrated approach to our marketing and digital businesses.”

“I am thrilled to increase my engagement across the Entravision organization,” says Lopez-Knowles. “Entravision’s understanding of the Latino market, and its commitment to embracing all segments of our Hispanic community, across all available media, is unparalleled in the industry. I share Entravision’s vision and passion and look forward to evolving the brand and its offerings, to better serve both our advertisers and the Latino market in its entirety.”

Entravision’s Pulpo division is a data-driven platform offering hyper-specific segmentation, personalized messaging, programmatic execution and in-depth analytics to marketers using its world-class proprietary technology. Entravision offers advertisers a one-stop solution that leverages Latino-focused television and radio properties, Hispanic Big Data and Analytics (Luminar), and Pulpo’s digital network.

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WPP’s stake in comScore no cause for concern among media agencies, who applaud the potential of the partnership.

Half_full_half_empty
ComScore-WPP: Half full or half empty?

Kantar and comScore have allied to provide what they’re calling best-of-breed, cross-media audience- and campaign-measurement to the international realm. Kantar, WPP’s data investment management decision, will work with comScore to integrate their technologies, and comScore will acquire the assets of Kantar’s Internet audience measurement businesses in certain European markets. To deepen the relationship, WPP will take an approximate 20 percent stake in comScore.

There is still a major gap for advertisers and agencies to crack the media measurement code.

Overall, I think it’s a very positive thing for the industry,” says Justin Kuykendall, CEO of Pulpo Media. “There is still a major gap for advertisers and agencies to crack the media measurement code.”

The international angle makes this a strong play, according to Ludmila Palašìn, associate director of The Media Kitchen. She says, “Since this deal involves only European audience measurement assets, we think this is terrific for our international clients. Cross-media measurement is an ongoing challenge everywhere. This agreement makes us more responsive to our international clients’ cross-media measurement challenges.”

There’s potential synergy in the combination, according to Alex Kalluf, director of intelligence at Figliulo&Partners. Kantar has some strong cross-platform offerings, while comScore rocks in digital. In addition, the two are complementary in international markets. Says Kalluf, “Especially in Latin America, Brazil and China, they will have a stronger offering.”

There is a potential downside to this partnership, Kalluf says: “There’s a lot of overlap between some of the Kantar companies and what comScore does.” If the two decide to roll some of those up into a unified offering, it could lead to fewer options for agencies.

Media execs did not seem concerned about a potential for undue influence by WPP because of its stake in comScore. WPP isn’t about to kill this golden data goose, they said.

“There’s a lot of overlap between some of the Kantar companies and what comScore does.

Captura de pantalla 2014-12-08 a la(s) 18.20.17“WPP is not about to invest in a partnership and then destroy one of the main the reasons the partnership was struck in the first place,” Palašìn says. “If WPP influenced comScore’s research in any way, comScore would lose its primary asset—its reputation for objectivity.”

One thing to watch, according to Kalluf, is whether WPP might tighten comScore’s purse strings. While WPP gives Kantar a lot of independence, he notes, large corporations are more reluctant to spend money. To date, comScore has invested heavily in new products. With WPP keeping an eye on its investment, he says, “ComScore might lose the ability to innovate as fast. Something to watch is how comScore will keep innovating and coming up with new solutions.”

Kuykendall thinks the deal will help companies like Pulpo Media, which, since it was acquired by Entravision last year, includes TV and radio properties as well as digital. “Advertisers are looking to see how different properties work together, and they want to see their investment across all those platforms and how each contributes to the ROI they’re getting.”

Nevertheless, he doesn’t see the Kantar/comScore combo as the ultimate measurement solution. I think one of the reasons WPP is investing in comScore is because it’s a hard problem to solve. Most advertisers and agencies would argue there is still a lot of work to be done.”

What: Audience-driven technology company Targeted Victory has partnered with Hispanic digital platform Pulpo Media by adding Hispanic Data to the Targeted Victory Audience Exchange.
Why it matters: Through the agreement, data and audience segments from Pulpo Media will be added to Targeted Victory’s Audience Exchange marketplace.The partnership is mostly aimed to target Hispanic voters, traditionally a demographic with low voting participation,  digitally in upcoming election campaigns and recognizes that a modern targeted  political advertising campaign must account for Hispanic demographics, across acculturation levels and digital devices.

 Portada interviewed Pulpo media’s Maria Lopez-Knowles on this partnership.

descargadescarga (1)Targeted Victory, an audience-driven technology company that specializes in programmatic media buying, has partnered with Hispanic digital platform Pulpo Media.

Through this agreement, data and audience segments from Pulpo Media will be added to Targeted Victory’s Audience Exchange marketplace. These new audience segments are available to self-service Targeted Engagement users and full-service Targeted Victory clients.

Maria_Lopez_Knowles_Pulpo_Media-1380102749Portada talked to Maria Lopez-Knowles, CMO at PULPO MEDIA, on this recent agreement:

Portada: Can you explain what an Audience Exchange marketplace means as opposed to an Ad-Exchange? Is Targeted Victory’s specialty in political audiences?

Maria Lopez-Knowles: “Ad exchange is a platform that facilitates bidding of online media ad inventory from multiple ad networks. Audience exchange is a platform that ensures that the most appropriate audience is served up an ad based on in-depth knowledge of that audience or consumer, including historical and/or transactional information about said consumer. It connects the most propended consumer with the most appropriate messaging.Yes, Targeted Victory’s specialty is indeed in political audiences.”

Portada: We understand that this partnership is mostly geared to find accurate means to target Hispanic voters digitally. Is that the case and why?

Maria Lopez-Knowles: “Absolutely. Digital Hispanics are overwhelmingly active online and it is the medium where they have found their voice. We see it across the board. Our acculturation model allows advertisers to not only target them more effectively, but message to an audience based on acculturation level – ensuring that it resonates with that Hispanic consumer in order to drive an affective brand connection, engagement, and advocacy.”

Portada: What election campaigns coming up in the U.S. are particularly prone to have strong political advertising targeting the Hispanic demographic?

Maria Lopez-Knowles: “Mid-term elections are going to be significant. That said, any Senate, House, Gubernatorial or Presidential election is critical for Hispanic voters and all should participate. 17% of the U.S. population is Hispanic. Their voices need to be heard.”

Any Senate, House, Gubernatorial or Presidential election is critical for Hispanic voters and all should participate. 17% of the U.S. population is Hispanic. Their voices need to be heard

Portada: Do you think digital advertising can be a good remedy to increase the low Hispanic participation rate at elections?

Maria Lopez-Knowles : “Absolutely. We know that online Hispanics, our (i)Hispanic segment, are comprised primarily of influencers. They are persuasive and actively involved in interpreting, demystifying, and translating for their foreign-born family and friends – this includes political issues. Reaching and touching them allows advertisers to drive greater advocacy. This co-branding, if you will, facilitates message reception and total Hispanic market return.”

Reaching and touching hispanics,  allows advertisers to drive greater advocacy

 

Yesterday morning, during a Time Warner investor meeting, Home Box Office Chairman and CEO Richard Pepler said that HBO will launch a stand-alone, over-the-top service that would allow consumers to watch HBO content without having a cable subscription – and let HBO reap what he characterized as hundreds of millions of dollars in additional revenue.

hbo latinoHe said HBO will sell stand-alone services in the United States and two other countries, with the aim of expanding eventually to every nation that it currently reaches via cable.

Whether HBO Latino will be part of this initiative or whether either of the two non-U.S. launch countries will be in Latin America are still to be determined. A spokesperson for HBO Latino told Portada, “At this time we are not elaborating beyond the statement that was issued today.”

Overall I think that a streaming HBO Latino has potential. We know that Hispanics are entertainment-hungry and digitally savvy, and brands are eager to engage with them through new channels.

Karina Dobarro, vice president and managing director of multicultural brand strategy at Horizon Media, notes that HBO will not necessarily include ads in its over-the-top offering; it may use a Netflix-like subscription model instead

But let’s play what-if, as long as HBO is thinking about shaking things up

Anel Hooper, associate media director for Bromley Communications, thinks this is a definite win for consumers. “There are a lot of cord-cutters out there. They’re trying to find other sources to watch television programs,” she says. While Netflix doesn’t include advertising, she points out that Hulu does – and advertising could be part of HBO’s plan to earn millions more dollars.

Maria Lopez Knowles
Maria Lopez Knowles

This move absolutely makes sense for consumers, and therefore for HBO, according to Maria Lopez-Knowles, CMO of Pulpo Media. She says, “Fragmented media and distributed content is the new reality, especially among Hispanics and the Hispanic Millennial in particular. Consumers now own both the remote control and the Programming Executive title. They choose to consume content and stream programming when they want to and in their own device of choice.” Based on this, she adds, advertising on an HBO OTT service makes perfect sense. “It’s a great idea whose time has come,” she says. And, of course, it makes even better sense for advertisers that want to reach highly mobile Hispanics.

Whether Bromley recommends advertising on streaming video to clients depends on the demographic they’re trying to reach, according to Hooper. “If the target demographic is using their smartphones and tablets and streaming, then yes, we have recommended that to our clients.”

Lee Vann, Captura Group
Lee Vann, Captura Group

Lee Vann, CEO of Captura Group, says, “Overall I think that a streaming HBO Latino has potential.  We know that Hispanics are entertainment-hungry and digitally savvy, and brands are eager to engage with them through new channels.  They key will be for HBO to curate and produce content that appeals to Hispanics in a relevant and authentic way.  If they can accomplish this, Hispanics will watch, and brands will follow.”

Not all advertisers may be ready to jump on board an over-the-top HBO, Lopez-Knowles says. “But the more progressive advertisers are certainly starting to understand that we’ve entered a brave, new world.”

Hispanic consumers love music, and they’re more likely than the general U.S. population to use mobile devices. Put those things together and marketers get an emotion-fueled rocket to their hearts and minds. Portada’s Digital Media Correpondent Susan Kuchinskas, on how marketers use music to connect with Hispanic audiences through mobile media.

a stack of colorful guitars
photo: SpeakingLatino.com

T-Mobile is telling its subscribers that they never have to stop the music. In June, the mobile carrier announced that its Music Freedom initiative, saying that its Simple Choice plan would exempt streaming music from its data allowances. It also partnered with Rhapsody to introduce unRadio, an ad-free music service. The service is free to Simple Choice customers on its newest unlimited data service, and for a discounted price of $4 per month for other customers.

Between one fourth and one third of T-Mobile’s subscribers are Hispanic, according to Gabriel Torres, vice president and general manager for T-Mobile USA’s Southeast region, and, citing the familiar studies showing that Hispanics over-index on mobile and use more data, he says, “There’s a very good story in terms of why this is relevant for the Hispanic market.” Although he couldn’t provide details of how these services might be marketed specifically to Hispanics, he adds, “The fact that we are bringing this incredible music offering helps us bring our community together at the same time.”

Selling spots

Buying digital music requires one foot in both worlds. SBD radio, for example, can sell radio/event/digital packages — but the company maintains separate budgets for each of them. Some agencies buy digital music through their digital teams and terrestrial radio through that dedicated team. It’s a tricky decision: Digital music is measurable, like other digital media, but it also is more audience-based, like traditional radio.

Vilma Vale-Brennan

MEC Bravo doesn’t separate terrestrial radio from web-streams of traditional radio stations from pure-play streaming services. In its work for AT&T, for example, “We see it as a holistic channel and we take a holistic approach,” says Vilma Vale-Brennan, managing partner in MEC Bravo. In the planning stage, this approach entails mixing some oranges with some apples.

The agency’s planners must try to understand the different market penetration of its different distribution partners. The AT&T media plan includes a lot of pure-play streaming providers, especially Pandora and iHeartRadio. The media team uses the services’ data to understand the penetration of Hispanic consumers, and then adds up the ratings on terrestrial radio in order come up with an estimated reach on all devices for a particular campaign.

“Combining those two is where the art comes in,” she says.

Station masters

Branded stations are a favored way for companies to reach consumers on streaming media services without interrupting their listening with commercials – and, of course, uninterrupted music is a prime selling point to get listeners to the brand’s station.

Another advantage is that, on branded streaming stations, the brand can at least to some extent own some real estate on the device screen; placements might include a banner at the top of the interface or a skin of the entire interface. Sometimes, the deals include sponsorships of live events, as well.

At this year’s Billboard Latin Music Conference and Awards in Miami, the Pandora Discovery Den Noche de Música Latina was sponsored by State Farm, P&G’s Orgullosa and Sprint. In addition to sponsoring live music performances, the brands offered special activities, gifts and presentations. They brands also used Pandora’s Mixtapes solution to create special stations with branded banners.

Another reason that branded music stations are so compelling to advertisers is that they offer an extended period of time in which a brand, through curation of the music, can evoke emotion in the listener – emotion that can be transferred to the brand itself.

Natalia Borges
Natalia Borges

“Music connects at an emotional level,” says Natalia Borges, vice president of marketing for Batanga Media. Custom stations are “a way we can feature music that speaks to the essence of the brand.” For example, Batanga worked with its editors to create a station to help Latina moms get their babies settled into bed at night. Setting this sweet moment to music not only helped the moms accomplish a crucial nightly task, the music itself also created sweet associations with the Huggies brand, with its own brand essence of sweet.

For Corona Extra’s Fill Your Summer 2014 campaign, Batanga created a station designed to evoke the fun and excitement of summer. Promotion for Batanga custom stations may include home page placement, placement on “hot radios” or “top stations” lists and, depending on the campaign targeting listeners via audio, video or display ads on Batanga’s mobile app.

Close to 90 percent of all music streams from Batanga take place via its mobile app, according to Borges, and clickthrough rates from mobiles, as well as engagement rates, are consistently higher on mobile – as much as 68 percent higher. “Video in any environment performs very well,” Borges says, and so do high-impact units such as interactive ads or full-page ads.

A campaign for McDonalds last year used the interactivity available in mobile ad units to good effect. The brand collaborated with Batanga to create a customized music awards on the platform that let consumers vote for their favorite artists across a variety of genres. A twist added by Batanga was creating the genres based on its own audience data instead of using standard genres. Fans could vote from within the ad unit, so that they did not have to pause their music listening.

MEC Bravo wants to create its own custom station ad unit that it could distribute to different steaming music services, although there are still details, both technical and business, to work out. The music in the channel could be tightly targeted to consumers and, ideally, be highly attractive to the target market. Ads could be included in the channel, so that they’d be native to the user experience, according to Vale-Brennan. This could turn out to be, MEC Bravo hopes, “a seamless, integrated way of capturing their attention in an organic way.”

Genre targeting

Spanish Broadcasting System (SBS) relies on its mobile app, La Musica, to power streaming services from the 20 U.S. terrestrial radio stations it operates. This combination of terrestrial radio, station websites and mobile app lets the company offer cross-platform campaigns, although the company maintains separate budgets for different channels, according to Max Ramirez, vice president of digital media for SBS Interactive, the company’s digital arm.

Max Ramirez
Max Ramirez

“We have a better opportunity to leverage relationships [with advertisers], and we can tie in digital with whatever they have going on. Maybe they buy a concert that includes radio but also some digital elements,” Ramirez says.

La Musica is used to run national digital campaigns and local advertising, and it also frequently carries custom stations for brands; a Dunkin Donuts-branded station within the app is just about to launch. Clients can select the type of music to be played according to artists, genres or DJs. The music streams ad-free and the advertiser gets a custom tab on the app that can lead to interactive functions.

For Vida Lexus, the automaker’s Hispanic-oriented lifestyle portal, the sponsored tab included a dealer locator with click-to-call. The stations can also run display ads, as well as one-click connections to the brand’s Facebook page and Twitter feed.

SBS Lexus channelMost mobile music services can’t yet target consumers according to their interests or even registration information. But the importance of musical genre for targeting should not be overlooked. In the case of SBS, its various stations draw in different segments of Hispanic consumers. For example, in Los Angeles, La Raza 97.9 attracts more Spanish-dominant listeners, while Mega 96.3 has a more bilingual listener base. Says Ramirez of the latter listeners, “They’re English-first, but still consuming Latino culture.” And the key to reaching the diverse Hispanic audience, he says, is, “It needs to be in-culture, which is more important that in-Spanish or in-English.”

Indeed, with the wide variety of acculturation levels and language preferences in this market, finding the right messaging and language can be tricky.

“Across acculturation levels, music preferences change,” points out Maria Lopez-Knowles, CMO of Pulpo Media (recently acquired by Entravision). She notes that Pandora is most popular among English-dominant Hispanics. According to Pulpo’s analysis, it’s these bilingual, bicultural, English-dominant Hispanics that are driving mobile adoption and penetration. Their hybridity is reflected in the fact that they listen to English and Spanish music.

Maria Lopez-Knowles
Maria Lopez-Knowles

Even the most acculturated Hispanics still love Latin music, according to Lopez-Knowles, as well as American pop. She likes to say that, to reach these influencers, you should “speak to them in English, but wink at them in Spanish.” That goes for music selections, as well. When creating custom radio stations, she says, go for Spanglish.

Spanish-language media company Entravision is buying Pulpo Media, a provider of digital advertising services and solutions focused on Hispanics in the U.S. and Latin America. The transaction, which will be funded from Entravision’s cash on hand, includes an initial payment of approximately US $15 million and up to US $3 million in contingent earn out payments based upon the achievement of certain performance benchmarks. Pulpo Media will continue as an independent unit called Pulpo Media an Entravision company.

handshake behind a corporative building.Great for any design.Entravision is buying 100% of Pulpo Media from the following investors: MHS Capital (Mark Sugarman); Crosscut Ventures (Rick Smith); Siemer Ventures (David Siemer); Robert Simon; Jim Barnett (co-founder/Chairman at Turn); and, Founders Fund (Brian Singerman). Entravision is also buying the company from Pulpo Media’s CEO Justin Kuykendall, who will stay on as President of Pulpo Media.

Pulpo Media is headquartered in Berkeley and has offices in Spain, Mexico and Argentina. “Pulpo Media will continue to work as an independent unit partnering with Luminar and will leverage Entravision’s 200+ salesforce,” Maria Lopez Knowles, CMO of Pulpo Media tells Portada. “We will remain as Pulpo Media, an Entravision company. There will be no personnel changes,” she adds. Will Pulpo Media continue to buy media for its clients at agencies and brand marketers across all digital publishers? Knowles tells Portada that “Pulp0 Media  will remain media neutral across all publishers.”

Entravision is mostly present in the U.S., but Pulpo will continue to concentrate in both U.S. and LATAM. “Entravision’s strong presence in Mexico, and border markets (along with LatAm) will only fortify us.,” Lopez Knowles says.

Pulpo Media will continue to work as an independent unit partnering with Luminar and will leverage Entravision’s 200+ salesforce.

“The addition of Pulpo Media is a strategic and highly complementary acquisition that will further strengthen our existing digital businesses,” said Walter F. Ulloa, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Entravision.

Pulpo Media’s Maria Lopez Knowles, tells Portada that the acquisition of Pulpo Media by Entravision is a fit in many ways. “Our strong online expertise with the (i)Hispanic market is a great complement to Entravision’s omnichannel offering, and Luminar’s focus on Big Data and Hispanic insights. This will make us more competitive across the board.”

Entravision’s Digital Expansion

Originally mostly a pure play radio and TV company Entravision has been heavily expanding into the digital media space over the last few years. In 2012 it created Luminar, a Big Data solutions provider for the U.S. Hispanic market. Earlier this year, Entravision, bought Todobebe, an integrated mostly digital  content property focused on Latino motherhood. And now Entravision is adding Pulpo Media to its staple of companies.

Spanish-language media company Entravision is buying Pulpo Media, a provider of digital advertising services and solutions focused on Hispanics in the U.S. and Latin America. The transaction, which will be funded from Entravision’s cash on hand, includes an initial payment of approximately US $15 million and up to US $3 million in contingent earn out payments based upon the achievement of certain performance benchmarks. Pulpo Media will continue as an independent unit called Pulpo Media an Entravision company.

handshake behind a corporative building.Great for any design.Entravision is buying 100% of Pulpo Media from the following investors: MHS Capital (Mark Sugarman); Crosscut Ventures (Rick Smith); Siemer Ventures (David Siemer); Robert Simon; Jim Barnett (co-founder/Chairman at Turn); and, Founders Fund (Brian Singerman). Entravision is also buying the company from Pulpo Media’s CEO Justin Kuykendall, who will stay on as President of Pulpo Media.

Pulpo Media is headquartered in Berkeley and has offices in Spain, Mexico and Argentina. “Pulpo Media will continue to work as an independent unit partnering with Luminar and will leverage Entravision’s 200+ salesforce,” Maria Lopez Knowles, CMO of Pulpo Media tells Portada. “We will remain as Pulpo Media, an Entravision company. There will be no personnel changes,” she adds. Will Pulpo Media continue to buy media for its clients at agencies and brand marketers across all digital publishers? Knowles tells Portada that “Pulp0 Media  will remain media neutral across all publishers.”

Entravision is mostly present in the U.S., but Pulpo will continue to concentrate in both U.S. and LATAM. “Entravision’s strong presence in Mexico, and border markets (along with LatAm) will only fortify us.,” Lopez Knowles says.

Pulpo Media will continue to work as an independent unit partnering with Luminar and will leverage Entravision’s 200+ salesforce.

“The addition of Pulpo Media is a strategic and highly complementary acquisition that will further strengthen our existing digital businesses,” said Walter F. Ulloa, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Entravision.

Pulpo Media’s Maria Lopez Knowles, tells Portada that the acquisition of Pulpo Media by Entravision is a fit in many ways. “Our strong online expertise with the (i)Hispanic market is a great complement to Entravision’s omnichannel offering, and Luminar’s focus on Big Data and Hispanic insights. This will make us more competitive across the board.”

Entravision’s Digital Expansion

Originally mostly a pure play radio and TV company Entravision has been heavily expanding into the digital media space over the last few years. In 2012 it created Luminar, a Big Data solutions provider for the U.S. Hispanic market. Earlier this year, Entravision, bought Todobebe, an integrated mostly digital  content property focused on Latino motherhood. And now Entravision is adding Pulpo Media to its staple of companies.

A recap of major news on the Marketing and Media front from around the web compiled  by Portada Digital Media Correspondent Susan Kuchinkas.

Upfronts in a Time of Overwhelming Supply

The combination of online video and the ability to target audiences there may profoundly change the TV upfront process, according to industry execs. While super-premium TV, especially live event coverage, may still require buying upfront, many see most buying moving to programmatic, real-time markets. Mediapost got predictions from Magna Global, GroupM and others. Read more.

Tweets Target Languages

Twitter enabled language-targeting for promoted tweets and promoted accounts, so that marketers can reach consumers in their preferred languages. Someone might see promoted tweets in multiple languages if his or her Twitter activity shows more than one language, according to ClickZ. Read more.

Merger of Ad Giants Falters

Major schadenfreude last week, as the Omnicom/Publicis merger failed to launch. The two advertising behemoths had said that combining forces would allow them to be more competitive in the changing tech landscape. While the companies’ CEOs had agreed to act as co-CEOs for close to three years, a power struggle to appoint other C-level executives may have torpedoed the deal. Reuters got some candid quotes from both sides. Read more.

Who the Heck Is Hispanic?

Does it make sense to maintain the distinction between mainstream and multiculti agencies in an America that’s increasingly multicultural? That was the hot topic at the AHAA: The Voice of Hispanic Marketing conference, AdAge says. The debate is similar to that which took place in the early days of digital, when traditional and digital agencies jostled for the lead, while clients sometimes acted like bewildered traffic cops. What’s the answer? It still depends on who you ask. You can download the AHAA Total Market Benchmark Study Advertisers Preliminary Findings from the AHAA website.  Read more.

Occupy Digital Advertising

The growing wealth from online advertising is unequally distributed, with the bulk of ad dollars flowing to rich companies, while news publishers go hungry, a new report says. Digital advertising grew 16 percent in 2013, but news organizations are fighting for a smaller piece of the pie. Who’s getting fat? Well, Google, duh — and all its ilk. Pew Research says, “Big tech companies that largely aren’t in the business of creating news content continue to dominate the digital ad space, often because they are able to reach much larger audiences than news organizations can.” In fact, half of all digital ad dollars go to just five companies. Read more.

Pulpo Media Seeks Missing Hispanics

Pulpo Media unveiled a new data-driven platform it says will help marketers reach hidden Hispanic segments, especially acculturated ones. For example, the agency identified what it calls the 1.5 generation, that is, adults who may technically be foreign-born or first-generation, but were mostly educated in the United States. Although they make up 35 percent of the first-generation immigrant population in America, Pulpo says they have not been taken into consideration in previous data models. That’s just one of the segments the Hispanic Acculturation Model aims to help advertisers reach. Read more.

What: The Hispanic Online Media company, Pulpo media, continues to strengthen its resources and expanding ,most recently through the hiring of Rosy Marin as CRO. Marin used to work as Senior Vice President at NBC Universal.
Why it matters: Digital media companies targeting the Hispanic space are gaining strength. Interestingly, Marin comes from the Broadcast TV world.

Pulpo_MediaPulpo Media, the digital media company targeting Hispanics in the United States and Latin Americans, has announced that Rosy Marin is joining their organization as its new Head of Sales.

RosyMarinAs Pulpo Media’s new Chief Revenue Officer, Rosy Marin (Photo) will further develop the brand’s growing portfolio of regional and national accounts nationwide. Marin has almost 20 years of senior level management expertise within the Hispanic television advertising industry.

Her experiences include serving as the Senior Vice President of Network Ad Sales for the Western Region at NBC Universal—Telemundo Media (2011 to 2013), and over thirteen years at Univision Communications where she rose to Senior Vice President, Director of National Sales (2009 to 2011).

While at NBC Universal, Marin contributed in transforming the Western Region into a high performing sales team with double-digit growth year over year. Additionally, as SVP, Director of National Sales for Univision, she spearheaded significant revenue gains for O&O and affiliate stations.  She also managed the strategic planning team working closely with clients and agencies as well as political sales for the station group.

“I am excited to start this new phase of my career with Pulpo Media and look forward to working with the team to drive sales across leading advertising agencies and blue chip brands focused on both the total online Hispanic market, and in particular—the more acculturated, and growing Hispanic segment,”said Marin.

 Justin Kuykendall, Chief Executive Officer for Pulpo Media said, “We view her appointment as a sign of our commitment to strengthening our position as the nation’s go-to resource for reaching and touching today’s Hispanics.”

Pulpo Media is headquartered in Berkeley, CA. and has satellite offices in Puerto Rico, Argentina, Colombia, Mexico, and Spain.According to comScore, is ranked as the first  Hispanic reach based on its Hispanic Ad Focus and new Bicultural Audience Network category.

Pulpo Media last week announced that Maria Lopez Knowles has joined the company as its Chief Marketing Officer. In the below interview Lopez Knowles tells Portada that there is a great need to demystify the market so that advertisers can drive more efficient programs. As confusing to advertisers she cites the fact that Hispanics online  can be camouflaged due to their English-language behavior and content consumption patterns. In addition, Lopez Knowles notes that much Internet viewing is done collectively in many Hispanic homes: “Some family members view Spanish content, then most of the e-commerce transactions and enrolments occur in English (driven by the more acculturated Hispanic) – again, confusing the marketplace.”

Portada: What do you think you bring in terms of experience and knowledge to Pulpo Media?

Maria Lopez KnowlesMaria Lopez Knowles, CMO, Pulpo Media: “From a professional background, I bring over 25 years of industry experience, both on the ad agency and client sides of the business, to Pulpo Media. I’ve also been committed to discerning and engaging the online Hispanic for the last 6 years, and have deep insights about the segment. That said, from a personal perspective, I am a U.S. born Hispanic, who has intimately lived the second-generation immigrant experience, and am passionate about marketing to distinct acculturation levels in hyper-relevant ways: linguistically; culturally; and, intellectually – via digital means. Pulpo’s commitment to reaching and touching the online Hispanic – (i) Hispanic, drew me to the company, as well as their superb product and services offerings, and excellent team of professionals.”

According to Adage Data Center estimates, Hispanic Internet display advertising increased  by 2.5% from US $420 million to US $431 million. Do you agree with that estimate? (It seems a bit high particularly because it doesn’t seem to include search)
Maria Lopez Knowles: “I think the estimate may be a little high, exclusive of search, that said it really depends on how much of the Hispanic market is included in this estimate, (e.g. English language dominant Hispanics).

However, the growth rate seems low (+2,5%). What is your take on that?
Maria Lopez Knowles: “I think advertisers are very confused about the online Hispanic market. The online Hispanic in many ways can be camouflaged due to their English-language behaviors and content consumption patterns.  For example, some advertisers assume that if their more acculturated Hispanic consumers are English-language dominant, they fall under ‘general market’ so they can market to them effectively in English, via their general market programs.  They may be reaching them, but the issue is that an affective connection isn’t being made – they aren’t touching them with their communications.  Once advertisers see that they can drive better engagement with the more acculturated online Hispanic by marketing to them in a distinct fashion, we’ll see greater growth. Furthermore, much Internet viewing is done collectively in many Hispanic homes.  Some family members view Spanish content, then most of the e-commerce transactions and enrolments occur in English (driven by the more acculturated Hispanic) – again, confusing the marketplace.  It’s essential to demystify the Hispanic market, so that advertisers can drive more efficient programs that deliver a greater ROI. Then, investment spend will follow.”

To what extent does an exclusively Hispanic/Latin American orientation benefit Pulpo Media compared to other DMP/DSPs?
Maria Lopez Knowles: “Our exclusive focus allows Pulpo Media to have greater comprehensive expertise and depth in the Hispanic/Latin American worlds, both across acculturation levels and countries of origin.  These worlds are extremely dynamic, in constant flux, and very diverse. Understanding the consumer’s heritage, their characteristics, and their unique journeys, from a Latino perspective, empowers us to better serve the markets and to be authentically committed to their growth and success.  We can drive greater insights and knowledge about our consumer base, and turn these into actionable recommendations and programs for our advertisers – constantly optimizing an advertiser’s reach, and positively informing their touch.”

New content, services and apps will need to be developed to serve the market. We are also going to see a drive towards hyper-relevance with language preference and acculturation gaining greater import.

Where do you see the Hispanic digital media sector evolving especially compared to general market.
Maria Lopez Knowles: “ We’ll definitely see a boom in investment spend in the digital Hispanic space as most advertisers that understand how valuable the segment is today, and how paramount it will be in the relatively near-term covet the online Hispanic market.  The amount of time Hispanics spend online and their engagement online, when compared to the general market, speaks for itself. For example, Hispanics spend more time than the general market consuming online video, texting, social networking, etc. For the millennial Hispanic, mobile devices are their primary source of entertainment. So new content, services and apps will need to be developed to better serve the market. I think we’re also going to see a drive towards hyper-relevance across the board, with language preference and acculturation gaining greater import, as well as country of origin/ancestry, geo-targeting, device-targeting, psychographics, familial composition, influencer-status, etc. And the key role of analytics on the back-end, will only gain more significance, as it will drive optimization and KPIs. I think we’re still in the very nascent stages of the Hispanic digital media space.”

There is talk about a need for consolidation in the Ad-Tech sector (Ad Tech ecosystem). Do you agree and how do you think this play out in the U.S. Hispanic and Latin American markets?
“It’s such a fragmented industry, that one would think consolidation makes sense.  In the short-term, I think we’ll see more strategic alliances and partnerships emerge, that may drive M & As down the road. Long-term, it may benefit the market: a fragmented consumer base + a fragmented supply chain = limited expansion due to fear and lack of discernment. I think this applies to both US and Latin America, but primarily, U.S.  That said, there’s always room for a best of breed provider vs. an ERP solution.”

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What? Maria Lopez Knowles joins Pulpo Media as CMO.
Why it matters: Major players in the Advertising Technology sector, such as Pulpo Media, are ramping up to exploit the growth opportunities in the U.S. Hispanic and Latin American markets.

Pulpo Media today announced that Maria Lopez Knowles has joined the company as its Chief Marketing Officer.

“Maria’s deep understanding and passion for multicultural marketing has established her as a trusted advisor to top brands and their agencies,” said Justin Kuykendall, CEO and founder of Pulpo Media. “We are very excited to have Maria working with us, and helping our customers better engage Hispanics at every stage of acculturation, across all digital platforms.”

Lopez-Knowles is an accomplished industry leader, having received an AdColor Innovator Award (2009) for her ground-breaking multicultural segmentation work with English-language dominant Latinos. Prior to joining Pulpo Media, Lopez-Knowles served as President of GlobalHue Latino. Previous to her tenure at GlobalHue, Lopez-Knowles founded and led MRM Worldwide’s (McCann Worldgroup) practice targeting the über-acculturated Hispanic via direct/digital marketing, with a keen focus on brand influencers. Her extensive career has spanned over 25 years in the marketing communications arena, across both general and multi-cultural audiences, including both B2C and B2B segments.

Lopez-Knowles holds a B.A. in Psychology and an M.A. in Mass Communications (with a specialty in Film & Television). She wrote her graduate thesis on Marketing to Hispanics, and is bilingual and bicultural.

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Programmatic digital media buying, or computerized trading of digital advertising, is advancing at a very rapid pace in the U.S. digital media market. Is it gaining as much traction in the U.S. Hispanic market? Will Wall Street like trading desks be as frequent in Hispanic ad agencies as in general market agencies? Portada interviewed major players in the digital media market to find out.

A recent MAGNA GLOBAL study forecasts that 43% of total online display advertising will be traded through programmatic mechanisms (or exchanges) in the US by 2017. MAGNA GLOBAL forecasts that programmatic will grow by more than 40% this year, rising to 23.2% of all online display advertising sold in 2013. By 2017, Magna predicts programmatic trading will rise to $7.533 billion, representing 43% of all online display advertising.

Programmatic, similar to computerized securities trading on Wall Street, can make digital media purchases more efficient as an algorithm looks for available inventory against a set of specific parameters set by the advertiser. The algorithm matches inventory demand and supply on a global scale. Are these sophisticated digital media trading mechanisms gaining traction in the U.S. Hispanic market?

Christopher Stanley, CEO, Alcance Media
Christopher Stanley, CEO, Alcance Media

“We have come across a limited number of agencies that have been asking about it, but as of yet have not seen a major slant towards programmatic buying when the focus is on Hispanic or Latin American based targeting,” says Christopher Stanley, CEO and Founder of Online Advertising Network Alcance Media.
Stanley adds that it is also a question of resources: ” For many Hispanic buyers, a key focus is on proving the success and showing where that success has come from versus just the statistics. For many companies, they are only starting to reach out to the Hispanic market and are trying to prove the case for more resources through that success.”

As of yet, we have not seen a major slant towards programmatic buying when the focus is on Hispanic targeting.

” It really depends on the agency,” says Justin Kuykendall, CEO and Founder of Pulpo Media, a Hispanic media and technology company that offers advertisers online media as well as a proprietary technology platform.

Justin Kuykendall, CEO Pulpomedia
Justin Kuykendall, CEO Pulpomedia

“We are working with some very sophisticated agencies that are very receptive and forward thinking in terms of data management, advanced targeting and segmentation. On the other hand, there are also agencies that are very resistant in the US that find it hard to go beyond their upfront plan with Univision–for example–that may only reach a fraction of Hispanics online. We are also seeing general market agencies that are working with us to target bilingual and even English dominant Hispanics in a much more engaging way than we used to see with people just translating banners to Spanish or just tracking CTR.”‘

 

Real Time Bidding

Programatic buying mechanisms are supplemented with Real Time Bidding (RTB) which adds an auction marketplace to programmatic buying. Instead of reserving prepaid advertising space, advertisers bid on each ad impression as it is served. The impression goes to the highest bidder and their ad is served on the page. According to Larry Harris Chief Marketing Officer at PubMatic, a digital media platform company for publishers, RTB ecpms (prices per thousand impressions) tend to be 5 times higher, on average, than ecpms offered by online ad networks. Harris notes that RTB amounts to 31% of all paid impressions and 48% of all revenues at publishers associated with PubMatic. PubMatic works with both traditional media companies as well as with so-called non-traditional ones, including companies like Toys “R” us and Target. PubMatic helps these companies to monetize their websites through RTB in a brand protected manner.

Slower growth in Mobile and Online Video

Larry Harris,, CMO, PubMatic
Larry Harris,, CMO, PubMatic

An additional obstacle to the growth of programmatic trading and RTB in the Hispanic market is that these trading technologies are not yet important when it comes to trading mobile advertising inventory. Hispanics index very high in mobile phone usage. The main reason for the low utilization of programmatic in mobile is that mobile audiences need to be better understood: while web browsers enable third-party cookies to provide data in the PC display advertising marketplace, mobile browsers, including Apple’s Safari browser, do often not accept third-party cookies. This has proven to be a major impediment to the programmatic trading of mobile ad inventory. As a result, other targeting data besides behavior is often used in mobile, such as location. According to PubMatic’s Harris programmatic trading and RTB are still nascent in the mobile space. “There is a need for a more robust offering as well as a question of getting enough inventory as well as the ability to standardize and automate it.”

 

The impact of programmatic trading and other digital advertising technologies on the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic market will be explored in-depth at Portada’s Latin American Advertising and Media Summit on June 4-5 in Miami.

Learn more about the enormous role Online Video can play in the Latin (Latin America and U.S. Hispanic) marketing space. Book now for our Latin Online Video Forum, a required event for any marketing professional.