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Portada Council System members have voted for the topics to be discussed at the three main speaking slots at Portada Los Angeles on April 2, 2020. The topics revolve around data collection with a cultural approach, influencer marketing, and consumer insights. 

 

For over a decade, Portada has been there to offer a space in which experts can discuss the most relevant issues of marketing and advertising. Now, for 2020 we are taking it one step further by inviting brand and agency decision-makers (members of the Portada Council System) to get directly involved in the selection of the content of each of our events.

Consequently, the brand marketers in Portada’s Council System have voted for the topics to be discussed at the three main speaking slots during Portada Los Angeles on April 2, 2020.

“The brand marketers in our Council System play a crucial part in determining the topics of our events. By having these leading practitioners suggest and vote for the themes of the three main speaking slots, we make sure that brand marketing, tech and media executives targeting the diverse U.S. consumer get the most relevant content available in the marketplace,” says Marcos Baer, president of Portada.

Below are the three winning topics as well as comments from Portada Council System members as to why these reflect their interests.

Portada Los Angeles Keynote: Why data scientists need to be cultural experts (A media planner/buyer perspective)

In 2017, the Economist declared data, and no longer oil was the most valuable resource in the world. And even though brands and agencies now have access to tremendous amounts of data, the tricky part is how to make sense of it. For the Portada Los Angeles Keynote talk, Council System members selected the topic of data collection and the extra layer of adding a cultural filter to how that data is processed. Below are the members’ thoughts and questions around the issue.

 

I’d like to hear how data scientists are cutting data to understand audiences and behaviors at the multicultural level. It would be interesting to see how the data changes once you’ve looked at it from a cultural perspective.

Would be interested to hear from data scientists about how they layer in cultural understanding. Is it all done in algorithms or are they also making “manual” choices based on cultural nuances?
Sometimes people have the view that with enough data, you can target anyone effectively, thereby removing the need to appeal to the audience’s culture. How can we continue to recognize the importance of culture in this technology-driven age?

How to combat bias in data, examples of how data can be interpreted in different ways by people who do not understand the culture?

I notice there is a shift where many ethnic or multicultural agencies are moving beyond population subgroups (Hispanic/Latino, Asian, etc) and shifting towards culture. So in a way, culture and being culturally relevant is the latest evolution of multicultural marketing. It would be good to hear how the rigors of data relate to culture or vice versa.

Consumer Insight Highlight Speaking Slot: What creates brand lift?

How to measure brand lift. How to understand the impact of media spend.

This seems fairly obvious, but with so many marketers choosing to focus on attribution and lower-funnel metrics, it’s important to remind ourselves that without a strong brand identity and awareness, the purchase funnel will dry up.
I am especially interested in understanding how can I lift or transform a brand’s reputation and perception online, social listening studies, setting benchmarks, improving engagement based on brand interactions that aren’t necessarily transnational, cause-related marketing and its true impact on brand love and conversion.

 

MarTech Solution Spotlight: Evolving Influencer Marketing

How do you break through the clutter in an age where people are used to influencers pitching product after product?

Which industries, type of messages or cultural moments are influencer moments and which are not?

Understanding how companies evaluate influencer marketing’s impact on their objectives. And also how they think about leveraging influencers.

As media markets are diversified to include more faces and individuals that come and represent specific communities it’d be pertinent to hear more about the process of influencer identification, vetting, and relevancy in the different markets we are trying to influence.

It would be good to understand how this has evolved and what the next platform capabilities are.

Portada Los Angeles 2020 will be a unique experience. First, the three different Council System bespoke workshops will take place in the morning. Also, brand marketers and best-of-breed marketing services suppliers will have 1:1 meetings and attend VIP networking functions. In addition, attendees will learn at four exclusive and highly-curated speaking slots on the themes outlined above, which were voted by the over 100 brand marketers in the Portada Council System.

More information about the structure of speaking slots at Portada events:

  • Keynote: 45-minute session. An overarching topic of paramount importance to the brand marketing community to be addressed by subject matter experts who provide innovative solutions.
  • Consumer Insight Highlight: 25-minute session. Consumer Engagement and sales conversion are the ultimate objectives for brand marketers. This session will provide key and fresh consumer insights that foster the understanding of the U.S consumer and provide actionable tips for marketers.
  • MarTech Solution Spotlight: 25-minute session. Technology plays a crucial role both for consumers as well as an enabler for marketers. During this session a major brand marketing thought leader will reveal the latest trends on the use of technology by consumers and brands.
  • Partner Thought Leadership Presentation. An opportunity for a Portada partner to gain major exposure in front of a listening audience of major brand marketing executives.

For more information about Portada Los Angeles on April 2, 2020 click here

 

Portada will host four major events and several Happy Hour & Council Content Choices in 2020 to spur networking and knowledge-sharing in a wide array of brand marketing disciplines.  Brand Marketers and Marketing Services Providers who are Portada Council System members will be voting for key speaking topics at Portada events.  Additionally, Portada will host 12 virtual events involving each of the six units of the Portada Council System. 

Portada is thrilled to announce its expanded year-round knowledge-sharing and networking platform for brand marketers, which will include 4 major events, 12 virtual events and 4 Happy Hours & Council Content Choices providing year-round marketing services buyer facing networking and thought leadership opportunities.

 “We are also making important innovative changes to the dynamics of our Council System. In 2020, brand marketers, and best-of-breed marketing service providers will be directly involved in the Portada events topic selection process as part of their activities as members of the six different units of the Council System: Americas Board, Agency Star Committee, Brand Star Committee, Brand Star Committee Latam, Sports Marketing Board, or Travel Marketing Board,” says  Janet Grynberg, Lead Editorial Coordinator at Portada.

Brand Marketers and Marketing Service Providers: Together Four Times a Year

The topic selection process has already started. At their second 2019 in-person meeting at Portada New York, the first-rate brand and agency decision-makers who are members of Portada’s Council System selected the most relevant topics from a list of imminent issues and challenges facing the marketing & media industry today. These topics will be announced soon and will provide a complete picture of what’s in the mind of marketers for 2020.

On November 14, these executives will gather in a special function presented by Digo Hispanic Media, the Happy Hour & Council Content Choice , where three units of Portada’s Council System (Brand Star Committee, Agency Star Committee, and Sports Marketing Board), will vote for the topics to be discussed at the three Portada Los Angeles speaking slots on April 2, 2020.

The four 2020 In-Person Portada Events will take place as follows

 

Portada Los Angeles, April 2, 2020

Portada Miami, June 4, 2020

Portada New York, September 24, 2020

Portada Mexico, October 29, 2020

 

 

If you are a brand marketer and would like to join the Portada Council System, please provide contact information.


If you are a marketing service provider and would like to join the Portada Council System, please provide your contact information here.

Hear it from Brand Marketers

“I think it’s a great thing that Portada has put together, it’s given me a chance to really interact with some folks that I’ve known in the industry but maybe we hadn’t gotten together, so it’s been very engaging for me,” said Dan Keats, Director Consumer Marketing-Sponsorships at Allstate Insurance at a previous Portada event.

“Through Portada, I have met new solution providers and we are already working with them,” commented Ariela Nerubay, CMO at Curacao.

“I love the way the Portada is continuously disrupting itself in order to make the experience very valuable for its members,”  John Sandoval, Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager at Intuit shared during the VIP Council System dinner at Portada New York. 

See below the list of only a few of the Council System members that will be shaping the future of marketing at Portada events and special Happy Hour functions in 2020. 

 

Members of the Brand Star Committee at the Portada New York in-person meeting

Brand Marketing Executives to Attend Portada 2020 Events & Special Happy Hour Functions Include:

 

Vice President, Sponsorships, Wells Fargo    

 

Senior Manager, Advertising & Marketing, Multicultural, Kia Motors America

 

Head of US Sports Marketing, Anheuser-Busch InBev

 

 Vice President, Global Sponsorships, Head of Americas, SAP

 

Marketing Manager, Nestle USA

 

 Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager, Intuit

 

National Media Manager, JCPenney

                                                                                                     

National Director, Multicultural & Growth Markets, Realogy

 

 US Managing Director, CH Carolina Herrera

 

Digital Marketing Manager – SEM and SEO, Sprint

                                                                                                     

EVP I CMO, Curacao

 

Manager, California Endowment

 

Category Marketing Manager, GraceKennedy Ltd

 

Head of Marketing Activation & CRM, Conagra

 

Dozens of additional brand marketers will be announced by early 2020.

What: In order to drive content strategy, brands need quality, granular data. As #PortadaLA panelists discussed, digital media allows gathering precise data that serves as a good starting point to make media, budget, and attribution decisions.
Why it matters: Content is one of the best ways to connect with consumers, but there is a need to develop better tracking methodologies and newer data tools that can be leveraged to reach the Hispanic audience more effectively.

By Ryan Orvis, guest Portada contributor.

 

The relationship between data and content formed the basis of ‘How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising’, a Portada Los Angeles panel discussion led by Guillermo Arduino, CNN Anchor and Correspondent for Encuentro (CNN en Español). Joining in the conversation were Caro D’Antuono, Vice President of Marketing for Northgate Markets; Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Manager for GroupM; Roxane Garzon, Media Director for Casanova; and Robin Garfield, Senior Vice President of Research and Scheduling for CNN.

Robin Garfield and Frances Rubio

A key takeaway from the panel was the need for quality, granular data to drive content strategy. This is particularly crucial for the Hispanic market, where there is a strong need for a common currency of audience measurement.

The panelists discussed utilizing data to construct a user profile as a starting point. “Who are we connecting with, and where is there an opportunity?” asked Caro D’Antuono. “Most of the time [content] resonates with a specific audience whether it’s male or female, a specific age group, or a language preference.”

Roxane Garzon explained how digital media allows us to hone in on a specific consumer to gather precise behavioral data. This data can then be leveraged to make decisions on media, budget, and attribution.

Roxane Garzon

For Frances, the process begins by looking at all data sources —including social, syndicated, and internal— to understand who the audience is. “There is no single source of truth,” she explained, describing the importance of a data-agnostic approach.

Robin discussed using real-time data to discern what people are thinking as opposed to what actions they are taking. “First we want to think about the people. Data is a representation of the audience and what people are doing. It’s one part of the research ecosystem. What’s really important is that we connect the data to audience insights.

Data is only as good as where you’re getting it from— especially in multicultural [marketing],” explained Roxane, outlining the challenges of attributing data to specific points in the sales funnel. This is especially difficult for smaller businesses, for whom multicultural audience data is expensive and relatively scarce.

Caro D’Antuono and Guillermo Arduino

Caro described content as one of the best ways for advertisers to connect with multiple users at different stages of the funnel, something that has become increasingly necessary with developments in media and technology. “The world is changing so much faster outside of our organization. Everything from the media landscape, to the consumer, to everything they have access to is changing so rapidly.”

Frances stressed the importance of developing better methodologies for tracking the Hispanic audience, especially as younger audiences grow increasingly diverse. This includes using multiple data sources to develop a fuller view of the audience and working with partners to develop new tools for data collection.

“It’s a fascinating time for us to be able to push the way forward,” she said. “[We] need to focus on speaking to growth opportunity segments, and those who don’t will be left behind.”

What: Caro D’Antuono, VP of Marketing at Northgate Markets, Robin Garfield, SVP of Research and Scheduling for CNNRoxane GarzonMedia Director at Casanova and Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Associate Director for GroupM gathered for a Portada Los Angeles panel presented by CNN en Español to discuss how How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising.  In this article, we present the panelists’ answers to questions they didn’t have time to answer at the event.
Why it matters: As we’ve known for a while, it’s all about data now. But the problem, rather than finding the data, is how to collect it and then make sense of it.

The word “data” is, without a doubt, a term we hear several times a day in our daily lives. A great part of our work is all about data now, and the future of the industry directly depends on understanding or trying as best as we can to understand what to do and how to deal with data. There are so many types of data, and so many different tools available that help companies make sense of it, that it’s easier than not to get it wrong.

Because it is part of our mission to help in this regard, after the panel titled How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising, we promised the Portada Los Angeles audience we would answer all their questions. And because we like to keep our promises, we got in touch with the panelists who kicked off Portada Los Angeles 10 days ago (Caro D’Antuono, Vice President of Marketing for Northgate Markets; Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Associate Director for GroupM; Roxane Garzon, Media Director for Casanova; and Robin Garfield, Senior Vice President of Research and Scheduling for CNN), and they set some time aside to answer the audience’s questions there wasn’t time for during the event.

Portada and CNN en Español will have two more opportunities to delve deep into the issue of How Data Continues to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising. Get tickets to Portada Data & Content Marketing Forum on April 3rd and Portada Miami on April 12 and get all your questions about data answered by experts.

Have you ever ignored data and gone with “gut feeling” or your own empirical experience?

Roxane Garzon (left) and Caro D’Antuono (right) speaking at Portada Los Angeles 2019

Roxane Garzon: Data is only as good as the way it is collected.  Many times the data does not “feel” right.  When that happens I ask the question about sample size and statistical reliability.  If there is no issue there, then I look for other sources to confirm my findings. This has happened a few times when creating profiles for target audiences, specifically bicultural millennials.

Frances Rubio: Even if we don’t have quantitative data, qualitative data can be just as important and in this, we can have a bit of a “gut feeling” further validated, whether it’s conducting focus groups or doing ethnographic research. We’ve often used quantitative data but sometimes we just don’t have the data to point to the “why” a trend is happening, and these qualitative methods can help to further guide us into unlocking directional psychological reasons behind the “why” of peoples’ behaviors and mindsets.

Caro D’Antuono: Yes. We recently produced a short video to support Women’s Day. We didn’t have historical data on an effort such as this.  However, we released it on Northgate social media pages and it has been very well received.  We are receiving more brand love than we ever expected.  We have to take calculated risks, especially when things have not been done before within an organization.

Is analysis paralysis a real symptom of the data age?

R.G.: It can be. We are fortunate to work in a time where data is much easier to collect. However, it can hinder marketers from making a decision if they don’t know how to think without numbers. Marketers can use data as a crutch instead of using it as a tool.

Frances Rubio (left) and Roxane Garzon (right)

F.R.: With all this data, there are so many opportunities to unlock valuable insights, and it’s important to separate the signal from all the noise! It’s really about focusing on the important business questions and what publishers/marketers are trying to uncover. From there, it’s looking at all data available, and strategically choosing which data is valuable in answering the business question. 

Where there’s room for improvement is in the data accuracy and integrity: we all need to be questioning where and how we get our data, understanding the methodology and recognizing any limitations (e.g. sampling, the methodology in it of itself, date ranges, etc.). Tools should be incorporated to tell a full story of our consumers, understand where the consumer is with the brand from a marketing funnel perspective;  from there, once we understand the opportunity, the psychographics and behaviors, it becomes easier to read their media consumption so we can speak to them with the right messaging and creative and reach them in the appropriate media channels.

What: Any Los Angeles market strategy should have the Hispanic fan at the forefront. For major league teams such as LAFC and the LA Rams, the challenge is to truly connect emotionally with Latinos through shared values.
Why it matters: Rather than attempting a mass market strategy, teams like the LA Rams, which were away for 25 years, need to go back to the communities roots.

By Ryan Orvis, Portada contributor.

Portada Los Angeles hosted a panel discussion titled ‘Major League Teams Bet Big on the Hispanic Market’, focusing on how major league sports teams approach the Hispanic market. Univision anchor Leon Krauze spoke with Rich Orosco, EVP of Brand and Community at LAFC, and Ronalee Zarate- Bayani, CMO for the L.A. Rams.

As major sports brands targeting Hispanic and Latino communities in Los Angeles, both LAFC (Los Angeles Football Club) and the Los Angeles Rams are in unique positions. Founded in 2014, the LAFC is a relatively new attempt to connect with futbol-loving Angelenos, while the recently-returned Rams have a long history with L.A. Latino fans.

Key takeaways from the discussion included the necessity of having the Hispanic fan at the forefront of any Los Angeles market strategy, and the importance of authentically connecting through shared values.

Ronalee explained how the Rams faced the challenge of earning back the trust of Angelenos after 25 years away. They particularly needed to consider the Hispanic community, which had provided a loyal grounding for the Rams fanbase. “Our shared values are around family, community, and tradition. So how do we use those shared values to connect on a deeper level so that the fandom is real?”

Rather than attempt a mass market strategy, she tapped back into the team’s community roots. One example included the creation of a Dia de Diablo-themed Rams T-shirt that showed community support during a confluence of tragedies in L.A. and Mexico City.

For Rich, the goal was to focus on authenticity rather than chasing or attempting to buy the Latino market. “We knew that Latinos would come to football. You don’t have to teach a Latino about football.” Thus, the organization became the Los Angeles Football Club – no mention of soccer. They also hired Mexican superstar Carlos Vela, which didn’t hurt their street cred. From there, they rolled out a risky “street by street, block by block, one by one” strategy that paid off with local communities.

“This is what we mean when we say we want to do it authentically,” said Ronalee. “We don’t want to force it, we don’t want to commercialize it. We want to honor the traditions and bring it to life.”

 

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