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We discussed consumer loyalty with Roberto Muñoz, Head of Travel at Puntos Colombia. In this insightful interview, Muñoz shares ideas and learnings about loyalty programs.

 

By guest contributor Alejandra Velazquez

 

Consumer Loyalty: Can’t Buy Me Love

Customer Loyalty Reward Programs have become a necessity in this fast-paced world of marketing. Thanks to e-commerce, consumers have a thousand different choices at arm’s length, each claiming to be better than any. But the only way for consumers to marry your brand is by offering them something greater. Something beyond just added value, more significant than the menial transaction of purchasing a product. A prize for choosing well.

Roberto Muñoz knows how to keep consumers engaged and coming back. He is the former strategist for Club Premier, Aeromexico’s loyalty program. It was so successful it became a company of its own. Today he’s the Head of Travel and Banks for Puntos Colombia, an ambitious nationwide implementation whose motto is granting you points “for living.” It’s an alliance of dozens of restaurants, banks, gas stations, clothing and apparel stores, and lifestyle companies.

PC effectively lets users accumulate benefits by purchasing virtually anything with either an affiliated card, or any card at the right place. Joining takes a simple online registration, and the points are redeemable as cash. Simply put, it’s a powerhouse venture, with the power to engage and captivate an entire country. “Getting benefits and rewards for everyday activities is the single most important thing to unify frequent customers with newcomers and infrequent users,” says Muñoz.  In this article, he shares a few of his insights and experience with Portada.

Getting benefits and rewards for everyday activities is the single most important thing to unify frequent consumers with newcomers and infrequent users.

From Frequent Flyers to Frequent Buyers: How to Make Consumer Loyalty Programs More Inclusive 

One of the barriers of loyalty programs is that people often consider them to be an elite benefit for privileged customers. They come off as unattainable. Consumers feel like they’ll need to travel once a week in exchange for a free local flight. The benefits seem like they might be a long way down the road, and not worth working for. So Roberto Muñoz had to figure out a way of making all consumers know not only seasoned millionaires get rewards. “Loyalty programs such as Club Premier used to be focused on elite 40-50 y.o. consumers with spending power,” says Muñoz. “The type design was a fancy-looking cursive and everything was designed to look exclusive. However, the younger audiences never felt a connection with the brand. They felt like the program was not meant for them. We had to develop a rebranding without losing the elite feeling but inclusive for lower-profile, younger audiences.”

customer loyalty expertFor Club Premier, the key was rewarding not only frequent flyers, but also frequent buyers. Muñoz explains: “We thought, how do we incorporate a travel rewards program into people’s daily lives? By offering them a very accessible credit card without minimum balance or positive credit history requirements. Users get points every time they purchase anything with it. With that execution, we went over 300% card affiliations and incorporated many new clients into the airline.” But it’s not just about the card, it’s also about the places willing to offer something in return. Just like Puntos Colombia and its partnerships, it’s important to find the right allies for your program. For example, bookstore Gandhi is one of Club Premier’s greatest allies, offering premier points just by purchasing books.

Latam: The Market of Immediate Rewards 

Puntos Colombia offers points you can use as cash, just like BBVA does with its credit cards. Many users redeem their benefits just as soon as they’ve gathered enough to purchase anything. But why won’t people wait until they have enough points for something much bigger? The answer lies in the cultural differences between the U.S. and Latin American markets. Muñoz explains: “We’ve done much research on the subject of savings culture. The U.S. market is really mature in terms of loyalty. Customers are very aware that the goal is traveling for free by accumulating miles. They see the big picture and understand the value of saving. However, the Latam market doesn’t share the same mindset. They want to know what prize or reward they’ll be getting, and they want it immediately, by tomorrow.”

The U.S. market is really mature in terms of loyalty. […] However, the Latam market doesn’t share the same mindset. They want to know what reward they’ll be getting, and they want it immediately.

According to Roberto Muñoz, when people get as little as 200 points, they immediately try to use them on a quick run to the convenience store. Once again, this responds to the fact that the Colombian market is—or was—used to seeing consumer loyalty benefits as something unattainable. They’re not used to the rush of receiving incentives. So, they become eager to spend whatever they get, whenever they get it. “In Puntos Colombia, I learned the Colombian market doesn’t even know banks and retail stores also have loyalty programs, they think it’s just for airlines,” says Muñoz. Only time and effective implementation can contribute to getting consumers more used to the exchange of benefits.

Experiences: The Future of Consumer Loyalty Rewards

Not everything is about points for cash or free flights. On the other side of the Latam coin, mature markets have become jaded. High-profile consumers with spending power have little or nothing to gain from a the occasional freebie. So, what do you offer someone who has everything? Many consumers have been earning and accumulating rewards for decades. Is there room for innovation? Muñoz comments: “We discovered many clients had a common issue: they had too many points and didn’t know what to do with them anymore. It’s like “I travel so much, I couldn’t travel any more”. So we started offering them something they didn’t have: exciting new experiences.” According to Roberto Muñoz, offering experiences as rewards is a very underdeveloped area of consumer loyalty programs. The field is ripe for exploration.

Muñoz developed some of the first experiences for Club Premier some years ago. “We planned an exclusive trip to Vegas in a private jet for clients. There was an Elvis impersonator and karaoke on board. They had a limo waiting for them at the airport with Moët and other drinks. There was a special welcome dinner at the hotel. High-profile customers look for differentiating experiences, and this really added value for them and the program.”

We started offering them something they didn’t have: exciting new experiences.

But are experiences limited to high-end consumers, or can regular users also participate for fewer points? Is there a way to include and rank users at the same time? Now there is. “At the beginning, they were focused on a very, very exclusive target,” comments Muñoz. “Now they’re more massive. I classify experiences into micro and macro. Users can exchange fewer points for a day at the spa, or dinner planned especially for them by a chef.”

 

Roberto Muñoz’s Best and Not-so-Great Loyalty Strategies 

Like in anyone’s career, not everything has been smooth sailing for Roberto Muñoz. Here are a couple examples of his most and least successful strategies. It’s always good to remember the greatest learnings come from seemingly terrible mistakes. In Roberto’s words:

Our most successful strategy has been letting users complete their points with actual money. It’s one of the best new options on the market. That way, customers don’t have to wait until they accumulate all necessary points for the reward, they can just pay the difference in cash. Maybe you only have half the points and you can pay to complete the other half and collect the reward.”

And the least successful?

Our least successful strategy has been trying to push the wrong routes onto the wrong target. We released “fly to Europa” campaigns because it was aspirational and exciting. But many customers that didn’t fit the profile to go to Europe also received the ads and the effect was very negative. We had comments like, “how can you people offer me a trip to Europa if you gave me a credit card with a 5,000 pesos limit?”. It was one of our worst moments. We learned so much about segmentation strategies and cross-marketing with the bank. They should’ve let us know whose profile wasn’t right for the offer. This was about two years ago.”

Roberto Munoz, Head of Travel at Puntos Colombia, will be one of the dozens of brand marketing innovators present at Portada Miami on June 4, 2020. If you are interested in participating in Portada Miami and/or in Portada’s networking and knowledge-sharing platform with brand marketers please contact us here.

At the 2019 Portada Event in Mexico City, we had an insightful Q&A session with Isaias Araiza, Manager, Destination Marketing LATAM at Hilton. He shares his know-how about destination marketing in Latin America, media mix, hotel sites vs. OTAs and more.

 

Interview conducted by Alejandra Velazquez

 

Destination Marketing: Tailoring the Message

In what ways are the Hilton advertising campaigns different for Latin America and for the rest of the world? 

Destination marketing expert
Isaías Araiza

For Mexico and Colombia, it’s important not just to translate, but to adapt the message. You have to be very aware of the kind of words and ideas you are conveying, otherwise, your audience won’t feel connected. They are often very nationalistic and proud of their identity, and the communication needs to be respectful of that. We always cast talent that looks and feels Latin for local executions. Anna Kendrick is our global image, but if we featured her on Hispanic campaigns, people wouldn’t relate. You can’t just take it for granted. You need to speak their local language. 

 

It’s important not just to translate, but to adapt the message.

 

How about between Mexico and Colombia? Can the same message work for both? 

The message and creativity can be the same. However, you have to pay attention to specific local language nuances. We’ve had issues with punctuation throughout Latin America. For example, many countries separate decimals with a comma, not a dot. So if we separate thousands with a dot, instead of three thousand pesos, it would end up looking like just three. We had to be meticulous with that. I always tell customers in the U.S. that they have to take into account the actual day-to-day grammar usage, not just what Google or the [Real Academia Española] says. We might even have legal problems if there’s a mix-up. 

 

Hilton’s Media Strategy for Destination Marketing

What does your media mix look like in Mexico? 

To promote destinations, we have an upper-funnel, massive media strategy. We’re trying to create brand awareness. Hilton is unequivocally recognized as a global hotel chain, however, its specialized portfolio brands are still not top-of-mind for audiences. For example, we want to make clear that Doubletree by Hilton is a part of our family. We still conduct a great deal of offline traditional marketing: printed magazines, in-flight reading material, billboards, OOH at airports, digital and offline radio, and Spotify. Absolutely no television. A bit lower on the funnel, we have digital performance, targeting, training desk…, all things reach-media related. We target customers depending on the kind of hotel we try to promote. 

 

 

How about your video content strategy?

We’re basing our contents around “Rediscover Mexico”, based on promoting the uniqueness of the destination. As of today, we have very little video content, but for this year we’ll be implementing a much stronger strategy. We need to capture customers during the “dreaming phase” and help them develop their journey through special offers. We’ll be offering two proposals: one focused on the destination and favorite places, and another with local stories and characters, influencers, experiences, and random tourist video tell-alls. Like, “tell me how everything was, what you did, where you stayed”, etc. 

We target customers depending on the kind of hotel we try to promote.

 

The Online Travel Agencies Controversy

Do you have a strategy to strengthen purchases on the hotel website vs. using OTAs as intermediaries? How do you fight the generalized idea that OTAs are much cheaper than buying directly at the hotel?

OTAs have spread the idea that their rates are cheaper, but that’s not true. Hilton has a strict parity policy, which means they offer the same rate on their website than anywhere else. This means a single rate anywhere online. There’s no way an OTA can offer a better rate. Expedia and other OTAs take a very significant cut out of the deal, but the price is the same for the general public. Of course, Hilton would prefer selling D2C.

A few years ago we launched a campaign called “Stop Clicking Around” and the motto was “don’t even look for a better rate, here’s the best offer you’ll find”. Same with the loyalty program. The only people who may get better rates than anyone else are the members of our Honor Program. Also, Hilton offers discounts and rewards for customers who purchase in advance. We have strong campaigns to fight OTA preference. 

Is there a way to cut away from OTAs?


Maybe in the long run, but definitely not right now. Since they used to be the only online booking platform, the industry let them grow without limits and now they’re a necessary evil. They became a monster and we’re doing everything we can to control it, but the truth is… it does generate great volume. The problem is, a company should never earn much greater revenue from outside channels than from direct channels. The goal right now is not renouncing OTAs, but rather pairing the revenue mix to a much fairer amount. We’ll implement the strategy to get more flow into our home by generating content, launching informative campaigns, and fostering organic traffic to our sites. 

 

 

Business VS Leisure

Could you give us cold hard numbers of the business vs. leisure categories for online purchases?


It’s hard to get precise data because Mexico is a very dynamic destination in terms of the business and leisure mix. For example, Hilton Reforma is for both sectors because of its privileged location. On weekdays it’s all about business, and during weekends it’s a leader of the plaza. Some hotels in Querétaro are really close to industrial parks and are purely for business, but we also offer benefits if you prolong your stay until the weekend. For example, all users may accumulate loyalty points by using hotel amenities, so they’ll end up redeeming them on future family trips. It’s almost impossible to get an average.

 

Marriott has a very strong minority inclusion program. Do you also have a competitive strategy?

We have an entire marketing section called Diversity and Inclusion, which covers all the spectrum: from commercial strategies to pricing, marketing, special offers, etc. We definitely offer special programs and rewards for our diverse program. Not doing it would be a mistake. 

 

Learning From Mistakes

What was the mistake you learned from the most during your career? 

I used to be a marketing director at one of our downtown Mexico City properties. We had a major issue with public protests and demonstrations. It was impossible not to address the issue. So we released campaign after campaign with alternative routes and all kinds of warnings. But instead of helping, it would highlight the problem. We spent too much time trying to solve it until we realized there was nothing we could do to soften the blow of traffic and blockades. We suffered several cancellations due to expecting an imminent protest, and in the end it wasn’t even as serious as it seemed. We’d live in fear and uncertainty.

Until we just accepted the issue instead of trying to cover it and we implemented a strike insurance: if your event had been in any way affected due to the circumstances, you got a discount. So instead of apologizing, we offered post-care. It’s all about the small details. For example, the Santa Fe DoubleTree offers a warm chocolate cookie upon check-in. We have customers married to the brand who come in just for that cookie. Every and any small thing you do for your customers counts. 

 

Isaias Araiza, Manager Destination Marketing LATAM, Hilton will be one of the dozens of brand marketing innovators present at Portada Miami on June 4, 2020. If you are interested in participating in Portada Miami and/or in Portada’s networking and knowledge-sharing platform with brand marketers please contact us here.

Americans’ interest in soccer both as active participants in soccer matches as well as in fandom is growing at a high rate. Therefore, the brand marketing community is taking notice and considering more soccer sponsorships. What is the best strategy for marketers to engage with the Hispanic population through the soccer passion point? International leagues and clubs such as LigaMX, English Premier League and La Liga are alluring propositions. Here’s why.

 

A 2018 Gallup poll shows soccer ranks second in popularity only surpassed by football among the coveted 18-34 demographic. Soccer ties with basketball at 11% and is ahead of baseball at 6%. Undoubtedly, soccer, including beach soccer, is a substantial alternative for brands to reach out to this coveted population segment. These are two reasons why European and Mexican soccer sponsorships can be viable alternatives.

1. High Name Recognition of European Clubs and Stars

Lionel Messi – Photo Property of Futbol Club Barcelona

The high name recognition of European clubs among U.S. audiences, and even more among U.S. Hispanic audiences, explains why brand marketers prefer these marketing platforms over MLS. Thus, more American brands are closing soccer sponsorships with clubs including Futbol Club Barcelona, Real Madrid, Manchester United, Juventus and Bayern Munich. Moreover, the fact that global soccer stars like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo are household names makes maximizes opportunities.

Partnering with European Leagues can be alluring to major U.S. consumer brands. As an example, LaLiga North America  —a joint venture between LaLiga, Spain’s top-soccer league, and Relevent Sports Group- recently partnered with Allstate for Soñando con LaLiga, which details the experience and progress of the best 17 players from the Allstate Sueño Alianza National Showcase while they traveled to Spain and competed against LaLiga academies and in front of LaLiga coaches and scouts. (Check out the partnership of Paris Saint German with Nike subsidiary Air Jordan.)

2. LigaMX Soccer Sponsorships Speak Closer to Hispanic Consumers than MLS

The Mexican LigaMX can be a much better soccer marketing vehicle to engage U.S. Hispanics than the MLS, Nick Kelly, Head of U.S. Sports Marketing at Anheuser-Busch, said at last fall’s Portada New York conference. The fact that 70% of Hispanics are of Mexican origin explains the high popularity of the Mexican National Team and LigaMX clubs (e.g. América, Guadalajara, Toluca, and Cruz Azul) among U.S. Hispanics.

soccer sponsorships expert
Nick Kelly

All our world cup campaigns were about the Mexican National Team (not the U.S. National Team)”, said Nick Kelly, a member of Portada’s Sports Marketing Board. Anheuser-Busch partners with the LigaMX particularly for soccer sponsorships and activations in the Southwestern U.S., an area with a very large Hispanic population. In particular, he mentioned Texas, Arizona and Nevada, as well as cities like Houston, Dallas, and surprisingly, Nashville.

Toyota is another company that is betting on Mexican soccer for its Hispanic outreach. Tyler McBride, Engagement and Events Marketing Manager at Toyota Motor North America, told Portada that he is partnering with Club America because they are the top club and most successful team in North America. The team is recognized internationally with a storied history and winning tradition in Mexico’s Liga MX and they are the most-watched soccer league in the United States. “Our partnership with Club America allows us to engage with Liga MX fans year-round across multiple touchpoints,” he said.

Featured image by Vienna Reyes on Unsplash

 

Loyalty marketing includes tools that help marketers engage with consumers. Here are some pros and cons of digital mobile wallets, in-app rewards, blockchain-based loyalty programs, AI-based loyalty marketing and mobile devices with beacon technologies.

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1. Digital Wallets, Great Organizers of Financial Lives

According to recent data, the average American carries 17 cards. This clearly shows how important it is for consumers to have an overview of their financial life (including their different loyalty programs).  Digital wallets are ideal to help customers organize their financial and loyalty products.

2. In-App Rewards: a Loyalty Marketing Tool

The digitalization of reward programs can be an important driver for customer engagement.  However, most In-App Rewards are based on a gamification context.

Pros:

  • Rewards for better prices, discounts, special offers. In other words, this type of technology can leverage the value proposition to customers.
  • Makes feel your regular customer as a high-value customer, that fact can generate effective recency/frequency and at least more interaction with the brand.
  • Churn strategies; getting back old customers / capture new generations and/or new markets.
  • Leverage Ancillary Revenue / Check-in ratio / Leverage negative performance markets or flights.
  • Incentives for B2C markets.
  • Differentiation from competitors.

Cons:

  • In-App can be very strong to generate engagement but also challenging to generate revenue.
  • Potentially low ROIs due to high operation costs (IT, back-end, front-end).

3. Blockchain-Based Loyalty Programs

Blockchain is a powerful strategy for loyalty marketing because of its inherent safety.  The most valuable asset of a loyalty or Frequent Flyer Program is the data. Blockchain is designed to store transactional data in a secure and decentralized way. Customers appreciate this model because it is a “Loyalty Hub”. This technology can simplify the process of applying and keep customers from having full wallets/apps or accounts/passwords with the brands they want to interact with.

Blockchain is designed to store transactional data in a secure and decentralized way.

Pros:

  • High redemption rates.
  • Analytical and statistical information / more accurate information / give the customer what they need, when they need it and at the right price.
  • Customer incentive oriented: “Buy what you need and I’ll reward you”.
  • Traditional loyalty programs reward you for the extra purchase when customers realize that is a problem. Here the information is secure.
  • Loyalty Hub: customers always appreciate simple and centralized platforms.
  • Points can be changed for cryptocurrency.

Cons:

  • Complex method.
  • High UX costs.
  • High consulting costs.
  • Blockchain technology may not yet be popular enough.

4. Artificial Intelligence

Nowadays is not enough to get customers and generate leads from e-commerce strategies. It is a must for companies to start being AI and Machine Learning oriented in some way. This is not a trend, but a real need. Brand marketers and loyalty marketing experts are looking for deep learning experiences that allow recording and auto-analyzing customer information. AI can enable an extremely high degree of personalization. To get the most out of AI it is important for managers to understand market behaviors, customer preferences, demographics, etc.

Brand marketers and loyalty marketing experts are looking for deep learning experiences that allow recording and auto-analyzing customer information.

5. Mobile Devices with Beacon Technologies

Frequent flyer travel programs or loyalty coalition programs are common currency in the travel and lifestyle sectors. These programs provide customers the opportunities to use/redeem the points (virtual coins) they win in the regular day-to-day shopping to acquire plane tickets, accommodation, car rental, ancillary airline products, etc. Beacons allow these programs to be farther reaching and help opening new markets, generally abroad.

Roberto Muñoz, Head of Loyalty Travel at Puntos Colombia, a member of the Portada Council System helped compile this information.

Scotiabank’s sponsorships in Canada and Latin America are focused on sports passion points like hockey and soccer, as well as arts & culture. How do we know this? We talked to Mike Tasevski, VP Global Sponsorships at Scotiabank, and a Portada Council System Member.

 

sports passion points expert
Mike Tasevski

Until a few months ago, Mike Tasevski held the position of VP, Market Development at Mastercard. We asked him in what way his current job at Scotiabank is different from the one he had at Mastercard. “At Scotiabank, I have a global role in which I oversee a very different portfolio that is heavily focused on sports passion points hockey and fútbol with a very unique flavor of arts & culture. In comparison to my previous role, where there was a focus on multiple partners, my role at Scotiabank is to establish unique partnerships that will assist in delivering ROI on all channels for our bank objectives including personal banking, wealth and clients…

My role at Scotiabank is to establish unique partnerships that will assist in delivering ROI on all channels for our bank objectives.

Mike Tasevski, VP Global Sponsorships at Scotiabank, will be one of the dozens of brand marketing innovators participating in Portada Miami on June 4, 2020. If you are interested in participating in Portada Miami and/or in Portada’s networking and knowledge-sharing platform with brand marketers please contact us here.

 

Canada’s Sports Passion Point: Hockey

Scotiabank has billed itself as “Canada’s most international bank” due to its acquisitions primarily in Latin America and the Caribbean, but also in Europe and parts of Asia. We asked Tasevski how Scotiabank’s marketing investment approach to sports passion points differs in all these regions. “The key focus in Canada is hockey due to the popularity of the sport in this nation,” he answered. “People widely consider us Canada’s Hockey Bank due to all our partnerships. Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment (MLSE) (20-year sponsorship agreement valued at C$800 million, many Canadian hockey teams, the NHL, Hockey Canada) In the South America market, we are investing heavily in soccer (A major partner of Concacaf, Fútbol Club Barcelona (FCB), Costa Rica Fútbol, etc.)”

 

The Way to Mexico’s Heart: Fútbol 

In 2000, Scotiabank increased its stake in Mexican bank Grupo Financiero Inverlat to 55%. Scotiabank later acquired the Inverlat banking house in 2003, taking over all of its branches and establishing a strong presence in the country. The Mexican bank’s name subsequently changed to Grupo Financiero Scotiabank Inverlat.

“Soccer/Fútbol will play an important role in the Latin American market. For example, there are over 25 million FCB fans in the Mexican market,” said Tasevsi. “Our association with FCB allows us to jointly communicate with the passionate fútbol fan and to educate them on the Scotiabank brand and how we can assist with all their financial needs. Fútbol is key in the Latin Market and we will continue to invest and support the growth of this sport passion point in this market.”

Our association with FCB allows us to jointly communicate with the passionate fútbol fan and to educate them on the Scotiabank brand.

Future Plans to Tap into Sports Passion Points

Spanish soccer champions FC Barcelona have unveiled a new regional partnership with financial group Scotiabank, the first deal struck from the club’s recently opened New York office.

The multi-year agreement will see Scotiabank become the La Liga side’s official partner in Latin America and the Caribbean, and it will work alongside the club to sponsor a number of soccer programs in the regions aimed at underprivileged youth.

Scotiabank will also set up soccer festivals and will support local teams in attending training events in Barcelona. On top of this, customers will receive exclusive ticket deals and competitions.

 

 

 

The podcast advertising market is becoming a force to be reckoned with. In fact, marketers are projected to spend over US $1 billion by 2021 according to the IAB and PwC. One recent transaction in the podcast M&A space caught our eye: the strategic investments in reVOLVER Podcasts by Latido Music.

 

Latido Music Partners Up with reVOLVER Podcasts

Latido MusicA source at Latido Music, a digital platform for Latin music fans, has told Portada that “for now, it is a minority stake in the double digits, but we are both optimistic about reVolver’s long-term success and ambitious, so you can draw your own conclusions.”

For now, it is a minority stake in the double digits.

The source adds that this was a strategic investment in every sense of the word. “We see reVolver as having a leadership position in its segment, and we like that its consumer base overlaps substantially with that of Latido Music.”

As with most target audiences in the digital age, the digital media industry for Latinx is very fractionalized. That is why, according to the source, ” a strategic investment in reVolver is something of a ‘horizontal integration’ strategy. We try to capture a greater mind share of this important audience across devices and content types, rather than trying to own the entire value chain of a single content type – which in this day and age is effectively impossible anyway.”

 

Graduated Investment

The amount of the investment has to remain undisclosed. However, the source adds: “that it is a graduated investment, meaning our stake in the company will grow over time.”

 

Check out previous Insider columns

Insider: Snackable Content, Multicultural as Something Organic, Amazon Ad Sales and More…

 

 

Pepsi announced an integration with Telemundo’s, through which it will become the first-ever beverage sponsor of La Voz, the Spanish-language edition of NBC’s  “The Voice.” As the show’s first-ever beverage sponsor and prizing partner, Pepsi will take the season two stage by storm, celebrating Latin music and the talented phenoms giving everything to become the next big musical superstar. The premiere episode of season two of “La Voz” is set to air this Sunday, January 19th.

 

Esperanza Teasdale
Esperanza Teasdale, VP & General Manager, PepsiCo’s Hispanic Business Unit

The new investment reflects Pepsi’s Hispanic Business Unit commitment to Hispanic Marketing and to “elevate the voice of the Hispanic consumer”, Esperanza Teasdale, VP & General Manager at PepsiCo’s Hispanic Business Unit , tells Portada. “The La Voz sponsorship, which taps into the Pepsi brand’s rich heritage in music and entertainment, allows us to celebrate Hispanic culture and passion points and support the next generation of talented musicians who aren’t afraid to live life their way and chase their musical dreams,” Teasdale adds.

The campaign is focused on Fusionistas who celebrate both the Hispanic and overall American culture.

Pepsi will level up the season two “La Voz”  prize, bringing the original $100k grand prize up to an epic $200K.  The integration will span the blind auditions, battle rounds and live performances.  It will feature cups branded with Pepsi in the coaches’ chairs and include Pepsi branding across a number of touchpoints:  multi-screen  presence throughout the season, in-show and out-of-show custom activations on linear and social and prominent thematic storylines woven throughout the season.

La Voz Sponsorship with the Fusionistas Target in Mind

Teasdale, a half Ecuadorean and half Colombian executive, notes that “Pepsi understands the passion point that Hispanics have with music. It’s in their DNA.” She adds that the campaign is focused on Fusionistas who celebrate both the Hispanic and overall American culture.”

 

“Eso es lo que quiero”

The integration will also bring to life and feature the newest U.S. Pepsi campaign tagline, “That’s What I Like” (“Es Lo Que Quiero”).  Launched earlier this month, the new tagline is the brand’s first in two decades and is inspired by the most loyal Pepsi drinkers, who proudly like what they like and live their lives out loud without worrying about what others will think – whether that’s belting out a song at karaoke, clapping at the end of a movie, or simply enjoying a Pepsi.

Pepsi unveiled five new national commercials to launch the new tagline, three of which were developed in partnership with the Pepsi brand’s Hispanic agency, Alma (“DJ BBQ,” “Subway,” and “Lavandería).  The new ads spotlight various everyday people getting lost in a moment and finding themselves dancing in unexpected places or situations, despite the amused gaze of onlookers.  Each spot is underpinned by a variety of upbeat music spanning hip-hop, dance hall, Latin pop tracks and more. The spots will air across English and Spanish-speaking properties to reach the brand’s ever-growing fusionista fans, Latinos celebrating and blending their Hispanic and U.S. cultures.

Radisson Anápolis, GM Bets on LatAm Market, Fazenda Futuro©´s Vegan Sausages & More Sales Leads LatAm

For prior Sales Leads LatAm editions, click here.

 

  • Radisson Anápolis

Radisson Anápolis: recognized hotel brand Radisson announced the opening of Radisson Hotel Anápolis at Avenida Oscar Mohn, No. 250, Anápolis, Brazil. This upscale hotel is perfectly positioned in one of the fastest-growing cities in Goiás, providing a convenient spot for guests interested in checking out the Brasil Park Shopping, or business travelers visiting companies like Vitamedic orLinea Alimentos. The hotel is also conveniently located near Terminal Rodoviário Josias Moreira Braga bus station and Goiânia Airport (GYN).“Our partnership with Atlantica Hotels allows us to bring the bright, inviting and balanced feel of the Radisson brand into vibrant cities like Anápolis, Brazil,” said Frances Gonzalez, vice president of Operations for Radisson Hotel Group in Latin America.Atlantica Hotels is a licensee for Radisson Hotel Group’s brands in Brazil, including Radisson Blu, Radisson, Radisson RED and Park Inn by Radisson. The two companies have enjoyed a longstanding relationship in Brazil that now includes 16 hotels in operation.

  • Urban Juve 

Health and beauty consumer packaged goods company The Yield Growth Corp. announced that it ships its first products to OMG Colombia, the subsidiary of Organic Medical Growth OMG3 Inc. (“OMG3”) in Latin America, based in Colombia, as part of a 5 year distribution deal for Yield Growth’s Urban Juve skin care line. Today, 1,800 products are being shipped, in partial fulfillment of OMG’s first product purchase order in anticipation of imminent completion of regulatory approval to sell Urban Juve products in Colombia and progressively in other parts of South America.According to Goldstein Research, the Latin America cosmetics market reached a value of USD US$31.98 billion in 2017 and is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of 4.49% during the forecast period 2017-2025.OMG3 is in the process of distributing Urban Juve skin care products in Colombia and other countries of Latin America. Through its Colombian partner Ortix, OMG has access to a distribution channel of over 44,000 pharmacies in South America and has partnered with on-demand delivery giant, Rappi, to sell products through its e-commerce platform. 

  • GM 

US carmaker General Motors has decided to exit Thailand market.The brand will withdraw the Chevrolet brand from Thailand by the end of 2020, and said that China’s Great Wall Motor (GWM) has agreed to buy over its manufacturing plants in Rayong.GM’s co-ordinated retreat is part of the company’s plan to exit unprofitable markets including Europe, while focusing on North America, China, Latin America and South Korea. With the planned sale of its Thai plant, GM has essentially given up on the rest of ASEAN as well, as the Land of Smiles is the company’s regional hub.GM is “focusing on markets where we have the right strategies to drive robust returns, and prioritising global investments that will drive growth in the future of mobility,” especially in electric and autonomous vehicles, GM chairman and CEO Mary Barra said in a statement. 

  • Collinson

Interpublic Group agency Golin announced a new client partner to its international roster. Leading travel loyalty and benefits brand, Collinson, appointed Golin the global PR and communications Agency of Record (AOR), following a competitive pitch. The partnership will be led via a dual hub model from the Golin London and Golin Hong Kong offices, and the work will begin immediately.As AOR, Golin will head up PR and communications for Collinson with particular focus in  Brazil, China, Hong Kong, India, UAE, the UK and the US; with further markets to be activated in Europe and Asia. The agency’s first charge will be to build awareness of Collinson’s integrated expertise in loyalty and travel experience, showcasing the group’s breadth of capabilities under one single brand voice and messaging.

  • Fazenda Futuro© 

Brazilian plant-based startup Fazenda Futuro, recently valued at US$100 million, will launch vegan sausages made with a seaweed skin for crispiness next month. The sausages are made with a blend of pea, soy, and chickpea protein with beetroot added for a “rosy color​”. The products are free from GMO ingredients, food colorings, artificial flavors, or enhancers and the pork flavor comes from natural flavors and spices. They are coated with a neutral-tasting seaweed ‘skin’ that emulates the crispiness of traditional pork sausages.The sausages, which will launch in April in Brazil and the Netherlands, have a 17% protein content and add to Fazenda Futuro’s portfolio of products consisting of its Futuro Burger, ground meat and meatballs.Although Fazenda Futuro is a newcomer – it was founded in May last year – it has quickly made a name for itself in the plant-based category. In July last year, the startup received its first round of investments with Monashees and investment firm Go4it Capital acquiring an 8.5% stake for US$8.5 million. The transaction valued Fazenda Futuro at around US$100 million.The company was founded by Marcos Leta, a Rio de Janeiro-based food entrepreneur and investor. 

JOIN PORTADA’S KNOWLEDGE-SHARING AND NETWORKING PLATFORM: To find out about Portada’s new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the above campaigns, please contact Sales Director Leslie Zambrano at Leslie@portada-online.com.

  • MasterChef

Endemol Shine North America has appointed award-winning licensing agency Tycoon Enterprises to serve as its exclusive licensing agent for the “MasterChef” television property in Latin America. MasterChef’ is one of the most successful food format in the world with over 60 localized versions across the globe including 10 in Latin America alone.Tycoon Enterprises will expand the “MasterChef” franchise in key categories including food and beverage, cookware and live experiences. Endemol Shine Brazil will continue to represent the brand in their market independently.In addition to “MasterChef,” the partnership will also look to explore opportunities in all categories for Endemol Shine series “¿Quién es la máscara” (“The Masked Singer”), “Te la Juego” (“Deal or No Deal”), “Fear Factor” and “Wipeout” in Mexico. 

Daniel Galvan Duque, Marketing Director for Flavored CSD’s at Gepp PepsiCo Mexico tells Portada about their Consumer Engagement Cycle for reaching audiences through meaningful experiences, heartfelt stories and open conversations. You may know everything about your consumers nowadays – what they wear, where they go, what they eat, and even what they need and when they need it. Perhaps your brand has been paying close attention for years. But have your brand’s consumers been paying attention to you? Read on to see how Gepp PepsiCo Engages the Mexican Consumer.

 

Interview conducted by Alejandra Velazquez

Daniel Galvan Duque, Portada, Brand Marketing
Daniel Galvan Duque, Gepp PepsiCo Mexico @gepp

The Power of Storytelling

PepsiCo has been mastering the Consumer Engagement Cycle for decades. Their beverage portfolio is relatable, and their strongest brands have been household names for the fashion, music, and sports industries for decades. This isn’t just about what people like, it’s about how people live. Melding into consumers memories of meaningful events gives brands a backstage pass into people’s experiences. And once they’ve shared an experience, it’s how the story gets told.

El Peluches: Creating Engagement Through Passion

When people don’t immediately skip your ad, you know you’ve hit a home-run. “Truth is, in an era populated with so many brands, communication, and content, the challenge is grabbing people’s attention,” says Daniel Galvan Duque, the man behind PepsiCo’s marketing strategy. In August 2016, Gatorade partnered with Alejandro “El Peluches” Ruiz, a man who runs marathons wearing a vest covered entirely in plush toys. Why? Because his unique passion encourages others and brightens their day. Gatorade was clever enough to notice and share the story to connect with their Mexican audience.

Truth is, in an era populated with so many brands, communication, and content, the challenge is grabbing people’s attention.

The “El Peluches” ad was an unconventional format with a story worth telling. “You have to constantly challenge yourself to produce things that create proximity. The digital world demands you to keep your pre-rolls under five seconds long and all your content under 20, and here was this 2’30’’ narrative with a 70% view rate” reminisces Galvan Duque.

5v5 Montemorelos: Rooting for the Underdogs 

The Gatorade 5v5 soccer tournament in partnership with the UEFA Champions League has gained plenty of momentum in its four-year run (check out our interview with Jill Leccia, Senior Marketing Director – Gatorade Latin America). In 2017, a team from the small rural town of Montemorelos made it to the playoffs but lost in the semifinals. “They asked us if there was a chance they could try again at the second playoffs, and we gave them permission. This time they won, and that gave us a chance to tell a great story. They ended up losing at the finals and didn’t get to travel to Barcelona for the first prize, but we still made the story fit perfectly with the brand’s message: sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, but you never quit trying” says Galvan Duque.

Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, but you never quit trying.

The outcome was a brief 3’34’’ documentary in which the narrator says “At the end you might win. You might not win. You might have all the odds against you. But one thing is true: in Montemorelos and anywhere else, if you keep sweating, nothing can stop you”. The message matched the brand messaging and reached over seven million views.

Fido Dido Parade: Nostalgia and Influence  

Relatable characters, a touch of nostalgia and partnerships with influencers can keep brand awareness alive. Fido Dido was 7UP’s beloved hand-sketched character in the nineties who was “ageless, thoughtful, chill, and compassionate towards one and all” according to one of its creators Joanna Ferrone. Reviving an ambassador like Fido Dido, highly nostalgic and relatable, does wonders for sparking all kinds of conversations, activations, experiences, and stories – the cogs that keep the Consumer Engagement Cycle alive and spinning.

We wanted each to have a different personality, imprinted by the person creating them. So we found an influencer pool that made sense with the brand.

He recently made a comeback in a series of ads and parades held across Mexico where the brand invited different artists to decorate blank forms of the beloved character. “We wanted each to have a different personality, imprinted by the person creating them. So we found an influencer pool that made sense with the brand. First thing to consider is whether they believe in your message and what you’re doing” reveals Galvan Duque. The right strategy goes a long way for how Gepp PepsiCo engages the Mexican consumer.

Daniel Galvan Duque, Marketing Director for Flavored CSD’s at Gepp, PepsiCo Mexico, will be one of the dozens of brand marketing innovators present at Portada Miami on June 4, 2020. If you are interested in participating in Portada Miami and/or in Portada’s networking and knowledge-sharing platform with brand marketers please contact us here.

All about how Latcom and Disney designed a successful communication strategy for the new Disney films and empowered the world’s largest entertainment company.

 

The premieres of Toy Story 4 and The Lion King quickly broke audience records, becoming some of the highest-grossing films so far this year. To position these releases, Disney followed the advice and strategic guidance of Latcom, a company specialized in Out of Home Advertising (OOH). Thus, Latcom and Disney worked together in an effective out-of-home strategy that helped the success of the entertainment company.

To develop an action plan, the company analyzed new challenges in the entertainment world, current market demand and changes in the way movies are consumed. It was also necessary to face the challenges presented by the target audience. On the one hand, Latcom and Disney had to connect emotionally with those that saw the original Lion King; on the other hand, they had to seduce Toy Story fans who considered that the existing trilogy was enough, or that a fourth film brought potential to ruin the story.

The objectives were generating awareness with target audiences: centennials, millennials, families and fans; and positioning the films as “must-see events.” Consequently, Latcom designed a strategy based on the consumer journey, while identifying the key touchpoints for the campaign. In the end, it was structured around four OOH advertising modules and a mobile component that worked as a complement.

“It wasn’t just about buying media, but rather about doing an in-depth analysis of the consumer behavior of the different audiences in Latin America and the different targets that make up that audience,” commented Valentín Bueno, CEO of Latcom. “Each target has a different point of contact with Out of Home media. For example, in the case of children, who are a very difficult target audience to reach, we had to generate special networks close to the areas they frequent.”

The campaigns were executed in Buenos Aires, Gran Buenos Aires, Córdoba, Rosario, Mendoza, San Pablo, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City, Guadalajara, Monterrey, and Puebla. A mobile component was included at some of the target’s points of interest to reinforce the main communication. Static images and gifs led traffic to the campaign’s website. In addition, geofencing technology covered a radius between 100 and 500 meters, in areas with a good concentration of the desired target audience, such as schools, sports clubs, parks, cinemas, and shopping malls, among others.

“Cities can be transformed into a hub for entertainment distribution and access to all kinds of content worldwide. This system has great potential and I think we can contribute a lot to it. Making this campaign for iconic movies like Toy Story and The Lion King filled us with pride because of the excellent results it had in all markets,” Bueno concluded.

 

For brands who want to connect with Caribbean Hispanics in the U.S., baseball could represent the right platform to start a long-term consumer-brand relationship. Nearly one-third of all major league players are Latinos, including those born in Latin America and within the 50 U.S. states. The Dominican Republic has the highest number of players in the big leagues.

Once upon a time, on May 9, 1871, Estevan Enrique “Steve” Bellán debuted as the first Latin American born individual to play professional baseball in the U.S.A. He played as a third baseman for the Troy Haymakers in New York. About 200 years later, nearly one-third of all major league players are first or second-generation Latinos.

connect with caribbean hispanics
Augusto Romano, CEO at Digo Hispanic Media.

According to the Major League Baseball (MLB), the Dominican Republic has the highest number of international players in the big leagues, with 102 players during Opening Day in 2019. Second in the ranking is Venezuela, with 68 players, and Cuba comes in third with 19 players. “Baseball receives the most attention in Caribbean countries, even more than soccer,” Augusto Romano, CEO at Digo Hispanic Media, tells Portada.

Catering for A Segment’s Needs

First, Digo noticed Caribbean Hispanics are a niche market with particular needs, separate from the general Hispanic market. Then, the U.S Hispanic audience network figured how to reach about five million Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Dominicans who are concentrated on the east coast of the U.S. However, Romano has a new strategy in mind: “Get to them through baseball!

Get to them through baseball!

Born from the union of the two largest media groups in the Caribbean, GFR Media from Puerto Rico and Grupo Corripio from the Dominican Republic, Digo’s audience has shown a special interest in how Caribbean-born baseball players are developing within MLB. We write stories about the players in a culturally relevant manner, starting with their origins, something the mainstream media doesn’t do. This allows U.S. Hispanic fans to follow players from their country of origin on our premium sites, says Romano. Nevertheless, it seems brands are still missing out on the opportunity.

Individual Promotions

According to Josh Rawitch, Sr. Vice President, Content & Communications for the Arizona Diamondbacks, since last year, the MLB has been working on promoting individual players.This is an important shift in the league’s marketing strategy where traditionally entire teams were promoted.

“The league is smart enough to let these players be who they are,” Rawitch tells Portada. “Therefore we are letting their personalities show a little bit more.”

Most of Arizona Diamondbacks’ fans come from Mexico and Venezuela. However, the team also recognizes the importance of its Caribbean followers. The star, pitcher Yoan Lopez, for example, is from Cuba.

Concerning Puerto Rican players, Esteban Pagán, sports editor at GFR Media, believes that even though Puerto Rico has produced four island born hall of famers, and they have always been very active and noticeable with players in the league, right now there’s a new group of very talented players that are starting to arise. It is a matter of time for us to see more profesional global Puerto Rican players, he explains. “Brands are missing out on opportunities to connect with the U.S.H. audience because these big players are just starting to emerge and are recently being noticed and followed by MLB fans.”

“We are in the exact time in which we can see the potential [of the Caribbean players] in the long run,” Jorge Cabezas, GFR Media, General Manager, adds.

Connecting With Caribbean Hispanics

“The way we try to connect with the Caribbean fan base is first through our social media accounts. They’re being followed by Latinos all over the world, thus we specifically try to highlight our Hispanic players. We have some Cuban players and tons of Venezuelans and Dominicans,” adds Rawitch. “We know when we are sending out messages on social media, we are interacting heavily with fans from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.

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The second way the D-Backs are connecting with Caribbean Hispanics is through their local baseball academy in the Dominican Republic. In fact, all 30 major league clubs have baseball academies there, according to Anthony Salazar, chair of the Latino baseball committee.

The way we try to connect with the Caribbean fan base is first through our social media accounts.
Josh Rawitch
Josh Rawitch, Sr. Vice President, Content & Communications at team Arizona Diamondbacks.

“We go down there for graduation every January or February. Moreover, we do a second trip when we do a clinic in the Dominican Republic or we’ll do public appearances,” explains Rawitch.

As a matter of fact, Digo Hispanic Media recently announced their exclusive partnership with NGL Collective, focused on custom content generation.

Their first docuseries named “Las Academias,” explores the beautiful island of the Dominican Republic along with the small towns scouting for talented hopefuls. These athletes each and every day train at one of the 30 major league youth training camps across the island.

“Brands will have access to sponsor these content series via our sales team and we will insert them in the story to ensure their brand and products are showcased in a relevant and engaging manner,” said Aisha Burgos, SVP of Sales & Marketing for Digo Hispanic Media.

Brands’ Approach

It seems that the league and its teams are already reaching out to their Hispanic and Caribbean Hispanic fans. So, what’s happening with brands?

Most brands recognize that outside of soccer, baseball is probably the second most followed sport in Latin America. However, in some countries like Cuba or DR, it is even bigger, believes Rawitch. “Simply, look at the sheer volume of people who are following baseball from the Caribbean. If you’re a company looking to communicate with them, it makes sense to find your way there through a major league team, for instance.”

According to Google Trends, in the past 12 months the words baseball, beisbol and pelota were the most searched the most in countries like the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Panamá & Venezuela. “Baseball runs in our blood. This represents a huge opportunity that brands need to take advantage of,” said Romano.

We talked to Terry Sell, national truck manager at Toyota Motor North America, about Toyota’s recent soccer campaign featuring Jorge Campos.  Toyota is one of the top 10 spenders in broadcast TV advertising, with $157 million spent in 2017. Through the campaign “Choose the Toughest Field”, the car company has managed to reach out to three audiences: Hispanics, soccer fans, and car lovers. Here’s what Sell had to say.

Toyota Campaign
Photo via Toyota.

Portada: Tell us what the “Choose the Toughest Field” soccer campaign is about.

Terry Sell: “The ‘Choose the Toughest Field’ soccer campaign is the 2019 soccer platform for Toyota. It builds powerful connections between the sport of soccer, players, fans, and trucks. The campaign was inspired by some of the more traditional playing conditions in Latin America. We considered that soccer is often played in dirt fields rather than nicely groomed grass. Those tough fields are where players exhibit their true potential, just like our trucks. The campaign’s commercials capture the toughness of the Tacoma and Tundra trucks as they take on tough terrains in a rough, non-traditional environment, thus their connection to the sport.”

To learn about another automotive brand that is reaching out to U.S. Hispanics, read  How to Market to Hispanic Consumers According to Kia’s Senior Director of Multicultural Marketing.

P: Who is the target of the campaign?

TS: “Toyota has long recognized Hispanic guests as a linchpin of its success. Hispanic vehicle registrations account for over 20% of overall registrations, making the Hispanic market a significant portion of Toyota’s overall success. In fact, Toyota has been the number one automotive brand among Hispanics for 14 consecutive years.”

Hispanic vehicle registrations account for over 20% of overall registrations.

P: On which platforms will it appear?

TS: “The campaign broadcast elements were timed for the 2019 Concacaf Gold Cup. But it will continue through March 2020 on other soccer media properties that we sponsor such as the UEFA Champions League, the U.S., and Mexican National Teams and Liga MX.”

P: Why did you choose retired Mexican goalkeeper Jorge Campos as your spokesperson?

TS: “We are delighted to partner with Mr. Campos. He is the embodiment of someone who has taken on the toughest terrains throughout his life and career as a legendary soccer player. His personal story, very much in sync with the attributes of the vehicles, resonates incredibly well with fans.”

Mr. Campos is the embodiment of someone who has taken on the toughest terrains throughout his life and career as a legendary soccer player.

P: How will you measure the success of the campaign?

TS: “Our goal is to drive consideration for Toyota trucks by increasing model association within their competitive set, and elevate ad awareness, vibrancy, opinion, consideration, and imagery. On the ground, through our interactive footprint at events, we are looking at engagement levels that funnel into sales leads.”

Photo via Toyota.

P: What other activities will you do around the campaign, off-screen?

TS: “The campaign has a diverse and robust digital and social component, including videos and rich mobile display ads and banners. For our social channels, we teamed up with Jorge Campos to develop a series of soccer technique videos. These showcase his great foot skills to engage guests in the sport.

Off-screen, we’re bringing the campaign to life through an interactive soccer footprint. It was present throughout the Gold Cup games and will be present during our sponsorship of Tour Aguila with our Club America partners in July. Also, it will appear at the Toyota Copita Alianza youth tournaments that continue through September.”

Off-screen, we’re bringing the campaign to life through an interactive soccer footprint.

P: Does this campaign appeal to any other market apart from Hispanics?

TS: “Soccer is part of the Hispanic culture. It is part of their life and brings generations together to enjoy the game. In fact, we know that Hispanics over-index when it comes to viewership in the U.S. With that in mind, our campaign fully focuses on this important target market for our brand.”

This is not the first time Toyota uses a Mexican celebrity to reach the Hispanic audience. Check out the campaign with movie star Diego Luna.

P: What challenges do you face with this campaign and how will you overcome them?

TS: “As soccer continues to gain popularity in the U.S., we have seen more brands getting into this space. Toyota has supported the sport and engaged with its fans for more than a decade so we’re appreciative of the brand loyalty we’ve received from fans and owners over the years. We’ll continue to engage with fans by developing creative campaigns that leverage partners, properties and celebrity talent that truly speak to the fans and to the essence of the game.”

As soccer continues to gain popularity in the U.S., we have seen more brands getting into this space.

P: What else are you working on?

TS: “As I mentioned, our campaign ambassador, Jorge Campos, engaged with us on a series of videos showcasing soccer techniques. In August, Jorge Campos hosted a soccer clinic at one of the Toyota Copita Alianza youth tournaments. We’ll also recognize a stellar student-athlete with a scholarship for their outstanding accomplishments in the classroom and on the field as part of our partnership with Alianza de Futbol.”

 

We caught up with Kia Motors America’s Eugene Santos, Senior Manager, Multicultural Marketing, about Kia’s new multicultural campaign, Driving Forces. Anything related to the Hispanic market comes to Santos’ desk first, so he knows a thing or two about how to market to Hispanic consumers. He told Portada New York 19’s audience all about Kia’s first time using influencer marketing to target Hispanics. 

Eugene Santos, Senior Manager of Multicultural Marketing at Kia, has spent years practicing how to market to Hispanic consumersThe last time we spoke to him, he gave us a preview of what he had in store for the brand’s next Hispanic-oriented campaign. All we knew at the moment was the goal, to reach the Hispanic segment through an emotional connection to the brand’s new slogan. Fast forward to a couple of months later, Kia has launched Driving Forces, a campaign that involves real Latino stories.

Eugene Santos discusses Kia’s Driving Forces campaign at Portada New York

“We launched a message during the super bowl: Give it everything,” Santos said to an audience of fellow brand marketers at Portada New York. “In the past, Kia has been successful with Superbowl commercials. But now that the message is out there, what do we do with it? What does it mean? Especially for Latinos.”

The problem facing automakers these days, according to Santos, is that vehicles are smarter and last longer, so consumers are holding to their cars for more time. “The need for an automobile has decreased,” Santos pointed out. But the campaign has already proved to be fruitful, as the 200-percent increase in traffic to the Kia Soul landing page shows. Santos shared this and other pieces of information in exclusive at Portada New York… metrics not even Kia’s management had seen!

 

Still Talking Up the Hispanic Market

For a Korean brand that is relatively new to the U.S., the new Driving Forces campaign is a huge deal. “As all multicultural marketing managers know, budget is an issue,” said Santos. “Since Hispanics account for 18% of the population, General Market assumes we should have 18% of the marketing budget, but it doesn’t work that way.”

In fact, a real problem that stood out throughout the Portada New York conferences was the need to convince management of the relevance of Hispanic consumers. “You’d think that in 2020 we wouldn’t need to fight to convince organizations about the Hispanic business opportunity,” commented Santos. “But we keep fighting the same fight. Therefore, make sure you can show metrics that the general market understands.

The good news is: insightful, culturally nuanced campaigns are an important step to increasing companies’ awareness…, and getting a few more ad dollars. “Telling a story allows us to continue to connect with our audience and keeps the brand on top of mind. This might look like a simple project, but it’s making our company reconsider how they think about multicultural,” shared Santos.

 

An Effective Campaign Will Take You Far

As Eugene Santos explained, a successful campaign can yield results that are very important for the long run: not only can it get you more budget with management, but it can also ease you into the next step of your strategy.

That’s why Santos likes storytelling; it can elevate your brand by telling relatable stories to consumers and then follow up on those stories. But many times complications arise from the start in multicultural marketing. Whether it’s the lack of multicultural representation in management, inaccurate audience measurement or a lack of creative assets, it’s still difficult to know how to market to Hispanic consumers, starting from the (still relevant) question of what language to use.

 

Problem: How to Market to Hispanic Consumers

“When people think ‘Hispanic’, they automatically assume they have to use Spanish,” told Santos. “It doesn’t have to be that way. So for the first time, we’re using English-language creative to reach Hispanics. Bilingual and bicultural creatives go a long way.”

But the problem persisted: how could they elevate the Kia brand in a meaningful way? There were many factors at play, like limited assets, recent leadership changes and a low budget. “For a long time people have assumed that Kia is a cheap Korean Brand, but for the last 5-6 years, Kia has been recognized with top quality distinctions with brands like Mercedes and Porsche,” pointed out Santos. “Kia has various brand messages, but the objective was to dilute it into one message that created top brand consideration.”

 

Answer: Brand Ambassadors Who Share the Consumers’ Stories

Influencers are a risk, and yet most marketers have experience with them. They all learn that the only effective influencer marketing is based on brand ambassadors that share a true affinity with the brand’s values. For that reason, Santos chose two unique influencers that could tell the Latino story, because it was theirs.

“How do we tell the underdog story, which is really the Kia story, and how do we tell the Latino story to them?” asked Santos rhetorically. “I want to talk about the professional who is trying to do something different and relate it to my key customer.”

Consequently, Kia worked with Andrea Londo, a self-proclaimed border child who commuted from Tijuana to San Diego every day to go to school. Now, she is living her dream of being an actress. “You probably don’t know her, but in 2-3 years you will,” assured Santos. On top of everything, Londo drives a Kia Optima, which made for a perfectly organic fit.

Click here to learn Andrea Londo’s story

Clara Pablo, the other influencer featured in the campaign, is the manager of Miami-based Latin Pop group CNCO and of Colombian singer Maluma. Music is one of Kia’s verticals, which allowed for an organic fit with Pablo. In addition, she’s a breast cancer survivor and awareness advocate, which adds “a humanistic element that allows us to send out a message not only about cars but beyond. Young Latinos want to connect with brands that stand for the same things they do.”

Watch Clara Pablo’s story here

 

Once You Have the Right Message, Put it In the Right Creative (and Get the Right Partner to Do It)

One of the first things to do if you wish to launch a successful campaign is choosing the right partner. Because of the various problems multicultural marketers have to face, an agency that can really carry your message is as important as the message itself. For the Driving Forces campaign, Kia partnered up with Verizon Media. “We knew they could programmatically expose our message to a wider audience that is bicultural. Also, their creative studio, RYOT, could help us with assets that allowed us to show our message in relation to the creative,” explained Santos.

Together, they came up with docu-style creatives and an array of branded formats to tell the story of Latinos and Latinas. Through the two “driving forces” the brand chose as ambassadors, they focused on upbringing, biculturalism, accomplishments and their will to tackle a challenge. “The main goal was for them to connect with us,” stressed Santos. “We wanted to hit them at different points of their journey to let them know that we’re here for them and we understand them.

 

Results (Spoiler: Cultural Marketing Works)

The results so far have been positive. The completion rates above the benchmark of both videos show that consumers are interested. Also, CTRs are the same in Spanish and English, so language doesn’t always matter as long as viewers really connect with the message. “If the emotional component is there, they’ll stick around and come back,” said Santos. Reach and engagement have also been good, which has given Santos the confidence to ask for more budget.

Ultimately, Santos concluded that it’s all about three key rules. First, define your strategy: be clear on what the content should speak to and ensure alignment to overall brand strategy. Second, listen to your gut. Pick a partner that can execute and deliver significant reach for your targeted audience. Finally, don’t forget to ask yourself this question: what’s my next move?

 

Featured image designed by welcomia / Freepik

The Mexican LigaMX can be a much better soccer marketing vehicle to engage U.S. Hispanics than the MLS, Nick Kelly, Head of U.S. Sports Marketing at Anheuser -Busch, said during last week’s  Portada New York.

Kelly, a member of Portada’s Sports Marketing Board, said that his company partners with the LigaMX particularly for soccer activations in the Southwestern U.S. which has a very large Hispanic population. In particular, he mentioned Texas, Arizona and Nevada as well as cities like Houston, Dallas and, surprisingly Nashville. “All our world cup campaigns were about the Mexican National Team” (not the U.S. National Team), he told Portada’s Janet Grynberg during the keynote interview at Portada New York in the Westin Times Square last Thursday.

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Chicharito Soccer Activation

Mexican soccer player Javier Hernandez (“Chicharrito”) has also been sponsored by Anheuser-Busch In-Bev brands. “The Chicharrito sponsorship worked very well and showed lift in the markets that mattered most”.”We don’t need brand awareness lift, what we have seen is retail lift in markets such as San Antonio and El Paso,” Kelly noted. “We activate 100% retail”, he added..

Anheuser Busch also activates jersey sponsorships of LigaMX teams through Corona (which is a Grupo Modelo brand; Grupo Modelo was acquired by Anheuser Busch InBev in 2012). LigaMX Club America recently switched its jersey sponsorship from Corona to Bud Light.

One of our objectives is to find out how to activate on a hyperlocal level.
Nick Kelly (right) at the Portada Sports Marketing Board meeting (on his left, Jose Antonio Ortega,(Prisa Brand Solutions), Manny Gonzalez, (Moët Hennessy USA) and Eugene Santos (Kia).

Asked by an audience member at Portada New York whether it makes sense to bring a LigaMX team to play in the U.S, Kelly said that while this type of soccer activation would be popular in the region the match is played, beer wholesalers in other regions would not necessarily like it.
However, Bud Light recently gave soccer fans in Las Vegas a chance to virtually experience a game 1,500 miles away with immersive technology. The four “Seats of Glory” were featured at Beerhaus, a beer hall on the Las Vegas Strip, for a Liga MX playoff match between Club América and Cruz Azul. Every fan over age 21 who visited the bar was able to watch part of the game in VR.

Anheuser-Busch InBev brands spent US$ 591 million advertising to the U.S consumer in 2017, according to Kantar Media.

What: For years, large chains have targeted Hispanics by adding a special aisle with select items from their home countries. These days, this approach can be a bit outdated. Here are some Hispanic grocery shopping insights, as diversity and globalization demand a more integrated approach.
Why it matters: Marketers are well aware that Hispanics are a huge consuming force that will only grow in time. It’s important to come up with ways to really cater to the community’s needs.

 

The Hispanic Cooking Rites

Us Latinos love our food. We love preparing it, we love planning it, we love buying fresh ingredients. Cooking and sharing is the ultimate family-bonding experience. Homemade meals are the first thing we miss when we’re away. We make them anywhere to feel at home. All these cultural traits not only make us great cooks, but also great produce and grocery shoppers. According to The State of the Plate, a 2015 Study on America’s Consumption of Fruits & Vegetables published by the Produce for Better Health Foundation, Hispanic grocery shoppers rank highest in produce consumption amongst 3 other ethnic groups (White/Non-Hispanics, Asians, and Black/Non-Hispanics).

There’s something all food marketers in the U.S. need to understand in order to cater to their Hispanic customers: From the moment the menu for a Hispanic table is conceived, every step of its preparation matters. Supermarkets appealing to the target can assert everything they must do to satisfy an ever-growing consumer base by being aware of the particularly ritualistic nature of Hispanic kitchens. Latinos love hand picking their food, buying enough ingredients to last for several meals, and trying out new ingredients on a permanent effort to enrich and expand their gastronomic experiences. But there’s one problem. Even though marketers are well aware that Hispanics are a consuming force, some have chosen to label and separate Hispanic (and generally ethnic) foods and products. This segregation rings counterintuitive and obsolete.

Finding the Balance Between Diversity and Globalization

Hispanics are widely diverse as a group. Every single Hispanic country has different ancestral dishes that require specific ingredients for their preparation. In addition, Millennials have been exposed to the culinary options of a globalized economy. This surely has an affect on traditional menus, even if Latino families have a specific and deep-rooted meal preparation routine.

Nearly six in ten Hispanics are Millennials or younger, according to Pew Research Center’s 2014 report, The Nations Latino Population is Defined by its Youth. 40% of American Millennials are multicultural, and more than half of this group are Latinos. As a global society would have it, we want to be able to make corn flour tortillas, but we want them filled with swiss cheese. According to The Why? Behind the Buy, a study conducted by Acosta Marketing and Univision in 2015, 57% of Hispanic Millennial Shoppers ages 25-34 say they often try new flavors/products.

 For years, the larger chains have catered to the Hispanic consumer (primarily) by adding an ‘Hispanic’ or ‘International’ aisle and placing select merchandise from Latin America. […] It is unclear if this format is successful.

Nothing more American than… Pizza?

As we have said before in other articles, foods that used to be foreign at some point, like pizza, sushi, and tacos, are such a big part of a global food culture that no one hardly ever questions their place in American households. These days, being able to find a wide variety of products from around the world is expected. In some cases it’s a given, because we live in a connected world in which boundaries are more blurry each day. As Rishad Tobaccowala, Chief Growth Officer at Publicis Groupe, said to Portada in a recent interview, “An idea that is not aligned with the unstoppable trends of diversity and globalization is doomed from the start.”

How to Include a Niche

For a minority seeking inclusion, all manifestations of inclusion are welcome. Supermarkets could start by dropping the label “Hispanic groceries” to call them just groceries. Yet, many supermarkets have tried to cater to the Hispanic audience by adding “exclusive” sections with the products Latino audiences may find at home. “For years, the larger chains have catered to the Hispanic consumer (primarily) by adding an ‘Hispanic’ or ‘International’ aisle and placing select merchandise from Latin America […] Some of the largest, such as HEB in Texas, developed their Mi Tienda (My Store) format which is located in a high dense Hispanic neighborhood. A larger store than a neighborhood store. It is unclear if this format is successful” says Randy Stockdale, director of Solex Marketing Solutions.

Problem is, inclusive as this effort may appear at first glance, Latinos already comprise 17% of the total American population. Inserting a Hispanic section surrounded by aisles of  “non-Hispanic” products might end up falling short for this ever-growing segment. “I don’t subscribe to a Hispanic aisle”, says Stockdale. “I would rather see the stores, particularly the larger chains, place like-items together and provide a greater convenience. Have you ever found Goya Olives in the general Olives section? Likely not.” Think of it this way: limiting their space is also limiting their consumption to one tiny section of an entire store.

Frozen Hispanic

In July 2017, a tweet got viral because one man saw the mockery potential of a supermarket freezer labeled “Frozen Hispanic.” He decided to pose as just that… a frozen Hispanic. The tweet got 152,278 retweets of people that didn’t see the need to separate frozen tamales from frozen chicken wings. Supermarkets would greatly profit from including Hispanic products without differentiation. It’s been proven that Hispanic consumers are generally willing to try new, different things.

An Emotional Connection

Brands like Jarritos spark the joy of feeling represented and identified while being abroad. Many people immediately purchase products that make them feel homesick when they’re abroad. This speaks of the great importance of having a supermarket experience that appeals not only to your needs, but to your emotions, comfort zone, and memories of home.

And just like it would at home the store needs to feel just like any other supermarket with staple sections. In Canadian supermarkets, for example, diversity is tangible all around. A variety of multicultural shoppers experience all kinds of international foods available to everyone. Anyone can add tzatziki, udon noodles, and jasmine-infused rice pudding to their shopping basket.

Just as the world’s boundaries are thinner, the gaps between demographic segments are narrower. We want to connect to our heritage, but we don’t want to feel isolated by it. We all want to feel human. So, if including a separate Hispanic grocery section on the supermarket is no longer a viable option, what is? How to attract Hispanics and make them feel welcome and included while strongly driving purchase intention? The answer lies in the power of emotions.

What Should Supermarkets Do, Then?

 In short? “Enhance their joy of shopping”, conclude Acosta and Univision on The Why? Behind the Buy. Perhaps general retailers could learn a thing or two from Hispanic grocery concept supermarkets like Northgate González Markets. The chain not only features an in-store tortillería, carnicería, and cocina, but that also offers children cooking classes and a gift certificate upon completing six lessons.

Or Fiesta Mart in Texas, offering a variety of fresh, organic, locally sourced produce with a side of social community programs to educate children and help feed the hungry. “I would not say [larger chains] are not doing a good job,” says Randy Stockdale. “They are trying at least. But, I would state that the larger chains should provide a friendlier-Hispanic atmosphere and improved merchandise. I am a strong proponent of bilingual in-store signage where the store is high-Hispanic density”. Therefore, the wisest move is to be inclusive and open-minded in both directions.

Both Fiesta Mart and Northgate Gonzalez are on the other side of the spectrum. Just as there are Hispanic aisles, there are entire stores that focus on the Hispanic community. But this doesn’t mean the general market should not come. There’s no reason to separate minorities, communities are not separate anymore. Everyone is welcome because everyone is from everywhere. No man is an aisle.

 

What: Paula’s Choice Skincare’s Rajaa Grar, Senior Director, Global Brand Marketing, reveals to Portada the keys to keeping content coherent across channels and why authenticity is critical to successful influencer marketing.
Why it matters: Paula’s Choice Skincare has built a cult following of consumers worldwide. At Portada Los Angeles, Grar will provide insights into how she uses influencers and informative content to generate brand awareness with new consumers, while deepening bonds with existing ones.

Paula’s Choice Skincare has built a cult following of enthusiastic consumers across the globe with “real talk about real facts,” and a singular focus on helping women with the truth about skincare. Founded by Paula Begoun in 1994, the highly successful cosmetic brand “helps women see real results,” according to its website. “We create skincare that’s shockingly straightforward.”

Senior Director of Global Brand Marketing Rajaa Grar is building upon and expanding the brand’s success with highly strategic influencer marketing and insightful awareness of the best approach for keeping content coherent across all marketing channels. Portada caught up with Grar for a preview of her participation at #PortadaLA on March 15th and where she will speak on “Influencer marketing: why passion and shared values are key.”

Portada: Content needs to be coherent across channels. What are the best practices for that? How do you get to that result?

 RG: For us, it all starts with a robust content and social strategy that is rooted in science-backed research and truly addresses our consumers and brand needs. We strive to empower our audience with the most educational and informative content on skin’s health and skincare while being relevant and engaging. Of course, the content may need to be customized depending on the platform but, it always needs to be aligned with our brand strategy and DNA.

Paula’s Choice Skincare’s Rajaa Grar, Senior Director, Global Brand Marketing, will be a featured speaker at #PortadaLA on March 15 when she will provide insights into how she uses influencers and informative content to generate brand awareness with new consumers.

Portada: Driving passion points through brand loyalty is key for you. How do you accomplish this and what role does influencer marketing play in that?

RG: At Paula’s Choice, we are passionate and absolutely love all aspects of skincare. Our consumers know it and it is one of the main reasons that the brand has a loyal following for the past 24 years and many of our products are cult favorites across the globe. Our influencer marketing strategy is centered around generating brand awareness among new consumers and deepening our bond with existing ones. Hence, many of the content creators that we collaborate with are skincare enthusiasts and share our skincare passion. They also have followers who are Paula’s choice fans as well. They also truly respect our brand and skincare philosophy, rooted in truth and advocacy and are themselves fans of the brand.

Portada: What do you see as being the three top tips/lessons to follow when using influencers in marketing efforts?

RG:  Stay authentic to your brand’s essence when aligning with ambassadors. Don’t be driven solely by the number of followers an influencer has. Deploy your marketing resources carefully.

Getting to know our influencers on a deeper level is essential as they are an extended part of our brand family.

Portada: How does Paula’s Choice protect its brand ethos/image when using influencer marketers?

RG: We go through a careful vetting process ahead of any collaboration and of course getting to know our influencers on a deeper level is essential as they are an extended part of our brand family. When doing so, the results are not only most authentic, but our brand efforts are reaping the benefits for a longer period of time after the content goes live.

Portada: What is the profile of the typical influencer Paula’s Choice prefers to use?

RG: We do not have really a typical profile of one influencer as we want to appeal to a diverse pool of consumers. We want to empower a wider audience to discover the power of our products as our brand truly transforms skin for the better and has changed people’s lives time and time again. We aim to collaborate with influencers that authentically love our brand and have experienced the transformative nature of our products. We found that those people are the most loyal and effective brand ambassadors.

We are looking at Nielsen’s social content ratings of the week of February 18 to 24 in order to get a good sense of which social platforms are the best tool for viewers to engage with their favorite programming.

 

This week, Nielsen’s Weekly Social Ratings show just how much of a passion point movies are. The first ever hostless Oscars show was the star, as it generated more interactions than any other special episode or sports event. Whereas previously we had seen sports inspired a great percentage of social activity, interactions related to TV episodes or specials accounted for 62% of the rankings this week, similarly to what happened with the 61st Grammy Awards Show. Furthermore, we can see that Hispanics brought about a good amount of social interaction as well, as the Premio Lo Nuestro show took the second spot right behind the Oscars, and 5 out of 10 personalities on the Top Talent list were Latinos. Take a look at the key insights below.

 

WEEKLY TOP TEN SERIES AND SPECIALS

RANKNETWORK / PROGRAM / DATEINTERACTIONS
(000)
FacebookInstagramTwitter
1ABC

The Oscars

2/24/19

17,6797523,48613,440
2Univision

Premio Lo nuestro 2019

2/21/19

6,6944166,100178
3NBC

America’s Got Talent

2/18/19

1,6562331,250173
4USA Network

WWE Monday Night RAW

2/18/19

1,50695982428
5USA Network

WWE SmackDown!

2/19/19

1,11267774271
6ABC

Grey’s Anatomy

2/21/19

7323362474
7ABC

The Bachelor

2/18/19

5783187388
8NBC

This is Us

2/19/19

4862637387
9CBS

The Big Bang Theory

2/21/19

4091237721
10NBC

Ellen’s Game of Games

2/19/19

376734425

[Source: Nielsen]

Key Insights

  • Out of the total of interactions on the top ten spots, 62.7(31.2 million posts) were related to a TV episode or special.
  • Facebook had 1.6 million interactions, a significant decrease compared to the previous analysis’ 4.9 million.
  • Twitter received 15 million interactions with TV episodes or specials, winning once again over the other two platforms.
  • Most interactions (76%) about the Oscars happened on Twitter, just as it happened with the Grammy’s two weeks ago.

 

WEEKLY TOP TEN SPORTS EVENTS

RANKNETWORK / PROGRAM / DATEINTERACTIONS
(000)
FacebookInstagramTwitter
1ESPN

North Carolina at Duke

College Basketball

2/20/19

3,1841141,8331,237
2ABC

Houston Rockets at Golden State Warriors

NBA Basketball

2/23/19

2,327801,978268
3TNT

Houston Rockets at Los Angeles Lakers

NBA Basketball

2/21/19

1,778791,289410
4ESPN*, ESPN Deportes

San Antonio Spurs at Toronto Raptors

NBA Basketball

2/22/19

1,336441,110182
5ESPN*, ESPN Deportes

Utah Jazz at Oklahoma City Thunder

NBA Basketball

2/22/19

1,04581705259
6TNT

Boston Celtics at Milwaukee Bucks

NBA Basketball

2/21/19

83922663154
7NBC

Pittsburgh Penguins vs. Philadelphia Flyers

NHL Hockey

2/23/19

80465484255
8NBA TV

San Antonio Spurs at New York Knicks

NBA Basketball

2/24/19

57314445113
9ESPN

Duke at Syracuse

College Basketball

2/23/19

46420319125
10FOX*, FOX Deportes

Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500

NASCAR Monster Energy Series

2/24/19

38265138179

[Source: Nielsen]

Key Insights

  • Over 12.7 million interactions, or 25% of the total of the three top ten rankings provided by Nielsen related to TV episodes or special events, were about sports.
  • From these, only 584,000 interactions were posted on Facebook.
  • Twitter received 3.1 million posts related to sports events, or 24%.
  • About 70(8,9 million) posts were made on Instagram, making it the winning platform in the sports category once again.
  • Most events were basketball matches, though a Nascar event and an NHL one also generated interactions.

TOP TEN WEEKLY TALENT

RANKNETWORK / TALENT / PROGRAMENGAGEMENTS
(000)
FacebookInstagramTwitter
1Univision

Lele Pons

Premio Lo nuestro 2019

92819243
2Univision

Anitta

Premio Lo nuestro 2019

906488616
3Univision

Natti Natasha

Premio Lo nuestro 2019

74337391
4ABC

Bohemian Rhapsody

The Oscars

6464352380
5ABC

Angela Bassett

The Oscars

516814313
6NBC

Terry Crews

America’s Got Talent

4972542745
7Univision

Daddy Yankee

Premio Lo nuestro 2019

449414063
8ABC

Jason Momoa

The Oscars

42004200
9NBC

Ellen DeGeneres

Ellen’s Game of Games

370634223
10Univision

Nacho

Premio Lo nuestro 2019

36603660.1

[Source: Nielsen]

Key Insights

  • According to Nielsen’s data, 5.8 million viewers engaged with the top ten posts sent directly from social media accounts owned or affiliated with TV programming.
  • For the top 10 spots, Facebook received 204,000 engagements, Twitter got 174,100, and Instagram came out on top again with 5,4 million.
  • The relationship between top series and top TV talents is very close: all of the top 10 TV talents appeared in the transmission of the popular shows of the week.
  • Interestingly, 5 out of 10 of the most popular talents appeared on Premio lo Nuestro, and are U.S. Hispanics.

 

Portada Los Angeles will provide a unique setting for brand marketers to explore the enormous opportunities sports, music and entertainment content offer to engage consumers in Multicultural America. Portada is offering a special President’s Day 35% Off Discount (only until this Friday February 22!). For the discount code, please contact Michelle Lopez.

 

We’re only three weeks away from Portada Los Angeles and we keep adding dazzling speakers to the agenda. Focusing on Passion-Point Marketing, the event will attract agency and brand marketing leaders from all over the U.S. to Santa Monica’s Loews Hotel on March 15 to discuss the opportunities in music, sports, and entertainment.

Portada Los Angeles will also be the meeting point for Portada’s Council System with the Brand Star Committee, the Agency Star Committee and the Sports Marketing Board holding their first 2019 in-person meetings during the event.

Take advantage of the SPECIAL 35% OFF PRESIDENTS’ DAY DISCOUNT (US $486 instead of US $749.), valid until Friday, February 22! For the discount code, please contact Michelle Lopez.

 

Portada Los Angeles offers media and marketing service vendors, including sports teams and leagues, the opportunity to interact with brand marketers through Portada’s one-on-one meet-up offering.

Here’s what you can’t miss:

THE PROMISE OF WOMEN’S SOCCER:  HOW BRANDS SHOULD USE IT FOR ACTIVATIONS

Sara Toussaint, VP, Sponsorships, Wells Fargo

With the Women’s Soccer World Cup coming to France this summer,  the potential arises for brands to profit from the world cup’s commercial opportunity. What success stories are there of brands efficiently engaging fans? How are they doing it? Which innovative concepts are promising going forward?

 

LEVERAGING DATA TO CASH-IN ON MULTICULTURAL CONSUMER GROWTH

 

Ariela Nerubay, CMO, Curacao

 

 

 

Kate Canel, Director, Performance Media, The Shipyard

 

 

 

Moderator: Stephen Brooks, EVP, VidaPrimo.

 

 

 

IN-LANGUAGE OR IN-CULTURE? DECISION SCIENCE ENABLES WHAT YOUR DIGITAL APPROACH IS MISSING

Seraj Bharwani, Chief Strategy Officer, AcuityAds

Simply turning on the language targeting tactic means you’re missing over 50% of your intended multicultural audience. Bi-culture and bilingual segments have remained elusive to marketers who are trying to make a genuine connection with their intended audiences.

In this session, you will learn how new decisioning technologies (i.e. machine learning) are being used to reach the multicultural segment. Using real-time consumer data on social, search and video-viewing behaviors, these tools are delivering early results with campaigns targeting in-culture personas for leading brands.

 

SHOULD CORPORATE AMERICA JUMP ON THE SOCCER OPPORTUNITY?

Tiago Pinto, Global Marketing Director, Gatorade, Pepsico

There is no true global sports brand that is dominant without having a significant presence in soccer. U.S. soccer audiences are growing at a rapid pace and soccer is currently the fourth or fifth sport ranked by audience size.  With the 2026 Soccer World Cup on the horizon, the ascent of soccer as one of the top three U.S. sports seems almost inevitable. Do brands need to jump on the wagon at this relatively early stage and if so how? What ways are there to align with soccer content: Domestic U.S teams, European or Latin American teams or leagues or via national teams? What a major global marketer with a vast soccer marketing experience recommends to U.S. brand marketers.

 

Take advantage of the SPECIAL 35% OFF PRESIDENTS’ DAY DISCOUNT (US $486 instead of US $749.), valid until Friday, February 22! For the discount code, please contact Michelle Lopez.

INFLUENCER MARKETING: WHY PASSION AND SHARED VALUES ARE KEY

Rajaa Grar, Senior Director, Global Brand Marketing, Paula’s Choice
Influencer marketing at Paula’s Choice Skincare, the effective, truthful and transparent global skincare brand, revolves around authentic brand storytelling, empowering consumers with skincare knowledge and engaging passionate influencers. Rajaa Grar will share her do’s and don’ts for brands to drive brand awareness and purchase intent by choosing the right influencer marketing strategy while authentically aligning with brand ethos.

 

PASSION-POINT MOVIES

How Pantelion and Pantaya (part of Lionsgate Entertainment) unlocks the opportunity of the multicultural film enthusiast.

Paul Presburger

CEO

Pantelion Films and Pantaya

@PantelionFilms

interviewed byDana Bonkowski

SVP, Multicultural Lead

Starcom

@starcom_USA

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