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What: Johnson & Johnson shifted its US $1 billion-plus U.S. media buying account holding from Interpublic’s J3 to OMD, to be effective immediately.
Why it matters: This means a major win for Omnicom Media Group, specially after the failed merger with Publicis group last month.The media-buying account includes all the J&J U.S. businesses.

JJOMD-USA_profile_logoJohnson & Johnson has shifted its US $1 billion-plus U.S. media buying account holding from Interpublic’s J3, a J&J-dedicated unit of UM, to OMD. The shift is effective immediately. Still, J3 will continue to handle media planning, which is the largest piece of the media business concerning revenue. The media-buying account includes all the J&J U.S. businesses.

The decision was made less than 19 months after J&J last reviewed its U.S. media business and less than two months since Kim Kadlec, who had been point person on that review, left her position as worldwide VP-global marketing of J&J to become head of relationship marketing at AOL. But the change doesn’t have anything to do with Ms. Kadlec´s departure, according to a J&J spokeman. Actually, her position at the company hasn’t yet been filled. Michael Sneed, Ms. Kadlec’s boss at J&J, will continue in his role as VP-global corporate affairs overseeing marketing and communications throughout J&J.

Apparently, this move comes after former Coca-Cola executive Alison Lewis´ hiring as the first chief marketing officer of J&J’s consumer business, which is by far the biggest media spender in the company.

The move reflects that Publicis Groupe-Omnicom merger break-up earlier this month, has not affected OMD, at least when it comes to J&J.

“Our marketing leaders who have responsibility for what the marketing plan looks like across the enterprise made the decision based on the suite of offerings of each agency. We’re taking a look at everything we’re doing and trying to figure out the best mix,” a J&J spokeman said.

“Interpublic remains a highly valued partner to Johnson & Johnson around the world and will continue to play an important role for us in the U.S. and globally,” interpublic, the holding company behind J3 and UM, said in a statement.

“J3 is proud to continue to provide the most strategic services to J&J including strategy, planning, content development and activation,” said a UM spokeswoman.

Interpublic is said to have lost much of its creative work with J&J in recent years, including accounts such as Tylenol in 2010 and some brands .However, it will remain on the creative roster with Acuvue, and digital shop R/GA has several J&J assignments.

Source: Adage

Ronald.GeskeyRonald Geskey is CEO of Marketing Communications LLC and author of “Media Planning & Buying in the 21st Century.”  Geskey has over 30 years of experience at major advertising agencies. He has a B.S. and M.S. from Southern Illinois University, doctoral work at Texas Tech University, and Executive Education at Wharton School of Business, Northwestern University, Michigan State University.

A media planner is like a writer who creates the screen play for a film. A media buyer is like the actor who brings the film to life. A politician with a good message who fails to get out the vote loses the election. And a good media idea, poorly executed, might as well have been a bad idea. Sometimes execution is everything.

A media plan might be brilliant, but will it be executed with equal zeal? Will the plan be executed on budget with the right media vehicles, in the right place, at the right time and with maximum communications impact? If not, the plan might not look so brilliant any more. Media planning, media buying, and media selling are all equal communications partners in driving ROI.

Why is Buying Underestimated?

Since all of the disciplines (planning, buying, selling) are all of roughly equal in importance, I have always wondered why media textbooks dedicate only a few pages to the art and science of media buying and no pages to media selling. Clients probably place the highest importance on the cost effectiveness of the buys negotiated on their behalf.

Agencies can lose clients on the basis of poor media buying performance, but I don’t think I can ever remember an agency losing an account because of a media simulation model.

Perhaps some academics believe that media planning is more conceptual, more creative, more research oriented, and provides better mettle for the mind. But these assumptions aren’t necessarily so. Media buying at its best requires honed negotiation skills which could be a course in psychology. Buying also it requires an understanding of the communications process that rivals media planning. And media buyers need a knowledge of the research documenting how different media variables, such as commercial affect performance and advertising effectiveness.

It is ironic that so many clients have the opposite belief where buying is more important than planning. After all, that is where the rubber hits the road and the dollars are spent.

In the 21st century, media buyers won’t just be responsible for buying TRPS or clicks at the lowest possible price, but must learn how to “buy communication, not TRPS, according to many experts. Beyond CPM, how can a buy’s communications effectiveness be maximized? Program involvement, attention levels, contextual considerations, commercial positioning and a host of other factors have a greater impact on communications effectiveness than media weight and CPMs. TRPS are not TRPS.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6362453

Ronald.GeskeyRonald Geskey is CEO of Marketing Communications LLC and author of “Media Planning & Buying in the 21st Century.”  Geskey has over 30 years of experience at major advertising agencies. He has a B.S. and M.S. from Southern Illinois University, doctoral work at Texas Tech University, and Executive Education at Wharton School of Business, Northwestern University, Michigan State University.

A media planner is like a writer who creates the screen play for a film. A media buyer is like the actor who brings the film to life. A politician with a good message who fails to get out the vote loses the election. And a good media idea, poorly executed, might as well have been a bad idea. Sometimes execution is everything.

A media plan might be brilliant, but will it be executed with equal zeal? Will the plan be executed on budget with the right media vehicles, in the right place, at the right time and with maximum communications impact? If not, the plan might not look so brilliant any more. Media planning, media buying, and media selling are all equal communications partners in driving ROI.

Why is Buying Underestimated?

Since all of the disciplines (planning, buying, selling) are all of roughly equal in importance, I have always wondered why media textbooks dedicate only a few pages to the art and science of media buying and no pages to media selling. Clients probably place the highest importance on the cost effectiveness of the buys negotiated on their behalf.

Agencies can lose clients on the basis of poor media buying performance, but I don’t think I can ever remember an agency losing an account because of a media simulation model.

Perhaps some academics believe that media planning is more conceptual, more creative, more research oriented, and provides better mettle for the mind. But these assumptions aren’t necessarily so. Media buying at its best requires honed negotiation skills which could be a course in psychology. Buying also it requires an understanding of the communications process that rivals media planning. And media buyers need a knowledge of the research documenting how different media variables, such as commercial affect performance and advertising effectiveness.

It is ironic that so many clients have the opposite belief where buying is more important than planning. After all, that is where the rubber hits the road and the dollars are spent.

In the 21st century, media buyers won’t just be responsible for buying TRPS or clicks at the lowest possible price, but must learn how to “buy communication, not TRPS, according to many experts. Beyond CPM, how can a buy’s communications effectiveness be maximized? Program involvement, attention levels, contextual considerations, commercial positioning and a host of other factors have a greater impact on communications effectiveness than media weight and CPMs. TRPS are not TRPS.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6362453

Carol Thompson is a media planner and buyer executive in Ad Cetera, Inc. , a Dallas, TX advertising agency.

Media planners and media buyers don’t just focus on radio, television, magazines, billboards or newspapers anymore. In fact, with a few exceptions, magazines and newspapers are becoming obsolete. There’s a host of new options available to advertisers, and professional media planners and buyers must stay on the cutting edge of an ever-changing media landscape. Expertise and business connections can be leveraged to not only stay abreast of technology, but to also get prime placement and the best rates.

Over the past several years, newer forms of media have emerged on the scene, including satellite television, cable television, satellite radio and digital (or online) media. Digital/online media may include social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook, email blasts, search engine marketing, referral linking campaigns, web portals, YouTube video ads, banner ads, interactive games and more.

As technology moves at the speed of light, when it comes to media planning and buying, the saying “You snooze, you lose” has never been more relevant. However, with so many choices, there’s never been a better time for a media planner or buyer to be able to truly target the right audience with the right advertising medium(s). If the budget allows, most media planners and media buyers will strive for a balanced “media mix” in which all forms of advertising work harmoniously to achieve optimal results.

Where traditional media is concerned, television still remains among the top choices for most advertisers, depending on their target audience and needs. Why? Because it works. When a media buyer is looking for “reach,” (targeting as many people as possible at one time), television can’t be beat for certain audiences. That’s especially true when you want to reach your target market with particular dayparts (certain multiple hours of day) and/or specific programming. People will always watch television, although it is becoming more and more difficult to hold the attention of a younger audience who is texting, tweeting and viewing their favorite show at the same time.

Radio can also be a highly effective traditional form of media, depending on how it’s utilized and what clients are selling. Radio is considered a “frequency” medium (targeting a specific demographic as many times as possible). Often radio will be used as a supplement to television, but not always. What can really enhance radio’s effectiveness is endorsements by on-air personalities, which holds especially true for sports and talk show personalities, who tend to have much more of a loyal following than the average DJ.

Savvy media planners and buyers must thoroughly understand each client’s target demographic, and determine the best media mix to achieve both maximum brand awareness and increased sales. They will then develop a strategic media buying plan based on several factors to ensure the client receives a maximum ROI. Most importantly, they will negotiate the actual media buy based on the particular medium’s standard measurement of audience. For example, with television, that measurement can be determined by CMP (cost per thousand), CPP (cost per point), etc. The ultimate goal is not to just reach the masses, but to reach the as many people who comprise the client’s target market as possible, as many times as possible, for as the best price possible.

While the media landscape is changing and evolving, some of the traditional methods of advertising are still bringing in fantastic results. Media planners and media buyers must not only keep the traditional methods in mind, they also have to stay on the cutting-edge and keep their client’s goals in the forefront of their minds to succeed.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7543149

Carol Thompson is a media planner and buyer executive in Ad Cetera, Inc. , a Dallas, TX advertising agency.

Media planners and media buyers don’t just focus on radio, television, magazines, billboards or newspapers anymore. In fact, with a few exceptions, magazines and newspapers are becoming obsolete. There’s a host of new options available to advertisers, and professional media planners and buyers must stay on the cutting edge of an ever-changing media landscape. Expertise and business connections can be leveraged to not only stay abreast of technology, but to also get prime placement and the best rates.

Over the past several years, newer forms of media have emerged on the scene, including satellite television, cable television, satellite radio and digital (or online) media. Digital/online media may include social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook, email blasts, search engine marketing, referral linking campaigns, web portals, YouTube video ads, banner ads, interactive games and more.

As technology moves at the speed of light, when it comes to media planning and buying, the saying “You snooze, you lose” has never been more relevant. However, with so many choices, there’s never been a better time for a media planner or buyer to be able to truly target the right audience with the right advertising medium(s). If the budget allows, most media planners and media buyers will strive for a balanced “media mix” in which all forms of advertising work harmoniously to achieve optimal results.

Where traditional media is concerned, television still remains among the top choices for most advertisers, depending on their target audience and needs. Why? Because it works. When a media buyer is looking for “reach,” (targeting as many people as possible at one time), television can’t be beat for certain audiences. That’s especially true when you want to reach your target market with particular dayparts (certain multiple hours of day) and/or specific programming. People will always watch television, although it is becoming more and more difficult to hold the attention of a younger audience who is texting, tweeting and viewing their favorite show at the same time.

Radio can also be a highly effective traditional form of media, depending on how it’s utilized and what clients are selling. Radio is considered a “frequency” medium (targeting a specific demographic as many times as possible). Often radio will be used as a supplement to television, but not always. What can really enhance radio’s effectiveness is endorsements by on-air personalities, which holds especially true for sports and talk show personalities, who tend to have much more of a loyal following than the average DJ.

Savvy media planners and buyers must thoroughly understand each client’s target demographic, and determine the best media mix to achieve both maximum brand awareness and increased sales. They will then develop a strategic media buying plan based on several factors to ensure the client receives a maximum ROI. Most importantly, they will negotiate the actual media buy based on the particular medium’s standard measurement of audience. For example, with television, that measurement can be determined by CMP (cost per thousand), CPP (cost per point), etc. The ultimate goal is not to just reach the masses, but to reach the as many people who comprise the client’s target market as possible, as many times as possible, for as the best price possible.

While the media landscape is changing and evolving, some of the traditional methods of advertising are still bringing in fantastic results. Media planners and media buyers must not only keep the traditional methods in mind, they also have to stay on the cutting-edge and keep their client’s goals in the forefront of their minds to succeed.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7543149

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