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Miami Headquartered Agency Media 8 is rebranding as M8. The rebranding reflects the fact that in today’s world advertising and media are a component of the marketing discipline but do not represent its entirety.  “We’re much more than media; we’re multicultural, multiscreen, marketers headquartered in Miami,” John Santiago, CEO of M8, tells Portada. The rebranding happens after Santiago bought out his former busines partner Paul Suskey. A new executive leadership has been appointed and new personnel is being added in NYC, Los Angeles and Mexico City.

John Santiago, CEO of M8
John Santiago, CEO of M8

“Today, with everyone now living a life on screens, we continue to focus on understanding users, the technologies and platforms that enhance their lives, and looking to find creative ways to open a dialogue with them and introduce them to the brands we love. We’re much more than media; we’re multicultural, multiscreen, marketers headquartered in Miami. We are now M8,” M8’s CEO John Santiago tells Portada.

M8 has a headcount of 80 employees. It also has offices in  Buenos Aires & Córdoba Argentina and is reopening its Mexico office in November. “We also just hired account personnel in NYC and Los Angeles to begin expansion and coverage for clients in those cities,” Santiago adds. M8 has also strengthened its senior management team, adding Sergio Barrientos, formerly SVP and Managing Creative Director at Havas Media, as Chief Strategy Officerand Joaquin Lira, formerly Digital Creative Director at Lopez Negrete, as Chief Creative. M8 clients include General Mills (Que Rica Vida CRM Program), Starwood Hotels and Resorts, Hertz and SONY.

Our team monitors and addresses the most trending and relevant subjects that fit our clients’ culture with on-brand, on-the-fly, snackable creative pieces.

According to Santiago, Facebook’s new Atlas cross-device tracking technology, released earlier this month, included M8 as its launch success story which demonstrates M8’s commitment to leading with technology and insights to build successful initiatives for its clients.

Content Studio “The Beat”

When asked what has been the most remarkable change in the marketing and media sector in the 13 years since Media 8 was founded, Santiago notes that “Advertising can no longer be an interruption; it must be woven into the consumer experience. The drastic change is that consumers are now in control and truly involved and participate in the brand experience. This is why the art of storytelling is so important to our business and our industry now and journalists understand this instinctively. It’s why we named our content studio ‘The Beat’. The Beat is housed in M8’s new office headquarters and aims to create in-the-moment, responsive content. Our team monitors and addresses the most trending and relevant subjects that fit our clients’ culture with on-brand, on-the-fly, snackable creative pieces that resonate with their audiences, ” says Santiago.

M8 hired Zain Deane more than 2 years ago to develop and lead the agency’s Content Department. Deane is the Director of Content and previously worked as Senior Editor for HCP/Aboard, a division of the Miami Herald. Santiago adds that Deane  leads a team of writers and creatives that develop unique, compelling content to support our client’s platform, social and distribution initiatives.”

scott.dadichWired’s Scott Dadich’s answers are in! His answers to questions asked by Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine, Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America, Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8, Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA), Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural and Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester.

Scott Dadich, the keynote Speaker at #PortadaLat (the Latin Online Video Forum and Latam Advertising and Media Summit) taking place on June 3 -4 in Miami responded to questions from our audience. See what he has to say.

Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine:

QUESTION: From a design and editorial perspective, what is the secret to be succesful on the web?
Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief-Wired: “Authenticity is paramount. At Wired, we employ a team of journalists–writers, editors, designers–who report and write and create stories about how tomorrow is being realized. On WIRED.com, these stories typically fall into one of two buckets, brand new information or thoughtful analysis about existing information. New information has a lot of value, so in some cases it is most important to be first in breaking a story. But there is a lot of value to adding context to existing information, and those kinds of stories form the bulk of our publishing stream. We spend a lot of time getting those stories right, from hiring crazy talented writers and best-in-class editors to building technology systems that serve our readers and producers. There is no easy answer, I’m afraid.”

Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America:

QUESTION:How do you see Millenial’s content consumption (themes, time spent, sources) impacting media?”
“Folks of this age group expect content to be instantly available, in all places, embedded socially, all of the time–largely for free. Those kind of consumption behaviors mean we have to be much more nimble, and we have to think of ourselves much more like a network. For consumers, that means they can have a Wired experience inside of a Facebook post, or on a Pinterest Pin, or in a Kindle single. It means we can’t take anything we make for granted. That’s a lot more work, but it also expands our reach and impact measurably.”

Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8

QUESTION: Brands as publishers? Do you think this makes any sense, or isn’t it the role of an editorial product publisher based on his/her independence and credibility?
“I believe the majority of readers know the difference between quality journalism produced by credible, trustworthy professionals and content produced with marketing as the goal. They are different products with different goals.”

Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA)

QUESTION: As an Editor, how do you deal with “Content Marketing”, e.g. working with advertising and
editorial to produce editorial products?

“I don’t. Editorial and advertising are church and state. My publisher is my business partner, and together we are tasked with making Wired a successful business, but my job falls strictly within the bounds of Wired editorial. Any content created for a brand partner or advertiser ofWired falls within the bounds of the company’s marketing arm, and my editors and I are not involved with that work–at all.”

Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural

QUESTION: What is your view of the future of apps? Will they, because of their high engagement  be more valuable than other media vehicles e.g. TV, Radio and Digital?
“Apps occupy a very substantial position in today’s media landscape. This shouldn’t be news to anyone–in fact, Wired wrote a cover story about this phenomenon in the summer of 2010. But there is no universal truth in this category. Sometimes a native app is the best outlet for putting content in the hands of an audience. Sometimes, the web does a better job. The difference comes in the quality of the product itself–how delightful and essential is the experience? How easy is it for a consumer to become an integrated member of a community?”

Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester

QUESTION: Explain some things you have done to integrate your print and digital products, and what has worked the best and why? “
“This integration is an ongoing process. It happens all day, every day. But I’ll tell you the best thing we did at Wired. We moved everyone into one space. Science editors sit next to science editors, no matter the platform. Digital producers sit next to print designers. Budget analysts sit next to fact checkers. It’s all one space and everyone gets to see the work that their counterparts do, regardless of how directly they collaboration. That was a big move for us, but hugely important because it places equal value on all of the efforts of our team. It’s not always the most convenient solution, but the transparency this arrangement affords has been a big part of our growth over the past two years.”

QUESTION (Anonymous): Is there a future for print magazines?
“Unequivocally yes. But not for all brands. And likely not in form factors we appreciate today.”

Wired’s Scott Dadich’s keynote at the upcoming Portada Latam Summit on June 3- 4 will be on “The Future of Technology by Design“. Hear first-hand insights from the Editor-in-Chief of the iconic magazine about the interaction of design and technology and its impact on media and marketing. What does design mean to technology? What’s next for Technology? Register here to attend!

scott.dadichWired’s Scott Dadich’s answers are in! His answers to questions asked by Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine, Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America, Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8, Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA), Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural and Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester.

Scott Dadich, the keynote Speaker at #PortadaLat (the Latin Online Video Forum and Latam Advertising and Media Summit) taking place on June 3 -4 in Miami responded to questions from our audience. See what he has to say.

Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine:

QUESTION: From a design and editorial perspective, what is the secret to be succesful on the web?
Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief-Wired: “Authenticity is paramount. At Wired, we employ a team of journalists–writers, editors, designers–who report and write and create stories about how tomorrow is being realized. On WIRED.com, these stories typically fall into one of two buckets, brand new information or thoughtful analysis about existing information. New information has a lot of value, so in some cases it is most important to be first in breaking a story. But there is a lot of value to adding context to existing information, and those kinds of stories form the bulk of our publishing stream. We spend a lot of time getting those stories right, from hiring crazy talented writers and best-in-class editors to building technology systems that serve our readers and producers. There is no easy answer, I’m afraid.”

Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America:

QUESTION:How do you see Millenial’s content consumption (themes, time spent, sources) impacting media?”
“Folks of this age group expect content to be instantly available, in all places, embedded socially, all of the time–largely for free. Those kind of consumption behaviors mean we have to be much more nimble, and we have to think of ourselves much more like a network. For consumers, that means they can have a Wired experience inside of a Facebook post, or on a Pinterest Pin, or in a Kindle single. It means we can’t take anything we make for granted. That’s a lot more work, but it also expands our reach and impact measurably.”

Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8

QUESTION: Brands as publishers? Do you think this makes any sense, or isn’t it the role of an editorial product publisher based on his/her independence and credibility?
“I believe the majority of readers know the difference between quality journalism produced by credible, trustworthy professionals and content produced with marketing as the goal. They are different products with different goals.”

Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA)

QUESTION: As an Editor, how do you deal with “Content Marketing”, e.g. working with advertising and
editorial to produce editorial products?

“I don’t. Editorial and advertising are church and state. My publisher is my business partner, and together we are tasked with making Wired a successful business, but my job falls strictly within the bounds of Wired editorial. Any content created for a brand partner or advertiser ofWired falls within the bounds of the company’s marketing arm, and my editors and I are not involved with that work–at all.”

Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural

QUESTION: What is your view of the future of apps? Will they, because of their high engagement  be more valuable than other media vehicles e.g. TV, Radio and Digital?
“Apps occupy a very substantial position in today’s media landscape. This shouldn’t be news to anyone–in fact, Wired wrote a cover story about this phenomenon in the summer of 2010. But there is no universal truth in this category. Sometimes a native app is the best outlet for putting content in the hands of an audience. Sometimes, the web does a better job. The difference comes in the quality of the product itself–how delightful and essential is the experience? How easy is it for a consumer to become an integrated member of a community?”

Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester

QUESTION: Explain some things you have done to integrate your print and digital products, and what has worked the best and why? “
“This integration is an ongoing process. It happens all day, every day. But I’ll tell you the best thing we did at Wired. We moved everyone into one space. Science editors sit next to science editors, no matter the platform. Digital producers sit next to print designers. Budget analysts sit next to fact checkers. It’s all one space and everyone gets to see the work that their counterparts do, regardless of how directly they collaboration. That was a big move for us, but hugely important because it places equal value on all of the efforts of our team. It’s not always the most convenient solution, but the transparency this arrangement affords has been a big part of our growth over the past two years.”

QUESTION (Anonymous): Is there a future for print magazines?
“Unequivocally yes. But not for all brands. And likely not in form factors we appreciate today.”

Wired’s Scott Dadich’s keynote at the upcoming Portada Latam Summit on June 3- 4 will be on “The Future of Technology by Design“. Hear first-hand insights from the Editor-in-Chief of the iconic magazine about the interaction of design and technology and its impact on media and marketing. What does design mean to technology? What’s next for Technology? Register here to attend!

DISH has selected Havas Worldwide as its new digital agency of record to support its general market and Latino digital marketing needs. Dish Latino digital needs were previously handled by Miami based agency Media 8. Offline Hispanic marketing  will continue to be done by Hispanic Group  also out of Miami.

Havas WorldwideHavas WW was chosen after a comprehensive agency review led by Keith Nyhouse, vice president of digital marketing.

DISH Latino, the Hispanic-targeted offer by Dish Network, has been growing steadily in the past few years, growing its advertising and marketing spend “substantially, in double digits,” Alfredo Rodriguez, VP of marketing at DISH, told Portada in an interview last year.

Dish Latino was the ninth largest Hispanic market advertiser in 2012, according to data from Kantar Media with an overall advertising expenditure of US $87.5 million.

“As DISH continues to grow its brand in an ever-evolving digital landscape it is important we have the best advisors to move the company forward,” said Nyhouse. “We found that in Havas WW and are excited to work with them to continue building DISH’s business.”

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

If succesful, Dish Network’s US $25.5 billion bid for Sprint Nextel will have many advertising and marketing implications. Taking over the third-largest mobile carrier in the U.S., with 55 million subscribers, would allow DISH to offer video, high-speed internet and voice service across the country, both in and outside of the home. For  media properties the big question is whether Dish and Sprint will consolidate some of their advertising and media budgets. Both companies, particularly Dish, are large advertisers in the Hispanic market.

Taking over the third-largest mobile carrier in the U.S. with 55 million subscribers, would allow DISH to offer video, high-speed internet and voice service across the country, both in and outside of the home. Although DISH does provide video service, its satellite internet service is not as fast as those from wired providers.

Improved Targeted Advertising through Nationwide Mobile Phone and Video Service

InteronnectednessBy uniting Dish and Sprint Charles Ergen, Dish Network’s Chairman, would create the first US company to offer nationwide mobile phone, data and video services. Dish could then use location and content consumption data, among other factors, to deliver targeted adverts, he said.“We think we can target commercials even better on a mobile basis,” Mr Ergen told the Financial Times. “We’ll know where you are with GPS. We’ll know who you call. We’ll know how you spend your money with the phone being a wallet in the future. All that goes together.”

Interestingly, Telefonica and Sprint recently created a mobile advertising alliance  to provide a platform for brands to target the two operators’ 370 million mobile subscribers worldwide. The deal is a tie-up between Telefonica Digital, the Spanish-based operator’s digital arm, and Pinsight Media+, US operator Sprint’s recently-launched advertising arm.

 Dish is the Number 1 Hispanic Advertiser according to a recent Nielsen ranking.

Marketing Budgets

Both Dish and Sprint Nextel are major advertisers in the U.S. general market and the U.S. Hispanic market. Dish is actually the Number 1 Hispanic Advertiser according to a recent Nielsen ranking (Quarter 3, 2012 to Quarter 2, 2013) with US$ 324 million in advertising investment. Sprint-Nextel occupies the sixteenth place in the ranking with US $79 million.
After DirecTV phased out its Hispanic subscriber acquisition strategy and integrated it into its general market strategy, competitor Dish Latino has stepped up its own Hispanic marketing activity. “Advertising in the multicultural space is crucial, and we allocate our expenditures in a very measurable way: net subscriber growth,” Alfredo Rodriguez, VP of marketing at DISH, recently told Portada.According to  another source (Advertising Age’s 2012 Hispanic Fact-Pack), Dish Latino, Dish’s Hispanic brand,  is now the second-largest advertiser in Hispanic media, after Procter & Gamble.

Digitas is the  primary agency for the Sprint brand, managing brand strategy, advertising, digital, offline media, digital buying and analytics. Dish Latino media buying and planning is mostly handled by Miami based Hispanic Group, Media 8 does digital marketing and Marca works on retention.

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