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What: Meredith Corporation  unveiled its new Quarterly English-language magazine “Parents Latina,” created specifically for Hispanic Millennial Moms.The quarterly debuts with  a guaranteed rate base of 700,000 and incorporates top-notch parenting content of Parents and Ser Padres magazines with the cultural values and heritage specific to bilingual Latina mothers.
Why it matters:  Almost all recent magazine launches in the Hispanic market have been English-language magazines, vs. Spanish-languages, in general, and Hispanic magazines in particular were hard hit last year due to the decrease in print advertising Procter & Gamble, the largest advertiser in the category.

unnamedMeredith Corporationhas unveiled Parents Latina, a new English-language magazine targeting U.S. Hispanic millennial moms, one of the fastest growing consumer segments in the marketplace.

Parents Latina is the latest enhancement to the Meredith Parents Network, which already includes Parents, FamilyFun, American Baby, and Ser Padres, as well as the digital brand extensions of Fit Pregnancy and ParentingParents Latina, which will be published initially on a quarterly basis, debuts with a guaranteed rate base of 700,000. It joins Meredith’s portfolio of brands serving U.S. Hispanic women including Siempre Mujer, Ser Padres, Ser Padres Espera, and Ser Padres Bebé.

Backed by the trusted Parents brand, Parents Latina incorporates parenting content of Parents and Ser Padres magazines with the cultural values and heritage specific to bilingual Latina mothers. A wide range of relevant topics will be featured in each issue, including kid’s health and nutrition, women’s health and beauty, home and lifestyle, cooking and family recipes, and finance and budget planning.

By 2030 one out of three children born in the U.S. will be of Hispanic heritage.

Meredith’s Hispanic Media Group currently reaches over 5 million Hispanic women including more than 2 million Hispanic millennial moms. According to the most recent census, by 2030 one out of three children born in the U.S. will be of Hispanic heritage. Advertisers in the launch issue feature well-known brands and marketers as L’Oreal, Procter & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, SheaMoisture and Toyota among others.

“Millennials expect customization, and Parents Latina allows us to deliver culturally relevant content in English to an important segment of highly engaged Hispanic millennials,” says Dana Points, Content Director, Meredith Parents Network. “Research shows that U.S. Hispanics are consuming more media content in English, reflecting growing acculturation. Yet in our pre-launch research, 80 percent of potential readers felt there wasn’t a magazine that currently spoke to the English-dominant Latina mom, and 90 percent found the concept of Parents Latina very appealing.”

Parents Latina speaks directly to Latina moms who are raising children in a modern-day multicultural family setting,” says Grace Bastidas, editor of Parents Latina. “I’m thrilled to introduce a new magazine that has been created to help parents like me balance our American and Hispanic cultures, so that our families can enjoy the best of both world.

Major launches in English

Most of the new Hispanic magazine launches have been in the English-language category. Carlos Pelay, Research Director/Founder at Media Economics Group, tells Portada that the momentum seems to be in favor of English-language titles. “With the exception of Playboy Latino, which launched at the end of 2014), all of the major launches in the past few years have been English-language (e.g. Cosmo for Latinas/Hearst, and Glam Belleza Latina/Conde Nast),” notes Pelay.

Pelay adds that a whole, regardless of language, the magazine segment was hit hard last year. One significant factor was Procter & Gamble’s shift in ad spending from “traditional” to digital and social media. Overall, P&G is estimated to have reduced spending across all media (general market) by 14.4% and by 40% in Hispanic magazines. This was a significant blow because P&G has traditionally been the top advertiser in this segment. Unfortunately, the Hispanic magazine segment has for too long been too dependent on the personal care category which accounted for almost half (48% ) of ALL ad dollars last year. Just two advertisers – P&G and L’Oreal – accounted for almost one-third (31%) of Hispanic magazine segment revenues.

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

What: Fronteras Ventures has established as a new, US based licensing agency for the famous animated Latino personality “Condorito.” The character identified as “Ours” by more than 85% of Hispanics when compared with Mickey Mouse.
Why it matters: In light of brand licensing becoming a growth business, Fronteras Ventures has big plans in store to help US manufacturers find new consumers through their affinity with ‘Condorito and Friends.’In addition to Condorito’s merchandising license, Fronteras has a  motion comic/digital version of Condorito for all digital platforms (web, tablets and mobile.)

descarga (1)On a written interview with Portada, Milka Pratt, Co-Founder, Licensing Director Fronteras Ventures, said that although the newspaper Fronteras is still coming out, it is not part of Fronteras Ventures . “We choose that name, since both companies began with Kent Kirschner’s idea, same founder and our friend. Besides, we like that name.”

Portada: Didn’t Condorito already have a LatAm presence?

Milka Pratt: Yes, Condorito has licensees agents in virtually each country in Latin America, but we must bear in mind that this is the most important and known cartoon character in the industry, which has also a strong presence on social networks like Facebook and Line with millions of followers. Now, what we aim from the US, which is home to the headquarters of many global companies, is to start managing businesses that include not only the market in this country, but also of all countries in Latin America.

 Milka Pratt-What we aim from the US is to start managing businesses that include not only the market in this country, but also of all countries in Latin America.

Portada: What is Fronteras Ventures realm and what other properties represent?

Milka Pratt: In addition to Condorito’s merchandising license, we also have a motion comic/digital version of Condorito for all digital platforms (web, tablets and mobile) and additionally, we have the rest of the characters that are also very popular: Coné, Yayita , Yuyito, and the rest of his family and friends from Pelotillehue.

Portada: Which type of client may be interested in licensing Condorito?

Milka Pratt:  All manufacturers of products for Hispanic families and service companies that want to reach this market because , as mentioned earlier, the character is extremely popular in Latin America. There are even studies in USA which position this character as the second most recalled Latin American brand in this audience.We should keep in mind that the vast majority of Latinos who immigrated to USA grew up reading and laughing with Condorito. Therefore are very fondof him. If companies want to reach the Hispanic market, what better way to do it than having Condorito as their ‘Brand Embassador.’ Especially now that there are several projects in the pipeline, which include films and television series, among others.

What: Fronteras Ventures has established as a new, US based licensing agency for the famous animated Latino personality “Condorito.” The character identified as “Ours” by more than 85% of Hispanics when compared with Mickey Mouse.
Why it matters: In light of brand licensing becoming a growth business, Fronteras Ventures has big plans in store to help US manufacturers find new consumers through their affinity with ‘Condorito and Friends.’In addition to Condorito’s merchandising license, Fronteras has a  motion comic/digital version of Condorito for all digital platforms (web, tablets and mobile.)

descarga (1)On a written interview with Portada, Milka Pratt, Co-Founder, Licensing Director Fronteras Ventures, said that although the newspaper Fronteras is still coming out, it is not part of Fronteras Ventures . “We choose that name, since both companies began with Kent Kirschner’s idea, same founder and our friend. Besides, we like that name.”

Portada: Didn’t Condorito already have a LatAm presence?

Milka Pratt: Yes, Condorito has licensees agents in virtually each country in Latin America, but we must bear in mind that this is the most important and known cartoon character in the industry, which has also a strong presence on social networks like Facebook and Line with millions of followers. Now, what we aim from the US, which is home to the headquarters of many global companies, is to start managing businesses that include not only the market in this country, but also of all countries in Latin America.

 Milka Pratt-What we aim from the US is to start managing businesses that include not only the market in this country, but also of all countries in Latin America.

Portada: What is Fronteras Ventures realm and what other properties represent?

Milka Pratt: In addition to Condorito’s merchandising license, we also have a motion comic/digital version of Condorito for all digital platforms (web, tablets and mobile) and additionally, we have the rest of the characters that are also very popular: Coné, Yayita , Yuyito, and the rest of his family and friends from Pelotillehue.

Portada: Which type of client may be interested in licensing Condorito?

Milka Pratt:  All manufacturers of products for Hispanic families and service companies that want to reach this market because , as mentioned earlier, the character is extremely popular in Latin America. There are even studies in USA which position this character as the second most recalled Latin American brand in this audience.We should keep in mind that the vast majority of Latinos who immigrated to USA grew up reading and laughing with Condorito. Therefore are very fondof him. If companies want to reach the Hispanic market, what better way to do it than having Condorito as their ‘Brand Embassador.’ Especially now that there are several projects in the pipeline, which include films and television series, among others.

Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

 

scott.dadichWired’s Scott Dadich’s answers are in! His answers to questions asked by Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine, Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America, Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8, Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA), Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural and Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester.

Scott Dadich, the keynote Speaker at #PortadaLat (the Latin Online Video Forum and Latam Advertising and Media Summit) taking place on June 3 -4 in Miami responded to questions from our audience. See what he has to say.

Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine:

QUESTION: From a design and editorial perspective, what is the secret to be succesful on the web?
Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief-Wired: “Authenticity is paramount. At Wired, we employ a team of journalists–writers, editors, designers–who report and write and create stories about how tomorrow is being realized. On WIRED.com, these stories typically fall into one of two buckets, brand new information or thoughtful analysis about existing information. New information has a lot of value, so in some cases it is most important to be first in breaking a story. But there is a lot of value to adding context to existing information, and those kinds of stories form the bulk of our publishing stream. We spend a lot of time getting those stories right, from hiring crazy talented writers and best-in-class editors to building technology systems that serve our readers and producers. There is no easy answer, I’m afraid.”

Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America:

QUESTION:How do you see Millenial’s content consumption (themes, time spent, sources) impacting media?”
“Folks of this age group expect content to be instantly available, in all places, embedded socially, all of the time–largely for free. Those kind of consumption behaviors mean we have to be much more nimble, and we have to think of ourselves much more like a network. For consumers, that means they can have a Wired experience inside of a Facebook post, or on a Pinterest Pin, or in a Kindle single. It means we can’t take anything we make for granted. That’s a lot more work, but it also expands our reach and impact measurably.”

Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8

QUESTION: Brands as publishers? Do you think this makes any sense, or isn’t it the role of an editorial product publisher based on his/her independence and credibility?
“I believe the majority of readers know the difference between quality journalism produced by credible, trustworthy professionals and content produced with marketing as the goal. They are different products with different goals.”

Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA)

QUESTION: As an Editor, how do you deal with “Content Marketing”, e.g. working with advertising and
editorial to produce editorial products?

“I don’t. Editorial and advertising are church and state. My publisher is my business partner, and together we are tasked with making Wired a successful business, but my job falls strictly within the bounds of Wired editorial. Any content created for a brand partner or advertiser ofWired falls within the bounds of the company’s marketing arm, and my editors and I are not involved with that work–at all.”

Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural

QUESTION: What is your view of the future of apps? Will they, because of their high engagement  be more valuable than other media vehicles e.g. TV, Radio and Digital?
“Apps occupy a very substantial position in today’s media landscape. This shouldn’t be news to anyone–in fact, Wired wrote a cover story about this phenomenon in the summer of 2010. But there is no universal truth in this category. Sometimes a native app is the best outlet for putting content in the hands of an audience. Sometimes, the web does a better job. The difference comes in the quality of the product itself–how delightful and essential is the experience? How easy is it for a consumer to become an integrated member of a community?”

Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester

QUESTION: Explain some things you have done to integrate your print and digital products, and what has worked the best and why? “
“This integration is an ongoing process. It happens all day, every day. But I’ll tell you the best thing we did at Wired. We moved everyone into one space. Science editors sit next to science editors, no matter the platform. Digital producers sit next to print designers. Budget analysts sit next to fact checkers. It’s all one space and everyone gets to see the work that their counterparts do, regardless of how directly they collaboration. That was a big move for us, but hugely important because it places equal value on all of the efforts of our team. It’s not always the most convenient solution, but the transparency this arrangement affords has been a big part of our growth over the past two years.”

QUESTION (Anonymous): Is there a future for print magazines?
“Unequivocally yes. But not for all brands. And likely not in form factors we appreciate today.”

Wired’s Scott Dadich’s keynote at the upcoming Portada Latam Summit on June 3- 4 will be on “The Future of Technology by Design“. Hear first-hand insights from the Editor-in-Chief of the iconic magazine about the interaction of design and technology and its impact on media and marketing. What does design mean to technology? What’s next for Technology? Register here to attend!

scott.dadichWired’s Scott Dadich’s answers are in! His answers to questions asked by Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine, Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America, Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8, Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA), Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural and Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester.

Scott Dadich, the keynote Speaker at #PortadaLat (the Latin Online Video Forum and Latam Advertising and Media Summit) taking place on June 3 -4 in Miami responded to questions from our audience. See what he has to say.

Mariza Bafile, Editor, Nuestra America Magazine:

QUESTION: From a design and editorial perspective, what is the secret to be succesful on the web?
Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief-Wired: “Authenticity is paramount. At Wired, we employ a team of journalists–writers, editors, designers–who report and write and create stories about how tomorrow is being realized. On WIRED.com, these stories typically fall into one of two buckets, brand new information or thoughtful analysis about existing information. New information has a lot of value, so in some cases it is most important to be first in breaking a story. But there is a lot of value to adding context to existing information, and those kinds of stories form the bulk of our publishing stream. We spend a lot of time getting those stories right, from hiring crazy talented writers and best-in-class editors to building technology systems that serve our readers and producers. There is no easy answer, I’m afraid.”

Guido Conterno, Executive Director, Grupo Diarios America:

QUESTION:How do you see Millenial’s content consumption (themes, time spent, sources) impacting media?”
“Folks of this age group expect content to be instantly available, in all places, embedded socially, all of the time–largely for free. Those kind of consumption behaviors mean we have to be much more nimble, and we have to think of ourselves much more like a network. For consumers, that means they can have a Wired experience inside of a Facebook post, or on a Pinterest Pin, or in a Kindle single. It means we can’t take anything we make for granted. That’s a lot more work, but it also expands our reach and impact measurably.”

Gustavo E. Garcia, Executive Creative Director, Media 8

QUESTION: Brands as publishers? Do you think this makes any sense, or isn’t it the role of an editorial product publisher based on his/her independence and credibility?
“I believe the majority of readers know the difference between quality journalism produced by credible, trustworthy professionals and content produced with marketing as the goal. They are different products with different goals.”

Jeffrey Duque, Group Publisher, Magazine Division at ImpreMedia (ESPN Deportes La Revista & VISTA)

QUESTION: As an Editor, how do you deal with “Content Marketing”, e.g. working with advertising and
editorial to produce editorial products?

“I don’t. Editorial and advertising are church and state. My publisher is my business partner, and together we are tasked with making Wired a successful business, but my job falls strictly within the bounds of Wired editorial. Any content created for a brand partner or advertiser ofWired falls within the bounds of the company’s marketing arm, and my editors and I are not involved with that work–at all.”

Yousef Kattan,‎Founder/President/CEO TruMedia Multicultural

QUESTION: What is your view of the future of apps? Will they, because of their high engagement  be more valuable than other media vehicles e.g. TV, Radio and Digital?
“Apps occupy a very substantial position in today’s media landscape. This shouldn’t be news to anyone–in fact, Wired wrote a cover story about this phenomenon in the summer of 2010. But there is no universal truth in this category. Sometimes a native app is the best outlet for putting content in the hands of an audience. Sometimes, the web does a better job. The difference comes in the quality of the product itself–how delightful and essential is the experience? How easy is it for a consumer to become an integrated member of a community?”

Pamela Centeno, Client Relations, Hispanic Researcher, Quester

QUESTION: Explain some things you have done to integrate your print and digital products, and what has worked the best and why? “
“This integration is an ongoing process. It happens all day, every day. But I’ll tell you the best thing we did at Wired. We moved everyone into one space. Science editors sit next to science editors, no matter the platform. Digital producers sit next to print designers. Budget analysts sit next to fact checkers. It’s all one space and everyone gets to see the work that their counterparts do, regardless of how directly they collaboration. That was a big move for us, but hugely important because it places equal value on all of the efforts of our team. It’s not always the most convenient solution, but the transparency this arrangement affords has been a big part of our growth over the past two years.”

QUESTION (Anonymous): Is there a future for print magazines?
“Unequivocally yes. But not for all brands. And likely not in form factors we appreciate today.”

Wired’s Scott Dadich’s keynote at the upcoming Portada Latam Summit on June 3- 4 will be on “The Future of Technology by Design“. Hear first-hand insights from the Editor-in-Chief of the iconic magazine about the interaction of design and technology and its impact on media and marketing. What does design mean to technology? What’s next for Technology? Register here to attend!