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stacey_abreuHispanic Digital Agency Captura Group has hired Stacey Abreu, until recently MD Multicultural at Mindshare. Abreu will have the position of Managing Director and be based in New York.

Ad Agencies are positioning themselves for 2016 as the end of the year approaches. One major announcement, we just learned from Captura Group, is that Stacey Abreu, a major executive until recently at Mindshare, will now be part of San Diego headquartered Digital Agency Captura Group. “As media and technology continue to converge, Stacey brings a unique skill set to Captura Group that will result in innovative solutions for our clients to reach Hispanic consumers across digital channels.” said Lee Vann, Co-Founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Captura Group.

“We are thrilled to have Stacey in our team and are confident that she will bring best-in-class solutions to drive growth for our clients.” Abreu has over 12 years experience leading large-scale multicultural and total market communications, media and Hispanic digital initiatives for companies including Unilever, Kimberly Clark, Kraft, Bacardi, ESPN, ampm and Boehringer Ingelheim.

As media and technology continue to converge, Stacey brings a unique skill set to Captura Group that will result in innovative solutions for our clients to reach Hispanic consumers across digital channels.

Previously, Stacey was Managing Director Multicultural for Mindshare where she oversaw over $70MM in annual media spend and managed a team across New York, Chicago and Los Angeles.

Captura Group provides Hispanic digital strategic and creative services for Kellogg’s, Unilever, Allstate, Bimbo Bakeries, La Costeña, Jumex and others. Abreu will be managing Captura’s growing business by bringing innovative solutions that help Captura clients reach Hispanics across channels.

Check out: Stacey Abreu on the Growth of Hispanic Advertising

192ef6b2e23318f94b178a91f6760abfIn the below article Lee Vann, Founder and CEO of Hispanic Digital agency Captura Group, details the evolution of the Facebook Hispanic Affinity Segment and notes that the latest update increases the segment to more than 29 million Hispanics.

In November 2013, Facebook announced the launch of their Hispanic segment to allow brands to better target Hispanics on Facebook. In April 2014, they improved the segment by allowing marketers to target Hispanics by language preference.

Today, Facebook has given brands 2 million more reasons to target Hispanics by expanding the Hispanic affinity segment from 26.7 million to 29.1 million.

Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 12.29.37 PM

Not only did Facebook increase the number of Hispanics in their Hispanic affinity segment, they also changed the composition of the segment from a language preference perspective. Prior to this update, Facebook reported that the Hispanic segment consisted of the following language sub-segments:

  • 10 million Spanish dominant (38%)
  • 9 million English dominant (35%)
  • 7 million Bilingual (27%)

Today, the sub-segments have shifted dramatically with a higher number of users identified as Spanish dominant and less as English dominant.

  • 14 million Spanish dominant (48%)
  • 7 million English dominant (24%)
  • 8 million Bilingual (28%)

By all accounts – and certainly what we’ve experienced with our clients – Facebook’s Hispanic affinity segment has been a huge success, with many brands increasing their investment in Facebook advertising to get their messages in front of Hispanics. We applaud Facebook for continually improving the ability to reach U.S. Hispanics and we look forward to seeing even more ads, en español, targeted at this growing audience.

Lee Vann is the co-founder of Captura Group, an award-winning Hispanic digital agency with full-service bilingual capabilities.

Lee Vann founded Captura Group in 2001 to help clients reach online Hispanics in ways that make sense.  He has led the agency on the cutting edge of digital and content marketing for over a decade, providing solutions for top-tier clients in a variety of sectors. He is a contributor to Media Post’s Engage Hispanics blog, wrote the chapter on Hispanic digital marketing in M. Isabel  Valdés newest book, Win! The Hispanic Market and is a frequent speaker at Hispanic and digital marketing conferences.  Prior to founding Captura Group, Lee launched and served as VP of L90 Latino, the Hispanic division of the publicly traded Internet advertising company L90. Lee holds a B.A. in Economics from the University of California Berkeley and a M.B.A. from the University of Southern California with a concentration E-Commerce. Born in Mexico City, Mexico, Lee is bilingual and bicultural.

192ef6b2e23318f94b178a91f6760abfLee Vann is the founder and CEO of hispanic digital agency Captura Group.

 Recently Portada asked a question that has been on the minds of content marketers everywhere: Will marketer owned media stretch consumer trust to a breaking point? The specific case examined was of Kellogg’s Días Grandiosos, noting that for the first time in its seven-year history, the Portada award for Top Content Provider to Hispanic Audiences was won by a brand-owned platform instead of a traditional media company.

Kellogg’s and Captura Group are indeed proud of that award, and agree that it signals a shift in the way brands communicate with consumers and where consumers turn for information online. Like any successful marketing strategy, you must begin with the consumer. What is important to her, beyond what she can buy? What entertains her? And most importantly: Why should she listen to you and engage with you?

Below are three ways to foster consumer trust with content marketing:

Relevancy

Disillusioned by the barrage of digital advertising they come across each day, the digital consumer craves relevancy. We spend a lot of time talking about cultural relevance when it comes to marketing to Hispanics, but it is never more important as it is in the content marketing space. Creating relevant and engaging content that serves to educate, entertain, empower and inspire rather than simply sell, establishes credibility and trust in the long run.

Originality

To get her attention, you must be original. Días Grandiosos con Kellogg’s, for example, connects with Hispanic families through stories about food, but also covers topics on family and culture through a journalistic approach that features real Latina women.  This unique approach is fresh and surprising and helps capture her attention, allowing for a deeper connection that is critical to build trust.

Authenticity

Taglines sell products; content sells brands. Moving away from traditional ad-speak is essential to leveling with the consumer in an authentic way and informing without sales pressure. As Portada mentioned, journalists have become a key component in this communication shift. We’ve examined the ways journalists give brands a content marketing edge on our blog, by being able to tell real stories that resonate with consumers while driving brand objectives in an authentic way.

Today’s digital consumer is smart, socially active, and weary of the traditional sales pitch. Content marketing serves to inform, educate and entertain, and when done well, brands may be rewarded with the most valuable asset: consumer trust.

Lee Vann founded Captura Group in 2001 to help clients reach online Hispanics in ways that make sense.  He has led the agency on the cutting edge of digital and content marketing for over a decade, providing solutions for top-tier clients in a variety of sectors.He is a contributor to Media Post’s Engage Hispanics blog, wrote the chapter on Hispanic digital marketing in M. Isabel  Valdés newest book, Win! The Hispanic Market and is a frequent speaker at Hispanic and digital marketing conferences.  Prior to founding Captura Group, Lee launched and served as VP of L90 Latino, the Hispanic division of the publicly traded Internet advertising company L90. Lee holds a B.A. in Economics from the University of California Berkeley and a M.B.A. from the University of Southern California with a concentration E-Commerce. Born in Mexico City, Mexico, Lee is bilingual and bicultural.

The case for Hispanic marketing just got (even) bigger. Yesterday’s executive order de facto increases the documented Hispanic population by almost 5 million consumers (95% of the undocumented population is Hispanic). While Obama’s executive order does not offer a permanent solution, it brings certainty and legality to millions of undocumented Hispanics. What are the marketing implications according to major players in the marketing and media space?

descarga (1)The U.S. will get its biggest immigration makeover in three decades in a step that is expected to eventually legalize some 5 million illegal immigrants. Any measure that makes it for the undocumented Hispanic population safer to live in the U.S. will have a positive impact on marketing. “I think the issue is that if the millions of undocumented come forward and instead of the U.S. Hispanic population being 17% of the overall population the percentage jumps closer to 20% we could potentially see an increase in advertising spending which we typically see right after census numbers are issued,” says Enedina Vega-Amaez, Vice President/Publisher of the Meredith Hispanic Ventures Group.
Enrique Arbelaez
, co-founder and partner of advertising agency XL Alliance, cautions that while “the reported Hispanic population numbers will increase, we have always worked with the assumption that Census numbers are underestimated by at least 10%+,” .

If instead of the U.S. Hispanic population being 17% of the overall population the percentage jumps closer to 20%, we could see an increase in advertising spending which we typically see right after census numbers are issued.

 

Categories Impacted

XL Alliance’s Arbelaez notes that the executive order also” brings higher income opportunities. Living under the shadows limits the jobs they seek. Now these jobs and services will be expanded as they won’t fear giving away information. Think all types of Insurance, Financial Services and any other service that require personal information.” As an example of an opportunity Arbelaez cites supermarkets who have “an opportunity to increase loyalty card programs growth, which Hispanics don’t register for due to fear of giving info.” Penni Barton, publisher of Al Dia Texas in Dallas, says that “most of these immigrants are already part of the economy, but having access to better job conditions might translate to an improved economic status, and potentially higher purchasing power. In the short term sectors like the legal counseling will see a constant trickle of customers that need representation to apply for this protected status. In the long term, we suspect that many of these immigrants will formally settle roots in their communities (thanks to the protection measure) and start buying homes, investing in higher education, and starting their own businesses. This is usually the case – legal certainty leads to stability and progress.” “We may see increased mobile/digital usage as this group of 5 million gets access to credit,”adds Lee Vann, CEO and Founder of Digital Ad Agency Captura Group.

Unfortunately marketers tend to stay in the sidelines because immigration reform is a divisive topic. I believe that if your company or industry is reaping the benefits from Latino consumption sales then you should take a stand to show gratitude and gain the loyalty of this desirable consumer.

 

Increase in Spanish-dominant Share

descarga (3)The addition of almost 5 million documented Hispanics to the population also means that the Spanish-dominant share of the Hispanic population will increase and somewhat counterweight the growth of the English-dominant population. Al Dia Dallas’ Penni Barton notes that “in markets like Texas and other border states the majority of the potential beneficiaries of this measure are Spanish-dominant Hispanics.” “After all, the nature of a Hispanic immigrant is that Spanish is their first language,” says Enrique Arbelaez from XL Alliance . He cautions, however, that the media consumption habits of these Hispanics  may not necessarily change because of their new legal status.

Lucia Ballas-Traynor, Co-Founder & EVP, MamásLatinas, suspects that the majority of the undocumented immigrant population is Spanish-dominant. However, she claims that “every Latino has been affected by the inaction around immigration reform. Most Latinos have a friend, family member, neighbor, colleague or employee who is undocumented. Our extended definition of familia means it affects Latinos of all acculturation levels.” Ballas Traynor adds that “until undocumented immigrants receive long term legal status I don’t think their media consumptions habits will dramatically change. If their legal status changes permanently then I think digital media – social, e-commerce and other channels will see a greater degree of participation as they come out from the shadows.” Similarly Captura Group’s Lee Vann notes that “Of course these immigrants will have access to better jobs, loans and be able to travel more freely which will have a positive impact on the economy, if you think about it, the 5 million undocumented immigrants have been integrated into the economy, consuming content, viewing ads and purchasing products.”

 

Caution: Not permanent

It is important to take into account that Obama’s executive order is temporary in nature and not really a long-term comprehensive plan. Says Al Dia Texas’ Penni Barton: “While it lends a helping hand to some, it is not a comprehensive solution to the general issue of illegal non-authorized immigration.”

Mama’s Latinas Lucia Ballas-Traynor agrees with Barton, “until we have long term and comprehensive immigration reform I don’t think there will be a significant impact on Hispanic marketing. President Obama’s executive action is shielding undocumented Latinos from deportation and providing temporary legal status which will allow Latino families to remain united. However, his plan does not seem to provide a pathway to citizenship and most importantly no entitlement to federal benefits such as health care. I hope his move promotes Congressional action around the issue of immigration reform which has been at a standstill for decades.”

 

Obama’s Executive Order
Under the plan announced last night by Obama, undocumented immigrants who have lived in the United States for five years or more, have children who are citizens or legal residents, formally register, pass a criminal background check, and are willing to pay their “fair share” of taxes will be able to stay in the country without fear of deportation. The rules could impact up to 5 million of the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants believed to be residing in the U.S. The crux of the White House’s plan is to protect undocumented parents of children born in the US from deportation. It would also expand a program created by the administration in 2012 called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which allows young people who were brought into the country as children to apply for deportation deferrals and work permits. The plan would extend eligibility to people who entered the United States as children before January 2010 (the cutoff is currently June 15, 2007). It would also increase the deferral period to three years from two years and eliminate the requirement that applicants be under 31 years old. About 1.2 million young immigrants are currently eligible, and the new plan would expand eligibility to approximately 300,000 more.

A recap of major news on the marketing and media front from around the web compiled by Portada Digital Media Correspondent Susan Kuchinskas.

Dennys  Denny’s “Likes” Hispanics

The restaurant chain is expanding is Hispanic marketing with a dedicated Facebook page that will offer original and curated content. Denny’s vice president of marketing John Dillon told Nation’s Restaurant News that, while the company actively reaches Latino consumers in a variety of ways, in both English and Spanish, ” So instead of taking a general-market idea and pushing it in the same way to Hispanics, why not create content targeted more directly at them? That should get better engagement.”

At the same time, Denny’s has found that Hispanics like the same mainstream grub that general-market consumers do – with the occasional addition of chorizo.

Pandora Beats Hispanic Streaming Sites

pandora mexicanWe knew that Pandora was popular with Latinos, but this popular? According to ComScore’s June numbers, 25 percent of Pandora’s total 76.4 million active monthly unique visitors are Hispanic. This makes it the top streaming music site for Hispanics – beating Univision Digital’s 10.5 million monthly uniques.

Billboard notes – as we have before – that Pandora has carefully created channels to appeal to a wide variety of tastes, with subgenres for Latin, Puerto Rican and Mexican. Meanwhile, Pandora’s strength in mobile appeals to highly mobile Hispanics.

Marketers Miss Out on Digital Hispanics

Lee Vann, Captura Group
Lee Vann, Captura Group

Lee Vann of Captura Group analyzed Adage’s latest Hispanic Fact Pack – and found that media buyers are under-spending on digital to reach this group. He points out that, while Hispanics over-index for all kinds of digital media, last year marketers invested only 7 percent of their Hispanic budgets on digital. Vann wonders whether the current buzz about the total market approach has led advertisers to think – or hope – they can reach Hispanics with general market advertising. He begs to differ.

Enough of the Hot Latinas, Please

PARLUX FRAGRANCES, LTD SOFIA BY SOFIA VERGARAFinally, here’s an opinion from an actual Hispennial. Jose Gutierrez, a staff writer for San Diego State University’s Daily Aztec, complains about the stereotypical Latino characters in TV and movies, those of the hot blood, exotic features and Spanglish. He writes, “As people, we are far more than stereotypes. As humans, we deserve to be represented as such. It goes without saying the media influences and shapes our perceptions about the world. Seeing Latinos represented almost exclusively as the aforementioned stereotypes is incredibly damaging and doesn’t go without negative repercussions.”

On the other hand, Modern Family, home to possibly TV’s best-loved Latina, has turned Sofia VErgara into a major star complete with red-carpet coverage and endorsement deals. Last year, Vergara defended the character, saying that while everyone is different, Gloria has aspects of women she knows.

What do you think is the best way to represent US Latinos?