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JDAnewSMpic-1Julie Diaz-Asper, Founding Partner & CEO at Social Lens Research offers an analysis of the Presidential campaign’s social media outreach to Latinos.  The campaigns who do well with Latinos on social media have significant amounts to gain.  Latinos helped the Democrats keep the White House in 2012, with 70% voting for Obama. Around 27 million Latinos are eligible to vote this time, with an estimated 13 million expected to vote, an increase of 17% since 2012 (NALEO). Expect to see significant spend and innovation on social outreach to Latinos this election cycle.

Expectations are high around the Latino vote in the 2016 election. Around 27 million Latinos are eligible to vote, with an estimated 13 million expected to vote, an increase of 17% since 2012 (NALEO). Latinos helped the Democrats win the White House with 70% voting for Obama.

Getting the Latinos to the poll this election cycle is paramount. Yet, targeted outreach to Latinos, especially on social and mobile channels, could use more attention. 64% of Latinos recently polled by Social Lens Research via MocoSpace, a mobile gaming platform, haven’t had any contact with a campaign recently. This low engagement is surprising given that the MocoSpace community tends to over-index on social media and mobile usage. Even more interesting, the survey found Latinos more closely watching the election on social media [36%] than whites [31%] or African Americans [30%], highlighting a potential engagement gap by the campaigns.

A Quick Look at Social Efforts of the Campaigns to Date:

Social media can have large implications for political campaign messaging and candidate perception. For example, Hillary Clinton’s campaign tried to engage Latino Millennials by comparing her to “your abuela,” and the social media community revolted. #NotMyAbuela and #NotMiAbuela hashtags developed, articles in NY Times, Slate and others picked up the anti-abuela campaign, and weeks later, the two hashtags continued to be used by Latinos who don’t support Clinton.

64% of Latinos haven’t had any contact with a campaign recently.
Not many Latino marketers including myself can say we have never tried the abuela angle but it’s much more powerful and way less risky when you have real abuelas involved versus trying to generically speak for them.
The good news is that Hillary Clinton’s social media efforts seem to be transitioning. There was a marked shift earlier this year by the campaign to bring in real voices that could help represent Hillary Clinton better. One great example leading up to the South Carolina primary, showcased the mothers of African Americans killed by police, adding authenticity and credibility to the outreach efforts. It appears to have paid off with higher than expected turnout and share of African American votes. Imagine if Hillary’s campaign would have done the same with real abuelas and Latinos?

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To connect more effectively, Hillary Clinton has been using more authentic, in-the-moment photos – that are moving in the right direction.

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I also really liked the Dump Trump Geofilter on Snapchat put out by Priorities USA Action, a pac backing Hillary Clinton.

Meanwhile, Bernie Sanders has been mainly sticking to the issues with many direct quotes and videos from his speeches and rallies.  Bernie also started well on Snapchat back in November with an adorable grandpa-like post “what is this Snapshot thing and why do I only get ten seconds?” I am not sure if he actually came up with that but it feels like he could have. Since then, the Bernie camp have also done some clever Snapchat geofliters  to get out the vote.

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Sanders’ strategy seems to be winning on being able to reach younger Latinos who are happy to volunteer and create content for him, checkout Latinos for Bernie on Facebook.  Millennials are also helping to sell “El Bernie” to their parents and grandparents. Given that Millennials are close to 50% of the Latino vote (Pew), the youth vote will be critical.

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It’s considered unlikely that Bernie Sanders’ social wins will translate into a Bernie win, but a lot can be learned from his campaign’ s reach and engagement success with Millennial Latinos.

On the Republican side, let’s just say it’s been more about alienation than outreach to Latinos. Trump has dominated by using his reality star status, sharp anti-immigrant rhetoric and loyal fans to use Twitter as a personal broadcast tool to dominant the news and get coverage. Trump’s social efforts and huge in-person rallies have taken down the much more experienced, well financed and establishment candidate, Jeb Bush, and made him the forefront leader.  What’s unclear is whether Trump’s unfiltered ranting will translate to a wider appeal for the general election.  The rest of the Republican pack doesn’t really stand out in their social outreach efforts.

Overall, it’s been a wild ride with social being used by non-established candidates to build a base and following—something no one predicted on either side.

Getting the Latinos to the poll this election cycle is paramount. Yet, targeted outreach to Latinos, especially on social and mobile channels, could use more attention.

What’s coming next? Honestly, who knows! We do we see a few potential opportunities for campaigns to increase their Latino engagement efforts from the MocoSpace community check-in:

  • Latinos Prefer Live Candidate Interactions: Asked how candidates could better connect to them and their friends, live Q & A on social media was most popular [35%] with Latinos, followed by live events with the candidate [34%].
  • Alternative Media Offers an Opportunity for Campaigns: Interviews with non-traditional media [bloggers, YouTube stars] scored well with Latinos [32%].
  • Optimize Social Media Messages for Mobile: 59% of Latinos think candidates should use social media mobile messages to reach them.  Latino interest was much higher than Whites at 53%.
  • Voter Registration Outreach Needed By Many Latinos: A quarter of Latinos polled are unregistered or unsure of their status.  Some [13%] say they plan to register. Another 15% are eligible but unsure how to register, not clear on their registration status, or have difficulties registering. Resolving these issues with them would benefit candidates.

Whether you are involved in politics or not, it will be important to watch campaign tactics as you can expect significant digital outreach spend and innovation regardless of who wins.

Julie Diaz-Asper is the founder of Social Lens Research. Social Lens has a proven track record of using a mix of social marketing techniques and sound research methodologies to better engage and gain deeper insights (mobile optimized research exercises, focus groups, social contests).Julie has over two decades of experience helping large organizations to innovate and pursue new market opportunities including American Express, AARP, Google Multicultural, Univision, Consumer Reports en Español, Cabot Cheese, Mobile Future, CX Act, HITN, Immersive Youth Marketing and Inspire Agency.

What: According to “The Race for the White House 2016: Registered Voters and Media and Information During the Primaries,” a new research study from the IAB Digital media has reached parity with TV as a primary information source about presidential candidates.
Why it matters: The study also found U.S. Hispanic & African-American voters are more likely to get political news via mobile.‘Political Influentials,’on the other hand, are much more reliant on digital media than TV.

 

credit: Israel Ortega, December 11, 2015
credit: Israel Ortega, December 11, 2015

Digital media has reached parity with TV as a primary information source about presidential candidates (61% for both digital and TV) and political issues (67% for digital vs. 69% for TV) among registered U.S. voters, according to “The Race for the White House 2016: Registered Voters and Media and Information During the Primaries,” a new research study from the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB).

The findings demonstrate that digital is a critical medium for reaching U.S. voters during the primaries, with three-quarters of those who have seen a candidate’s online or mobile ad taking action afterwards, such as searching for more information about the candidate or starting an in-person conversation about them.

More than a third (35%) of registered voters say digital will be their most important method for getting candidate information during this election season. These U.S. voters are more likely to be younger (35% vs. 23% total), to take action after seeing an online political ad (71% vs. 53% total), stream the debates (30% vs. 20% total), and to vote in the primaries (90% vs. 85% total).

35% of registered voters say digital will be their most important method for getting candidate information during this election season.

U.S. Hispanics

credit: scpr.org
credit: scpr.org

Delving deeper into the results, the study reveals that certain demographic groups are more reliant on mobile for political news and views than others, particularly U.S. Hispanics and African-Americans. The report shows that:

  • 67 percent of Hispanic voters and 60 percent of African-American voters visit political sites on a mobile device as opposed to 49 percent of voters overall.
  • In addition, Hispanic voters are significantly more likely to take an action after viewing a digital or mobile ad for a candidate, with 87 percent of them saying they have done so.

Making the case even stronger for the importance of digital media in the current election cycle, registered voters who are more heavily involved in politics and public affairs, called “Political Influentials” in the study, are particularly dependent on digital media for their political information (78% for digital vs. 63% for TV).

social media

descargaThe report also shows that social media plays a key role in the political process, with 28 percent of registered voters saying they get information on candidates via social platforms. Other social media findings include:

  • 31% of registered voters read political articles and links shared by their friends on social media
  • 25% of registered voters have seen an ad for a candidate on social media
  • 24% of registered voters have “defriended” or “unfollowed” someone because of his or her political posts on social media platforms

“The results of the study demonstrate the vital role of digital media in the political process and substantiate that digital is on par with TV among registered voters as a key resource,” said Sherrill Mane, Senior Vice President of Research, Analytics, and Measurement, IAB. “As the election season heats up, it is abundantly clear that candidates and advocacy groups must harness the informational and relationship-building power of digital media to succeed.”

“U.S. Hispanic and African-American voters are crucial to candidates, and this research shows that mobile is the best way to reach them,” said Anna Bager, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Mobile and Video, IAB.

“The Race for the White House 2016: Registered Voters and Media and Information During the Primaries” was released during the 2016 IAB Annual Leadership Meeting at the JW Marriott Desert Springs Resort and Spa in Palm Desert, CA. To download the complete study, go toiab.com/electionstudy.

Methodology

The IAB commissioned Vision Critical to conduct this online study with 18+ U.S. registered voters in November 2015. The total sample of 1,513 is nationally representative of this registered voter population by age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Additional Hispanic registered voters were sampled to ensure statistical robustness in analyzing this important group of voters.

 

Mike_Madrid_headshotAs the 2016 Political Campaigns goes into full gear Portada interviewed Mike Madrid, Principal at GrassrootsLab and a nationally recognized expert on Latino voting trends. Madrid tells us that the immigration issue is overemphasized as a key theme for Hispanics; Education and Economical issues are much more important. 3 Do’s and Don’ts in Hispanic Political Marketing.

Portada: How has digital marketing evolved since the last election cycle in 2012?
M.M, Principal at GrassrootsLab: “Digital marketing has changed dramatically since 2012. Facebook’s changes alone have considerably changed the political landscape, let alone the creation of numerous new platforms. Where digital was an intriguing new add-on to a political campaign it’s now a central component to a winning campaign.”

Where digital was an intriguing new add-on to a political campaign it’s now a central component to a winning campaign.

Portada: For what elections do you see the Hispanic vote as particularly important in 2016 both on the national level, but also on the different administrations levels (presidential, national leg, state, municipal)?
M.M: “There’s a lot of chatter about the importance of the Latino vote in the Presidential race. While that’s true, most of this is really being hyped by consultants and academics who don’t understand we don’t elect Presidents through the national vote but through an electoral college. The Latino vote is still largely concentrated in states that are decided – California, Texas, New York Illinois. Having said that great importance will be placed on states like Florida, New Mexico, Colorado and Nevada. But even then we’re talking about marginal increases that could have a significant impact on moving those key states. The Latino vote is likely to have much greater impact in picking up or retaining congressional and legislative seats.”

Use digital advertising optimized for mobile technology. Latinos are far more likely to get information this way than whites.

emerging.markets.webPortada: What candidates, PACS, are you now representing and helping them in their “marketing” efforts?
M.M: “Our firm is actually preparing to announce a new consortium with some of the country’s top Democrat, Republican and Independent Latino political consultants in the country. Formal launch will be January and we’ll focus on the turnout problem our community faces. While our voter models are currently projecting very high Latino turnout in both the primary and general kept in 2016, the worst kept Latino secret is our community has a very big turnout problem – very big – and we intend on having interests from the right and the left working to understand and solve the problem. It’s an exciting and important undertaking that needs to be addressed.”

The worst kept Latino secret is our community has a very big turnout problem – very big – and we intend on having interests from the right and the left working to understand and solve the problem.

Portada: What are “make or break” issues for political candidates when it comes to win the Hispanic vote?
M.M: “Well, immigration reform is clearly a key issue. It is however dwarfed by education and jobs issues. Unfortunately there’s a huge over reliance on the immigration issue by the media, candidates and consultants. It’s not only not the main issue on the mind of Latino voters but it prevents a discussion on the issues that Latinos overwhelmingly care about. This is one of the problems driving low voter turnout – the overemphasis on immigration has left Latino voters with little motivation to compel them to vote. As a result, we don’t vote and we can see that in high Hispanic precincts having very low turnout rates.”

The huge over reliance on the immigration issue by the media, candidates and consultants is one of the problems driving low voter turnout

Portada: How are these “make or break” issues different between Hispanic Baby Boomers and Hispanic Millennials?votoM.M: “Great question. Generational differences are undeniably the driving force in how Latino voters develop their political positions. Our immigrant community has a set of priority issues that are distinct from their sons and daughters – and those are completely different from their grandsons and granddaughters. While there is no question immigration is an issue that transcends these generational differences – we also know without question – that this is not the top issue for each of these groups. In fact immigration reform is almost never the top issue for any generation of Latino voters. More specifically, education and economic issues are top priority for all generations of Latinos but they play out very differently for each group. For example, student testing tends to be important for Latino immigrant parents, access and curriculum tends to be key for second generation Latinos. By the third generation teacher accountability, reform and interest in charter schools starts to drive voter behavior.”

Portada: What are the three “dos” and the three “don’ts” when it comes to successful Political Marketing towards the Hispanic populations in 2016?

M.M:

DO’s

  1. Use digital advertising optimized for mobile technology. Latinos are far more likely to get information this way than whites.
  2. Use third party testimonials as a strategy. Endorsements from Latino politicians are particularly impactful.
  3. Focus on women. Latinos with a female in the home have higher participation rates for voting and civic engagement.

DONT’s

  1. Don’t think immigration is all Latinos think about – it’s not. Focusing only on immigration reform is the best way to guarantee low voter turnout.
  2. Focusing exclusively on Spanish mediums is a common mistake. Second and third generation Latino voters are English dominant. Use Spanish but not exclusively.
  3. Bicultural messaging is far more important than bilingual messaging.

For over fifteen years, Mike Madrid has been changing the outcomes of political campaigns throughout the country. His active involvement in local, state, and federal races has helped him to develop a keen insight into the successful characteristics of winning campaigns. Madrid is a nationally recognized expert on Latino voting trends. He graduated from the Edmund G. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in 1997. He has served as the press secretary for the California Assembly Republican leader and as the political director for the California Republican Party. In these roles, Madrid played a key role in pioneering Latino outreach and communications strategies. In 2001 he was named as one of America’s “Most Influential Hispanics” by Hispanic Business Magazine. He is a regular commentator on Latino political issues in statewide and national media publications. Since 2000, Madrid has also developed an expertise in local governments in California. He served as the public affairs director to the League of California Cities. In 2011, Madrid helped develop the Leadership California Institute, an organization dedicated to educating and training future legislators before they get in office. Madrid is the editor and publisher of California City News, a news site dedicated to “the best politics, policy and practices of local government in California.”

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