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Latin American market leaders will discuss the future of marketing technology on October 17 at the beautiful Casa Lamm in Mexico City. The agenda includes:  5G, DOOH, e-commerce, and much more. Three units of Portada’s council system will hold their private meetings at the event. Get tickets now and meet executives of your choice at Portada Meet Up.

 

Don’t Miss Latin American Market Leaders at Portada Mexico

This year, for the 2019 edition of Portada Mexico, the leaders of marketing innovation in Latin America will delve deep into the state of the art of MarTech and will discuss new insights to target consumers in key Latin American markets. 

On October 17 at the Casa Lamm, top brands and agencies will show how they’re evolving their video and digital marketing toolkit to engage consumers via out of home advertising and e-business. In addition, brilliant speakers will discuss 5G and its relevance in the Mexican market.

Portada Mexico attendees will be able to network with members of Portada’s Council System. The Americas Board, Brand Star Committee Latam, and Travel Marketing Board will hold their second 2019 in-person meetings at the same venue.

Portada Mexico offers senior executives from tech, media and marketing firms the opportunity to interact with brand marketers through Portada’s one-on-one meetup offering. Get tickets and choose whom to meet from a list of brand and agency decision-makers pre-screened by Portada (first-come, first-served). 

Latin American Market Leaders to Take the Portada Mexico Stage:

Is 5G a Reality in Mexico?

Henry Zamarripa, Head of Sales & Partnerships, Verizon Media

5G promises endless opportunities for brands to redefine their relationship with consumers: Smart Cities, IoT, instant brand-consumer communications, etc…

 

 

Out of Home Advertising in the Digital Era

Valentin Bueno, CEO, Latcom

Mobile and geo-location technologies are expanding the horizons of out of home advertising.

 

 

Using Digital Strategies to Reach Small Business Owners in Mexico

Juliana Sarria, Manager of Consumer & Client Engagement, Grupo Gepp

Traditional business owners handle around 80% of Mexican CPGs. The head of consumer & client engagement at Gepp will explain how digital marketing can help navigate the complex world of Mexican retail.

 

 

The Revolution of Video Marketing in Mexico

Marine Garmrouguian, Head of Programmatic, Affiperf MX, Havas Media Group

 

 

 

 

E-Business as a Cornerstone of Marketing

Luis Macin, VP of E-Commerce, Nestlé MX

Macin will explore how E-Business dynamics impact marketing from brand building to digital communications.

 

 

 

What: Ecommerce marketing strategy is revealed by retailers Walmart and Soriana. It shows how they’re capturing the e-commerce home delivery grocery market in Mexico with alternative digital payment strategies.
Why it matters: Fear of fraud stops many Mexico consumers from making online purchases with a credit card. As a result, Walmart and Soriana are on it. Consequently, they’re deploying cash on delivery, branded digital cash cards, mobile phone loyalty programs, and PayPal options.

The race is on as grocers deploy ecommerce marketing strategy in Mexico. Grocery and general merchandise retailer Walmart has taken the lead. But in Mexico, its competitors, including Soriana, are racing to build their online-delivery businesses.

How customers pay for their online purchases could make all the difference.

High credit card commissions and fear of fraud pose a significant barrier to online sales in Mexico. Digital purchases make up only 3 percent of all consumer goods sales nationwide. As a result, that’s way below the average seen in other countries, according to branding expert Vilma Vale-Brennan. She is deputy general manager of Vale Network in Mexico.

The new President of Mexico, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, has promised to get banks to lower credit card commissions. But grocery retailers like Walmart don’t have time to lose.

Ecommerce Marketing Strategy with Digital Payment App

Last year, Walmart launched its own digital application. As a result, it allows customers to pay for goods at stores with the Walmart digital application “Cashi.”

After downloading the app to their mobile phones, customers can recharge it with cash at any Walmart-owned store. It’s a fast and easy way to convert cash into a secure digital payment option. As a result, customers use it for purchases at Walmart, Superama, Sam’s Club, and Bodega Aurrera stores.

Cashi can be used to pay electric bills and services including Netflix, Spotify, and Uber.

The idea here is to make purchasing with Walmart easier, and to give people more options.

But perhaps more importantly, Walmart tells Portada it expects to extend the Cashi digital payment system later this year to allow its online customers to use Cashi for online grocery purchases, according to Gabriela Buenrostro, assistant director of corporate communications. “The idea here is to make purchasing with Walmart easier, and to give people more options,” she said.

Walmart’s ecommerce marketing strategy outpaces the online market with 4.5 million e-commerce shoppers in Mexico, followed by grocers Soriana at 1.1 million, according to a study by the American media measurement and analytics company Comscore as reported by Portada.

Cash, PayPal Options Offered

Walmart offers online customers the option to use PayPal, and Soriana added the PayPal payment option to its online shopping site this year.

Soriana also allows its online customers to pay cash to the home delivery person, or use their credit card on the delivery person’s portable card reader, Director of Electronic Commerce Rafael Castelltort told Portada.

Most of Soriana’s online grocery customers shop online using Soriana’s branded mobile application on their cell phones. A Soriana loyalty card program has more than 9,000 users, and to build loyalty even more, Soriana, deploying its own ecommerce marketing strategy launched its own mobile phone service “Soriana Movil” in 2017, which earns users loyalty points that can be exchanged for free products, Castelltort said.

The trends are very clear. Mexicans prefer to use a mobile phone when visiting grocery stores’ online sites.

Soriana’s decision to launch its own mobile phone service in Mexico might appear tangential to an effort to build online purchases, however, it could be spot-on in terms of getting more online shoppers.

“The trends are very clear,” comScore’s Alejandra Ibarra, manager of comScore’s Latin America Services, told Portada when asked about ecommerce marketing strategies among grocers in Mexico. “Mexicans prefer to use a mobile phone when visiting grocery stores’ online sites.”

And as time goes by, mobile applications are becoming more and more important for grocery ecommerce market leaders like Soriana and Walmart.

Just last year, Walmart announced its acquisition of the online marketplace Cornershop. Users download the Cornershop application to make online purchases using their mobile phones at supermarkets, specialty food stores and pharmacies in Mexico and Chile, according to Forbes.

“The Cornershop acquisition by Walmart shows the focus that applications have for the company and the performance it must deliver to maintain its leadership,” Ibarra told Portada.

What: Teads and Precision, Publicis Media’s programmatic division, have announced a partnership that will expand across eight Latin American countries.
Why it matters: Through this partnership, Teads and Precision aim to deliver a more efficient ad-tech supply chain with curated inventory and data that uses advanced technology.

Teads and Precision, the programmatic division of Publicis Media, will collaborate in Latin America. Their objective is delivering a more efficient ad-tech supply chain with curated inventory and data that uses advanced technology.

Precision will continue to provide a tech agnostic approach for its clients while adapting to their business needs. In the meantime, Teads will be the full-stack digital platform for viewable video and display inventory. Together, the team will develop new strategies for Latin America.

Teads will then conduct regular training for the Precision team to share cutting-edge information and best practices on advertising campaigns optimization. Thus, the company will strength Precision’s position as a reliable guide of its clients throughout their transformation journey.

Full-Funnel Technology

“By combining our premium and brand-safe inventory with engaging, personalized, non-intrusive ads, we are helping brands at every stage of the marketing funnel, from awareness to conversion, passing through consideration,” said Eric Tourtel, Senior Vice President of Teads Latin America. “Instead of simply charging by the impressions, at Teads we use machine learning and artificial intelligence to optimize the campaign or ROI. Moreover, we guarantee results, from viewability, completed views, unique incremental visitors, or even conversions.”

“Teads has earned our trust by offering the most advanced technology, innovation, and brand-safe inventory. The Teads team never stops looking for ways to improve results, “said Monica Gadsby, CEO of Publicis Group Latin America. “It’s really inspiring to see the immense possibilities that this partnership brings. Therefore, Teads has definitely become a key business partner for Precision in the region.”

 

What: Google Flights, with its dominant search engine positioning, has turned the competition for online airline ticket sales upside down.
Why it matters: Airlines are scrambling to keep up and compete in new ways in response to what Ernesto Echeverri, Director of Marketing for North America, the Caribbean & Asia for LATAM Airlines Group, says is Google Flights’ complete disruption of the business of directing consumers to the best flights online.

It isn’t easy to compete with Google. In fact, Google’s owner, Alphabet, Inc., finds itself under intense scrutiny by governments and regulators. In these instances, Institutions have accused Google and in some cases won court judgments for antitrust violations. Now, airlines are discovering Google’s entry into the online ticket advertising and sales market has both good and bad consequences.

First launched in 2011, Google’s airfare search tool has become a dominant player among travel booking sites. The San Francisco Chronicle’s Thrifty Traveler columnist Jared Kamrowski says Google Flights is “leaps and bounds better than any other flight searching tool.”Google Flights

“Google Flights is the most powerful flight search tool,” Kamrowski wrote in a recent column. “[It] should be your go-to flight search engine.”

A Matter of SEO

But the tool’s success is turning out to be a double-edged sword for airlines. Since it directs users to the best fares, brands have to compete harder —and spend more— for first-page search-engine results.

“No one else has as much access to online flights information as Google. That means Google can outperform any other online flight aggregator,” Ernesto Echeverri, director of marketing for North America, the Caribbean & Asia for LATAM Airlines Group, and a member of Portada’s Travel Marketing Board, told Portada. “It makes it a little bit uneven because they have a tremendous advantage.”

Google Flights is the most powerful flight search tool. It should be your go-to flight search engine.
Ernesto Echeverri

As a result, it makes it more difficult for brands like LATAM to ensure top positioning on search engine results, especially on mobile platforms where appearing on the first page is even harder due to the smaller screens on mobile.

To compete with Google Flights’ dominant positioning in search results, LATAM will have to spend more money on purchasing first-page positioning, increasing its digital advertising costs, Echeverry said.

Competing with Google

Portada typed the words “flight to Paris from Boston” into Google recently and the following results popped up:

The first four search engine results were paid positioning by companies including Expedia, Cheap Flights, and Opodo.com. Google Flights took the fifth spot, the first unpaid position.

“We see players like Kayak and Priceline or Expedia who are also struggling to remain relevant with Google Flights,” shared Echeverri. Competing with Google for first-page search results is going to cost LATAM more. “What I think is going to start happening is that this will start increasing my costs.

A Silver Lining

The consequences of Google Flights’ entry into online flight search haven’t been all bad, however.

Echeverri declared that LATAM ticket sales tied to searches on Google have increased as a result of Google Flights directing consumers to LATAM flights. “Google Fights is increasing our sales. The multiple is probably ten-fold per year in the category of metasearch.”

Google Flights’ dominance on Google search has also forced LATAM to compete harder for other ways to win customers, including making improvements to its mobile application, frequent flyer program, and CRM.

We see players like Kayak and Priceline or Expedia who are also struggling to remain relevant with Google Flights.

A Better Deal for Consumers

Another consequence of Google’s disruption of flight search has been the possibility to break down the geographic barriers that allow airlines to sell tickets on the same routes at different prices, based on the market where the ticket is purchased.

According to Echeverri, the same round trip ticket between Mexico and Chile may cost more or less, depending on whether the purchase is made, in Chile or Mexico.

LATAM faces tough competition against Google flightsGoogle’s massive database of online information means Google Flights looks at fares from all over the world, so consumers can find a cheaper price on the same route, depending on where they choose to pay. It’s great for the consumer, but it will force airlines to adopt single pricing. “It’s hard on the airlines that used to have geographic barriers to manage their markets,” Echeverri asserted.

As a company you can do two things: start crying right now, or start doing stuff. LATAM has started doing stuff.

Here to Stay

“As a company, you can do two things: start crying right now, or start doing stuff. LATAM has started doing stuff. You don’t want all your eggs in one basket,” Echeverri warns.

Google Flights is “dominant and they are leveraging that dominance, which is good in the short term,” but could produce consequences that will have to be examined over the long term, according to Echeverri. “Google Flights is here to stay.”

 

What: Ecommerce marketing strategy is revealed by retailers Walmart and Soriana. It shows how they’re capturing the e-commerce home delivery grocery market in Mexico with alternative digital payment strategies.
Why it matters: Fear of fraud stops many Mexico consumers from making online purchases with a credit card. As a result, Walmart and Soriana are on it. Consequently, they’re deploying cash on delivery, branded digital cash cards, mobile phone loyalty programs, and PayPal options.

The race is on as grocers deploy ecommerce marketing strategy in Mexico. Grocery and general merchandise retailer Walmart has taken the lead. But in Mexico, its competitors, including Soriana, are racing to build their online-delivery businesses.

How customers pay for their online purchases could make all the difference.

High credit card commissions and fear of fraud pose a significant barrier to online sales in Mexico. Digital purchases make up only 3 percent of all consumer goods sales nationwide. As a result, that’s way below the average seen in other countries, according to branding expert Vilma Vale-Brennan. She is deputy general manager of Vale Network in Mexico.

The new President of Mexico, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, has promised to get banks to lower credit card commissions. But grocery retailers like Walmart don’t have time to lose.

Ecommerce Marketing Strategy with Digital Payment App

Last year, Walmart launched its own digital application. As a result, it allows customers to pay for goods at stores with the Walmart digital application “Cashi.”

After downloading the app to their mobile phones, customers can recharge it with cash at any Walmart-owned store. It’s a fast and easy way to convert cash into a secure digital payment option. As a result, customers use it for purchases at Walmart, Superama, Sam’s Club, and Bodega Aurrera stores.

Cashi can be used to pay electric bills and services including Netflix, Spotify, and Uber.

The idea here is to make purchasing with Walmart easier, and to give people more options.

But perhaps more importantly, Walmart tells Portada it expects to extend the Cashi digital payment system later this year to allow its online customers to use Cashi for online grocery purchases, according to Gabriela Buenrostro, assistant director of corporate communications. “The idea here is to make purchasing with Walmart easier, and to give people more options,” she said.

Walmart’s ecommerce marketing strategy outpaces the online market with 4.5 million e-commerce shoppers in Mexico, followed by grocers Soriana at 1.1 million, according to a study by the American media measurement and analytics company Comscore as reported by Portada.

Cash, PayPal Options Offered

Walmart offers online customers the option to use PayPal, and Soriana added the PayPal payment option to its online shopping site this year.

Soriana also allows its online customers to pay cash to the home delivery person, or use their credit card on the delivery person’s portable card reader, Director of Electronic Commerce Rafael Castelltort told Portada.

Most of Soriana’s online grocery customers shop online using Soriana’s branded mobile application on their cell phones. A Soriana loyalty card program has more than 9,000 users, and to build loyalty even more, Soriana, deploying its own ecommerce marketing strategy launched its own mobile phone service “Soriana Movil” in 2017, which earns users loyalty points that can be exchanged for free products, Castelltort said.

The trends are very clear. Mexicans prefer to use a mobile phone when visiting grocery stores’ online sites.

Soriana’s decision to launch its own mobile phone service in Mexico might appear tangential to an effort to build online purchases, however, it could be spot-on in terms of getting more online shoppers.

“The trends are very clear,” comScore’s Alejandra Ibarra, manager of comScore’s Latin America Services, told Portada when asked about ecommerce marketing strategies among grocers in Mexico. “Mexicans prefer to use a mobile phone when visiting grocery stores’ online sites.”

And as time goes by, mobile applications are becoming more and more important for grocery ecommerce market leaders like Soriana and Walmart.

Just last year, Walmart announced its acquisition of the online marketplace Cornershop. Users download the Cornershop application to make online purchases using their mobile phones at supermarkets, specialty food stores and pharmacies in Mexico and Chile, according to Forbes.

“The Cornershop acquisition by Walmart shows the focus that applications have for the company and the performance it must deliver to maintain its leadership,” Ibarra told Portada.

What: WeWork’s Ana Rivadeneyra reveals to Portada how WeWork “humanizes” its outreach to potential customers in order to grow its market in Mexico and Latin America.
Why it matters: WeWork is leveraging the power of its own members’ experiences as told by them on social and other digital media to fuel its rapid growth in Latin America. 

“Our community is our most valuable marketing tool.” That’s how Ana Rivadeneyra, Marketing Manager México at WeWork, describes WeWork’s strategy for continuing its rapid growth in Mexico and Latin America.

WeWork first entered the Latin America market in 2016 starting in Mexico City and has since grown its presence in the region to 50 locations and 11 cities in six countries, including Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Sao Paulo, Bogota, Río de Janeiro, Lima, Monterrey, Santiago de Chile, Medellin, Guadalajara and Belo Horizonte.

“This region is of utmost importance globally for WeWork since it is the fastest-growing region, taking into account that we have only spent a little more than two years in this territory,” Rivadeneyra tells Portada.

Today, WeWork has 32,000 members in Mexico, and 450,000 members worldwide.

Portada: How does WeWork see itself operating worldwide and in Mexico? Is it a real estate, services, or software company?

AR: Our growth in Latin America—and the world—is on all of those fronts. We provide a 360-degree solution that simplifies space installation and maintenance. We are a single point of contact for an architect, designer, construction professional, landlord, and attorney. Here, workers and companies have the space, technology, services and experience to help them focus on what’s most important to them. Beyond just the physical space, our network of members and our application create a worldwide community of professionals and businesses.

WeWork has 32,000 members in Mexico, and 450,000 members worldwide.

Portada: What are the traditional marketing tools WeWork is using to grow its market in Mexico and Latin America?

 AR: Our community of members is our most important marketing tool. For that reason, we have developed our “member stories” which are case studies of success that tell how WeWork has contributed with its growth, expansion and connections. To distribute these messages and to amplify their content, we use multiple channels such as social media, print, radio, videos and events. By the same token, we place a lot of importance on our referral program where our employees and members are awarded for recommending someone who is interested in a work space.

Our most valuable marketing tool is our own community. There is no one better than our members to explain what WeWork is and how we can help.

Portada: What are some of the newer marketing tools that WeWork is using to grow in Mexico and the region?

 AR: At WeWork we are constantly looking to innovate in all areas, and our marketing is no exception. Our strategy is highly focused on digital (Social Media, Google Ads, Search, Website, Email Marketing, etc.), but without losing the real experiences and the value of real connections with people. Therefore, we like to define our strategy as “humanized marketing.” Another one of our very valuable tools is our WeWork application. With it we have managed to materialize loyalty tactics like discount benefits for members, direct communications, push notifications, a referral program, etc.

Portada: Among the new digital marketing tools that WeWork is using, which ones are proving to be the most important?

 AR: Organic content on the Facebook and Instagram platforms works well for us in order to promote our mission and generate awareness of what we offer. We add to that strategic segmentation on the same social networks that allows us to talk about our products to a new market and grow the community. We also use tools like LinkedIn that work to connect with a specific target in a more direct way.

Portada: What is an example of a tool or technology that is making a big difference in your Latin America marketing?

 AR: We use the “WeWork experience” that our members have when working in our spaces, including events and experiences that can be posted on Instagram. This has proven to be one of the 360-degree tools where people can learn more about trends, well-being, and different themes that interest them. For this reason, we focus many of our efforts and actions to invite more people to enter our buildings and experience and live the spaces within.

What: Latin Trade has published its annual ranking of the Top 1,000 Latin American Companies by revenue, total assets and net income.
Why it matters: The net income of the 1,000 companies in the most recent LT1000 ranking reached $100.7 billion, down from the $121 billion from last year.

The net income of the 1,000 companies in the most recent LT1000 ranking reached $100.7 billion, down from the $121 billion from last year.

Maintaining their spot among the top 5 are Petrobras, with a 5,034 percent jump in net income compared with the previous year; Pemex (+20 percent); América Móvil (+1.7 percent); JBS (-4.9 percent) and Vale (+5.8 percent).

The LT1000 ranks Latin America’s 1,000 largest, non-financial, publicly listed companies by revenues, assets and EBITDA.

The sectors covered in the ranking are:

  • Agriculture & Fisheries
  • Metal
  • Chemical
  • Construction
  • Electronics
  • Home Appliances
  • Electric Power
  • Food & Beverage
  • Industrial Machinery
  • Mining
  • Oil & Gas
  • Pulp & Paper
  • Retail
  • Software & Data
  • Telecommunication
  • Textile
  • Transportation
  • Vehicle & Parts

To read the full document visit Latin Trade: https://latintrade.com/2019/07/30/latin-americas-top-1000-companies-2019/?v=0b98720dcb2c