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Alex Sanchez
Alex Sanchez

Alejandro “Alex” Sánchez is joining EPMG as Executive Vice President and Director of Hispanic Media and Custom Publishing.  Sánchez’s main focus will be put on driving growth in digital and print integrated platforms. He will oversee EPMG’s national sales team. Sanchez joins EPMG, a leading print and digital media placement firm  in the multicultural space, from The Houston Chronicle’s La Voz, where he was the publisher and general manager.

Trevor Hansen, CEO of EPMG, tells Portada that with the rapid growth in EPMG’s digital platform and overall growth in Hispanic print media, “Alex will be focussing on the synergy of these vehicles along with experiential opportunities where appropriate to create and deliver strong multi platform programs to our clients. An example of this is our forthcoming multi market/national World Cup program.”

“Alex has proven to be a leader in the advertising and communications industry and we are pleased to add him to our team,” Hansen, adds. “His experience, passion, and leadership will be a huge asset to our company, agency, and client partners.”

Brad Branson – General Manager Hispanic at The Houston Chronicle

Prior to joining the EPMG executive team, Sánchez worked at Hearst Media Services as vice president of advertising and marketing for the Houston Chronicle Media Group and as publisher and general manager for La Voz. It is not clear whether La Voz will get a new publisher. However, Brad Branson was recently promoted to the position of General Manager – Hispanic, Automotive at Hearst Media Group – Houston Chronicle and La Voz de Houston.

While general market newspapers continue to suffer from circulation decreases, despite growth in digital subscriptions, this is not the case for Hispanic newspapers. Several Hispanic publications, perhaps because of their strong community newspaper appeal,  have increased their circulation in recent months. Below is the case of four newspapers. Two in California, one in Houston and one in Atlanta.

 

    • La Prensa Riverside, CA
      NewspapersLa Prensa Riverside, CA, published by Belo Newspapers, just increased its circulation to 130,000 copies per week. The Spanish-language weekly has expanded circulation to the  Palm Springs/Coachella/Indio area with 25,000 issues bringing total weekly circulation to 130,000 copies per week. La Prensa Riverside had already doubled its circulation over a year ago from 65,000 to 105,000 copies per week.  Riverside/San Bernardino is the 4th largest Metro for Hispanic population. Also, these areas are showing record growth for the Hispanic population. Anita Grace of Anita Grace AD Execs in Minneapolis tells Portada that “nearly 2 million of the LA DMA Hispanics live in La Prensa’s distribution area.”  La Prensa Riverside circulation is audited by VAC and is the only Spanish language newspaper specific to the Inland Empire.  According to Grace, “La Prensa is distributed in racks in high Hispanic traffic areas and places where pick up remains high. We want to keep the pickup rate where we expect it to be so if a location has a few copies left over one week, we are going to move those to a location which runs out quickly.”
      Grace sells advertising into National & Strategic Accounts for La Voz AZ, La Prensa Riverside , Excelsior OC and El Sol Salinas, CA   at   Anita Grace AD Execs in Minneapolis.  La Prensa also recently introduced an i-phone App.

 

    • El Clasificado, CA
      El Clasificado, a weekly classified newspaper published by EC Hispanic Media that originated in Los Angeles in 1998, has expanded to several other markets through a sophisticated distribution system. Its weekly circulation just increased from 500,000 to 510,000 reaching over 300 cities through 28,000 distribution points in Los Angeles, Central Valley and San Diego. More than 1.5 million readers through racks in counties including  Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Riverside, San Bernardino, Kern, San Diego, Imperial, Fresno, Madera, Tulare and King. Hugo Hernandez, Director, Marketing, Events and National Sales at EC Hispanic Media tells Portada that “few people realize that every week we actually print 46  different publications targeting 46 distinct zones. One can buy one zone or all 46 zones, it is very efficient and eliminates waste.”

 

    • La Voz de Houston
      Hearst’s La Voz de Houston late last year announced that it expanded its weekly circulation to 405,000. The Spanish-language newspaper started to be published on Wednesday’s.  The mid-week issue, focuses  on providing useful, forward-looking information and events listings, is a complement to the weekend publication, which offers enterprise stories on the issues most compelling to the Latino community, exclusive sports and entertainment content and original series and opinions.

 

    • Atlanta’s  Mundo Hispánico
      Atlanta, GA, Spanish-language weekly Mundo Hispánico, published by Cox Media Group,  has a circulation of 71,000. Over the last year it has introduced several new publications that are published as stand-alone publications and cater to distinct audiences. They include legal Magazine Mundo Legal, which is published three times a year with a circulation of 30,000.  Padres & Hijos magazine, a monthly parenting magazine as well as health magazine Mundo Salud (3 times a year).  Two more biannual magazines are going to be introduced in the next few months: Mundo Educacion (education) and Mundo Belleza (Beauty).

 

Televisa Publishing and Digital just announced the launch of the Texas Edition of Poder Hispanic, a
a business and lifestyle publication targeted at English-speaking business-minded Latinos.  Mariano Faget,  Texas Sales Director at Televisa Publishing + Digital, tells Portada that the Texas  edition will have a circulation of 150,000.  The national circulation of Poder Hispanic  is 400,000. “Texas subscribers will obviously receive the Texas edition only.” The launch of the Texas edition of Poder reflects the strength of the oil-driven  Texas economy and its advertising and media markets.  Faget notes that  “The Texas market is growing in both advertising and subscriptions. ”

Similar to the national edition, Poder Hispanic Texas will focus on the local corporate and entrepreneurial community and provide its readers an in-depth look at the business landscape at large. This is the second regional edition of Poder Hispanic. It also publishes Poder Miami with a circulation of 125,000.

Strong Texas, Strong Print Advertising

Texas FlagHearst’s La Voz de Houston recently increased its distribution to twice a week and raised its circulation to 405,000. Contrary to the general  malaise in the  magazine market, print media properties have been growing in Texas. This is the case of the Emmis Communications owned Texas Monthly.  It has a circulation of 300,000. Texas Monthly chronicles life in contemporary Texas, writing on politics, the environment, industry, and education. The magazine increased ad sales last year by 7,2% to US $75 million.  Texas Monthly Publisher Amy Banner Saralegui said last year to Minonline that : “Every category is up, local and national are up, all of our existing advertisers are back and increasing and many of our prospects are converting to advertisers…  Texas is just doing well, and Texas Monthly is doing even better than that.”    Televisa’s Faget says that Poder Hispanic  is ” the clear Hispanic alternative  to Texas Monthly mirroring a similar demographic.  Advertisers cannot ignore this segment in this market.   The strong advertising categories include financial, regional auto, retail, education, tourism, spirits and all insurance.” Faget adds that “the Poder Hispanic Texas edition will serve the burgeoning Hispanic business market in Texas.”

la voz de houstonIn mid-November The Houston Chronicle’s La Voz de Houston added a second weekly home-delivered publication to its staple of Spanish-language newspapers. La Voz de Houston now will also be published on Wednesday’s. The first edition of the Wednesday newspaper was published yesterday. This mid-week issue, focused on providing useful, forwardlooking information and events listings, is a complement to the weekend publication, which offers enterprise stories on the issues most compelling to the Latino community, exclusive sports and entertainment content and original series and opinions. The increased publication schedule coupled with an expansion of the publication’s distribution footprint from 100 to 199 key zip codes has resulted in a quadrupling of circulation to a total of 405,000 copies per week, said La Voz de Houston’s publisher, Alejandro Sanchez. “Our Wednesday and weekend issues each reach 165,000 hand-selected Spanish-speaking households, with an additional 75,000 copies of the weekend edition distributed within targeted retail outlets in hightraffic areas.”
Approximately 70% of U.S. Hispanics are of Mexican origin. Do Mexican companies have an advantage when marketing to the U.S. Hispanic market because of this demographic fact? A panel organized during the Foro Portada Mexico 2012, which took place in Mexico City on October 17th, examined if and how Mexican companies, can successfully enter the U.S. Hispanic market.
THE MEDIA SIDE…
Many Mexican media companies have tried to enter the U.S. Hispanic market. Many have failed – take Editorial Armonia backed Megazines Publications which folded a few years ago. Other ventures, like Televisa’s “telenovela’ format have been wildly successful. Asked about his experience in exporting Diario de México, a domestic Mexican daily newspaper, to the U.S. Hispanic market, publisher Federico Bracamontes (second from right in the above photo) noted that : “Fue una locura” (“It was an insanity”). “We had to start from scratch. It’s a big mistake to expect that launching a newspaper in the U.S. Hispanic market will produce the same results as in Mexico. The Mexican community in the United States is not Mexico!” According to Bracamontes, Diario de México USA was the only ABC audited newspaper that was able to grow its circulation in 2011 along with The Washington Post.
Diario de Mexico USA has two editions: one in New York and one in Chicago. The content of each of these issues reflects the very different communities of Mexican Americans living in both cities. In New York, the Mexican community is mostly composed of first and second generation immigrants from Puebla, Oaxaca and Guerrero, while Mexican-Americans living in Chicago have lived there 60 years on average and are fourth or fifth generation immigrants. Most Mexican Americans living in Chicago come from the Michoacán and Zacatecas regions. “Many of them have their own house and manage their own business,” Bracamontes noted.
HYPERLOCAL CONTENT
Bracamontes explained that his company’s content approach to the U.S. Hispanic market is hyperlocal. In the light of the different composition of the Mexican American audience in New York and Chicago and its different content needs, Diario Mexico USA created a system Bracamontes calls “the information turbine”. Two different editions (Chicago and New York) are produced in the newsroom of Diario de Mexico in Mexico City. One edition contains news from the regions of origin of Mexicans in New York and, another one, is customized for Chicago. These editions are then sent to Diario Mexico USA’s offices in Chicago and New York. A team in each of these cities then adds local news about the Mexican community to the editions which are printed at local printing plants. The result is that content is not only tailored to each specific audience but also produced at more affordable Mexican salaries. Newspaper distribution in New York City and Chicago is outsourced. However, Diario de Mexico USA does have a local and national advertising sales force in the U.S.

The Houston Chronicle’s La Voz de Houston has added a second weekly home-delivered publication to its staple of Spanish-language newspapers. The move reflects the Houston Chronicle’s commitment  to expand its Hispanic oriented products as well as the strength of the Texas Hispanic Advertising and Media markets. On the advertising side, the addition of a home delivered publication on Wednesday’s takes into account the retail advertisers’ increasing demand for home-delivered publications.

La Voz de Houston now will also be published on Wednesday’s. The first edition of the Wednesday newspaper was published yesterday. This mid-week issue, focused on providing useful, forward-looking information and events listings, is a complement to the weekend publication, which offers enterprise stories on the issues most compelling to the Latino community, exclusive sports and entertainment content and original series and opinions.

Texas Flag

The Texas (Hispanic) advertising and media market is growing at a higher rate than the overall U.S.  market. This is partly due to the state profiting from high oil prices.  La Voz’s move is also related to the increasing demand of retail advertisers for home-delivered publications. Home-delivered newspapers reach household decision makers (mostly the Hispanic housewife) at home and often contain coupons and preprint-FSI advertising.

The increased publication schedule coupled with an expansion of the publication’s distribution footprint from 100 to 199 key zip codes has resulted in a quadrupling of circulation to a total of 405,000 copies per week, said La Voz de Houston’s publisher, Alejandro “Alex” Sanchez. Sanchez added “La Voz is Houston’s most-read Spanish-language newspaper and the only one delivering local, national and international news twice a week,” Sanchez said. “Our Wednesday and weekend issues each reach 165,000 hand-selected Spanish-speaking households, with an additional 75,000 copies of the weekend edition distributed within targeted retail outlets in high-traffic areas.”

Additions to Editorial Team

The Houston area’s Latino population is projected to grow 18 percent over the next five years, and relevant, compelling content and commerce serving this community is in demand as well, Sanchez said. To bring those stories to life, La Voz de Houston in recent weeks has added several new voices, including Alvaro Ortiz, who most recently led Azteca America’s Texas News Bureau; Olivia P. Tallet, who has worked for EFE News Services; and Giselle Bueno, who joins the team from Semana News and will lead efforts on LaVozTX.com.“These experienced journalists, like the communities they cover, hail from diverse backgrounds and bring to the table a wide variety of experiences,” said Aurora Losada, editor of La Voz de Houston.