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What: Kantar has published the results of a study that aims to understand millennial households in Latin America.
Why it matters: A quarter of the population of Latin America is millennial, and they account for 24% of total FMCG spend – equivalent to US $30 billion dollars.

 

Millennials are on every marketer’s mind, for one reason or another. In Latin America, they account for 24% of total FMCG spend, equivalent to US $30 billion dollars. Most of them are grown-ups, which means marketers should be thinking of understanding not only how they behave, but also how they fulfill their responsibilities and care for their families.

Kantar has released the results of a study titled Demystifying Millennial Families that aims to provide the full picture: what’s on millennials’ minds? What are their households like? What are their priorities? While it’s true that they are digitally connected all day every day, this also means they expect products, services, and experiences to be personalized, so brands need to be able to tailor their message specifically for their target if they wish to make an impact. Below are a few of the study’s main findings.

 

Millennial Families: What Makes Them Different

According to Kantar’s report, 8 in every 10 millennial households have young children, defining to a great extent the family’s cares and concerns. Two-thirds (66%) of these households are low-income families, and half are getting by on a single income. Half of millennial housewives in Latin America do not have jobs and the ones who do only work part-time. If we add to that the financial pressures of the country they live in, millennials have it difficult. Because of this reason, they are switching to economy brands and looking for special promotions.

High-income families, on the contrary, represent 34% of the millennial population in Latin America. They tend to have smaller families, of one or two people and are less likely to have kids.

Source: Kantar, Demystifying Millennial Families

What Do They Buy?

To a great extent, what millennial families buy (and how they buy) depends on their income and whether they have children. The report shows 63% of high-income families own a car, compared to only 22% of low-income families.

Millennials are also spending a big percentage of their budget on groceries, and e-commerce is growing fast in this category. As said in the report, this is set to be an increasingly key channel through which to reach millennials, with value share expected to reach 5% in Argentina and 3% in Brazil and Mexico by 2025.

The products in millennials’ baskets are directly related to their families’ needs. Diapers, powdered milk, snacks, biscuits, and bread are the most-bought products among low-income households, making up 15% of the value share. UHT milk, beer, yogurt, pet food, and cheese are the top categories (14.5% value share) for high-income families. As for their online purchases, personal care products make up almost half of all FMCG products bought online by millennials, twice that of the general population.

As the report concludes, marketers really need to be aware that the millennial generation has grown, and so have their hopes and responsibilities: “It’s time to revisit millennial shoppers and adjust our view of who they are – recognizing the line that exists between high-income and low-income households. Only then can we successfully reach, target and engage this vitally important group.”

 

 

What: Kantar has released the results of its yearly Brand Footprint report, based on research of 72% of the global population.
Why it matters: In Latin America, 8 of the top 10 brands belong in the food and beverage category. Brands can refer to Kantar’s report to find out what these brands have in common, and why they are so close to the Latin American consumer’s heart.

 

Kantar has released the 2019 edition of the Brand Footprint report, a study of this year’s most chosen fast-moving consumer goods based on research of 72% of the global population; a total of one billion households in 49 countries across five continents, accounting for a staggering 85% of the global GDP.

According to the study, Coca-Cola reigns steady for the seventh year in a row as the world’s most chosen brand, purchased over 5.9 billion times. Stepping on its heels are Colgate, the only brand chosen by more than half of the world’s population (6 out of 10 households globally), and Maggi, raising consumer’s choice up to 7%.

In Latin America, the food and beverage categories dominated the top ten (except for Colgate, at second place, featuring a 89.6% penetration in 2018). Falling behind Coca Cola, the ultimate champion, are staple brands Bimbo and Maggi taking up the third and fifth spot, followed by the soft-drink category represented by Lala, Pepsi, Nescafé, and Tang ranking from 6 to 9, and kitchen basic Knorr at the 9th spot.

The study revealed an important turning point in Latam: the FMCG market has brought its growth to a grinding halt after seeing an 8% volume increase just a decade ago. Consumers are changing their habits and priorities, challenging brands and manufacturers to keep up with their new frames of mind. Health and environmental sustainability have become imperative features of modern products that seek to thrive with the millennial consumer force. The following is a list of the top 10 most-chosen brands in Latin America.

Top 10 Most-Chosen Brands in Latam

RankBrandPenetration, %Consumer choice

(choices by shopper)

Consumer reach points (000)
1Coca-Cola88.2%27.72797
2Colgate91.0%8.2854
3Bimbo32.4%19.3715
4Lala17.8%32.3657
5Maggi63.1%8.9641
6Tang56.6%7.6496
7Pepsi41.6%10.1479
8Knorr57.4%7.2475
9Nescafé41.5%9.4446
10Palmolive59.3%5.4364

Source: Brand Footprint Report, Kantar Worldpanel 2018.

 

What: A summary of the most relevant consumer insight research in the US, US Hispanic, and Latin American markets.
Why it matters: If you’re trying to keep up with the latest happenings, this is your one-stop shop.

 

  • Kantar has published the results of a study titled Trends: Mexican Consumer, Shopper and Retail, which shows that 87% of young Mexicans feel they can change the world through their actions. 71% try to purchase products in recycled or reused packaging, while 45% choose companies that follow clear and committed environmental policies.

 

  • According to new Digital Lives Study data from the Culture Marketing Council, the 13-49 social media influencer follower market is a multicultural majority; 55% (6.7 million) of 13-17 followers are multicultural, 51% (31.3 million) of 18-49 are multicultural. Sixty-nine percent of Hispanic teens and 51% of non-Hispanic teens see the influencer as a trusted source and would consider buying the brand or service they feature.

 

  • New research from the Harris Poll and ZestFinance shows deep dissatisfaction among most Americans with the traditional credit scoring system. More than half (54%) of loan applicants don’t even have a clear understanding of why they receive the interest rate they do from a lender, while a majority (70%) say it is difficult finding lenders who will look at them as something other than their credit score. 7 in 10 American adults (71%) wish there was another way to prove themselves to credit lenders outside of the standard credit score. Hispanics (82%) and African Americans (81%) are more likely than Whites (67%) to want lenders to look at additional factors in lending decisions.

 

  • According to survey conducted by Ipsos on behalf of Charlie Finance, 46% of American women who are single/have never been married say that they would rather be in a relationship with someone who has bad credit (credit score below 500) over someone who has a tattoo of their ex (54%). Another 45% say that they would rather go on a first date with someone who has moderate credit card debt ($5k – $10k) over someone who doesn’t vote in political elections (versus 55% who disagree). Only a third (34%) believe that being in a serious relationship brings financial security (versus 66% who disagree).

 

  • A U.S. survey conducted by Simmons Research in August 2018 found that 27.4% of parents said they were more likely to buy products they see used or recommended by friends on social sites, higher than the one-fifth of total adult respondents. Mothers were almost twice as likely as fathers to say the same. Parents were more likely to be influenced by social ads vs. adults overall, among whom just 13.0% of total adults said they were more likely to buy goods they see advertised on social. The survey also found that 44.7% of mothers and 36.4% of fathers acknowledged that advertising “helps me learn about the products companies have to offer.”

 

  • According to the annual survey released by the National Retail Federation, Mother’s Day spending is expected to total a record US $25 billion this year, up from $23.1 billion in 2018. A total 84% of U.S. adults are expected to celebrate in honor of their mothers and/or other women. Consumers ages 35-44 are likely to spend the most at an average $248, up from $224, and men are likely to spend more than women at $237 compared with $158.

 

 

 

 

What: BrandZ, WPP and Kantar have released their annual report of the top 50 more valuable brands in Latin America.
Why it matters: Mexico is home to more of the most valuable brands than any other Latin American country.

According to the sixth annual BrandZ Top 50 Most Valuable Latin American Brands report, Mexican beer Corona, with an 8% brand value growth, has edged out Skol, which grew by just 1%. Corona is sold in more than 180 countries.

The 2017 BrandZ LatAm ranking, based on Kantar data, shows the difficult time faced by many brands in the region with a 22% decline in total brand value. In the 2018 ranking, total brand value increased by 18% to US $130.8 billion, boosted by an impressive performance from the strongest and healthiest brands, those that believed in their purpose and stayed relevant to the consumers.

“The power of strong brands to drive improved business performance can be clearly seen in this year’s Latin America Ranking. While the economy may fluctuate, those brands that are strong will remain more stable in the tough times and grow faster in the good times,” said WPP’s David Roth in a press release.

The BrandZ™ Top 10 Most Valuable Latin American Brands 2018


This year’s BrandZ Latin American ranking shows a strong performance for local financial institutions (up 46%) and the four beer brands in the Top 10, controlled by global giants –Corona, Skol, Brahma (all AB InBev) and Aguila (Heineken)– have maintained and invested in their local characteristics enabling them to boost brand value.

“Latin American brands have an in-depth understanding of their local consumers; the speed at which they can tap into local consumers’ needs with good products and strong marketing campaigns has made many of them more successful and relevant in the region than their global counterparts. As a result, Latin Americans have great respect and pride in these brands,” said Kantar’s Eduardo Tomiya.

Other key trends identified in the BrandZ™ LatAm Top 50 study include:

  • There were eight new entries in the Top 50 this year: Globo (no. 8), Ypé (no. 33), Azteca (no. 37), Embratel (no. 40), Lojas Americanas (no. 46), Net (no. 48) and Porto Seguro (no. 50). All are from Brazil, except Azteca which is based in Mexico. Communications provider Tigo Une was formed from the merger of Tigo and Une in Colombia, which were previously listed separately, and is now No 27.
  • Mexico dominates but Brazil is catching up: For the fifth year the ranking was dominated by Mexico, which contributed 35% of the total brand value of the ranking. Brazil however was close behind at 34%, with strong performances by its retail and financial players. Chile was in third position at 16%, followed by Colombia at 7%.
  • FinTechs threaten established financial players: In Brazil, Nubank started this revolution and became the first billion-dollar startup in the country, followed by Banco Original and Banco Neon. Well-positioned brands such as the Brazilian banks Bradesco and Itaú and the Chilean bank Banco de Chile are still strong brands in the consumers’ minds and are using these attributes aligned with local needs to fight back by launching their own digital platforms.
  • E-commerce is a real threat to established retail: Rising internet usage and mobile access in many markets, up 14% every year across the region since 2010, represents a real threat to bricks and mortar stores. While the Retail category saw growth of 2% in this year’s ranking, the transition to a mixed retail economy is still in progress.

“Disruption has already spawned a new wave of brands across Latin America and while they have not yet displaced some of the more established names, rising internet access, and mobile uptake is giving them greater market access. The power of a strong brand combined with its own digital platform will be required to future proof many of today’s big players,” said Kantar’s Gabriel Castellanos.

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

Leo Burnett Madrid has brought Dani Sáenz back to the team after 8 years. He’ll be creative director, filling in for the role after the departure of Mercedes Lucena, who will start a new phase of her career in Mexico.

 

 

 

 

Vivendi-owned video platform Dailymotion has announced the appointment of David L. Rios to Head of Latin American & US Hispanic Content Partnerships.

 

 

 

 

 

Bernardo Geoghegan has been named director of future strategy and tendency prevision in Latin America at Kantar, reported AdLatina. He had been general manager of the firm since 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

Indiana Quiñones will be head of business development in Latin America at Adsmovil. Previously she had been working at Adcolony. Both firms announced their exclusive partnership recently. Matias Godoi is also joining Adsmovil, as head of programming and platform development. He has over 12 years of experience in media and 5 years of experience in the videogame industry.

 

 

Juan Manuel Hoyos has been appointed to marketing director at Nissan Latin America. He’ll be replacing Rodrigo Centeno, who is now general manager of the operation in the region. Hoyos will be in charge of marketing strategies from the company’s Mexican headquarters.

 

 

 

 

 

Xerox has combined its marketing operations in Latin America and the Caribbean, and has placed Mariana Ferola as head of the region.

 

 

 

 

Adecco has promoted Aldo Sepúlveda Tobar to new commercial director for Latin America. He’s been a part of the company since 2003.

 

 

 

 

 

Natura has appointed Juan Salgado to marketing manager in Argentina. His main role will be boosting growth and leadership, as well as improving the brand positioning in South America.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A summary of the most exciting recent research in brand marketing in the U.S., U.S.-Hispanic and Latin American markets. If you’re trying to keep up, consider this your one-stop shop.

According to a study by Survata, Instagram, with 22% of the vote, ranked No. 1 among 18- to 24-year-olds for the platform with the best natural ad experience, followed by Google with 21%, Facebook, 17%; Snapchat, 14%; YouTube, 11%; Pinterest, 8%; and Twitter, 7%.

Social Media Marketing Works: A study at University of Oxford, recently found that brands whose social marketing campaigns portrayed the brand as “more personable, emotional and less functional” – essentially more human – had a strong positive effect on brand awareness. There was, however, a difference of up to than 35 percentage points between the most and least effective campaigns, where content and style of the ad made a significant impact.

According to Tubular Intelligence, there are 181 videos from 91 brands that have more than 1 million engagements as well as 5 million views on YouTube. 

A new study conducted by IPG Mediabrands’ intelligence and investment unit Magna, the IPG Media Lab, analytics company Moat and programmatic software company The Trade Desk over the past year found that more viewable campaigns are also more likely to lead consumers to buy, click or register and that related standards achieve similar results.

Almost 80% of marketers said customer communications must include a two-way dialogue between brands and consumers that “more deeply engages customers, address[es] customer questions, resolves issues, influences purchase decisions, improves loyalty and increases transactions,” but that less than half (48%) of marketers thought current two-way communications platforms could meet those needs, including social media, messaging apps and chatbots, according to a study by LiveWorld.

A study by Kantar Millward Brown found no strong correlation between campaign success and factors such as industry category, region, or number of creative types used in a campaign, but that brands who communicate using human language, connecting with people’s emotions and “avoiding more functional words and phrases,” tend to perform better in advertising effectiveness.

A new study from Goldsmiths University and Adobe found that the majority of firms are not taking advantage of how AI can provide improved customer experiences. Almost two thirds (61%) of consumers said they were loyal to brands that tailor their experiences to them, yet less than a third of marketers are using AI to do so (32%).

The “Trust in News” study by Kantar found that traditional print and broadcast media brands are more resilient to accusations of “fake news” than social media platforms and digital news outlets and that news consumers are reading more widely and becoming more sophisticated in their engagement with news content, engaging in activities like “fact checking.”

 Smartling, a translation technology service, released findings of a new study that reveals content localization is a top priority for global brands, with 94 percent of marketers surveyed in the U.S. and Europe citing plans to increase spending on content localization in the coming year.

WPP’s stake in comScore no cause for concern among media agencies, who applaud the potential of the partnership.

Half_full_half_empty
ComScore-WPP: Half full or half empty?

Kantar and comScore have allied to provide what they’re calling best-of-breed, cross-media audience- and campaign-measurement to the international realm. Kantar, WPP’s data investment management decision, will work with comScore to integrate their technologies, and comScore will acquire the assets of Kantar’s Internet audience measurement businesses in certain European markets. To deepen the relationship, WPP will take an approximate 20 percent stake in comScore.

There is still a major gap for advertisers and agencies to crack the media measurement code.

Overall, I think it’s a very positive thing for the industry,” says Justin Kuykendall, CEO of Pulpo Media. “There is still a major gap for advertisers and agencies to crack the media measurement code.”

The international angle makes this a strong play, according to Ludmila Palašìn, associate director of The Media Kitchen. She says, “Since this deal involves only European audience measurement assets, we think this is terrific for our international clients. Cross-media measurement is an ongoing challenge everywhere. This agreement makes us more responsive to our international clients’ cross-media measurement challenges.”

There’s potential synergy in the combination, according to Alex Kalluf, director of intelligence at Figliulo&Partners. Kantar has some strong cross-platform offerings, while comScore rocks in digital. In addition, the two are complementary in international markets. Says Kalluf, “Especially in Latin America, Brazil and China, they will have a stronger offering.”

There is a potential downside to this partnership, Kalluf says: “There’s a lot of overlap between some of the Kantar companies and what comScore does.” If the two decide to roll some of those up into a unified offering, it could lead to fewer options for agencies.

Media execs did not seem concerned about a potential for undue influence by WPP because of its stake in comScore. WPP isn’t about to kill this golden data goose, they said.

“There’s a lot of overlap between some of the Kantar companies and what comScore does.

Captura de pantalla 2014-12-08 a la(s) 18.20.17“WPP is not about to invest in a partnership and then destroy one of the main the reasons the partnership was struck in the first place,” Palašìn says. “If WPP influenced comScore’s research in any way, comScore would lose its primary asset—its reputation for objectivity.”

One thing to watch, according to Kalluf, is whether WPP might tighten comScore’s purse strings. While WPP gives Kantar a lot of independence, he notes, large corporations are more reluctant to spend money. To date, comScore has invested heavily in new products. With WPP keeping an eye on its investment, he says, “ComScore might lose the ability to innovate as fast. Something to watch is how comScore will keep innovating and coming up with new solutions.”

Kuykendall thinks the deal will help companies like Pulpo Media, which, since it was acquired by Entravision last year, includes TV and radio properties as well as digital. “Advertisers are looking to see how different properties work together, and they want to see their investment across all those platforms and how each contributes to the ROI they’re getting.”

Nevertheless, he doesn’t see the Kantar/comScore combo as the ultimate measurement solution. I think one of the reasons WPP is investing in comScore is because it’s a hard problem to solve. Most advertisers and agencies would argue there is still a lot of work to be done.”

What: ComScore has announced a strategic alliance with WPP’s data investment management division, Kantar to boost the companies’ cross-platform audience and ad measurement capabilities outside of the U.S. The agreement follows the intended acquisition by WPP of a substantial equity stake in comScore, worth about US$300 million giving WPP a total ownership of between 15% and 20%.
Why it matters: WPP will have a significant stake in ComScore.nComScore is the second audience-measurement firm that WPP has recently taken a stake in, last year the global ad conglomerate  took a 16.7 percent stake in Oregon-based Rentrak, It remains to be seen what reaction major WPP competitors such as Havas, Publicis etc, have towards these audience measurement firms WPP has a stake in.

0P3GbWrt_400x400Reston-based company ComScore, whose measures of Web, mobile and other digital consumer behavior are often used to track how ad campaigns perform, has announced a strategic alliance with WPP‘s data investment management division, Kantar to boost the companies’ cross-platform audience and ad measurement capabilities outside of the U.S.

The alliance establishes a framework for the parties to bring the best of breed together from the two companies – their products, technology, data assets, research panels and relationships – to provide world class cross-media audience and campaign measurement capabilities.

The alliance establishes a framework for the parties to bring the best of breed together from the two companies – their products, technology, data assets, research panels and relationships

The agreement follows the intended acquisition by WPP of a substantial equity stake in comScore, worth about US$300 million, according to The Financial Times. Under the terms of this agreement, comScore will issue 4.45% in shares in exchange for the benefits of the strategic alliance, and acquisition of certain European Internet audience measurement assets. WPP will also purchase up to 15% shares of comScore at US $46.13 a share, giving WPP a total ownership stake in comScore of between 15-20%. The transaction is subject to customary regulatory approvals and is expected to close in the second quarter of 2015.

In addition, as part of the deal, comScore will get Kantar’s audience measurement business covering some markets in Europe. In these markets, Kantar and comScore will continue to provide the same level of seamless integration and data services.

As long as WPP’s tender offer is successful, it is expected to be accretive to comScore’s non-GAAP earnings per share in 2015. Following this deal, ComScore would maintain its independence and WPP executives would not play leadership roles or have a spot on ComScore’s board.

“This long-term, strategic alliance will simplify the deployment of global measurement capabilities and accelerate the creation of new services for the industry. The emerging mediascape points to a massive global opportunity waiting to be unlocked by cracking the code on cross-media audience and campaign measurement,” said comScore CEO Serge Matta. “We look forward to working together with Kantar to deliver new measurement products based on our complementary offerings in these markets.”

Kantar CEO Eric Salama commented, “By partnering with comScore and combining our respective strengths, we will integrate data and expertise to give our clients a new standard in measuring audiences and campaigns across multiple platforms. This continues our strategy of combining survey, panel and census data and putting digital at the heart of all we do.”

ComScore is the second audience-measurement firm that WPP has recently taken a stake in, as last year, the firm took a 16.7 percent stake in Oregon-based Rentrak, a company that measures viewing behavior of movies and television.The alliance will certainly help comScore compete against rival Nielsen, which launched a partnership with Adobe last October to measure all digital content consumption—including online TV and video—across the Web and apps.To the WPP, it means bolstering the digital and data services it offers to its clients.

What: ComScore has announced a strategic alliance with WPP’s data investment management division, Kantar to boost the companies’ cross-platform audience and ad measurement capabilities outside of the U.S. The agreement follows the intended acquisition by WPP of a substantial equity stake in comScore, worth about US$300 million giving WPP a total ownership of between 15% and 20%.
Why it matters: WPP will have a significant stake in ComScore.nComScore is the second audience-measurement firm that WPP has recently taken a stake in, last year the global ad conglomerate  took a 16.7 percent stake in Oregon-based Rentrak, It remains to be seen what reaction major WPP competitors such as Havas, Publicis etc, have towards these audience measurement firms WPP has a stake in.

0P3GbWrt_400x400Reston-based company ComScore, whose measures of Web, mobile and other digital consumer behavior are often used to track how ad campaigns perform, has announced a strategic alliance with WPP‘s data investment management division, Kantar to boost the companies’ cross-platform audience and ad measurement capabilities outside of the U.S.

The alliance establishes a framework for the parties to bring the best of breed together from the two companies – their products, technology, data assets, research panels and relationships – to provide world class cross-media audience and campaign measurement capabilities.

The alliance establishes a framework for the parties to bring the best of breed together from the two companies – their products, technology, data assets, research panels and relationships

The agreement follows the intended acquisition by WPP of a substantial equity stake in comScore, worth about US$300 million, according to The Financial Times. Under the terms of this agreement, comScore will issue 4.45% in shares in exchange for the benefits of the strategic alliance, and acquisition of certain European Internet audience measurement assets. WPP will also purchase up to 15% shares of comScore at US $46.13 a share, giving WPP a total ownership stake in comScore of between 15-20%. The transaction is subject to customary regulatory approvals and is expected to close in the second quarter of 2015.

In addition, as part of the deal, comScore will get Kantar’s audience measurement business covering some markets in Europe. In these markets, Kantar and comScore will continue to provide the same level of seamless integration and data services.

As long as WPP’s tender offer is successful, it is expected to be accretive to comScore’s non-GAAP earnings per share in 2015. Following this deal, ComScore would maintain its independence and WPP executives would not play leadership roles or have a spot on ComScore’s board.

“This long-term, strategic alliance will simplify the deployment of global measurement capabilities and accelerate the creation of new services for the industry. The emerging mediascape points to a massive global opportunity waiting to be unlocked by cracking the code on cross-media audience and campaign measurement,” said comScore CEO Serge Matta. “We look forward to working together with Kantar to deliver new measurement products based on our complementary offerings in these markets.”

Kantar CEO Eric Salama commented, “By partnering with comScore and combining our respective strengths, we will integrate data and expertise to give our clients a new standard in measuring audiences and campaigns across multiple platforms. This continues our strategy of combining survey, panel and census data and putting digital at the heart of all we do.”

ComScore is the second audience-measurement firm that WPP has recently taken a stake in, as last year, the firm took a 16.7 percent stake in Oregon-based Rentrak, a company that measures viewing behavior of movies and television.The alliance will certainly help comScore compete against rival Nielsen, which launched a partnership with Adobe last October to measure all digital content consumption—including online TV and video—across the Web and apps.To the WPP, it means bolstering the digital and data services it offers to its clients.

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Late last year consultancy group Kantar acquired the majority interest and control of Latin America’s leading media measurement business, IBOPE Media  for an undisclosed amount of money.Portada talked to Antonio Wanderley, COO of IBOPE Media, on the acquisition  and its implications for the Latin American research space.

Portada: What does the majority stake of Kantar in Ibope mean in terms of future offerings?

347198fAntonio Wanderley: “Kantar has already been participating in the decisions of IBOPE Media in Latin America for 17 years. In the last three years, Kantar Media increasingly assumed a leading role in this process. Through technological support of the company, IBOPE Media might include solutions in the portfolio like the inclusion of search engines in monitoring advertising investment and the measurement of television viewing on PCs. This acquisition does not represent a strategic realignment of the company, but it accelerates the implementation of our strategy.”

Kantar has already been participating in the decision making process at  IBOPE Media in Latin America for 17 years

Portada: How will Kantar and Ibope’s presence evolve in Latin America in terms of  the physical location of offices?
Antonio Wanderley: “Today, IBOPE Media has a wide coverage, with operations in 16 countries in Latin America. The combination of technology with the investment of Kantar Media will enable the expansion of coverage within each country.”

Portada:  Question 2 but referred to the Miami space.
Antonio Wanderley: “The performance of IBOPE Media in Miami is well established and has been very successful for 15 years. Customers are satisfied with our services and there are no plans to introduce changes.”

Portada: Do you see more consolidation happening in the research services space? Yes, no, and why?
Antonio Wanderley: “The demand of global customers for integrated services and a global approach in combination with the need for substantial investments in technology are the main drivers of  market consolidation trend.”

 

What: Insight, information and consultancy group Kantar has acquired the majority interest and control of Latin America’s leading media measurement business, IBOPE Media for an undisclosed amount of money. IBOPE Media’s senior management and company structure will remain unchanged.
Why it matters: The deal marks a new era for both companies and reflects Kantar’s belief that the Latin American market presents major growth opportunities. Kantar and IBOPE have been competitors in the LatAm market research space, specially in media measurement, for many years. The deal combines the largest companies in the Latin American space.  The deal cements Kantar Media’s position as a market leader in Television Audience Measurement in 48 countries.

Tl7BRWNG_400x400Kantar, the data investment management arm of WPP and one of the world’s largest insight, information and consultancy groups, has acquired the majority interest and control of Latin America’ media measurement business, IBOPE Media.

The acquisition further strengthens Kantar Media’s significant global footprint and expertise in all aspects of media measurement and evaluation and will enable Kantar to better link media and purchase data throughout the region.

IBOPE Media’s senior management and company structure will remain unchanged. CEO Orlando Lopes will continue to run the company, joining the Kantar Media board and reporting to Kantar Media Chairman and CEO Andy Brown.

The deal marks a new era for both companies and reflects Kantar’s belief that the Latin American market presents major growth opportunities.

Andy Brown commented: “Kantar Media and IBOPE Media have worked in partnership for 17 years. Given the opportunities we see in the region, the time was right to increase ownership and to accelerate the sharing of technologies and offers with the Kantar Media business. We’re excited to welcome Orlando and the exceptional team at IBOPE Media to Kantar Media and look forward to driving continued innovation and growth as we develop our combined offer.”

Orlando Lopes, CEO of Ibope Media
Orlando Lopes, CEO of Ibope Media

Orlando Lopes added: “I am looking forward to the next stage in IBOPE Media’s evolution and excited about the investment that Kantar Media will bring. Our company will not only keep its business strong within the markets in which it operates but it will also benefit from investment and new expertise enabling us to offer fresh and exciting products to our clients”.

In the past 18 months, Kantar Media has added expertise, extended global reach and new measurement capabilities through the acquisition of companies including Data Republic, Precise, the audio watermarking unit of Civolution as well as its recently-announced asset swap and investment in US TV and video measurement specialist Rentrak.