Tag

juan manuel beltran

Browsing

CRONICAS ESPAÑOL

In our third installment of “Chronicles across the pond” Juan Manuel talks about one of the “old-new” trends in advertising: Real Time Bidding (RTB). This type of media buying and selling has generated several changes in the industry that may not necessarily be apparent at this time. What kind of changes are we talking about?

Translated by Candice Carmel

Photo: SunnyUK. Used under license from CC

If Newton was right — and there isn’t much evidence to the contrary — every action has an opposite reaction that tries to prevent the movement initiated. In the advertising market (and by that I mean all advertising regardless of media platform), there is an action that is coherently developed in tune with the possibilities offered by technology, and which is changing the structural relationship between media and the market.

As you may have guessed, I’m referring to business formulas based on real-time auctions, or Real-Time Bidding—which is the final frontier, the universal paradigm, the great utopia and ultimately, something very old that is sustained by a very new technology.

RTB, something very old supported by very new technology…

The auction concept has existed since time immemorial, but the current trend does open up immense possibilities in the Internet market. Shall we take a look at this new world?

First, what is obvious is that it is a huge change in both the SELLING and BUYING process and how it’s done. For now, these two forces appear to have the upper hand, applying their enormous financial capacity to impose the method. Marketers today seem to react to it without feeling comfortable with the results, methods, and of course the prices being bandied about.

These growing pains will lessen as the method becomes more established and evolved, and both parties realize that the tool should not condition the value or price of what is being sold through it.

By exaggerating our hand, we risk a sort of consecration of the absurd. It’s as if when fax machines were first introduced, we had used them to impact advertising rates.

The bidding process will eventually adjust values ​​and everyone will experiment with it until having mastered the ability to generate value products that have adequate demand—the kind that makes prices go up.

The second fantasy involves the number and profile of the professionals needed in the entire process, from start to finish. It seems that both sides need a refresher on concepts that will allow those using the tool to achieve maximum performance. While it is true that the number of processes will be reduced, I doubt that in the long term we will need to rely on having fewer professionals volved. Different ones, yes, but I do not think they will be fewer in number.

The technology is evolving too fast to exponentially increase options, and those involved in the buying and selling need to have a very good knowledge of available alternatives in order to achieve the best results.

This means negotiating, sharing information, knowing what your goals are, making adjustments, improving services, adapting profiles, and establishing coherent and well-known targets. In short, it involves highly knowledgeable work that will end up yielding results that are impossible at the moment.

And this will be possible thanks to well-trained professionals who will be better able to recognize and generate empathy, and who want to improve their knowledge and skills in a sector that — unless I’m mistaken — will be the first of many more to adopt this marketing system. Hasn’t television been doing something similar to this for a long time?

Forewarned is forearmed…

beltranJuan Manuel  is a media and advertising professional since the 80s, he has worked in many areas related to advertising management, such as media buying for TV and print. Since 1994, he has worked on Internet-related sales, purchasing, and management. For the past three+ years, Beltrán has been in charge of the Spain Business Development at Improve Digital, a company dedicated to optimizing inventory for editors.

CRONICAS ESPAÑOL

In our third installment of “Chronicles across the pond” Juan Manuel talks about one of the “old-new” trends in advertising: Real Time Bidding (RTB). This type of media buying and selling has generated several changes in the industry that may not necessarily be apparent at this time. What kind of changes are we talking about?

Translated by Candice Carmel

Photo: SunnyUK. Used under license from CC

If Newton was right — and there isn’t much evidence to the contrary — every action has an opposite reaction that tries to prevent the movement initiated. In the advertising market (and by that I mean all advertising regardless of media platform), there is an action that is coherently developed in tune with the possibilities offered by technology, and which is changing the structural relationship between media and the market.

As you may have guessed, I’m referring to business formulas based on real-time auctions, or Real-Time Bidding—which is the final frontier, the universal paradigm, the great utopia and ultimately, something very old that is sustained by a very new technology.

RTB, something very old supported by very new technology…

The auction concept has existed since time immemorial, but the current trend does open up immense possibilities in the Internet market. Shall we take a look at this new world?

First, what is obvious is that it is a huge change in both the SELLING and BUYING process and how it’s done. For now, these two forces appear to have the upper hand, applying their enormous financial capacity to impose the method. Marketers today seem to react to it without feeling comfortable with the results, methods, and of course the prices being bandied about.

These growing pains will lessen as the method becomes more established and evolved, and both parties realize that the tool should not condition the value or price of what is being sold through it.

By exaggerating our hand, we risk a sort of consecration of the absurd. It’s as if when fax machines were first introduced, we had used them to impact advertising rates.

The bidding process will eventually adjust values ​​and everyone will experiment with it until having mastered the ability to generate value products that have adequate demand—the kind that makes prices go up.

The second fantasy involves the number and profile of the professionals needed in the entire process, from start to finish. It seems that both sides need a refresher on concepts that will allow those using the tool to achieve maximum performance. While it is true that the number of processes will be reduced, I doubt that in the long term we will need to rely on having fewer professionals volved. Different ones, yes, but I do not think they will be fewer in number.

The technology is evolving too fast to exponentially increase options, and those involved in the buying and selling need to have a very good knowledge of available alternatives in order to achieve the best results.

This means negotiating, sharing information, knowing what your goals are, making adjustments, improving services, adapting profiles, and establishing coherent and well-known targets. In short, it involves highly knowledgeable work that will end up yielding results that are impossible at the moment.

And this will be possible thanks to well-trained professionals who will be better able to recognize and generate empathy, and who want to improve their knowledge and skills in a sector that — unless I’m mistaken — will be the first of many more to adopt this marketing system. Hasn’t television been doing something similar to this for a long time?

Forewarned is forearmed…

beltranJuan Manuel  is a media and advertising professional since the 80s, he has worked in many areas related to advertising management, such as media buying for TV and print. Since 1994, he has worked on Internet-related sales, purchasing, and management. For the past three+ years, Beltrán has been in charge of the Spain Business Development at Improve Digital, a company dedicated to optimizing inventory for editors.

CRONICAS ESPAÑOL

We are very pleased to intoduce  “Chronicles from across the pond”, a new regular feature by digital marketing expert  Juan Manuel Beltrán. Based  in Madrid , Spain, Beltrán will be writing insight and thought leadership articles twice a month. He will analyze the “marketing-tech revolution” that the advertising and media industries are going through and the wide implications this has for practitioners.

Translated by Candice Carmel
Fotografía: ...marta...maduixaaaa. Bajo licencia Creative Commons

As much as globalization strives to make our small world even smaller, there are still things that do not change or change ever so slowly before becoming universal. This delays the “trip” as these concepts or practices “get to know” countries, places, and continents little by little, at their own pace and rhythm.

The advertising market has shown itself to be a constant, but moody traveler when selecting itineraries—making stopovers as needed, but generally adhering to what its “relatives” do.

What does that mean? Well, if a trend is born in the United States, the first stop it’s tried out in is usually the UK and once the “family” is satisfied with the results, the trend then spreads according to its own criteria and it becomes difficult to guess what the next stopovers will be.

That said, this column will attempt to provide an overview of what is happening in Europe with regards to the Internet market, without this necessarily determining the fate of anything. What is now happening in Europe and what is about to happen may be a model, a reflection or a feature that doesn’t necessarily have to be inevitably implemented in any other market.

There are many things we share and a lot of others that set us apart too, but we need to be aware that big companies go about introducing uses, ways and cultures in places where they make their money, and that determines a way of doing things according to patterns or trends that have proved effective.

The advertising world responds, to a large extent, to what a small group of large corporations wants them to respond to, so it’s no wonder that these trends are very recognizable in all the markets these companies operate in.

What is global has come to stay for good, and that is nowhere truer than the Internet. So, we will be dedicating this space every other week to comment on trends, things, and processes that are in vogue in old Europe, in the event it can help those in the new Americas to know and anticipate what’s cooking on these other burners.

What are the topics and trends discussed today?

Almost all of those related to automatic channels for buying, selling and managing advertising—the final frontier that some are promising as the paradise and solution to all Internet advertising ills.

Dragged by this unstoppable train and hanging by the stirrups, we can talk about the terminology and language – an interesting topic, now that we finally have a “glossary” that is adapting to what the various Spanish language academies advise – of the expected changes in professional relationships arising from the implementation of technology; along with stereotypes (right or wrong) generated around the implications of using new management channels; the future of digital advertising and its strange relationship with the physical world and money, the engine of it all; and what our esteemed readers will provide, with their well-thought out insults to the columnist.

I promise your comments will always be welcome.

Best wishes from across the pond,

Juan Manuel Beltrán

 

beltranJuan Manuel  is a media and advertising professional since the 80s, he has worked in many areas related to advertising management, such as media buying for TV and print. Since 1994, he has worked on Internet-related sales, purchasing, and management. For the past three+ years, Beltrán has been in charge of the Spain Business Development at Improve Digital, a company dedicated to optimizing inventory for editors.

CRONICAS ESPAÑOL

In our second installment of “Chronicles across the pond,” Juan Manuel invites us to reflect on the much used marketing and advertising practice of interspersing English terms in our Spanish speech, and asks: Is it a question of vanity, habit, knowledge or ignorance?

Translated by Candice Carmel

Creative Commons. Carlos Tejo.

In recent years we have seen the birth, growth, development and death of countless businesses and communication models that promised to be “the last and final…” before disappearing, leaving nothing more than a trail of empty links on search engines. Of all these, only a few seem to have stuck around for good, bringing with them terms, usage, and language ​​that we are obliged to incorporate into a jargon that increasingly distances us from pure Spanish.

For many, this coexistence is harmonious, but in my opinion it sets up elephant traps that make understanding more difficult rather than facilitating it. Being old, doubting, and somewhat anarchic in my methods and rules, I’ve been able to prove the following and invite you to do the same:

In any meeting among Internet professionals, you can be sure that after a few minutes, you will have heard ​​several English terms pronounced, which no one asks for translation or explanation. If you want to check the perversity of this common situation, all you need to do is interrupt the meeting and ask what each person at the table perceives is the meaning of the terms just used.

The results are shocking and I heartily recommend putting it to the test. My experience tells me that each person will define the word or term differently, which has the direct result of making understanding impossible.

What to do? Although I haven’t found the magic formula, there are some common sense tips that usually work:

1. Set or find a consensus on the meaning of the term used. For example, if we use the term Real Time Bidding, ask if the whole table understands that we are talking about buying and selling online display advertising in real time, one ad impression at a time, and what that implies.

2. Pick and choose the terms that generate the best and broadest consensus, and define them. Translate the rest without embarrassment and if someone switches back to the English term, ask that person what they understand to be the word’s real meaning. If they are switching back to English, he or she may have a different idea as to what the word means.

3. Find a consensus. You can use the Spanish glossary published by the IAB as a reference: http://www.iabspain.net/glosario/

4. Beware of sounding foolish in an effort to appear modern: One thing is to be informed, but quite another is to be a pedantic snob who hides his ignorance behind abstruse terms.

It is not necessary to substitute normal terms with a meta-language no one can understand. This is a fatal error that disqualifies us from the start. Typically, when someone knows a topic inside out, he or she knows how to explain it in easy and accessible terms. Genius is not hidden inside dark terms; mediocrity is.

If we stick to these simple criteria, we will see that agreement on terms makes it easier to monitor and follow-up on actions, and everyone will know where they stand. The Spanish language will also suffer less and show that it can be plastic, flexible and generous when it comes to incorporating Anglicisms.

All we need to know are which “ones” are really here to stay.

beltranJuan Manuel  is a media and advertising professional since the 80s, he has worked in many areas related to advertising management, such as media buying for TV and print. Since 1994, he has worked on Internet-related sales, purchasing, and management. For the past three+ years, Beltrán has been in charge of the Spain Business Development at Improve Digital, a company dedicated to optimizing inventory for editors.

CRONICAS ESPAÑOL

We are very pleased to intoduce  “Chronicles from across the pond”, a new regular feature by digital marketing expert  Juan Manuel Beltrán. Based  in Madrid , Spain, Beltrán will be writing insight and thought leadership articles twice a month. He will analyze the “marketing-tech revolution” that the advertising and media industries are going through and the wide implications this has for practitioners.

Translated by Candice Carmel
Fotografía: ...marta...maduixaaaa. Bajo licencia Creative Commons

As much as globalization strives to make our small world even smaller, there are still things that do not change or change ever so slowly before becoming universal. This delays the “trip” as these concepts or practices “get to know” countries, places, and continents little by little, at their own pace and rhythm.

The advertising market has shown itself to be a constant, but moody traveler when selecting itineraries—making stopovers as needed, but generally adhering to what its “relatives” do.

What does that mean? Well, if a trend is born in the United States, the first stop it’s tried out in is usually the UK and once the “family” is satisfied with the results, the trend then spreads according to its own criteria and it becomes difficult to guess what the next stopovers will be.

That said, this column will attempt to provide an overview of what is happening in Europe with regards to the Internet market, without this necessarily determining the fate of anything. What is now happening in Europe and what is about to happen may be a model, a reflection or a feature that doesn’t necessarily have to be inevitably implemented in any other market.

There are many things we share and a lot of others that set us apart too, but we need to be aware that big companies go about introducing uses, ways and cultures in places where they make their money, and that determines a way of doing things according to patterns or trends that have proved effective.

The advertising world responds, to a large extent, to what a small group of large corporations wants them to respond to, so it’s no wonder that these trends are very recognizable in all the markets these companies operate in.

What is global has come to stay for good, and that is nowhere truer than the Internet. So, we will be dedicating this space every other week to comment on trends, things, and processes that are in vogue in old Europe, in the event it can help those in the new Americas to know and anticipate what’s cooking on these other burners.

What are the topics and trends discussed today?

Almost all of those related to automatic channels for buying, selling and managing advertising—the final frontier that some are promising as the paradise and solution to all Internet advertising ills.

Dragged by this unstoppable train and hanging by the stirrups, we can talk about the terminology and language – an interesting topic, now that we finally have a “glossary” that is adapting to what the various Spanish language academies advise – of the expected changes in professional relationships arising from the implementation of technology; along with stereotypes (right or wrong) generated around the implications of using new management channels; the future of digital advertising and its strange relationship with the physical world and money, the engine of it all; and what our esteemed readers will provide, with their well-thought out insults to the columnist.

I promise your comments will always be welcome.

Best wishes from across the pond,

Juan Manuel Beltrán

 

beltranJuan Manuel  is a media and advertising professional since the 80s, he has worked in many areas related to advertising management, such as media buying for TV and print. Since 1994, he has worked on Internet-related sales, purchasing, and management. For the past three+ years, Beltrán has been in charge of the Spain Business Development at Improve Digital, a company dedicated to optimizing inventory for editors.