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What: Yahoo  has appointed IMS Internet Media Services (IMS) to help drive advertising sales in Spanish-speaking Latin America.
Why it matters: Yahoo recently closed its offices in Mexico and Argentina, but still wants to monetize the region’s traffic. It continues to have a direct Latin American sales force in Brazil and Miami.

descarga (3)Yahoo has appointed IMS Internet Media Services (IMS), a joint venture with Sony Pictures Television and a digital marketing and communications company, to help drive advertising sales in Spanish-speaking Latin America. The partnership is not exclusive. Armando Rodriguez, VP & Managing Director, LATAM & US Hispanic tells Portada that “Latin America remains an important region for Yahoo and we’re dedicated to expanding our business in that market. We’re excited to partner with IMS to help drive ad sales in Spanish-speaking Latin America inclusive of  Mexico and South America. We continue to have a direct sales force in Brazil and Miami supporting pan-regional clients.”

According to Rodriguez, “this is a strategic partnership that allows us to focus on doing what we do best: driving value for advertisers by helping them engage with consumers online through the combination of data, we have unique insights from 165 billion daily data events, content leading news, sports, finance and lifestyle properties) and technology, including ad platforms – Yahoo Gemini and BrightRoll.  Yahoo Gemini is our marketplace for native advertising.

Yahoo drives value for advertisers in Latin America by helping them engage with consumers online through the combination of data, content and technology. Fusing valuable data insights from 165 billion daily data events, Yahoo provides high-value, high-performing solutions to help advertisers target, reach and engage relevant audiences.

We’re excited to partner with IMS to help drive ad sales in Spanish-speaking Latin America inclusive of Mexico and South America. We continue to have a direct sales force in Brazil and Miami supporting pan-regional clients.

The core offerings IMS will provide on behalf of Yahoo to clients in Latin America include:

  • High-impact premium formats: includes Yahoo Homepage, along with leading news, sports, finance and lifestyle properties, for brand building and content marketing.
  • Audience display and video: leverage Yahoo’s rich data set and sophisticated targeting solutions to reach more relevant audiences across Yahoo sites and apps, and third-party inventory.
  • Native advertising through Yahoo Gemini: tap into the fast-growing native ad format to reach target audiences seamlessly across devices.
  • Programmatic advertising through BrightRoll: drive efficient programmatic buying to connect with consumers across ad formats and devices.

“We are delighted to partner with Yahoo, such an iconic digital player, throughout Spanish-speaking Latin America. Yahoo’s premium content and data-driven audience solutions drive relevance for advertisers throughout the region,” said Gastón Taratuta, CEO, Founder and Partner for IMS.

Yahoo joins IMS’ roster of international brand leaders such as Twitch, EA, Vevo, Foursquare, Twitter, Waze, Spotify and LinkedIn.

Doing business in Brazil is not only good business, but very rewarding. Alas, it is no easy feat.

At least, that was the consensus during an afternoon session at the last day of the Latin American Advertising & Media Summit in Miami, where panelists, Brazilians and non-Brazilians, shared some light on what to do  -and not do- when doing business in Brazil.

“Brazil is very rewarding, but it is really difficult,” said Mario Cordon, the Guatemala-born CMO of Open English. “There are a lot of similarities with the U.S., but there are also lots of differences too.” Cordon, whose web-based course of English has been a success in Brazil, said doing business in the country is unlike doing business in the rest of Latin America. “Sometimes Brazil feels like a different continent; a place that just happens to be in Latin America.”

Other panelists included Gastón Taratuta, the CEO of IMS Corporate, a digital marketing agency that does work for high-profile American companies, including Twitter and Netflix. Taratuta, who is fluent in Spanish, Portuguese and English, also spoke of the differences between Brazilians and the rest of Latin America, and while he said speaking Portuguese is crucial to succeed there, the single most important thing is to find the right management team to operate locally.

Other piece of advice came from Diego Terán, managing director of MEC. “Brazil is not really one market. If you launch in Brazil, you have to pick your region; it’s more like doing business in the U.S.”

Panelists also touched on media and how Brazil -along with Argentina and Mexico- continue to be a TV-centric market. In Brazil, said Taratuta, 60 cents of every media dollar is taken by Globo; and Internet advertising has grown mostly because Globo didn’t want to focus on digital. An example on how small, dynamic agencies are helping change this landscape is IMS itself. According to Taratuta, when Netflix entered Brazil, it was going to allocate 80% of their media on TV and 20% in digital. “In the end, they ended up doing the opposite: 80% on digital and 20% on TV,” he said.

Among the advantages cited by the panelists of doing business in Brazil:

  • High-penetration of credit and debit cards
  • Brazilians are tech-savvy
  • High-penetration and adoption of Smartphones
  • Several important cities, not just one like in many Latin American Countries.
  • e-commerce is well developed
  • Brazilians are leapfrogging, skipping the landline and going straight to mobile; skipping PCs and going to tablets

 

Doing business in Brazil is not only good business, but very rewarding. Alas, it is no easy feat.

At least, that was the consensus during an afternoon session at the last day of the Latin American Advertising & Media Summit in Miami, where panelists, Brazilians and non-Brazilians, shared some light on what to do  -and not do- when doing business in Brazil.

“Brazil is very rewarding, but it is really difficult,” said Mario Cordon, the Guatemala-born CMO of Open English. “There are a lot of similarities with the U.S., but there are also lots of differences too.” Cordon, whose web-based course of English has been a success in Brazil, said doing business in the country is unlike doing business in the rest of Latin America. “Sometimes Brazil feels like a different continent; a place that just happens to be in Latin America.”

Other panelists included Gastón Taratuta, the CEO of IMS Corporate, a digital marketing agency that does work for high-profile American companies, including Twitter and Netflix. Taratuta, who is fluent in Spanish, Portuguese and English, also spoke of the differences between Brazilians and the rest of Latin America, and while he said speaking Portuguese is crucial to succeed there, the single most important thing is to find the right management team to operate locally.

Other piece of advice came from Diego Terán, managing director of MEC. “Brazil is not really one market. If you launch in Brazil, you have to pick your region; it’s more like doing business in the U.S.”

Panelists also touched on media and how Brazil -along with Argentina and Mexico- continue to be a TV-centric market. In Brazil, said Taratuta, 60 cents of every media dollar is taken by Globo; and Internet advertising has grown mostly because Globo didn’t want to focus on digital. An example on how small, dynamic agencies are helping change this landscape is IMS itself. According to Taratuta, when Netflix entered Brazil, it was going to allocate 80% of their media on TV and 20% in digital. “In the end, they ended up doing the opposite: 80% on digital and 20% on TV,” he said.

Among the advantages cited by the panelists of doing business in Brazil:

  • High-penetration of credit and debit cards
  • Brazilians are tech-savvy
  • High-penetration and adoption of Smartphones
  • Several important cities, not just one like in many Latin American Countries.
  • e-commerce is well developed
  • Brazilians are leapfrogging, skipping the landline and going straight to mobile; skipping PCs and going to tablets