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What: Get your tickets to #PortadaNY, Sept. 25 and learn about the best (and the not so great) consumer engagement practices during the 2018 FIFA World Cup. Daniel Keats, Director Consumer Marketing at Sponsorships, Allstate and Alejandro Solorio, Hispanic Marketing Director at Comcast Corporation will dig deep into the matter.
Why it matters: The world soccer tournament is arguably the most important sports event for advertisers, as a myriad of companies looks for the chance to increase brand health. Experts discuss the gist of the Russia 2018 opportunities.

After 2014’s FIFA World Cup in Brazil reached an audience of 3.2 billion people, with over one billion of viewers of the final match between Argentina and Germany alone, the expectations for this year’s tournament were pretty high. For instance, US $600 million bought Telemundo the exclusive rights to broadcast the 2018 and 2022 cups, leaving Univision out of the question. By the way, Telemundo reached 57% of the U.S. Hispanic population during the Russia 2018 World Cup, and Telemundo Deportes’ digital presentation reached 15.5 million unique users, generating a record-setting 130 million livestreams and 1.96 billion live minutes viewed.

Therefore, advertisers are usually enthusiastic about showing their products and services to an audience that has the huge passion point of soccer in common. And this year was more special: it was the most connected World Cup ever. In the cord-cutting era, digital disruption promised an array of ways for advertisers to reach consumers effectively; from in-app real-time push notifications celebrating a goal to interactive content on social media, every brand knew people would be watching in multiple screens, so what could be the best way to engage them? 

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Allstate’s Daniel Keats

As it turns out, FIFA has revealed that Russia 2018 is now the most-engaged World Cup in history, just as previously predicted by all those ready to display an omnichannel marketing arsenal. FIFA managed 7.5 billion engagements across FIFA digital platforms during the World Cup, over 580 million interactions on social media, and extended the number of followers to more than 128 million.

On September 25, you’ll have the chance to learn first-hand from two experts about what went right and what went slightly off during this year’s World Cup. Daniel Keats, Director Consumer Marketing at Sponsorships Allstate and member of Portada’s Sports Marketing Board, will join a conversation with Alejandro Solorio, Hispanic Marketing Director at Comcast Corporation, on what lessons we can all learn about consumer engagement around the most important soccer event.

Comcast’s Alejandro Solorio

Now that the joint bid between the USA, Canada and Mexico has won the right to host the 2026 World Cup, we should be aware of what went wrong this year and start preparing for the opportunities soccer will bring in the future. Don’t miss the chance to get ahead and join the conversation at #PortadaNY. Click on the banner below now!

 

 

 

 

What: OnBrand and Bynder have published the results of their latest branding report, which gathers answers from 504 marketers on branding trends and challenges for this year.
Why it matters: As consumers’ expectations rise, brands struggle to provide a seamless experience that aligns with their needs across all new channels.

OnBrand and Bynder joined forces with Survata this last January in order to gather answers from 504 marketing decision-makers in the U.S. and the UK on their goals, challenges, and priorities for this year. The selection of respondents encompassed a wide variety of industries, from Consumer Products and Financial Services to Telecommunications, E-commerce, and Sports. The main conclusion, as proved by other recent studies, is that customer experience is the number one priority in marketers’ minds; however, fulfilling customer’s expectations is not only more important than ever, it’s also more difficult because of the number one challenge that goes with it: identifying the right technologies for a seamless experience. Based on the participants’ answers, the team behind the study identified 5 key findings.

1. Brands Want to Personalize but Struggle to Find the Right Technologies

The digital landscape has drastically changed marketing. To quote the study, it has “blown up”. Customers want their individuality considered, they expect each transaction to become a personalized experience, and this forces brands to use technology in order to deliver. According to a study by Segment quoted in the report, 44% of consumers say they will likely repeat a purchase that was a personalized experience. Among the participants who answered the survey, 56% expressed intentions to personalize their marketing this year, and while 89% agreed that technology plays a key role in developing a personalized experience, 90% think that finding the right technologies to do so is a significant challenge. “The two-fold challenge facing marketers today is how to deliver relevant and consistent customer experiences across all channels, while filtering through the clutter of the rapidly evolving marketing technology landscape.” The image below shows the biggest challenges in 2018 when incorporating new technologies into marketing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Voice Assistants Dominate Tech Investments

According to the report, 40% of marketing decision-makers will invest in voice assistants this year, and 39% are developing integrations that run through platforms like Facebook, Alexa, and Siri. Interestingly, brands will need to choose the voice they want to present to the consumer: “The rise of voice technology has turned the discussion of a brand’s voice from metaphorical to physical, and brands need to consider the delicate politics of gender, personality, and accents,” states the study. 75% of the respondents agree that an ethical development of voice-based technology is a top priority, and characteristics they would take into account are tone, speaking speed, accents, and personas. While gender was reportedly the least important aspect, 54% of marketers would still prefer a female voice. The chart below shows the technologies marketers will be investing in in 2018. We shouldn’t be surprised that 68% will invest in mobile apps, but it’ll be interesting to see how voice assistants shape customer experience.

3. Influencer Marketing is Still Hot

The magic of Influencer Marketing is that they provide access to an already-engaged base of consumers. Good results are not guaranteed and even though influencer marketing could still be proved to be a passing fad, the report’s results show that most marketers are still betting on influencers. 79% of the respondents will invest in influencer marketing this year, and 43% are planning to spend more than they did in 2017. To quote the study, “Influencer marketing is not just a new broadcasting channel, and the brands that achieve cultural relevance in smaller, niche communities will win in 2018.”

The most successful brands no longer market to the world, but behave in the world.

4. Brand Activism is on the Rise

Today’s world is interconnected and transparent: there’s no way a brand will do or say something without everyone finding out the next minute. Consumers expect brands to use their power and influence to give something back to the community; there’s no reason not to contribute to or get involved in social issues, and in fact, customers don’t mind spending a bit more in a product if they know the brand is supporting a cause. According to the study, “The most successful brands no longer market to the world, but behave in the world,” which is why 79% of the respondents said that social and cultural issues will play a role in their marketing this year. 

5. Marketing Teams Are Hiring More Tech Talent

As customer’s expectations rise and the digital landscape explodes, companies will need to largely invest in hiring the right talent that can adequately handle the technological challenges ahead. 53% of respondents said they’ll be hiring experiences designers and developers in 2018, while 34% said they’ll add data scientists to their teams.