Tag

Colombia

Browsing

What: Argentina and Colombia will battle in East Rutherford, N.J., on Sept. 11 as part of a series of international soccer matches in the U.S. this summer into the fall.
Why it matters: These events can follow on the heels of the excitement of World Cup competition, albeit seven or more time zones away and without the U.S. represented, and successful United 2026 bid to boost the sport for fans and marketers here moving forward.

Argentina (@afaand Colombia (@FCFSeleccionColare on through their respective Groups to the knockout phase at 2018 FIFA World Cup, who along with Mexico, Uruguay and Brazil leave five Latin American teams still alive in the hunt for the trophy. And while they have bigger things on their collective minds right now, the squads will also compete in a match on September 11 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., which while it won’t have the same stakes on the field, will have an important role in keeping the sport top of mind, particularly among the fervent Hispanic fan base in the region.

CMN Sports (@CMNEventsand Relevent (@C_Stillitano), two firms committed to boosting the sport in the U.S., announced the matchup this week, as well as Monday’s on-sale opportunity.

The success of events like these will go a long way in determining how much the World Cup, minus the U.S., Canada and traditional favorite Italy, will have boosted interest in the sport here.

“We’re delighted to partner with Relevent and look forward to hosting this match,” said Henry Cárdenas, President of CMN Sports, in a statement. “Argentina is a powerhouse, loaded with impressive talent, while Colombia has shown enormous potential during this World Cup. We hope fans will enjoy this South American rivalry in a post-World Cup celebration.”

Along with the International Champions Cup (July 20-August 12) , which will feature the top international club teams numerous U.S. cities with large Latino populations like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Miami and more, international soccer will maintain a strong presence in the U.S. with friendlies featuring Colombia vs. Venezuela in Miami and Argentina vs. Guatemala in Los Angeles, both on Sept. 7.

Subscribe to Portada’s daily Sports Marketing Updates!

Colombia jersey (Futbolero)

“Relevent is committed to bringing the incredible culture and enthusiasm of international soccer to the U.S. and this match is sure to deliver that excitement to new and established fans alike,” said Charlie Stillitano, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman of Relevent.

The success of events like these will go a long way in determining how much the World Cup, minus the U.S., Canada and traditional favorite Italy, will have boosted interest in the sport here. The successful United 2026 World Cup bid “won the press conference,” but it will take a sustained effort to keep the momentum rolling to benefit MLS, the U.S. National Team and World Cup preparation for fans and marketers alike.

Cover Image: credit: Oleg Bkhambri (Voltmetro)

What: Colombia vs. Venezuela (in Miami) and Argentina vs. Guatemala (in Los Angeles) soccer friendlies are set for Sept. 7
Why it matters: Soccer in the U.S. was dealt a blow with the National Team’s absence from FIFA World Cup, but the sport is stronger than ever in the Hispanic community here, with these two friendlies and the International Champions Cup hitting this summer.

FIFA World Cup (@FIFAWorldCupwill be contested half a world away, but supporters and natives of four Latin American countries will be able to see their favorite national teams in action in friendlies set for September 7. Colombia will take on Venezuela at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami, while traditional powerhouse Argentina will battle Guatemala at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

The matchups and locations lean heavily on the popularity of the sport among the Hispanic community in South Florida and Southern California and beyond. The first is a prelude to the planned MLS expansion into the market (@futbolmiamimls) set to debut in 2020, led by David Beckham, and the second comes with the timely announcement that a portion of ticket sales will be donated to Guatemalan relief efforts following the devastating Mount Fuego volcano eruption.

The friendlies, along with the MLS expansion and numerous U.S. locations in this summer’s International Champions Cup are strong signals that promoters and marketers aren’t giving up on the sport…

The matches feature successful squads in Colombia (ranked No. 16 in the world) and Argentina (No. 8), which will both begin Group Play at World Cup in the next week in Russia, battling upstarts in Venezuela and Guatemala, neither of whose sides have ever qualified for the event. And why they may not be marquee pairings, marketing organizers CMN Sports (@CMNEvents) and Relevent (@C_Stillitanoare hoping the World Cup boost in interest in the sport here carries over into September.

Subscribe to Portada’s daily Sports Marketing Updates!

Credit: Danilo Borges-copa2014.gov.br

“CMN Sports is excited to partner with Relevent to showcase these talented teams,” said Henry Cárdenas, President of CMN Sports, in a statement. “Colombia is a World Cup contender and has shown enormous potential, making them a very tough opponent for Venezuela. We hope fans will enjoy this South American rivalry at one of the most iconic stadiums in the country.”

“Relevent is committed to bringing the incredible culture and enthusiasm of international soccer to the U.S. and this match is sure to deliver that excitement to new and established fans alike,” said Charlie Stillitano, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman of Relevent. “We look forward to celebrating both of these national teams and their fans, while honoring all of those affected by the natural disaster in Guatemala.”

The friendlies, along with the MLS expansion and numerous U.S. locations in this summer’s International Champions Cup (@IntChampionsCupare strong signals that promoters and marketers aren’t giving up on the sport despite the absence of the U.S. National Team from the World Cup.

Cover Image: credit Tasnim News Agency

What:  Latin American media owners’ net advertising revenues (NAR) to grow by +9.3% in 2018, to US$26.3 billion, following a +7.3% growth in 2017;  thanks to a more robust economic recovery in the region, according to MAGNA.
Why it matters: Television remains the top media category in the region with 54% of total advertising sales while Digital advertising in Latin America remains lower than the global average.

MAGNA is expecting Latin American media owners’ net advertising revenues (NAR) to grow by +9.3% in 2018, to US$26.3 billion, following a +7.3% growth in 2017, thanks to a more robust economic recovery in the region. The latest IMF update forecasts real GDP growth of +1.9% next year in the region, compared to +1.7% in 2017 and -0.9% in 2016. Economic recovery remains extremely fragile, however, and political instability continues to loom over several countries, including Brazil.

A +9% growth would not be that impressive considering the high levels of economic inflation in the region, and the growth rates experienced pre-2014 that usually range between 10 and 15%. However, that would the strongest growth rate since 2013.

Ad spend trends continue to vary by country. Digital switch-overs, the introduction of new TV channels, government reconstruction programs in natural disaster areas, and elections are all expected to impact marketing activity and advertising spending. Nevertheless, most LATAM markets are expected to see slightly higher ad spend growth in 2018 versus 2017, as economies in the region are stabilizing and benefitting from the recovery of commodity prices.

Television remains the top media category in the region with 54% of total advertising sales at the end of 2017

Television remains the top media category in the region with 54% of total advertising sales at the end of 2017, way above the global average (35%). Television is forecast to hold its media leadership until 2021, when digital finally becomes the top media format in Argentina and Brazil. Free-to-air TV is the dominant segment (+4% in 2018) controlling 80% of total TV NAR but Pay TV is experiencing faster growth (+6% in 2018) as subscription fees and programing are gradually becoming more attractive. Another driver is the change in selling models, from a cable model (where advertisers buy packaged airtime with little control over which channels their campaign appear on) to a direct sales model (where advertisers and agencies buy from individual Pay TV vendors). This is taking place in Chile and Uruguay, for example.

Television will benefit from increased viewing and brand interest around the FIFA World Cup as usual, although the excitement may not be quite as high as four years ago when the tournament was hosted by Brazil; time difference may also be an issue but the event is still guaranteed to boost TV ad sales especially in the eight nations that qualified this year: Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Colombia and Peru in South America, as well as Mexico, Costa Rica and Panama for Central America.

Digital advertising in Latin America remains lower than the global average, inhibited by a relatively low digital penetration and the sheer power of television. It is expected to grow by +23% to reach 32% total media share at the end of 2018, still well below the global average of 44%. Social media (+30%) and digital video (+33%) will grow significantly again next year, while search (+21%) remains the number one media type with 36% of total digital ad sales.

Brazil: +12%

With BRL 49 billion in NAR (approx. $14 billion), Brazil is the sixth largest advertising market in the world and accounts for over half of LATAM’s advertising spend.

Brazil’s economy has begun to stabilize from the recession in 2015 and 2016.  Real GDP will grow by +1.5% in 2018, accelerating mildly after the stabilization of 2017 (+0.7%) and the severe recession of 2016 (-3.6%), while Consumer Price Index (CPI) inflation has dropped from its peak of 9% in 2015 to just 4% expected in 2018. Media cost inflation, on the other hand, remains high (between 6% and 10% across media categories). Business confidence however, continues to be hindered by political instability with unelected President Michel Temer, successor to impeached president Dilma Rousseff, himself facing various corruption scandals.  The next presidential election, scheduled for October 2018, will hopefully clarify the political environment but is not expected to directly affect advertising spend, as parties are not allowed to buy television advertising time.

In that mixed environment, MAGNA anticipate media owner NAR to grow by +11.8% in 2018 following a decent performance in 2017 (+9.7%). That will be driven by strong digital growth (+23%) coupled with robust TV ad sales: +5.4% for free-to-air channels and +9.2% for pay TV. The FIFA World Cup, which will air on Globo, SporTV, and FOX Sports, will help drive cost inflation (CPM +9%) and offset declines in viewing.

Mobile advertising is growing dramatically (+52% in 2017) and now accounts for over 55% of digital advertising expenditures in Brazil.  Internet and mobile penetration rates reached around 60% in 2017 and will continue to grow over the next five years. Google, Facebook, and YouTube dominate the search, social, and video markets, reaching of over 90% of the total internet audience.

Digital advertising in Latin America remains lower than the global average, inhibited by a relatively low digital penetration and the sheer power of television.

Mexico: +5%

Mexican media companies’ net advertising revenues will grow by +5% in 2018, to 92 billion pesos (approx. $4.9 billion). Mexico’s participation to the FIFA World Cup typically drives TV ad sales up, but that may not be enough to prevent TV NAR from decreasing (-1% to $43 billion pesos). Presidential elections are scheduled that take place in July 2018 but should not have a direct impact on TV revenues as political parties are not allowed to buy commercial air time beyond the free minutes allocated by Law.

Ad growth will be primarily driven by a +16% growth in digital ad sales (rising to a 31% market share) while print NAR will decrease by -5%, radio will increase by +5% and OOH NAR will grow by almost +8%.

The extinction of analogue terrestrial broadcasting at the beginning of 2016 disrupted television reception and introduced new digital channels competing with incumbent broadcasters Televisa and Azteca. That in turn created audience fragmentation and cost inflation (20%+) in Free TV CPMs as well as in digital video. CPM inflation has nevertheless cooled down in 2017 and will remain moderate in 2018 (+5%)

Online Video has been growing faster than any other ad format and already accounts for 32% of digital advertising, more than double its global share of 13%. Alongside Youtube, Facebook is becoming another important video advertising platform, especially in Mexico, where the social network has close to 80 million monthly active users. In addition, Mexico has one of the highest smartphone penetrations, driving mobile ad sales to grow by +22% in 2018, accounting for 64% of ad spend.

Argentina: +24%

Advertising sales in Argentina will grow by +24% in 2018 to reach 100 billion pesos (approx. $6.7 billion at a constant average 2016 exchange rate).

The economy began to stabilize in 2017, when real GDP grew by +2.5%, and 2018 is expected to see continued economic growth and gradual slowdown in the inflation rates. CPI inflation is expected to slow from 27% in 2017 to 18% in 2018, and will continue to drop over the next five years.

Nominal advertising sales growth, which peaked at 47% in 2014, when inflation was around 40% per year, will thus also stabilize over the next five years, to around 10% per year.

Television is still the largest media in Argentina, accounting for 36% of total advertising sales.  Newspapers remain relatively strong too with a market share of 19% at the end of 2017, significantly higher than regional and global averages (5% and 8% respectively); however the slow nominal growth rate (3% in 2018) means that the category is quickly losing share. TV NAR is expected to grow by 29% in 2018, driven by the FIFA World Cup and the last-minute qualification of the national squad.

Digital advertising is more developed than in the rest of Latin America. It already accounts for 32% of total advertising sales at the end of 2017, and will surpass television NAR by 2019.

Colombia: +5%

Colombia’s net advertising revenues (NAR) will grow by +5.2% in 2018 to reach COP 4.8 trillion pesos (approx. $1.6 billion). The Colombian ad market ranks 4th in the region, behind Brazil, Argentina and Mexico.

Pay TV channels control more than half of TV NAR in Colombia, due to high multichannel penetration and reach. In 2018 Pay TV ad sales will grow by +7% and account for 58% of TV ad spend, while Free TV will grow by just +3%.

Digital media advertising is still very under-developed, accounting for 16% of total ad spend. It is the fastest growing media though (+27%), growing from a small base.

Furthermore, Colombia is in the process of a digital switch-over, expected to be completed by December 31, 2019. Television signals are currently offered in Simulcast (analogue and digital), allowing for everyone to continue watching terrestrial TV, a frequency resource to accommodate analogue and digital, and a transition period to full digital.

A new free national TV network, Canal Uno, was launched in August 2017 by Plural Comunicaciones. Although Canal Uno aims to become a competitor to the commercial duopoly of RCN and Caracol, Canal Uno cannot compete yet in terms of coverage. However, as the digital switchover transition progresses, there are expectations it could reach 90% of the population by the end of 2018.

Some of Latin America’s other smaller markets will continue to experience ad spend growth.

 

What: Global youth media company and digital content studio VICE has opened a Miami, Florida bureau in an effort to build out its offerings for the US Hispanic youth market, and expand its existing content and sales operations across Latin America.
Why it matters: The bureau will launch with full production capabilities and international sales team building out offerings for US Hispanic youth market, and coordinate VICE’s existing LATAM operations, creating domestic and LATAM news and culture content for all of VICE’s channels.

15e9fc92457c5b7633b5378a77b80c26_400x400VICE, the global youth media company and digital content studio that has News Corp and A&E, among its share holders,  has announced that it has opened a Miami, Florida bureau in an effort to build out its offerings for the US Hispanic youth market, and expand its existing content and sales operations across Latin America. The bureau will produce its own news and cultural content while also connecting content from VICE’s Latin American Bureaus in Brazil, Colombia, and Mexico, with the US Hispanic market.

We’re not creating Vice Espanol. That’s not what we’re doing here. It’s just more Vice content, just with more relevancy to some of the topics that the audience is interested in.

Located in the Wynwood Arts District of Miami, the bureau launch in June 2015 with full production and editing capabilities, delivering editorial and video programming to all screens and reaching the exploding US Hispanic youth audience. The bureau’s business development and sales team will work with leading brands, media and tech companies to distribute and deliver Hispanic geared content.The programming coming out of VICE Miami will run on all 10 (soon to be 11) of VICE’s digital channels from MUNCHIES (VICE’s food channel) to MOTHERBOARD (vice’s science and tech channel) to VICE News.

The Miami operation will also act as coordinator for VICE’s U.S. Hispanic youth offerings as well as VICE’s existing Latin and South American operations, which currently spans from Mexico to Brazil.The new bureau will be responsible for expanding VICE’s roster of channels in the region, and producing hundreds of hours of programming per year, covering the underreported stories and breaking news that matters most to young people. A spokes person at VICE tells Portada that Dan Perry will be in charge of Sales/Business Development in the Miami office.

The spokesperson adds that “It’s important to note that this is an expansion of the work VICE is already doing in LatAm and the US. As our Co-President, Andrew Creighton, said in an AdAge interview, “We’re not creating Vice Espanol. That’s not what we’re doing here. It’s just more Vice content, just with more relevancy to some of the topics that the audience is interested in.”

All Screens

VICE operates across all screens, from mobile through its Snapchat partnership to digital with YouTube to TV. Expect to see more and more and as Mr. Creighton noted in the same interview, “There will be a significant distribution deal in the pipeline, and there will be some significant Fortune 100 companies involved in what we’re doing,”

In recent years, VICE has opened up bureaus in Sao Paulo, Mexico City and Bogota, distributing its programming across online, mobile and linear platforms and reaching millions of regional viewers each month.

This announcement comes as VICE continues to expand and diversify its global network of content through new bureaus and content distribution arrangements with industry leading platforms across online, mobile and linear, including Live Nation, HBO, Spotify, YouTube, Skype, Rogers Media, 20th Century Fox, Antenna Group and more.

VICE has regularly produced slates of critically acclaimed news, cultural, sports and entertainment programming on its network of channels with specific Hispanic relevance. Series have included: an eight-part look at the 2012 Mexican Presidential elections, and Miscelánea Mexicana a series on uniquely Mexican cultural oddities like indigenous transvestites in Oaxaca and teenage bullfighters in Yucatan. Noisey produced a show, Suena Bien, that shines light over the most original Hispanic bands out of Latin America and the US, like Elis Paprika, Calle 13 and Dengue Dengue Dengue. In 2014 VICE opened a Bogota bureau and since then has produced a variety of cultural and news content, including a documentary on the violence in the port town of Bueanaventura.

VICE provides advertisers with a wide range of offerings through its owned-and-operated channels, along with its in-house creative services agency, Virtue Worldwide. Cross-platform media and soapbox-model sponsorship of VICE content allow clients to reach the company’s global audience of young people and align themselves with a name that they trust. Driven by some of the industry’s most creative minds, Virtue Worldwide leverages its expertise in strategy, content creation, event production and activation, in addition to an unrivaled understanding of the Millennial audience, to create tailor-made programs spanning digital, mobile, linear, and experiential for the world’s leading brands.

descarga (1)Havas’ Meaningful Brands 2015 study reveals  that brands do matter in LatAm, as the disconnection to brands is lower  than globally, which means the connection with brands is healthier than in other regions.

Latin America outperforms global results by 7 percentage points in “brand attachment”. In LatAm 47% of the people would care if the brands analysed disappeared, while worldwide it is just 40%. It is more equivalent to Apac, the second most attached region in the world.That’s because in LatAm people still “believe” in brands: the level of Trust is high, as 69% of brands are trusted (global, 50%), with 38% of brands notably improving our Quality of Life (28% global.)

In LatAm people still “believe” in brands: the level of Trust is high, as 69% of brands are trusted while Globally the level is 50%.

The widening polarization brings different challenges that require different approaches. Understanding the key drivers by category and market, a must for brands to reconnect:

CountryTop Brand Per Country
BrazilNestle
MexicoNike
ArgentinaLa Serenisima
PeruGloria
ColombiaGoogle

Inside LatAm, Colombians are the most attached people: 55% of the people would care if the brands analysed disappeared, while in Brazil that ratio goes down to 44% and in Peru it’s 50%.Food, Beverage, Consumer Goods and Automotive demonstrate to be more meaningful in Argentina than globally, while Technology (influenced basically by telcos brands) and Retail are less meaningful in that country.In Colombia, 41/62 of brands researched have a quality of life value of 50% or higher, which means that 50% of the population consider they are contributing to improve their quality of life.The level of interest in brands in Peru is higher than the global average:54% declare that they regularly seek out information about the behaviour of companies and brands, while worldwide it’s 37%.

Inside LatAm, Colombians are the most attached people: 55% of the people would care if the brands analysed disappeared.

New and actionable Insights on Brand Leadership in Latin America are going to be discussed by cutting-edge Brand Marketers at Portada’s Latin American Advertising and Media Summit in Miami on June 3 and 4. Thought leaders include Jon Suarez Davis, VP, Global Media & Digital Strategy, Kellogg Company, Ruben Leo, Marketing/Digital Marketing Director / Mexico & International, Genomma Lab, Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director, Latin America, The Estée Lauder Companies, Manuel Medina Riveroll, Marketing Director Mexico, Bayer and Pedro Tabera, President/CEO, Mercedes-Benz Mexico.

Mexico results

Most of the brands are well established companies with a long history in Mexico. The rest are tech oriented companies (meaningful because they make life easier, and people feel proud of using them). Home care and Dairy are the sub-sectors with the highest average attachment, Lala and Cloralex are the  leading companies.These are the key findings:

  • Overall happiness in Mexico (7,81/10) is higher than the Global average: 6,85
  • And people also see relationships with brands in a more positive way: 66% believe brands can play a role in improving their quality of life and the wellbeing of their family (52% ww-worldwide)
  •  People in Mexico also like to be informed: 52% regularly seek out information about the behaviour of companies (37% ww)
  • 59% consider the impact of a brand on people’s wellbeing when they are deciding whether or not to buy it (43% ww)

Brazil results

The Brazilian economy has been struggling to grow, and this is reflected in the main drivers of Attachment and perceived Quality of Life.Interesting to see that the Top 5 Meaningful Sectors are those that are taken as a conquest or aspirational to Brazilians since the Economic Boom in 2008 (exclusion of Auto) and taken as conquests on Brazilian daily life.The same happens when we look to the brands – which have an avg. better performance on Quality of Life than Attachment – enhancing Brazilian daily life in many aspects.Key findings:

  • Nestle and Danone bring added value products to Brazilians tables, being leaders inspiring confidence.
  • Google is unquestionable making people’s lives easier and thus providing peace of mind.
  • Natura and O Boticario, the only two Brazilian brands and completely linked to Personal dimension, extremely important to Brazilian.
  • Visa and Mastercard: making life easier by being enablers of recent conquests.
  • And the tech brands that display status, bringing satisfaction and happiness.
  • 72% of Brazilians declare that, when they have a bad experience with a product/service, they often share it with a number of people.
  • But, on the other hand, Brazil is a high interesting market for brands that want to lead and be innovative, as there is an open-minded attitude towards state-of-the-art products: 65% would pay more for high-quality items, 42% could not live without being connected 24/7 and 71% often follow the latest news

Argentina results

The three most important things for Argentinians to be happy and satisfied with their quality of life are: to achieve a better standard of living, take notice of and enjoy the small things in life and have people in their life who really care about them. There are no significance differences between sex or ages.In terms of expectations:

  • 77% of Argentinians believe that companies and brands should play a role in improving their quality of life and wellbeing and 70% consider that companies and brands should be actively involved in solving social and environmental problems. These percentages are slightly lower than those recorded in the previous wave.
  • 56% believe that brands can play a role in improving their quality of life and the wellbeing of their family.
  • While Argentinians will recognize a brand’s role in the quality of life improvement, 66% believe that the change will come from people.
  • Only 27% consider that companies and brands communicate honestly about their commitments and promises.
  • Finally, 38% of Argentinians generally trust brands.

In Argentina meaningfulness varies across categories: Food and Consumer Goods are best valued. In contrast, Telcos, Finance & Insurance and Department Stores have the lower levels of meaningfulness. They have the greatest challenges in the future.

In terms of brands, comparing Argentina’s top ten brands with the Global top ten brands:Samsung, the first brand in terms of Global Meaningful Brand Index, has the second position in the Argentina Meaningful Brand Index. Consumer Electronics.La Serenisima continues to lead the ranking in Argentina.Dove, Gillette, Knorr and Philips have better position in Argentina than Global top ten.

Colombia results

In this country, expectations are really high, but those are not totally covered:

  • 87% believe brands should play a role in improving our quality of life and wellbeing.
  • And 72% think brands can actually play that role.
  • The risk is that just 47% feel brands are working hard at it (global average is 39%)
  • 65% declare they consider the impact of a brand on people’s wellbeing or the environment when they are deciding whether or not to buy it (globally this is just 43%)And even if this trust is not enough to be meaningful (as we saw just 47% of Colombians feel brands are working hard), it is a pre-requisite for brands to deepen connections and be allowed to play a meaningful role in people’s lives

In Colombia, meaningfulness varies across categories: Healthcare and Food are the most meaningful categories. Finance & Insurance scored lower on MBI. Healthcare is one of the worldwide “Star” categories.FMCG’s traditional brands remain amongst the top as they largely contribute to improve our daily lives.

  • Food is one of the most meaningful categories, attaining strong Attachment and Trust. This brands are especially meaningful for making our daily lives better prevailing the rational benefits of savings, convenience, health or better nutritional habits.
  • Technology is becoming increasingly meaningful worldwide. And in Colombia 1/5 declare they could not live without being connected 24/7; and 1/3 say they are always the first to try new products
  • The highest level of Advocacy is for Sony (92% of the people would recommend the brand to their acquaintances). This brand ranks 5th globally, enjoying the high meaningfulness and trust that the whole category shows.

 Peru results

  • In Peru, 50% of people would not care if the brands analyzed disappeared.
  •  52% of Peruvians think those brands notably improve their quality of life.

In Peru the most significant brands belong to the food and beverage industry (Gloria, Inca Kola and Nestlé), while globally the brands that stand at the top are those related to the tech industry (Google, Microsoft, Samsung and HP among others).

  • The level of interest in brands in Peru is higher than the global average:54% declare that they regularly seek out information about the behaviour of companies and brands, while worldwide it’s 37%.
  • 61% declare they consider the impact of a brand on people’s wellbeing when they are deciding whether or not to buy it (43% ww).
  • 62% declare they often buy from companies with a reputation for having a purpose other than just for profit (49% ww)

There is an opportunity for brands to offer a more holistic & meaningful approach, increasingly driven by personal wellbeing, delivering what really matters to people.So the widening polarization brings different challenges that require different approaches. More than ever, a “global approach” is key for global brands to adapt and respond to the context and expectations of each local market.

What:Busca Corp., a digital entertainment network headquartered in La Jolla, California, has signed a multi-year license agreement with Rotten Tomatoes to launch Tomatazos.com, a Spanish language movie ratings and reviews site. Tomatazos.com went live on April 6th , 2015 in Mexico and will  later roll out to other Latin American territories. It will expand to Colombia, Chile and Argentina in 2016, and in 2017 it will go on to the rest of the region, except Brazil. For the US Hispanic market, the company will make use of Tomatazos.com in Spanish. “if there is any demand for a Hispanic version of Tomatazos, we may consider it”, but “it is rather a RottenTomatoes USA call,” says Ramon Toledo, Busca Corp.’s founder and CEO.
Why it matters: Entertainment Content, including movie reviews and advertising, belongs to the more profitable sectors of Digital Media. Busca Corp. also represents all CBS Interactive digital properties, in Mexico and LatAm for online advertising sales, including CNet en español.

tomatazos-Busca Corp., a digital entertainment network headquartered in La Jolla, California with offices in Silicon Valley, Tijuana, Mexico City, Bogota Colombia and Santiago Chile, announced that it has signed a multi-year license agreement with Rotten Tomatoes to launch Tomatazos.com, a Spanish language movie ratings and reviews site.

The website went live on April 6th , 2015 in Mexico and later roll out to other Latin American territories: it will expand to Colombia, Chile and Argentina in 2016, and 2017 will go on to the rest of the region, except from Brazil.

Regarding editorial, although Tomatazos.com is a Busca Corp. effort it is also supported by some RottenTomatoes2306cc5 original content, but “most of our content will be done at home and supported by other news portals through their reviews, as neither RottenTomatoes nor Tomatazos make their own movies reviews,”says Ramon Toledo, Busca Corp.’s founder and CEO (photo).

The Editorial content will be compiled by the two units Busca Corp has in Mexico. The Mexican and Latin American film content will be produced in Mexico  D.F, whereas all the U.S. films content will be done in Tijuana.

Tomatazos.com will sell all kinds of advertising, including banners, rich media, Pre-Rolls, skin advertising, depending on the client demands. But, according to Toledo, premieres, Spanish and DVD movies, Netflix content and Streaming are the categories that have the biggest potential. Toledo says that there is no guide to Netflix movies in Latin America. “TV series is another category we are planning to include. Our plan is to sell in Mexico, Chile and Colombia through Busca Corp. sales teams, ”he adds..

Tomatazos.com will sell all kinds of advertising, including banners, rich media, Pre-Rolls, skin advertising, depending on the client demands.

Tomatazos.com

Busca Corp. is launching Tomatazos.com using the company’s innovative platform technology, the same platform and technology the company uses for its flagship site LevelUp.com, which welcomes nearly five million unique visitors each month, and is Latin America’s #1 online video game community and social networking destination.

Creating a vast community of movie fans, Busca Corp. will integrate all of the latest social tools into Tomatazos.com. Busca Corp. has also hired a local team of talented reporters, editors and translators to produce an ongoing stream of unique regional content. It is all part of the company’s commitment to establishing the website as Latin America’s premiere destination for top quality film reviews, synopses, trailers, news original editorial and fan forums.

In addition to having rights to develop and manage Tomatazos.com’s editorial content, Busca Corp. will also oversee the property’s commercialization and monetization. In year one of the agreement, the company’s sales strategy will focus primarily on the Mexican marketplace. In year two, it will focus on Argentina, Chile, Colombia, and Venezuela. And in year three, it will roll out to additional countries across Latin America. Busca Corp. also represents all CBS Interactive in Mexico and LatAm for online advertising sales.They are 30 sites in total, excluding those in China and Korea.

“The Latin American film community is robust, and those filmmakers and fans are an important part of the worldwide film community,” commented Matt Atchity, the Editor-in-Chief of RottenTomatoes.com, which has a large and growing base of users across Latin America.

“We’re excited to add Tomatazos.com to our growing digital media portfolio,” commented Toledo Busca. “By aligning with Rotten Tomatoes, the leading brand in movie ratings and reviews, we will help movie lovers throughout Latin America discover the best Movie content from around the world. In light of Latin America’s immense untapped potential, we have set an aggressive expansion strategy for Tomatazos.com. However, I have no doubt that our hard-working and talented team will do what it takes to make it happen.”

What: Social media engagement in Latin America in 2014 showed 127 %  year over year increase in engagement across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, with 455.3 million total actions.
Why it matters: With 87,620 total actions, Mexico ranks as the second most social media engaged country in the region, after Brazil.Facebook accounted for 94.6 % of total actions.

redes.sociales-285x200Social media engagement in Latin America for the month of July 2014 showed 127 percent year over year increase in engagement across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, with 455.3 million total actions, according to a Shareablee’s analysis.

 

Engagement per country

Mexico ranked #2 by total actions (87,620) while ranking fourth overall based on audience size, indicating a highly engaged audience. For the number of average unique people engaged by each brand, Brasil led with 218,000, followed by Argentina with 89,000, Colombia with 62,000 and Mexico with 60,000. Twitter had the highest penetration in Argentina and Chile, while Instagram was strongest in Brasil and Colombia.

 

PublisherTotal Actions
(Facebook,
Instagram,
Twitter)
(000)
UniqueEngaged Audience(000)%Actions
(Facebook)
%Actions
(Twitter)
%Actions
(Instagram)
Latin America455, 30448294.58%2.31%3.11%
Brazil192, 74321893.07%0.99%5.95%
Mexico87,6206096.30%2.93%0.77%
Argentina75,8448995.72%4.08%0.20%
Colombia51,5366293.19%3.66%3.15%
Peru33,5673798.32%1.58%0.10%
Chile13,9931694.43%3.90%1.67%
The total actions metric includes post-level likes, shares, favorites, retweets and comments.Unique engaged audience is the number of people who took an action with a page’s content on Facebook.The % actions metric notes the portion of actions (likes, shares, favorites, retweets and comments) attributable to the specified social media platform.

Engagement across platforms

455.3 million was the number of  total actions in the region regarding social media.

  • Facebook accounted for 94.6 % of those actions
  • Instagram followed with 3.1 %
  • Twitter ranked third with 2.3 %

“Consumers in Latin America are highly engaged social media users, providing a unique opportunity to marketers in this region to connect with consumers in a personal yet scalable manner,” said Alejandro Fosk, SVP Latin America at comScore.

 

 

What: Led by Andres rodriguez, Ariadna Colombia will be Diageo’s new digital agency.
Why it matters: The agency will handle brands Johnnie Walker, Buchanan´s and Smirnoff Ice.

image001Digital agency Ariadna , led by Andres Rodriguez in Colombia, has been chosen to handle Diageo’s brands : Johnnie Walker,    Buchanan’s and Smirnoff Ice.

This partnership kicks off  a new era of innovation and creativity for both companies, thanks to Araidna’s digital offering and the renowned liquor company’s trajectory in the market.

“Receiving Diageo’s greater projection accounts challenge us with overcoming our past achievements, something I am sure we will accomplish with our highly-qualified staff and the vision the client has regarding digital, shared visions, challenges and desire, so definitely  this partnership will give much to talk about,” said Andres Rodriguez.

What: Latin American broadcasters Brazil’s Globosat and Colombia’s Caracol TV have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to launch a Spanish-language pay-TV channel in the United States in 2015.
Why it matters:The new joint venture will air existing content from Globosat and Caracol and will also develop new  fiction programming aimed at the US market. (Caracol competitor RCN, also Colombian, provides content to the MundoFox network.)

descargadescarga (1)Brazil’s Globosat and Colombia’s Caracol TV. Two major Latin American  broadcasters, have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to launch a Spanish-language pay-TV channel in the United States in 2015. This will be Globosat’s most ambitious international expansion to date.

This will be Globosat’s most ambitious international expansion to date.
 

The new joint venture will air existing content from Globosat and Caracol and will also develop new high-quality fiction programming specifically aimed at the US market, which is one of the fastest growing markets in the US. Globosat will provide its know-how and library of Portuguese-language fiction, which can be dubbed into Spanish or adapted as formats. The operating budget and programming details of the new channel will be unveiled in October.

Both networks believe that their new pay-TV channel will be able to compete with Univision and NBCUniversal’s Telemundo over the audience, as they have gained increasing control over this market with popular telenovelas and new Spanish-language shows for US viewers.

Globosat, part of the privately controlled Globo group, is the biggest pay-TV operator in Latin America, with 34 Brazilian channels – spanning news, fiction, sports, culture, education and live entertainment – including 15 HD channels, 10 PPV channels and 6 VOD channels.The network already has partnerships in the US, including with MGM, NBC-Universal, Fox and Playboy. To tap into the US Hispanic market,the company  needed strategic partnerships given that it’s core programming is in Portuguese.

Caracol TV, part of the publicly-listed Valorem Group, is Colombia’s largest free-to-air broadcaster, producing 5,200 programming hours per year, and is one of Latin America’s largest producers of telenovelas, including titles such as “El Cartel”.Caracol has offices in Miami, Madrid and Bogota and has maintained an production deal with Televisa (which owns about 38% of Univision).Caracol also operates its own US Hispanic pay-TV channel, Caracol TV International, launched in 2003, that focuses on news, entertainment and sports, and has over 2.1 million subscribers.

“Globosat, with almost 23 years of existence, has accumulated major experience in launching pay TV channels in collaboration with leading international groups. For us it’s a natural step to look carefully at the fastest growing sector in the US – the Spanish-language pay TV market,” said Globosat’s CEO, Alberto Pecegueiro.

Caracol’s CEO, Gonzalo Córdoba Mallarino commented that Globosat, “is the partner that we all wanted in this long-term project, which aims to strengthen our existing presence in the Hispanic market in the USA. This is a recognition of the quality of Colombian TV production and reaffirms our dedication to innovation and expansion into new sectors and markets, with new and refreshing content in a market we know and that is increasingly demanding.”

images-250x185The Social Networking Market in Latin America has been experiencing a phenomenal growth, reaching a total aggregate of 85,934 million minutes per month on such sites. Of this result, Brazil reaches the top position as the Latin American country with the highest number of minutes spent on social networks (49.682 million  minutes and 55.24 million page views), according to a study carried out by comScore.

Brazil: The country with highest number of minutes on social networks in LatAm

In Latin America, the total number of minutes on social networking sites reaches 85.934 million  with 96.704 million page views. Out of this total, Brazil is significantly ahead of other Latin American countries (Argentina, Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Chile), reaching a total of 49,682 million minutes and 55,240 million  page views on social networking sites.

7

Facebook still leads in LatAm – Taringa in Argentina

• Facebook: has a total of 145.009 million unique visitors across the region, out of which 66.983  million belong to Brazil.
• Share this: has 92.674 million  unique visitors and Brazil accounts for one third of the total (38.236 million).
• LinkedIn: with a total of 37.538 million unique visitors in the region of which 13.087  million are in Brazil.
• Taringa: reaches 29.335 13.087  million unique visitors across the region, but unlike the other sites, is in Argentina where it has the highest number of visitors with 8.775  million.
• Twitter: has 29.153 million unique visitors in Latin America, out of which 11.491 million belong to Brazil.
• Google +: is Brazil’s third social networking  site ranked by unique visitors (13.562 million)
• SlideShare: surprisingly, has the most unique visitors in Colombia (3.128 million).
8

Total time spend on Social Networking 

In Latin America, Facebook leads the total time spent on social networks with a 95.5% percentage of overal time. The gap is huge comparing to  other social networks, which achieved much lower percentages:

    • Twitter 1,4%
    • Ask.fm 0,9%
    • Badoo 0,6%
    • Tumblr 0,4%
    • LinkedIn 0,4%
    • Vostu 0,4%
    • Taringa 0,3%

6

Mobile leads in the U.S.

Most social networks in the US market see more engagement via mobile, with respect on other platforms like desktop. Snapchat, Instagram and Vine are the social networks with  highest percentage of engagement on mobile (100%, 98% and 98% respectively).
9.2

Millennials lead in the U.S.

Results show that  millennials, the generation from 18 to 34 of age born between 1980 and 1996, dominate the major social networks’ penetration rates in US . The three most used social networks  by this generation regarding penetration rates are:

    • Facebook: 91%
    • Instagram: 46%
    • Twitter: 39%

10

Source: CosmCore

redes.socialesThroughout this  year, there have been significant developments in the digital landscape, including Social Networks. Both mobility and connectivity have shown higher growth rates, especially in Latin America, where internet users spend at least 8, 67 hours per month, according to a research carried out by comScore Inc., making it the region with greatest engagement in social networks. Below, some highlights from the report:

Engagement of Social networks per region

During the month of April 2014, Latin America has proved to be the region with highest engament on social networks with a total average of 8.67 hours per visitor per month. Europe ranks second with a total of 8.07 hours per visitor monthly while North America, with a considerable difference of almost two hours vs. LatAm, ranks third with 6.08 hours per visitor per month.

1

Social networks’ engagement per region/Average hours per visitor per month/ Latin America: 8.67 , Europe: 8.07 , North America:6.08 , Middle East and Africa: 5.39 , Asia: 2.47

In Latin America, women are more social

Globally, women have proven to be more “social” than men when it comes to the amount of hours spend each month on social networks, according to Comscore. The female audience spends at least 5.88 hours per month on social networks, while male audience devotes a total of 4.75, according to April 2014 figures.

  • In Latin America, women spend at least 9.08 hours per month on social networking and men a total 8.27 hours.
  • In Europe, there’s a broader gap. Women reach a total of 8.99 hours a month while men spend only 7.14 hours per month.
  • North American women spend about 6.82 hours per month per visitor and men 5.28 hours.

2

Average hours per visitor / Women and Men / Latin America: women 9.08 and men 8.27, Europe: women 8.99 and men 7.14, North America: women 6.82 and men 5.28, Global: Women 5.88 and men 4.75, Asia: women 2.62 and men 2.34.

Minutes on average per visit on Social Media sites

In Latin America, audiences spend on average more minutes per visit on social networking sites than the average in other regions. So far this year, the results suggest there is a 6 minutes difference between April 2014 and April 2013, reaching a total of 17 minutes per month per visit on social networks in LatAm in 2017.

3.2

Minutes on average per visit on Social Media sites:LatAm,Middle East and Africa, Europe, Gloabl, North America, Asia

LatAm: young people show greater engagement and affinity to Social Networks

In Latin America, people between 15-24 years old show greater engagement and affinity to social networks with 120.6 and 101.8 percentages respectively. People between 25-34 years old rank second with 92.5 percentage engagement and 99.4 percentage affinity. Unexpectedly, the group of people between 45 and 55 years of age show a higher level of affinity over the latter with a total of 99.5.

4

Affinity rate: 15-24:101.8 , 25-34: 99.4, 35-44: 99.0, 45-54: 99.5, more than 55: 98.0 ; Engagement rate: 15-24: 120.6, 25-34: 92.5, 35-44: 88.7, 45-54: 89.4, more than 55: 84.4

How do Latin American audiences spend their time on PC / Laptops?

The results indicate that Social Media is the category that is longer time on PCs / Laptops with a total of 86.636 minutes monthly. The Social Media Category is  followed by Corporate Presence with a total of 54.688 minutes and the  Services category with 39,112.

5

Total minutes per month: Social Media: 86.636 , Corporate Presence: 54.688 , Services: 39.112, Portals: 30.502, Entertainment: 27.951

Source: CosmCore

What: IPG Mediabrands will launch Rally, a social media agency,  in Latin America.  
Why it matters: With its own software and processesRally will bring solutions for social media across all platforms and technology to the region. It will roll out in Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Uruguay.

rallyIPG Mediabrands has announced the launch of Rally in Latin America, a social media agency.

Rally, the social media arm of Mediabrands Audience Platform (MAP) , was first established in Asia in 2011. But now it’s being rolled out in Latin American countries including Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Uruguay.

Rally will bring to the Latam advertising market a broad offering of solutions for social media across all platforms and technology, built with its own proprietary software and processes,  including mobile solution capabilities.
 

This includes content, design, campaign planning, and customer relations. In addition, its’ scope extends to analytics and insights for daily monitoring, strategic campaigns as well as world-class crisis management solutions.

Rally will be led by Lucia Parodi in Argentina, Alvaro Morales in Colombia, Natalia Neves in Uruguay and Walter Yenes in Chile; all planning specialists.

Pablo Rodriguez, President, World Markets, Latam at IPG Mediabrands said, “Rally’s unique selling point that sets it apart from its competitors is its focus on social media proprietary tools and its affiliation to a global agency network like Mediabrands.”

“Rally is the only social media agency that combines big data, technology, and content with an RTB solution. We fuse the social strength of Rally with the programmatic buying expertise of Cadreon to generate unsurpassed efficiencies and maximize investments for our clients,” said Marina Mendez, Regional Director, MAP, Latin America.

It currently has operations in nine countries across South East Asia, five offices in Northern Europe headquartered in Denmark, and five offices in Southern Europe headquartered in Portugal and Turkey. With more than 300 dedicated social media professionals, Rally manages over 50 blue-chip clients globally in more than 20 different languages.

What: Neustar, Inc. (NSR), has   acquired .CO Internet S.A.S. and certain associated assets for US $109 million .
Why it matters:
 .CO Internet, as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Neustar, will continue to manage the .co domain extensions from its headquarters in Bogotá, Colombia.

co-Neustar, Inc. (NSR), a provider of real-time information and analytics, has closed up a definitive agreement to acquire .CO Internet S.A.S. , to operate .CO — formerly a domain extension specific to Colombia —and certain associated assets for US $109 million . CO Internet is an operator of the worldwide registry for Internet addresses and the highest domain assigned to Colombia.

.CO Internet was founded in 2009 by Colombian entrepreneur Juan Diego Calle. Since its global launch in 2010, names under management for .co have grown to more than 1.6 million in over 200 countries and territories worldwide. Neustar and .CO Internet have been partners since 2010, as Neustar, Inc. provides registry services and infrastructure support for .co extensions. The acquisition of .CO Internet expands Neustar’s registry services, which maintains the .biz and .us domains and has been selected to provide services for up to 350 new domain extensions .

During 2013, Neustar recorded US $4 million in revenue for its role as the back-end provider for .CO Internet, which will be eliminated upon consolidation. In addition, results for the first quarter of 2014 will include pursuit costs associated with this transaction.

The acquisition is subject to standard closing conditions and is expected to close within one month.

Following the acquisition, .CO Internet, as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Neustar, will continue to manage the .co domain extensions from its headquarters in Bogotá, Colombia.

´By combining .CO Internets innovative domain marketing capabilities with Neustars distribution network and technical resources, we will be able to broaden our registry services and the .co brand worldwide, while creating shareholder value,´´ said Lisa Hook, president and CEO of Neustar.

 Source: Neustar, Inc.

What: Multinational technology corporation IBM has invested US $17 million in a new data center facility in Bogota, Colombia.
Why is it important: Colombia is one of the fastest growing outsourcing datacenter services markets in Latin America, with estimated growth of 15.3% this year, and according to Fedesoft’s president, Paola Restrepo, the total IT software and related services sector in Colombia reached some 4.2tn pesos (US $2.34bn) last year. This hefty IBM investment reflects the country’s technological expected growth and reliability.

IBM recently announced it is investing $17 million in a new data center located in Bogota, Colombia. This new facility will provide Colombian companies with state-of-the-art cloud computing and big data services with which they will be able to meet the growing demands of local and international markets, focusing on industries including banking, insurance, healthcare, food and oil and gas. By means of these services, Bogota-based companies will have the ability to offer flexible, high quality, and personalized services to their customers.

This new data center facility will expand upon the $8 million investment IBM made in Colombia when it opened up its first data center, back in 2011.

According to Gustavo Mendez, IBM Latin America’s VP of strategic outsourcing, “data center and service center investments in the region have been a key priority for the company, as part of its efforts to boost infrastructure and service outsourcing business”. As a matter of fact, IBM has invested heavily in data centers in Latin America since 2009  (it has already opened nine IT service centers across the region) and earlier this year it also opened new data centers in Lima (Peru) and Santiago (Chile).

Sources: BN Americas, Dividend.com

Using Facebook’s advertising segmentation tools, we were able to identify the number of users on the social network
by country. For example, Brazil has the largest number of users, but not the highest percentage of social network
penetration for Facebook (which is higher in several other countries). However, it has to be taken into account that
Brazil’s social networking leader is Google’s Orkut and not Facebook. Marketing efforts of various brands
are focused not so much on entire countries, but rather specific cities. With this in mind, we measured the Facebook
user population of 10 major cities in Latin America (see box below). Surprisingly, the fourth most populous
country on Facebook – Colombia – is first in the rankings by city, thanks to Bogota (where according to data from
Facebook itself, the penetration rate is very high).