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A summary of the most exciting recent news in online video and ad tech in the US, US-Hispanic and Latin American markets. If you’re trying to keep up, consider this your one-stop shop.

US/US-HISPANIC MARKET

AT&T has announced the launch of an online streaming video service, DirecTV Now, with more than 100 premium channels.


AppsFlyer has upgraded its Active Fraud Suite, a brand new technology called DeviceRank, which it describes as “the world’s first solution to identify mobile fraud at the device-level” that will deliver “3x to 12x stronger performance than industry standard anti-fraud solutions such as IP filtering and distribution modeling.” It is now enabled for all AppsFlyer customers.

Ooyala has published its Q2 2016 Global Video Index featuring insights from more than 3.5 billion video analytic events per day from 220 million viewers across the world.This quarter, the report focused on ‘power users’: “customers who visited on more days each month — at least seven days per month but typically many more — and made more frequent visits each day than an average customer.” Among other insight, the report claims that on an AVoD news site users visit 37 per cent more during the workweek than on weekends and use computers to consume content for longer periods, compared to the average user who uses a mobile phone.

Get ready for the 2017 Online Video Marketing Guide to be published on October 25, 2016 with the latest stats/projections and intelligence on the Ad-Driven Online Video market (OTT) throughout the Americas. To align your brand with this important annual reference and thought leadership report, please contact Portada’s Sales and Marketing Director Kelley Eberhardt at kelley@portada-online.com.

Apple Inc. and Google made changes to their mobile web browsers to enable video content to play automatically in web pages, provided audio is muted. The adjustment may result in more mobile video consumption, driving new revenue.

Click here to watch Tubular Insight‘s new webinar: “The State of Online Video 2016.”

Josh McFarland, Twitter’s vice president of product, spoke at DMEXCO marketing conference in Cologne, Germany, and presented the following stats on Twitter and video: 93 percent of Twitter videos are watched on a mobile device. In Europe, almost half of people use Twitter while watching TV. He also said that tweets with video are 6x more likely to go viral, and tweets with a photo are 3x more likely than tweets with an animated GIF to go viral.

anatomyAnatomy Media released a report about millennials claiming that two-thirds of millennials use an ad blocker on a desktop or mobile device, and that about 36% block pre-roll ads on short-form videos; and 28% do so for long-form content such as a TV series.
Furthermore, 61% of millennials who stream content used a shared password or cable log-in.
CNET en Español, CNET’s Spanish-language sister site, has announced its annual list of the top 20 most influential Latinos in technology for 2016.  The list, which marks its fourth consecutive year and includes 18 new executives as well as a record number of women (9), is made up of Latinos with a broad range of experience and skills, that are leading teams in high-profile tech companies in the U.S.
VTR, an international telecommunications firm announced that it has reached an agreement with Netflix to offer the streaming platform’s content to its clients through its cable programming. This is the second agreement of its kind for Netflix: in July, Comcast announced that it would include Netflix’s services on its X1 video system.
Legendary Mexican singer Vicente Fernandez released a video announcing his support for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in an effort to rally Latino voters. The video was paid for by the Latino Victory Project, and apparently Fernandez volunteered to do it.

LATAM MARKET

Mexico’s Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB) claims that more than eight in ten Mexican teenagers (between 13-17) come across advertising while watching or downloading videos, films or TV programs, as well as while using mobiles apps. 52% say that brands are important. Music videos are the preferred content to consume online (64% of teenagers do this), followed by concerts (46%), films (44%) and TV series (35%).

The Mexico City Tourism Trust (Fondo Mixto de Promoción Turística del Distrito Federal) has partnered with Marko and Alex Ayling, known online as The Vagabrothers, to develop a four-part video series, launching today, to introduce their millennial audience to Mexico City’s charm in ways that appeal directly to their interests.

Brazil’s Ministério Público Federal (MPF) has initiated a civil lawsuit against Google because it believes that YouTube has broken legislation regarding advertising to children: the MPF wants YouTube to warn advertisers that child-related products cannot be advertised in the country.

In Peru, TV consumption habits are changing as online video surges. A study by Nielsen claims that 72% of Peruvians are watching online video through subscription platforms. 72% have cable, 13% have satellite cable, and 13% have an account with an online video provider. But only 24% implied that they would exchange their current provider for a VOD platform.

PORTADA RESEARCH: Hispanic Online Video Ad Market to Soar to US $450 million. In a new report Portada estimates that the Hispanic Online Video Ad market volume will climb to US $450 million by 2020. Particularly high growth is to be expected by branded content videos. Among video ad-tipes, in-stream will continue to have the largest share, although out-stream will grow at a higher rate.

Latin Everywhere has announced a partnership with Telefónica to offer the mobile carrier’s LatAm customers Pongalo, a content streaming service with a library of more than 50,000 hours of telenovelas and other content.

tipalti_logo_final-nobackgroundAutomized payment provider Tipalti has announced that it is expanding its services to better aid companies in validating tax ID numbers of its providers in Argentina and Brazil. This way, companies can work with providers and partners in these countries to guarantee tax compliance through registering the beneficiaries’ tax information and reduce fraud.

Endemol has sold its Argentine affiliate to its local partner, Martín Kweller, who has been a minority shareholder until now. The company’s name will be changed to Kuarzo Endemic Argentina. 

What: CNET, an online-first source of consumer technology news and reviews, will launch a new  print magazine that will be distributed through newsstands across the U.S. and Canada.The magazine,which will carry articles of its own rather than recycling content from cnet.com., has a cover price of US US$5.99.The arrival of CNET in print could begin a trend to go back to traditional forms. A Spanish-language magazine is not in the plans for now.
Why it matters:With this move CNET joins a small but growing list of digitally native publications that have plunged their toes in print like Pitchfork (that launched The Pitchfork Review) or Politico (that launched a free bimonthly magazine).

descargaCNET, which began life as a digital consumer portal of news, information and reviews largely generated from tech magazines that are barely still available in print, is now a print magazine. The publisher, which is now a part of CBS’ CBS Interactive division, has unveiled plans to launch a new quarterly print Cnet Magazine with a Nov. 3 premiere issue cover date, hitting newsstands in the U.S. and Canada now.

CNET Magazine has secured prominent placements with the country’s lead newsstand sellers, including Barnes & Noble, Hudson News, Walmart, Target and Costco, among many other retailers. The quarterly magazine’s premiere issue, which runs 128 pages and is dated winter 2014, features the rapper and actor LL Cool J on the cover and has a cover price of US $5.99.

CNET will print about 200,000 copies of the inaugural issue of the magazine, which will carry articles of its own rather than recycling content from cnet.com. The magazine is anchored around four main sections: You, Your Home, Your Ride and Your Work. Every section offers CNET’s accessible, eclectic and knowledgeable take on technology.Among the first issue’s articles are “The Ultimate Tech Gift Guide,” “Driving Reinvented: The 2014 Tesla Model S” and “Should You Wait for the Apple Watch — or Not?” Sources at CNET en español told Portada that there are currently no plans to produce a Spanish-language CNET magazine.

The issue includes ads from well-known brands in categories that include automobiles, electronics, packaged goods and technology; among them are AT&T, Ford, Gillette, GMC, Hewlett-Packard, HTC, Intel, Lenovo, LG, Porsche, Roku, Salesforce.com, Samsung, TiVo and Toyota. Saatchi & Saatchi was the Publicis Groupe agency that created the full-page ad in the premiere CNET issue from Toyota, for the 2015 Camry.

According to Lindsey Turrentine, editor-in-chief of CNET Reviews, the magazine “It’s complementary to what’s online,” as it gives readers things they can’t get online, such as bright photography, long form articles and a 24-page gift guide.

Digital-first magazines

With this move CNET joins a small but growing list of digitally native publications that have plunged their toes in print like Pitchfork (that launched The Pitchfork Review ) or Politico (that launched a free bimonthly magazine).
However, in general it is completely the opposite.These days, most publications are moving from print to web. The transition from print to digital has clearly hastened. Companies like International Data Group (IDG) (which this year shuttered Macworld Magazine) and Wired, are nowadays digital-first magazines.
Wired magazine, which started as a print only publication, now has approximately 50% of its revenue coming from digital sources.

With this move CNET joins a small but growing list of digitally native publications that have plunged their toes in print.

“The future for this brand is multiplatform. We know the audience wants to experience CNET in multiple ways. This is a project we talked about for a number of years, and it got momentum in 2013, the best year in the history of CNET,” said Jim Lanzone, president and chief executive of CNET parent company CBS Interactive.

“Cnet Magazine will extend the Cnet brand and leverage the print medium to showcase Cnet’s renowned reviews, storytelling, amazing photography and access to the people making a difference in the tech world,” stated Mark Larkin, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Cnet.

At the  Online Video Forum organized by Portada as part of #Portadalat  we were lucky to have first level conversations and panels as those held by Carlos Ernesto Gutierrez, CEO Miami, Chief Growth Officer Latin America, McCann Worldgroup and Mark Larkin, SVP and General Manager of CNET. Gutierrez interviewed Larkin on stage about the industry and the development of the online video market, about how CNET uses online video, how it produces online video content and on what the future might look like.

larkin.gutierrez.portadalatMark Larkin opened the interview talking about his experience as one of the first professionals to enter the online video market. “Back when broadband was just coming into focus, I launched CNET TV,which gave rise to all of the video you see on CNET and CNET en Español today. In fact,I led the team that made sure CNET was one of the first online publishers to embrace video on the web,” Mark said.

“I think pre-roll, mid-roll and post-roll are still effective ways to communicate with consumers, especially when it’s adjacent to premium content where users are engaged in something compelling.” he said. “I think the fuss about online video is more about a rich and diverse opportunity for marketers to reach targeted audiences where they are truly engaged and across all of the platforms with which they engage,” he added.

 

Premium Content Vs. Free Content

I come from premium, so I say always spend your money in premium
 
larkin,portadalat

“Let’s talk about another dichotomy that makes us all marketers scratch our heads: Free content or premium/paid content…when to use which one in a video format?,”  McCann World Group’s Gutierrez asked.  Larkin is a big supporter of premium content. “It’s about the difference between quality audience/engagement and scale,” says Larkin. “The scale may differ in some cases, but the audience will have a great content experience and the messages that surround that experience are richer and more impactful for their association with that premium content,” he added.

 

“Church and state” separation

Carlos Gutierrez also asked how CNET is able to balance advertising sales interests with editorial integrity. To which Larkin answered that at CNET “we take the separation of church-and-state very seriously and people who come to CNET know they are getting high-quality, tested, reliable information that helps them make smart decisions about technology.”

The 7th Annual Portada Latam Advertising and Media Summit will take place on June 4 and 5 2015 in Miami.

At the  Online Video Forum organized by Portada as part of #Portadalat  we were lucky to have first level conversations and panels as those held by Carlos Ernesto Gutierrez, CEO Miami, Chief Growth Officer Latin America, McCann Worldgroup and Mark Larkin, SVP and General Manager of CNET. Gutierrez interviewed Larkin on stage about the industry and the development of the online video market, about how CNET uses online video, how it produces online video content and on what the future might look like.

larkin.gutierrez.portadalatMark Larkin opened the interview talking about his experience as one of the first professionals to enter the online video market. “Back when broadband was just coming into focus, I launched CNET TV,which gave rise to all of the video you see on CNET and CNET en Español today. In fact,I led the team that made sure CNET was one of the first online publishers to embrace video on the web,” Mark said.

“I think pre-roll, mid-roll and post-roll are still effective ways to communicate with consumers, especially when it’s adjacent to premium content where users are engaged in something compelling.” he said. “I think the fuss about online video is more about a rich and diverse opportunity for marketers to reach targeted audiences where they are truly engaged and across all of the platforms with which they engage,” he added.

 

Premium Content Vs. Free Content

I come from premium, so I say always spend your money in premium
 
larkin,portadalat

“Let’s talk about another dichotomy that makes us all marketers scratch our heads: Free content or premium/paid content…when to use which one in a video format?,”  McCann World Group’s Gutierrez asked.  Larkin is a big supporter of premium content. “It’s about the difference between quality audience/engagement and scale,” says Larkin. “The scale may differ in some cases, but the audience will have a great content experience and the messages that surround that experience are richer and more impactful for their association with that premium content,” he added.

 

“Church and state” separation

Carlos Gutierrez also asked how CNET is able to balance advertising sales interests with editorial integrity. To which Larkin answered that at CNET “we take the separation of church-and-state very seriously and people who come to CNET know they are getting high-quality, tested, reliable information that helps them make smart decisions about technology.”

The 7th Annual Portada Latam Advertising and Media Summit will take place on June 4 and 5 2015 in Miami.

mark larkinPortada interviewed Mark Larkin, SVP and General Manager of CNET at CBS Interactive, as part of the #PortadaLat interview series.

Below, Mark Larkin discusses his vision on online video, how they create and use video at CNET, his own history regarding video and CNET TV, as well as his opinion about where will be video ten years from now:

Portada: What is your experience in your long career in online video?

Mark Larkin: I have always been a champion of video. People love to read, but they also love to watch. Here at CNET and CNET en Español, we create video because there is enormous appetite for content that entertains, informs and engages all at once – and nothing does all three like video. Back when broadband was just coming into focus, I launched CNET TV,which gave rise to all of the video you see on CNET and CNET en Español today. In fact,I led the team that made sure CNET was one of the first online publishers to embrace video on the web. In my 18-year career with the company, I’ve directed other video-centric brands within our portfolio, including CBS MoneyWatch and CBSNews.com, where I launched a slate of successful web shows including @KatieCouric, 60 MINUTES OVERTIME and WASHINGTON UPLUGGED. Today, CNET and CNET en Español have more than 500,000 pieces of premium-content video in our combined archives. And every year, we rapidly expand our palette of programming.

Portada: How is online video in text content integrated if at all at CNET?

Mark Larkin: Video is at the heart of everything we do here at CNET. It’s where we started and it’s where we’re headed. We have a robust in-house video production team that produces tens of thousands of pieces of video content every year – and that content sits alongside the written content we produce. Together, CNET and CNET en Español offer live video coverage of news events, such as press conferences at which the latest and greatest consumer products are revealed. Our reviews of newly released products are accompanied by videos explaining the pros and cons of each device to our audience. We offer a full slate of ‘How To’ videos, in which our editors show consumers how to make the most of their products. And we have a number of recurring series in English and in Spanish that help viewers keep abreast of the rapidly occurring changes in consumer tech. What’s more, all of our videos are available across all platforms, whether desktop and mobile (Android, iOS, Windows 8) or on “Smart TVs” or distributed through our partners like YouTube, Roku, Xbox and more.

Video is at the heart of everything we do here at CNET.
 

Portada: Where will video be 10 years from now?

Mark Larkin: I envision we will see more video content than ever as screens proliferate across platforms that we may never have initially imagined. Any platform that can stream video will have video on it – and we’ll be there. With advancements in wireless technology speeds, and with new ways for consumers to access content, we expect to reach consumers not just in the home or office, but in unexpected places like cars (where video has already made considerable inroads), through wearable technologies, and on devices that one might not normally expect to encounter a screen (such as refrigerators with built-in streaming technologies) and more. What it really boils down to is this: More ways for us – and our marketing partners – to reach consumers at nearly all points along the marketing funnel to help them make smart purchasing decisions.

Portada:  How do you integrate video with your social media platforms?

Mark Larkin: Video is critically important to our success on all social media platforms. We highlight individual pieces of content regularly across our Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and Pinterest accounts. Video is critically important to our social strategy – and video is also critically important to the success of Facebook, Twitter and all of the social platforms. Which is why you see them consistently modify their algorithms to prioritize premium content/video higher within their users’ news feeds and streams.

Video is critically important to our success on all social media platforms.
 

Portada: What is the most striking feature for you at CNET en español?

Mark Larkin: The fact that we’ve grown so quickly in such a short amount of time. We knew there was a market to deliver premium content – and, specifically, premium video – to Spanish speakers here in the United States. Seven months after the launch, we’ve seen page views and engagement increase with ad inventory remaining scarce. We are thrilled with the response but we continue to learn along the way and we invite our readers to give us continuing feedback about the content they see – and want to see – across all of our platforms.

Mark joined CNET in 1996 and over the course of his career with the company has directed other brands within the CBS Interactive portfolio, including CBS MoneyWatch, BNET and CBSNews.com, where he served as vice president and general manager and tripled traffic during his tenure. During that time, Mark and his team launched a slate of successful web shows including @KatieCouric, 60 MINUTES OVERTIME, WASHINGTON UPLUGGED and successful blogs like Crimesider and Political Hotsheet.

Our discussion with Mark Larkin joins those with LatAm Summit speakers Annika Blockstrand and  Caio del Manto, both of Mondelez, Fernando Calderón of OCCMundial and  César Salazar of 500 Startups.

mark larkinPortada interviewed Mark Larkin, SVP and General Manager of CNET at CBS Interactive, as part of the #PortadaLat interview series.

Below, Mark Larkin discusses his vision on online video, how they create and use video at CNET, his own history regarding video and CNET TV, as well as his opinion about where will be video ten years from now:

Portada: What is your experience in your long career in online video?

Mark Larkin: I have always been a champion of video. People love to read, but they also love to watch. Here at CNET and CNET en Español, we create video because there is enormous appetite for content that entertains, informs and engages all at once – and nothing does all three like video. Back when broadband was just coming into focus, I launched CNET TV,which gave rise to all of the video you see on CNET and CNET en Español today. In fact,I led the team that made sure CNET was one of the first online publishers to embrace video on the web. In my 18-year career with the company, I’ve directed other video-centric brands within our portfolio, including CBS MoneyWatch and CBSNews.com, where I launched a slate of successful web shows including @KatieCouric, 60 MINUTES OVERTIME and WASHINGTON UPLUGGED. Today, CNET and CNET en Español have more than 500,000 pieces of premium-content video in our combined archives. And every year, we rapidly expand our palette of programming.

Portada: How is online video in text content integrated if at all at CNET?

Mark Larkin: Video is at the heart of everything we do here at CNET. It’s where we started and it’s where we’re headed. We have a robust in-house video production team that produces tens of thousands of pieces of video content every year – and that content sits alongside the written content we produce. Together, CNET and CNET en Español offer live video coverage of news events, such as press conferences at which the latest and greatest consumer products are revealed. Our reviews of newly released products are accompanied by videos explaining the pros and cons of each device to our audience. We offer a full slate of ‘How To’ videos, in which our editors show consumers how to make the most of their products. And we have a number of recurring series in English and in Spanish that help viewers keep abreast of the rapidly occurring changes in consumer tech. What’s more, all of our videos are available across all platforms, whether desktop and mobile (Android, iOS, Windows 8) or on “Smart TVs” or distributed through our partners like YouTube, Roku, Xbox and more.

Video is at the heart of everything we do here at CNET.
 

Portada: Where will video be 10 years from now?

Mark Larkin: I envision we will see more video content than ever as screens proliferate across platforms that we may never have initially imagined. Any platform that can stream video will have video on it – and we’ll be there. With advancements in wireless technology speeds, and with new ways for consumers to access content, we expect to reach consumers not just in the home or office, but in unexpected places like cars (where video has already made considerable inroads), through wearable technologies, and on devices that one might not normally expect to encounter a screen (such as refrigerators with built-in streaming technologies) and more. What it really boils down to is this: More ways for us – and our marketing partners – to reach consumers at nearly all points along the marketing funnel to help them make smart purchasing decisions.

Portada:  How do you integrate video with your social media platforms?

Mark Larkin: Video is critically important to our success on all social media platforms. We highlight individual pieces of content regularly across our Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and Pinterest accounts. Video is critically important to our social strategy – and video is also critically important to the success of Facebook, Twitter and all of the social platforms. Which is why you see them consistently modify their algorithms to prioritize premium content/video higher within their users’ news feeds and streams.

Video is critically important to our success on all social media platforms.
 

Portada: What is the most striking feature for you at CNET en español?

Mark Larkin: The fact that we’ve grown so quickly in such a short amount of time. We knew there was a market to deliver premium content – and, specifically, premium video – to Spanish speakers here in the United States. Seven months after the launch, we’ve seen page views and engagement increase with ad inventory remaining scarce. We are thrilled with the response but we continue to learn along the way and we invite our readers to give us continuing feedback about the content they see – and want to see – across all of our platforms.

Mark joined CNET in 1996 and over the course of his career with the company has directed other brands within the CBS Interactive portfolio, including CBS MoneyWatch, BNET and CBSNews.com, where he served as vice president and general manager and tripled traffic during his tenure. During that time, Mark and his team launched a slate of successful web shows including @KatieCouric, 60 MINUTES OVERTIME, WASHINGTON UPLUGGED and successful blogs like Crimesider and Political Hotsheet.

Our discussion with Mark Larkin joins those with LatAm Summit speakers Annika Blockstrand and  Caio del Manto, both of Mondelez, Fernando Calderón of OCCMundial and  César Salazar of 500 Startups.

There were many news last week at the NewFronts, the weeklong series of presentations from digital content powerhouses in New York City.  The focus on Spanish-speaking consumers was particularly, and somewhat surprisingly, strong.  Below a roundup.

      • CNET to introduce Spanish-language version
        CBS Interactive (CBSi) plans to introduce a version of CNET for Spanish-speaking consumers in the fall. Jim Lanzone, president of CBSi, said he wants to offer unique digital content for a Spanish-speaking audience of 50 million in the U.S., with more in Latin America and across the globe. The Spanish-language version of CNET “will not just be a machine translating our English content into Spanish,” Lanzone said, “[it] will be its own distinct site.” CBSi is also working on a Spanish-language version of GameSpot.

 

      • Hulu Latino
        NewfrontsHulu announced  “East Los High” , the first English-language drama series produced by Hulu that specifically targets Hispanic audiences.   “East Los High”will  join the ten other Hulu Original Series and Hulu Exclusive Series that will be premiering as part of Hulu’s Summer Slate 2013,According to Hulu, “Dance, sex, romance and mystery are at the heart of this inner city school in East L.A. where two teenage cousins, Jessie, a 16-year-old virgin, and Maya, a troubled runaway with a violent past, fall in love with Jacob, a popular football player.  With this forbidden love triangle, Maya, Jessie and Jacob, along with their close friends, must face true-to-life decisions throughout a turbulent year that will mark their lives forever. A Hulu Exclusive Series, “East Los High” features an all Latino cast, director, writers and creators—many hailing from East L.A. More than 15 leading public health organizations such as Advocates for Youth, Voto Latino, California Family Health Council and Legacy LA, among others, advised on the scripts and content to address teen issues related to relationships and sexuality in a meaningful way.

 

      • NBC Universal Telemundo
        NBCUniversal’s Telemundo announced a partnership with The Weather Company to tailor weather coverage to a Hispanic audience. Telemundo hopes to increase interaction between its broadcasts and social media by partnering with Zeebox, a second-screen viewing app for tablets and smartphones.

 

      • Mundial Sports Network
        The Mundial Sports Network, a digital network catering to the U.S. Hispanic sports fans announced expanded digital video and branded content offerings at its New York City NewFront presentation. The network is offering branded audio content to advertisers through digital radio.

 

      •  Univision
        Univision Communications on Wednesday unveiled plans to launch several  web-only series; a new online destination for Hispanic millennials, and  announced the addition of five new channels to its UVideos platform.Among the new initiatives, Univision introduced Flama, a digital destination  that promises “culturally relevant content” targeting Hispanic millennials.  “This is the place for fun, irreverent content,” said Camila Jimenez, VP,  Strategy at Univision, at the presentation. Series concepts include  Salseras, and Back Home, a docu-series that “takes young  Hispanics on a journey back to their ancestral homelands with a small budget and  a list of challenges.”  Flama is slated to launch in the fall.

        Join us at PORTADA Mexico!

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