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Last Tuesday and Wednesday hundreds of marketing and media executives convened in Miami for #Portadalat. The Latin Online Video Forum and the Sixth Annual Latam Advertising and Media Summit. Below some highlights and intelligence obtained from a star roster of speakers and participants. #Portadalat 2015 will take place on June 4 and 5 2015  in Miami.

50% of ESPN Sales are multiplatform

Cynthia Evans, Managing Director Group, M Latin America, Josh Chasin, Chief Research Officer, ComScore and Marilyn Aldir, Digital Marketing Director at Televisa Publishing and Digital
THE QUEST FOR ONLINE VIDEO METRICS: Cynthia Evans, Managing Director Group, M Latin America, Josh Chasin, Chief Research Officer, ComScore and Marilyn Aldir, Digital Marketing Director at Televisa Publishing and Digital

One interesting fact provided during the Latin Online Video Forum was when Artie Bulgrin, SVP Global Research + Analytics, ESPN said that 50% of ESPN’s global sales are multiplatform. At the same panel, moderated by Cynthia Evans, Managing Director, Group M Latin America, Josh Chasin, Chief Research Officer at ComScore noted that in terms of online video metrics, “we are still operating in the wild west”. All panelists agreed that TV is going digital and will become a digital medium.”

Changing Media Mix

BRAND STORY TELLING: Carlos Espindola, e Hub Manager Latin America, 3M, Fernando Rodriguez, principal DG, Juan Carlos Pedreira, Partner/Senior Social Media Strategist Social Business Hub, Inc., Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director Latam Estee Lauder
BRAND STORY TELLING: Tom Gerace, CEO, Skyword;Carlos Espindola, e Hub Manager Latin America, 3M; Fernando Rodriguez, principal DG; Juan Carlos Pedreira, Partner/Senior Social Media Strategist Social Business Hub, Inc. and Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director Latam Estee Lauder

Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director at Estee Lauder, noted that only four years ago 100% of Estee Lauder’s Latin American Advertising budget was invested in print media. Since the global beauty products company has diversified its ad buys and now also buys other media including digital media and TV. Guerra was one of the speakers in a panel on Brand story telling in Latin America moderated by Tom Gerace, CEO, Skyword. Gerace quoted a recent Skyword survey according to which 76% of marketers think that marketing has changed more in the past 2 years than in the past 50 years.

Mexican Investors have moved to Miami

Cesar Salazar, Venture Partner, 500 Startups
Cesar Salazar, Venture Partner, 500 Startups

In a conversation between Cesar Salazar, Venture Partner, 500 Startups and Victor Kong, president of Cisneros Interactive, Cesar Salazar explained that many Mexican venture capital and angel investors are now based in Miami from where they invest into the region. He also said that there are 2 to 3 venture capital companies in most Latin American countries. The public sector of all these countries supports VC’s. What does Salazar look for when investing in start-ups? Mostly the quality of the team and the size of the market opportunity. “It is not difficult to start a company, what is difficult is to scale its business.”

Good Design is as little Design as possible

Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief, Wired
Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief, Wired

Wired’s Scott Dadich who gave the #Portadalat’s keynote on “The future of technology by design” provided many insights about the interaction of technology and design. “Good design is as little design as possible”, Dadich claimed. “Good apps teach you as you go,” he added.

Dadich also talked to Portada about the current state of the media market. “There has never been a better time to be a journalist”, he said noting that the boom of content marketing has increased demand for journalists. On the increasing amount of  brand marketers becoming publishers, Dadich said that as a publisher-journalist he does not fear them: “We are really all in the business of fighting for attention and time.”  Dadich said that he recently increased Wired’s editorial team by 45 people, most of them in copy editing,fact checking and social media. Wired publishes between 40 and 60 online stories per day, including video stories. It recently increased its publishing time to 19 hours per day from 10 hours per day. Interestingly the home page amounts to less than 20% of total page views at Wired.com. Dadich is sceptical about rewarding journalists by the amount of clicks their stories get: “Clicks can be a race to the bottom.”  

 

El Presidente’s show

Fernando Fiore,
Fernando Fiore, “El Presidente” de la Republica Deportiva, Univision

Attendees very much enjoyed Fernando Fiore, “El presidente’s” conversation with Pacino Mancillas, Partner at AC&M Group. Fiore reminisced about all the World Cups he has been present at as well as about his friendship with many soccer legends. He voiced concern about Brazil’s readyness to host the World Cup in terms of its infrastructure. Fiore also noted how Soccer and Soccer Marketing has changed over the last decade: “It has become a huge entertainment business,” he said.

Check out more pics from #Portadalat!

The 7th Annual Portada Latam Advertising and Media Summit will take place on June 4 and 5 2015, in Miami

Last Tuesday and Wednesday hundreds of marketing and media executives convened in Miami for #Portadalat. The Latin Online Video Forum and the Sixth Annual Latam Advertising and Media Summit. Below some highlights and intelligence obtained from a star roster of speakers and participants. #Portadalat 2015 will take place on June 4 and 5 2015  in Miami.

50% of ESPN Sales are multiplatform

Cynthia Evans, Managing Director Group, M Latin America, Josh Chasin, Chief Research Officer, ComScore and Marilyn Aldir, Digital Marketing Director at Televisa Publishing and Digital
THE QUEST FOR ONLINE VIDEO METRICS: Cynthia Evans, Managing Director Group, M Latin America, Josh Chasin, Chief Research Officer, ComScore and Marilyn Aldir, Digital Marketing Director at Televisa Publishing and Digital

One interesting fact provided during the Latin Online Video Forum was when Artie Bulgrin, SVP Global Research + Analytics, ESPN said that 50% of ESPN’s global sales are multiplatform. At the same panel, moderated by Cynthia Evans, Managing Director, Group M Latin America, Josh Chasin, Chief Research Officer at ComScore noted that in terms of online video metrics, “we are still operating in the wild west”. All panelists agreed that TV is going digital and will become a digital medium.”

Changing Media Mix

BRAND STORY TELLING: Carlos Espindola, e Hub Manager Latin America, 3M, Fernando Rodriguez, principal DG, Juan Carlos Pedreira, Partner/Senior Social Media Strategist Social Business Hub, Inc., Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director Latam Estee Lauder
BRAND STORY TELLING: Tom Gerace, CEO, Skyword;Carlos Espindola, e Hub Manager Latin America, 3M; Fernando Rodriguez, principal DG; Juan Carlos Pedreira, Partner/Senior Social Media Strategist Social Business Hub, Inc. and Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director Latam Estee Lauder

Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director at Estee Lauder, noted that only four years ago 100% of Estee Lauder’s Latin American Advertising budget was invested in print media. Since the global beauty products company has diversified its ad buys and now also buys other media including digital media and TV. Guerra was one of the speakers in a panel on Brand story telling in Latin America moderated by Tom Gerace, CEO, Skyword. Gerace quoted a recent Skyword survey according to which 76% of marketers think that marketing has changed more in the past 2 years than in the past 50 years.

Mexican Investors have moved to Miami

Cesar Salazar, Venture Partner, 500 Startups
Cesar Salazar, Venture Partner, 500 Startups

In a conversation between Cesar Salazar, Venture Partner, 500 Startups and Victor Kong, president of Cisneros Interactive, Cesar Salazar explained that many Mexican venture capital and angel investors are now based in Miami from where they invest into the region. He also said that there are 2 to 3 venture capital companies in most Latin American countries. The public sector of all these countries supports VC’s. What does Salazar look for when investing in start-ups? Mostly the quality of the team and the size of the market opportunity. “It is not difficult to start a company, what is difficult is to scale its business.”

Good Design is as little Design as possible

Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief, Wired
Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief, Wired

Wired’s Scott Dadich who gave the #Portadalat’s keynote on “The future of technology by design” provided many insights about the interaction of technology and design. “Good design is as little design as possible”, Dadich claimed. “Good apps teach you as you go,” he added.

Dadich also talked to Portada about the current state of the media market. “There has never been a better time to be a journalist”, he said noting that the boom of content marketing has increased demand for journalists. On the increasing amount of  brand marketers becoming publishers, Dadich said that as a publisher-journalist he does not fear them: “We are really all in the business of fighting for attention and time.”  Dadich said that he recently increased Wired’s editorial team by 45 people, most of them in copy editing,fact checking and social media. Wired publishes between 40 and 60 online stories per day, including video stories. It recently increased its publishing time to 19 hours per day from 10 hours per day. Interestingly the home page amounts to less than 20% of total page views at Wired.com. Dadich is sceptical about rewarding journalists by the amount of clicks their stories get: “Clicks can be a race to the bottom.”  

 

El Presidente’s show

Fernando Fiore,
Fernando Fiore, “El Presidente” de la Republica Deportiva, Univision

Attendees very much enjoyed Fernando Fiore, “El presidente’s” conversation with Pacino Mancillas, Partner at AC&M Group. Fiore reminisced about all the World Cups he has been present at as well as about his friendship with many soccer legends. He voiced concern about Brazil’s readyness to host the World Cup in terms of its infrastructure. Fiore also noted how Soccer and Soccer Marketing has changed over the last decade: “It has become a huge entertainment business,” he said.

Check out more pics from #Portadalat!

The 7th Annual Latam Advertising and Media Summit will take place on June 4 and 5 2015, in Miami

We have designed next week’s stellar #Portadalat’s program so that attendees get the best content and key takeaways on the 12 main issues which will drive the growth of the Latin American/panregional advertising and media sector. They are:

marklarkin1. Online Video, the hottest Latin media platform: Explore how Online Video is expanding in the Latin space. What are the key challenges that have to be overcome in order for growth to be accelerated: The quest for credible metrics for video entertainment experiences as understood by Group MESPN and ComScore. Learn from Mark Larkin (photo), general manager of  global digital media player CNET, how to use online video to engage audiences worldwide. Plus, best practices from Havas, Puig and Avaya.

2. The latest research about how multiscreen consumption is evolving in the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic markets. What are the media consumption habits of today’s kids and teenagers? Key insights from Discovery, Viacom and YuMe.

3. Is there money in it? How should media owners best monetize online video. Learn from experts how best to take advantage of online video content through advertising. What a leading executive from BrightCove has to say.

fp4. Real-Time-Marketing: What does it mean in a Latin Context? As Ad-Tech companies are expanding to Latin America,  is Latin America really ready for the new world of Real-Time Marketing,programmatic,RTB’s, SSPs …? What concrete real-marketing campaign examples targeting Latin American audiences are there already and what can be learned from them? The answers by Felix Palau (photo), Brand VP Global Marketing. Américas, Heineken.

5. Panregional Content Marketing: Is there such a thing? How do major Content Marketers strategize within the local-vs panregional pendulum. Hear about actionable Latin American content marketing insights. from leading Content Marketing practitioners at 3M, Skyword and Piccolo Universe. Plus the latest addition Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director Latin America ESTÉE LAUDER!

scott.dadich.feature6. The Interaction between Design and Technology. A key issue facing consumer electronics. How Design will impact technology and what this means for marketers and media, by Wired’s Editor-in-Chief Scott Dadich (photo).

7. How is panregional advertising going to evolve in a real-time marketing world? Is it going to be strengthened by it? The example of the travel services industry.

8. How Global Brand Planning impacts Latin American media buys, according to key marketers from global snack powerhouse Mondelez.

9. Mexico: Financial Service Marketing in Latin America’s second largest economy. Key takeaways on:  How to market financial services in a country where only 30% of the population has a bank account.  How Citibank-owned Banamex, integrates its  marketing with Citibank’s global marketing objectives.

cesar salazar10. What opportunities are there for Latin American tech-entrepreneurs and who is ready to finance them. A conversation between Cesar Salazar (photo), Venture Partner, 500 Startups, Mexico and Victor Kong, president of Cisneros Interactive.

fiore11. The biggest show in the World! Learn first-hand from Soccer Celebrity “El Presidente” Fernando Fiore on his bets for the Soccer World Cup which starts on June 12 in Brazil. Plus his views on the future of the soccer marketing discipline.

12. Learn about opportunities and acquire market-intelligence at #Portadalat’s popular Speednetworking function.

Table Leaders will include Vanessa Gonzalez, Managing Director, Omnicon Digital Latin America, Luis Ortuzar, Regional Marketing Director, Christian Dior Parfums LatAm & Caribbean, Anita Geller, Head Digital Marketing at Sandoz Latin America, Helber Diaz, Media Director at MediaBrands and many more!

cesar salazarPortada interviewed Mexican entrepreneur César Salazar, Venture Partner of 500 Startups, as part of the #PortadaLat interview series. Our discussion with César Salazar joins those with LatAm Summit speakers Annika Blockstrand and  Caio del Manto, both of Mondelez, and Fernando Calderón of OCCMundial.

Translated by Candice Carmel

César Salazar’s emergence as one of Latin America’s outstanding entrepreneurs has meant a long journey and considerable effort, “after trying everything,” in his own words. This is an entrepreneur who “wanted to be a designer (or maybe an architect) when I was a kid – and I became both,” he tells Portada, and who hopes to be able to “transform pre-school education” in the long-term future, as well as helping “create several public companies that transform entire industries.” Below, César Salazar discusses his vision on startups in Latin America, his own history as an entrepreneur, as well as some challenging advice for businesses and entrepreneurs in Latin America:

Portada: How did you come to do what you do?

César Salazar: I became an investor after trying everything, but mainly through being an entrepreneur. For a little less than 10 years I was a technology entrepreneur; then I jumped to the other side of the fence when I saw that in my country, despite enormous opportunities, there was little access to capital.

I was born and raised in a suburb of Mexico City, but in recent years I have done a lot of traveling, so I’ve had the chance to see everything. I wanted to be a designer (or maybe an architect) when I was a kid – and I became both. During my years as an entrepreneur I specialized in product design, and graphic interfaces and experience.

Portada: What was the process involved in creating Mexican.VC? 

César Salazar: It was a spontaneous process. David Weekly, one of the founding partners, had the idea during a visit to Mexico. His observation was that there were very talented entrepreneurs, products that solved some big, genuine problems – but very little capital. A few weeks later we took on the task of bringing together a little capital in Silicon Valley, and we started to look for companies to invest in.

In reality we didn’t know what we were doing. I think that if we had known how hard venture capital is, we wouldn’t have tried it.

Portada: What was the process for acquiring Mexican.VC? What was the decision that led to the move to sell the company?

César Salazar: When we created Mexican.VC, one of the first people to find out about it was Dave McClure. We knew that if anyone would trust our vision of bringing venture capital to a little-understood market, it would be him. So that’s how we got 500 Startups to be an investor in that first fund. A year later we sat down to talk, and two things became clear:

  • The first was that Mexico (and Latin America) had even more potential than we originally thought, and was therefore strategic for 500.
  • The second conclusion was that our team did not have enough expertise, and it would be good for us to work closely with others who had been doing this for some time.

The final touch was that we shared the same entrepreneur-friendly culture and are all hands-on people. I think 500 is the best place to learn how to do venture capital.

Portada: Do you enjoy your work? What are the things you like the most, and the least?

César Salazar: I love it. I see myself doing this for at least 10 or 15 more years. What I like the most is learning about different industries every day, through the entrepreneurs we work with; it’s the best business school there could ever be. What I like the least, or let’s say what wears me down the most, is dealing with most people’s pessimism. Every day I find myself talking with people who avoid opportunities because they’re unwilling to risk their time, money or reputation.

Portada: How would you define what a Latin American company needs to have in order to invest in it?

César Salazar: For me, it’s important that they are solving a real problem, and that it’s a problem faced by a large number of people or businesses. I love working with entrepreneurs who have goals going beyond 10 years, although it’s hard to find them. I also believe the most important thing is that they be able to attract talent and capital; that is, the resources needed to grow the business.

For me, it’s important that they are solving a real problem, and that it’s a problem faced by a large number of people or businesses

Portada: What would be your main advice for global investors setting their sights on Latin startups?

César Salazar: I think they have to look for high-growth areas, leave prejudices at home, and bet on the long run.

Portada: What do you think makes 500 Startups different from existing sources of financing in Latin America?

César Salazar: I think the first thing that makes us different is the speed at which we’re moving. Over the past 20 months we’ve made more than 70 investments in Latin American companies. The second is our focus on forming an entrepreneurial community; we think our job is to bring the best together and help them form their own global support network. The third, I suppose, would be our focus on marketing and distribution for transactional businesses. Our accelerator program tends to be more useful the more traction a company has in terms of clients and sales.

Our speed makes us different

César Salazar: Do you think Latin America’s startup market is going to grow? What should people be betting on specifically?

César Salazar: Of course. In countries like Mexico activity has doubled each year for the past four years, and I think that trend will continue for several more years. The up and coming generation has a lot more disposable resources to invest, while less and less intend to work as part of a corporation.

Portada: What are your hopes for this year? And for the long-term future?

César Salazar: I hope we’ll finish the year with at least 20 well-capitalized companies that are clearly growing, and that we begin to grasp their true impact and return potential.
Over the long term I hope to have helped create several public companies that transform entire industries. After that, I would like to return to the role of founder, and what I would most like to transform is pre-school education for the masses.

César Salazar is a Venture Partner at 500 Startups’. He is in charge of investments in Latin America (Spanish-speaking companies), and helped consolidate Hackspedition, Startup Dojo and SuperHappyDevHouse in Mexico.

cesar salazarPortada interviewed Mexican entrepreneur César Salazar, Venture Partner of 500 Startups, as part of the #PortadaLat interview series. Our discussion with César Salazar joins those with LatAm Summit speakers Annika Blockstrand and  Caio del Manto, both of Mondelez, and Fernando Calderón of OCCMundial.

Translated by Candice Carmel

César Salazar’s emergence as one of Latin America’s outstanding entrepreneurs has meant a long journey and considerable effort, “after trying everything,” in his own words. This is an entrepreneur who “wanted to be a designer (or maybe an architect) when I was a kid – and I became both,” he tells Portada, and who hopes to be able to “transform pre-school education” in the long-term future, as well as helping “create several public companies that transform entire industries.” Below, César Salazar discusses his vision on startups in Latin America, his own history as an entrepreneur, as well as some challenging advice for businesses and entrepreneurs in Latin America:

Portada: How did you come to do what you do?

César Salazar: I became an investor after trying everything, but mainly through being an entrepreneur. For a little less than 10 years I was a technology entrepreneur; then I jumped to the other side of the fence when I saw that in my country, despite enormous opportunities, there was little access to capital.

I was born and raised in a suburb of Mexico City, but in recent years I have done a lot of traveling, so I’ve had the chance to see everything. I wanted to be a designer (or maybe an architect) when I was a kid – and I became both. During my years as an entrepreneur I specialized in product design, and graphic interfaces and experience.

Portada: What was the process involved in creating Mexican.VC? 

César Salazar: It was a spontaneous process. David Weekly, one of the founding partners, had the idea during a visit to Mexico. His observation was that there were very talented entrepreneurs, products that solved some big, genuine problems – but very little capital. A few weeks later we took on the task of bringing together a little capital in Silicon Valley, and we started to look for companies to invest in.

In reality we didn’t know what we were doing. I think that if we had known how hard venture capital is, we wouldn’t have tried it.

Portada: What was the process for acquiring Mexican.VC? What was the decision that led to the move to sell the company?

César Salazar: When we created Mexican.VC, one of the first people to find out about it was Dave McClure. We knew that if anyone would trust our vision of bringing venture capital to a little-understood market, it would be him. So that’s how we got 500 Startups to be an investor in that first fund. A year later we sat down to talk, and two things became clear:

  • The first was that Mexico (and Latin America) had even more potential than we originally thought, and was therefore strategic for 500.
  • The second conclusion was that our team did not have enough expertise, and it would be good for us to work closely with others who had been doing this for some time.

The final touch was that we shared the same entrepreneur-friendly culture and are all hands-on people. I think 500 is the best place to learn how to do venture capital.

Portada: Do you enjoy your work? What are the things you like the most, and the least?

César Salazar: I love it. I see myself doing this for at least 10 or 15 more years. What I like the most is learning about different industries every day, through the entrepreneurs we work with; it’s the best business school there could ever be. What I like the least, or let’s say what wears me down the most, is dealing with most people’s pessimism. Every day I find myself talking with people who avoid opportunities because they’re unwilling to risk their time, money or reputation.

Portada: How would you define what a Latin American company needs to have in order to invest in it?

César Salazar: For me, it’s important that they are solving a real problem, and that it’s a problem faced by a large number of people or businesses. I love working with entrepreneurs who have goals going beyond 10 years, although it’s hard to find them. I also believe the most important thing is that they be able to attract talent and capital; that is, the resources needed to grow the business.

For me, it’s important that they are solving a real problem, and that it’s a problem faced by a large number of people or businesses

Portada: What would be your main advice for global investors setting their sights on Latin startups?

César Salazar: I think they have to look for high-growth areas, leave prejudices at home, and bet on the long run.

Portada: What do you think makes 500 Startups different from existing sources of financing in Latin America?

César Salazar: I think the first thing that makes us different is the speed at which we’re moving. Over the past 20 months we’ve made more than 70 investments in Latin American companies. The second is our focus on forming an entrepreneurial community; we think our job is to bring the best together and help them form their own global support network. The third, I suppose, would be our focus on marketing and distribution for transactional businesses. Our accelerator program tends to be more useful the more traction a company has in terms of clients and sales.

Our speed makes us different

César Salazar: Do you think Latin America’s startup market is going to grow? What should people be betting on specifically?

César Salazar: Of course. In countries like Mexico activity has doubled each year for the past four years, and I think that trend will continue for several more years. The up and coming generation has a lot more disposable resources to invest, while less and less intend to work as part of a corporation.

Portada: What are your hopes for this year? And for the long-term future?

César Salazar: I hope we’ll finish the year with at least 20 well-capitalized companies that are clearly growing, and that we begin to grasp their true impact and return potential.
Over the long term I hope to have helped create several public companies that transform entire industries. After that, I would like to return to the role of founder, and what I would most like to transform is pre-school education for the masses.

César Salazar is a Venture Partner at 500 Startups’. He is in charge of investments in Latin America (Spanish-speaking companies), and helped consolidate Hackspedition, Startup Dojo and SuperHappyDevHouse in Mexico.

We have designed next week’s stellar #Portadalat’s program so that attendees get the best content and key takeaways on the 12 main issues which will drive the growth of the Latin American/panregional advertising and media sector. They are:

marklarkin1. Online Video, the hottest Latin media platform: Explore how Online Video is expanding in the Latin space. What are the key challenges that have to be overcome in order for growth to be accelerated: The quest for credible metrics for video entertainment experiences as understood by Group MESPN and ComScore. Learn from Mark Larkin (photo), general manager of  global digital media player CNET, how to use online video to engage audiences worldwide. Plus, best practices from Havas, Puig and Avaya.

2. The latest research about how multiscreen consumption is evolving in the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic markets. What are the media consumption habits of today’s kids and teenagers? Key insights from Discovery, Viacom and YuMe.

3. Is there money in it? How should media owners best monetize online video. Learn from experts how best to take advantage of online video content through advertising. What a leading executive from BrightCove has to say.

fp4. Real-Time-Marketing: What does it mean in a Latin Context? As Ad-Tech companies are expanding to Latin America,  is Latin America really ready for the new world of Real-Time Marketing,programmatic,RTB’s, SSPs …? What concrete real-marketing campaign examples targeting Latin American audiences are there already and what can be learned from them? The answers by Felix Palau (photo), Brand VP Global Marketing. Américas, Heineken.

5. Panregional Content Marketing: Is there such a thing? How do major Content Marketers strategize within the local-vs panregional pendulum. Hear about actionable Latin American content marketing insights. from leading Content Marketing practitioners at 3M, Skyword and Piccolo Universe. Plus the latest addition Denisse Guerra, Regional Marketing Director Latin America ESTÉE LAUDER!

scott.dadich.feature6. The Interaction between Design and Technology. A key issue facing consumer electronics. How Design will impact technology and what this means for marketers and media, by Wired’s Editor-in-Chief Scott Dadich (photo).

7. How is panregional advertising going to evolve in a real-time marketing world? Is it going to be strengthened by it? The example of the travel services industry.

8. How Global Brand Planning impacts Latin American media buys, according to key marketers from global snack powerhouse Mondelez.

9. Mexico: Financial Service Marketing in Latin America’s second largest economy. Key takeaways on:  How to market financial services in a country where only 30% of the population has a bank account.  How Citibank-owned Banamex, integrates its  marketing with Citibank’s global marketing objectives.

cesar salazar10. What opportunities are there for Latin American tech-entrepreneurs and who is ready to finance them. A conversation between Cesar Salazar (photo), Venture Partner, 500 Startups, Mexico and Victor Kong, president of Cisneros Interactive.

fiore11. The biggest show in the World! Learn first-hand from Soccer Celebrity “El Presidente” Fernando Fiore on his bets for the Soccer World Cup which starts on June 12 in Brazil. Plus his views on the future of the soccer marketing discipline.

12. Learn about opportunities and acquire market-intelligence at #Portadalat’s popular Speednetworking function.

Table Leaders will include Vanessa Gonzalez, Managing Director, Omnicon Digital Latin America, Luis Ortuzar, Regional Marketing Director, Christian Dior Parfums LatAm & Caribbean, Anita Geller, Head Digital Marketing at Sandoz Latin America, Helber Diaz, Media Director at MediaBrands and many more!

Victor Kong, President of Cisneros Interactive, and Cesar Salazar, Venture Partner, 500 Startups are the latest additions to a very impressive agenda for Portada’s 2014 Latam Advertising and Media Summit next month (June 3-4) in Miami’s InterContinental Hotel.

VICTOR-KONG
Victor Kong

In a conversation under the banner “Ignite the entrepreneur inside you!” Mexican venture capital and tech maven Cesar Salazar will talk with veteran Media entrepreneur Victor Kong, about his job of finding and financing the best tech entrepreneurs in Mexico and Latin America. His advice to Media and Ad-Tech companies targeting the Latin American space.

Other Marketing, Tech and Media luminaries that are part of the stellar roster of speakers include:

– Keynote speaker: Tech Media Star Scott Dadich, Editor-in-Chief, Wired
Fernando Fiore, Sports Anchor – Republica Deportiva, Univision
Mercedes Lopez Arratia, Head of Digital Marketing and Premium Marketing, Banamex
Annika Blockstrand, Regional Media Director,Mondelēz International

Tickets are going fast! Register here!