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The Portada Data and Content Marketing Forum this Wednesday April 3 in New York City is a great opportunity  for brand, agency and media executives  to learn directly from the experts how data and content are being leveraged for increasing ROI. A star-studded list of speakers, which includes CNN’s Robin Garfield, Heineken’s Belen Pamukoff, Sotheby’s International Realty’s John Passerini, Leonor Palao, AVP, Brand and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds  and the Washington Post’s Annie Granatstein will dive deep into how data analytics drive content strategies and ultimately content influences commerce.

If you are looking for fresh insights into how data and content are driving  advertising and e-commerce, get your tickets now  for the Portada Data and Content Marketing Forum which will take place in New York City at the Cachet Boutique Hotel on April 3.

The event includes a special breakfast panel courtesy of CNN en Español as well as time set aside for valuable networking.

Here’s what you can’t miss:

CREATING MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS WITH AFFLUENT CONSUMERS

John Passerini, Global VP Interactive Marketing, Sotheby’s International Realty
John Passerini is on a roll, and Sotheby’s International Realty is reaping the benefits of his “digital first” approach
to the venerable firm’s marketing, raising the bar in the industry and connecting with  consumers in new
and highly personalized ways. How is he leveraging AR and video to create content that builds market loyalty even before a customer makes a purchase? How can a company’s own AR application be used to drive sales? What approaches and decisions are driving Sotheby’s digital success?

 

HOW DATA AND CONTENT CONTINUE TO FUEL THE EVOLVING WORLD OF ADVERTISING

Join a highly informative and insightful discussion of how data and content are joined to produce a higher return on investment for brand marketers. Hear valuable experiences from both sides of the marketing coin: media and brand strategists. as well as agency

Moderator, Guillermo Arduino, CNN Anchor and Correspondent for Encuentro, CNN en Español

 

 

 

Robin Garfield, SVP, Research & Scheduling, CNN

 

 

 

LaToya Christian, Managing Partner Marketing Strategy and Analytics, GroupM

 

 

 

Belem Pamukoff, Heineken Brand Director, Tecate & Tecate Light

 

 

DRIVING CONTENT WITH DATA AND AI

AI is sweeping the marketing and customer communications landscape by storm. Leonor Palao, AVP, Brand and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds and Annie Granatstein, Head of WP BrandStudio, The Washington Post will reveal how Oppenheimer Funds and the Washington Post partner to leverage data and ensure that native content is served within contextually relevant content served up by WAPO.. Hear how these brand and tech innovators answer questions about the role of AI, how brands who do not use first party data or a DMP can profit from a partnership with a publisher and more….

Leonor Palao, AVP, Brand and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds

 

 

 

Annie Granatstein, Head of WP BrandStudio

 

 

 

 

CONTENT PREFERENCES OF SPANISH-SPEAKING CARIBBEAN CONSUMERS IN THE U.S.

What are the best-in-class content passion points being used to reach the more than 8 million Puerto Rican, Dominican and Cuban consumers on the US mainland? How are brands successfully marketing to this important part of the Hispanic population? Hear all the answers from Augusto Romano, CEO of
DIGO Hispanic Media who will be interviewed by Edwina Morales, Group Media Director Multicultural at Horizon Media.

 

CONTENIDO EN ESPAÑOL

Juan Carlos Samper, CEO, We Are Content

Get ready to hear insights and leading-edge tips on Spanish-language content marketing in the United States from Juan Carlos Samper, the CEO of We Are Content. We Are Content is a site where agencies and brands can connect with thousands of providers of content strategy marketing including video and animation, photography, audio, music, design, translation and copy.

CASE STUDY: A CONTENT DISRUPTOR

INQMC is a rapidly growing e-commerce business leveraging content to build market share in the fintech sector. CEO Marcelo Rodriguez will explain how INQMC, a digital financial advisor and digital financial platform, is using content strategy and technology to connect under capitalized Hispanic businesses with small-business lenders. Rodriguez will pull the curtain back on the techniques and insights INQMC’s is deploying to grow its brand and customers’ loyalty. “As Hispanic entrepreneurs in the US, we saw thriving businesses unable to grow because of their lack of financial knowledge and access to capital.”

 

Enjoy the sights and sophistication of the Big Apple and hone your data and content marketing skills at the same time. Click on the banner below now!

The Portada Data and Content Marketing Forum  next Wednesday April 3 in New York City is a great opportunity  for brand, agency and media executives  to learn directly from the experts how data and content are being leveraged for increasing ROI. A star-studded list of speakers, which includes CNN’s Robin Garfield, Heineken’s Belen Pamukoff, Sotheby’s International Realty’s John Passerini, Leonor Palao, AVP, Brand and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds  and the Washington Post’s Annie Granatstein will dive deep into how data analytics drive content strategies and ultimately content influences commerce.

If you are looking for fresh insights into how data and content are driving  advertising and e-commerce, get your tickets now  for the Portada Data and Content Marketing Forum which will take place in New York City at the Cachet Boutique Hotel on April 3.

The event includes a special breakfast panel courtesy of CNN en Español as well as time set aside for valuable networking.

Here’s what you can’t miss:

CREATING MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS WITH AFFLUENT CONSUMERS

John Passerini, Global VP Interactive Marketing, Sotheby’s International Realty
John Passerini is on a roll, and Sotheby’s International Realty is reaping the benefits of his “digital first” approach
to the venerable firm’s marketing, raising the bar in the industry and connecting with  consumers in new
and highly personalized ways. How is he leveraging AR and video to create content that builds market loyalty even before a customer makes a purchase? How can a company’s own AR application be used to drive sales? What approaches and decisions are driving Sotheby’s digital success?

 

HOW DATA AND CONTENT CONTINUE TO FUEL THE EVOLVING WORLD OF ADVERTISING

Join a highly informative and insightful discussion of how data and content are joined to produce a higher return on investment for brand marketers. Hear valuable experiences from both sides of the marketing coin: media and brand strategists. as well as agency

Moderator, Guillermo Arduino, CNN Anchor and Correspondent for Encuentro, CNN en Español

 

 

 

Robin Garfield, SVP, Research & Scheduling, CNN

 

 

 

LaToya Christian, Managing Partner Marketing Strategy and Analytics, GroupM

 

 

 

Belem Pamukoff, Heineken Brand Director, Tecate & Tecate Light

 

 

DRIVING CONTENT WITH DATA AND AI

AI is sweeping the marketing and customer communications landscape by storm. Leonor Palao, AVP, Brand and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds and Annie Granatstein, Head of WP BrandStudio, The Washington Post will reveal how Oppenheimer Funds and the Washington Post partner to leverage data and ensure that native content is served within contextually relevant content served up by WAPO.. Hear how these brand and tech innovators answer questions about the role of AI, how brands who do not use first party data or a DMP can profit from a partnership with a publisher and more….

Leonor Palao, AVP, Brand and Advertising at Oppenheimer Funds

 

 

 

Annie Granatstein, Head of WP BrandStudio

 

 

 

 

CONTENT PREFERENCES OF SPANISH-SPEAKING CARIBBEAN CONSUMERS IN THE U.S.

What are the best-in-class content passion points being used to reach the more than 8 million Puerto Rican, Dominican and Cuban consumers on the US mainland? How are brands successfully marketing to this important part of the Hispanic population? Hear all the answers from Augusto Romano, CEO of
DIGO Hispanic Media who will be interviewed by Edwina Morales, Group Media Director Multicultural at Horizon Media.

 

CONTENIDO EN ESPAÑOL

Juan Carlos Samper, CEO, We Are Content

Get ready to hear insights and leading-edge tips onSpanish-language content marketing in the United States from Juan Carlos Samper, the CEO of We Are Content. We Are Content is a site where agencies and brands can connect with thousands of providers of content strategy marketing including video and animation, photograpy, audio, music, design, translation and copy.

CASE STUDY: A CONTENT DISRUPTOR

INQMC is a rapidly growing e-commerce business leveraging content to build market share in the fintech sector. CEO Marcelo Rodriguez will explain how INQMC, a digital financial advisor and digital financial platform, is using content strategy and technology to connect under capitalized Hispanic businesses with small-business lenders. Rodriguez will pull the curtain back on the techniques and insights INQMC’s is deploying to grow its brand and customers’ loyalty. “As Hispanic entrepreneurs in the US, we saw thriving businesses unable to grow because of their lack of financial knowledge and access to capital.”

 

Enjoy the sights and sophistication of the Big Apple and hone your data and content marketing skills at the same time. Click on the banner below now!

What: Block chain technology offers brands the opportunity to collect customer data and incentivize their behavior directly and transparently.
Why it matters: Customers can protect their personal data and monetize it, entering into a one-on-one relationship with brands through a technology called “smart contracts”. Smart contracts allow users to enter into data sharing agreements with brands that are “securely stored on the block chain along with the detailed terms and conditions.”

Block chain technology is poised to revolutionize how brands gather customers’ data and incentivize their behavior. The digital computer code that is best known for being used to create the crypto-currency known as “Bitcoin,” also allows for “smart contracts,” whereby two entities (i.e. a brand and a customer) can enter into agreements that are transparent, verifiable, secure and direct.

So what do “smart contracts” mean for brands?

Smart contracts backed by block chain technology have the potential to shatter the traditional paradigm whereby brands purchase customer data from third parties like Facebook, or loyalty programs that rely on consumer subscriptions but don’t provide a lot of purchasing behavior or product preferences information.

Enter Killi, a consumer application available on iOS or Android. Killi lets consumers sell their personal data directly to brands and receive compensation every time marketers choose to buy it.

Using block chain technology, Killi collects users’ locations and their purchasing data which is stored on the user’s device. Brands can then purchase the data with the permission of the app users.

A personal data locker is controlled by the user and secured by the block chain. This allows you to take back control of your personal data from those who are selling it today without your consent.

When users authorize brands to access their data, Killi stores the payment on the Killi app until users choose to redeem it.

“Killi acts as a personal data locker that is controlled by the user and secured by the block chain. Killi allows you to take back control of your personal data from those who are selling it today without your consent,” Killi tells consumers on its website.

The Killi website is a bit vague on how the technology actually works, but “the offering of being able to monetize your own personal info does sound intriguing,” said Jay Gumbiner, vice president for Latin America at IDC.

“We could even imagine some consumers being worth much more than others based on their purchasing habits, socioeconomic placement, educational level, etc.”

We could even imagine some consumers being worth much more than others based on their purchasing habits, socioeconomic placement, educational level, etc.

“In terms of using block chain for maintaining the integrity of that data and being able to easily track who has been able to access the information, it seems like blockchain could be a great use case for managing data such as this,” Gumbiner noted.

The Killi app relies on block chain technology to create what is known as a “smart contract” between the app users and brands.

Smart contracts allow users to enter into data sharing agreements with brands that are “securely stored on the block chain along with the detailed terms and conditions,” according to Yves Benchimol, CEO at the French startup Occi.

Thanks to these smart contracts and encryption via the block chain, consumers can “easily request an exhaustive list of all retailers/brands they have shared data with, and in which conditions, in compliance with GDPR,” Benchimol said.

Occi is working on its own products for retailers that use block chain and smart contract technology to reward customers while providing a rich set of data about their shopping behavior to brands.

Smart contracts with consumers provide a channel for consumers to share their information with brands, while providing brands new possibilities for influencing consumers’ behavior.

Brands can “create a campaign rewarding a shopper for visiting a store and define the amount they’re willing to reward a shopper along with a total budget, which will be locked in a smart contract,” Benchimol said.

Retailers have access to well-established sources of data on consumers’ preferences and behaviors from a wide range of sources, but new laws such as GDPR create barriers to using that data without consent.

Block chain and smart contract technology “bring forth a new way to solicit data sharing from shoppers, that is more transparent and fair because it directly rewards them,” Benchimol said.

If you already read our 2016 brands and agencies guide, don’t miss what Diego Reck (FOX), John Mafoutsis (Viacom), Jeremy Piotraut (Teads.tv), Martín Frontini (Zoomin.TV) and Eugenia Denari (Google) tell us about media trends in the new year.

Translated by Gretchen Gardner

Big Data

Diego Reck, SVP and Chief Marketing Officer at FOX International Channels Latin America

Diego Reck

“Without a doubt, expectations are high when it comes to the consolidation of “Big Data.” The industry is going through a great deal of changes in the consumption of content and consumers’ habits are evolving faster than the market. People are dedicating more and more time to consuming entertainment, and the demand for new formats, and high-quality “everywhere experiences” is growing quickly. Our focus has shifted from targets by age or socio-economic class to audience groups that are segmented by genres of consumption. For that reason, to be competitive in marketing, we need to know the habits of our audiences to understand where and how to lead them to advertising messages. In this sense, integrating, processing and utilizing all of the data generated by the different media platforms will allow us to be productive and continue bringing the consumer better experiences every day.”

Multiplatform Opportunities

John Mafoutsis, SVP Advertising Sales and Brand Solutions at Viacom International Media Networks Américas

John Mafoutsis

“We know that the way that our audiences consume content is continuously evolving. For that reason, Viacom International Media Networks (VIMN) Américas will continue to offer innovative formats and a diverse portfolio of channels and products to generate multiplatform options that respond to the demands of our clients in Latin America. VIMN Américas will continue to invest in original productions and in the creation of content for all of our brands to compete in the multiplatform world with our linear, non-linear, mobile, social and live event products. With these products, brands offer clients an opportunity to be in constant contact with their respective audiences at any  time and on any platform.”

Video + Mobile + Programmatic

Jeremy Piotraut, Managing Director at Teads.tv Cono Sur

Jeremy Piotrout

“There will be an increase in digital investment, sustained by growth in video advertising. Within that growth, native video is taking on an important role thanks to the effort that advertisers have to distribute their videos on a premium level. Today, with the increase in Ad-Blocking(in 2015, for example, blocked videos represented 26% and 23% of advertising time in Chile and Argentina, respectively), it is crucial to strengthen formats that respect the user and generate a safe digital ecosystem with native formats.

The three trends for 2016 will be “video” + “mobile” + “programmatic.

Online Video and Mobile

Martín Frontini, Managing Director Latam & US Hispanics at Zoomin.TV

Martin Frontinni

“Expectations are high, and even better than they were in 2015. The online market continues to grow from year to year, and there are countries that haven’t even entered the double digits, which means that there is enormous potential compared to developed economies like that of the U.S. or UK, where online has already outgrown TV. Markets like that of Brazil, the biggest in the region, have experienced moderate growth due to political problems and their economic consequences.On the other hand, we expect a significant increase in online video. An increasing number of advertisers are migrating investment from TV to pre-roll, particularly, as the perfect “partner” to achieve appropriate reach and ROI.
At the same time, within online, the fact that desktop is losing market share to other devices, principally mobile, is nothing new. This trend is as global as it is regional.”

Online Platforms and Complementarity Between On and Off-Line Media

Eugenia Denari, director of marketing at Google for Argentina, Chile and Peru

Eugenia Denari“In 2016 everything indicates that the industry will continue on a sustained growth path. This forecast is based primarily on the perspectives of the market, which will continue to grow organically and constantly, with a strong emphasis on complementarity between off and online media and online platforms, which will gain a larger share of the market. Online search will continue to be a central component of online advertising campaigns, but we are going to see a clear evolution focused on efficiency and video and mobile device integration. These will be the largest spaces for innovation in the next years.

At Google, our biggest goal is to continue to be a digital partner and ally for all of the companies that want to take advantage of the Internet as a strategic pillar of their business. Online advertising is an indisputable component of advertising strategy for any brand. No leading company is questioning whether it needs to be online or not. The question is simply how to be online. To us, the current challenge is that the digital element is present in the earliest stages of designing a campaign, whether its in the marketing or advertising department or within an agency.”

sands-floor-sm As weary ad execs wandered home from CES 2015, we took a look at what this mother of all consumer electronics shows revealed about the future of advertising. We identified five trends that we think will matter for advertisers in the years to come, and checked in with three smart executives to get their thoughts.

1. Connected Watches

They show no sign of going away, with twice as many wearable exhibits as at CES 2014. But ads on them? Really? Probably, according to Jeremy Sigel, director of mobile, North America, for digital agency Essence. “Similar to mainstream mobile ad formats, it is easy to envision a full-screen interstitial ad or even a 15-second video on a smartwatch,” Sigel says. He points out that while a watch face may seem small, the dimensions would be similar to a Facebook mobile newsfeed ad. “While smartwatch ads may start there, the bigger opportunity will be highly contextual push notifications that strive to be additive, and branded applications that are inherently helpful to keep a brand top-of-mind.”

smart-watches-sm

If you think people won’t accept ads on their smartwatches or fitness devices, just remember that in the early days of mobile, people said the same thing about their phones. In fact, some of us, ahem, are old enough to remember when advertising on the World Wide Web was frowned upon.

2. OTT TV:

Dish’s SlingTV streaming service gave another push to over-the-top video, enabling subscribers to watch live TV, video-on-demand and 12 cable channels on a variety of devices. It also could open the way for better targeting and tracking of TV ads. Sling did not immediately respond to an email about its ad plans, but third-party ad networks may start salivating now.

Pat McKenna, CEO of Strike Social, says Sling and other OTT services will help marketers get a more accurate comparison of the performance of video ads on TV and digital. Strike Social is a third-party TrueView advertising, targeting and analytics platform that tracks video-ad performance across YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. The key to achieving this, according to McKenna, is for OTT services to provide APIs and consistent data to allow ad servers and analytics platforms to consume their data. “The opportunity for us is to marry performance data across all platforms, and then provide the report to [advertisers],” he says.

David Santana, art director at global, digital marketing agency Deep Focus, says that Sling TV’s $20 monthly subscription, no-contract deal will be attractive to Hispanic consumers, who are gravitating to other companies like T-Mobile that don’t demand customers lock themselves in. He says a bigger win will be if Sling TV develops content packages for Hispanics, the way that DirectTV does. (In December DirecTV introduced OTT Video Service Yaveo targeting the Hispanic population.) “The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow,” Santana concludes.

The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow.

3. Connected and autonomous cars

Internet-connected cars have been around at least since BMW introduced ConnectedDrive in 2011 – and CES 2014 seemed to be the CES of the Car. This year, more than a dozen cars were on display, many of them highlighting current or concept connected-car technology. With Google powering or at least participating in several of these offerings, you have to wonder: Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls. There’s also a strong –someday – play for ads on the so-called infotainment screens, the ever-larger digital dashboard screens that show everything from what’s playing on the sound system to your navigation route to use Facebook.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyCox6In5bg&w=560&h=315]

How about sending the driver a McDonald’s coupon when she’s approaching the restaurant? Actually, TeleNav has been doing that since 2010. The problem has always been, and continues to be for now, getting enough scale to make it worthwhile for national advertisers to bother. Maybe someday …

Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls?

 

Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball

4. Virtual Reality

Volvo, Dos Equis, Marriott, HBO, Tourism Australia and a handful of movie marketers have already released branded apps. VR is cool and fun, but hampered by the need to use a headset. Joining the fray among the expensive and still-in-beta Oculus Rift and the adorably crafty – and cheap – Google Cardboard headsets, Avegant and Samsung demonstrated virtual reality at the show. In the short term, VR marketing will live at trade shows and special events, where staffers can be on hand to manage the hardware and software.

Deep Focus’ Santana gives kudos to Volvo for it’s VR campaign that sent consumers who registered a Google Cardboard viewer kit. “That make it inclusive,” he says. “You don’t need a lot of money or to be in a major market to experience virtual reality. That’s important for the Hispanic community.”

Eventually, Digital Agency Essence’s Sigel thinks, that these virtual-reality “experiences” could contain ad units, in much the same way ads have been inserted into TV broadcasts, as well as into video and console games. He gives the example of a VR experience that lets you sit court-side at an NBA game. “In addition to traditional signage, the t-shirts of patrons, concessions, chants from the crowd, a comment from a court-side celebrity and shouts from players may all be sellable units,” he says.

By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?

5. Big data gets ginormous with connected-everything

The Internet of Things was one of CES 2015’s Top Tech Trends, along with wearables and autonomous cars. All these devices will generate data either all the time or a lot of the time. Location-based data combined with behavioral and contextual data could make ad targeting incredibly more complex – and possibly better. The quantified self, continuously tracked by wearables, could alone generate unprecedented amounts of usable personal data. The possibilities – futuristic as they are – are fascinating. By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?  Would his anonymous personal profile include the information that he’s more likely to respond to ads 20 minutes after he’s completed a run? How about a tweet from New Belgium Brewing after that run? Now, that’s the future of advertising.

sands-floor-sm As weary ad execs wandered home from CES 2015, we took a look at what this mother of all consumer electronics shows revealed about the future of advertising. We identified five trends that we think will matter for advertisers in the years to come, and checked in with three smart executives to get their thoughts.

1. Connected Watches

They show no sign of going away, with twice as many wearable exhibits as at CES 2014. But ads on them? Really? Probably, according to Jeremy Sigel, director of mobile, North America, for digital agency Essence. “Similar to mainstream mobile ad formats, it is easy to envision a full-screen interstitial ad or even a 15-second video on a smartwatch,” Sigel says. He points out that while a watch face may seem small, the dimensions would be similar to a Facebook mobile newsfeed ad. “While smartwatch ads may start there, the bigger opportunity will be highly contextual push notifications that strive to be additive, and branded applications that are inherently helpful to keep a brand top-of-mind.”

smart-watches-sm

If you think people won’t accept ads on their smartwatches or fitness devices, just remember that in the early days of mobile, people said the same thing about their phones. In fact, some of us, ahem, are old enough to remember when advertising on the World Wide Web was frowned upon.

2. OTT TV:

Dish’s SlingTV streaming service gave another push to over-the-top video, enabling subscribers to watch live TV, video-on-demand and 12 cable channels on a variety of devices. It also could open the way for better targeting and tracking of TV ads. Sling did not immediately respond to an email about its ad plans, but third-party ad networks may start salivating now.

Pat McKenna, CEO of Strike Social, says Sling and other OTT services will help marketers get a more accurate comparison of the performance of video ads on TV and digital. Strike Social is a third-party TrueView advertising, targeting and analytics platform that tracks video-ad performance across YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. The key to achieving this, according to McKenna, is for OTT services to provide APIs and consistent data to allow ad servers and analytics platforms to consume their data. “The opportunity for us is to marry performance data across all platforms, and then provide the report to [advertisers],” he says.

David Santana, art director at global, digital marketing agency Deep Focus, says that Sling TV’s $20 monthly subscription, no-contract deal will be attractive to Hispanic consumers, who are gravitating to other companies like T-Mobile that don’t demand customers lock themselves in. He says a bigger win will be if Sling TV develops content packages for Hispanics, the way that DirectTV does. (In December DirecTV introduced OTT Video Service Yaveo targeting the Hispanic population.) “The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow,” Santana concludes.

The opportunity to tailor content packages to this market is important to see it grow.

3. Connected and Autonomous Cars

Internet-connected cars have been around at least since BMW introduced ConnectedDrive in 2011 – and CES 2014 seemed to be the CES of the Car. This year, more than a dozen cars were on display, many of them highlighting current or concept connected-car technology. With Google powering or at least participating in several of these offerings, you have to wonder: Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls. There’s also a strong –someday – play for ads on the so-called infotainment screens, the ever-larger digital dashboard screens that show everything from what’s playing on the sound system to your navigation route to use Facebook.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyCox6In5bg&w=560&h=315]

How about sending the driver a McDonald’s coupon when she’s approaching the restaurant? Actually, TeleNav has been doing that since 2010. The problem has always been, and continues to be for now, getting enough scale to make it worthwhile for national advertisers to bother. Maybe someday …

Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of driving, you could, um, use Google Search or watch YouTube with prerolls?
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball
Nick Cannon playing virtual volleyball

4. Virtual Reality

Volvo, Dos Equis, Marriott, HBO, Tourism Australia and a handful of movie marketers have already released branded apps. VR is cool and fun, but hampered by the need to use a headset. Joining the fray among the expensive and still-in-beta Oculus Rift and the adorably crafty – and cheap – Google Cardboard headsets, Avegant and Samsung demonstrated virtual reality at the show. In the short term, VR marketing will live at trade shows and special events, where staffers can be on hand to manage the hardware and software.

Deep Focus’ Santana gives kudos to Volvo for it’s VR campaign that sent consumers who registered a Google Cardboard viewer kit. “That make it inclusive,” he says. “You don’t need a lot of money or to be in a major market to experience virtual reality. That’s important for the Hispanic community.”

Eventually, Digital Agency Essence’s Sigel thinks, that these virtual-reality “experiences” could contain ad units, in much the same way ads have been inserted into TV broadcasts, as well as into video and console games. He gives the example of a VR experience that lets you sit court-side at an NBA game. “In addition to traditional signage, the t-shirts of patrons, concessions, chants from the crowd, a comment from a court-side celebrity and shouts from players may all be sellable units,” he says.

By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?

5. Big Data Gets Ginormous with Connected-Everything

The Internet of Things was one of CES 2015’s Top Tech Trends, along with wearables and autonomous cars. All these devices will generate data either all the time or a lot of the time. Location-based data combined with behavioral and contextual data could make ad targeting incredibly more complex – and possibly better. The quantified self, continuously tracked by wearables, could alone generate unprecedented amounts of usable personal data. The possibilities – futuristic as they are – are fascinating. By tapping into someone’s Fitbit or health-tracking device, could you send him an ad for Starbucks when his energy flags?  Would his anonymous personal profile include the information that he’s more likely to respond to ads 20 minutes after he’s completed a run? How about a tweet from New Belgium Brewing after that run? Now, that’s the future of advertising.

Walmart3.jpg

Although details are still sketchy, Walmart’s announcement that it will create and operate its own media exchange to help its suppliers spend its media dollars based on the data WalMart obtains, has gotten mostly positive comments. What are the implications for the multicultural sector?

The retailing giant still is working on the software for Walmart Exchange, or WMX, which execs have described as “in beta.”

It’s just the natural evolution in Walmart’s decades-long big data initiative, according to Cesar Sroka, group account director for OMD. He says, “A lot of folks out there are not comfortable with it, but data can help drive a lot of decisions and effectively target who you’re going after. Walmart has millions of shoppers every week, so they have lots of data.”

Walmart will combine its own retail and online sales, gathered in close to real time, with social media data – and the new data stream coming from its Savings Catcher, an online service that gets consumers to input in-store receipts to see if they could have gotten a better price elsewhere. WalMart is a top ten Hispanic advertiser and many of its suppliers in the CPG and other categories are major advertisers.

Cesar Sroka, OMD
Cesar Sroka, OMD

Sroka thinks that WMX could help the retailer – and the brands that sell products through Walmart – better target African-American and Hispanic customers, allowing it to move beyond language preferences to consumer attitudes and behaviors. For example, the data could reveal whether some of the accepted wisdom on Hispanic shoppers, such as they shop in families and have larger basked sizes, are really true. “It’s raising the standard for everyone,” he says.

WMX could help the retailer – and the brands that sell products through Walmart – better target African-American and Hispanic customers

OMD isn’t worried that WMX will cut out media agencies, according to Sroka. “They’re just cutting costs out of the business. I believe they’ll still need an agency for strategy,” he says. “Programmatic doesn’t do that for you. Anybody can buy a thousand points. We are advisers: We look at your business holistically, from products being developed through consumer experiences.”

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Source Technoratti

Big Data is one of the buzzwords of the year, if not the buzzword. It describes collection of data sets so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using on-hand database management tools. The challenges include capture, curation, storage, search, sharing, analysis, and visualization. Information Technology is now increasingly able to sort through these massive amounts of data. The implications for the advertising and marketing industries are very important.

Oscar Padilla, VP of Strategy at Luminar, urged the audience to take analytics more seriously, and to learn how to “translate data into business intelligence,” during his presentation at Portada’s recent Annual Conference.

“Data is not only more important than many people think, but also much more overwhelming than imagined. For starters, data shows that 2.9 million emails are sent out every second worldwide,” said Padilla. Padilla noted that Big Data can help marketers reach their goals and make an effective sell of everything, from credit cards and hair-care products to automobiles and political messages. Luminar licenses data from about 2,000 different sources to create a master file and come up with the right analytics.

 

Big Data not only applies to the so-called general market, it will also strongly impact marketing and advertising in the U.S. Hispanic market. Major media players in the U.S. Hispanic market have already been taking their first steps. In fact, Padilla’s company Luminar is owned by Hispanic media company Entravision.

“Big Data is how we get the right message, to the right people, at the right time, on the right platform, on the right place.”

The double Whammy of Big Data and the U.S. Hispanic market

“We see a tsunami of Big Data forming and another tidal wave of Hispanics population in the U.S.. I would not be surprised to see a lot of activity in that intersection soon as the advertisement industry goes from Mad men to Math men, “Esteban Lopez Blanco, Chief Strategy Officer, Corporate Development and Innovation at Entravision Communications, tells Portada. To Lopez Blanco, “Big Data is how we get to the right message, to the right people, at the right time, on the right platform, on the right place.”

Implications for the Advertising Model

The current display ad model is typically based on advertisers demographically targeting areas of consumer interest on website properties or off-line. The new model, driven by Big Data, helps brands target consumers digitally based on their actual behaviors. Ads are targeted based on much more than just cookie data. Data Management Platforms (DMPs) are helping marketers better understand and segment in complex ways based on user attributes and user consumption habits. Players in the digital media market including DSPs (Demand side platforms) and SSP’s (Supply Side Platforms) are gravitating to also have the role of DMP’s or Data Management Platforms.

According to Blanco, “Google and Facebook have been doing big data for a while and technologies like hadoop and others will bring this to all forward looking companies.”

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