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Distorted by the impact of COVID-19, global consumer media usage, including all digital and traditional media, grew at an accelerated 2.8% to an average of 53.1 hours per week in 2020, according to PQ Media’s annual Global Consumer Media Usage Forecast 2020-2024.

How much media did we consume in 2020? In contrast to the loss of momentum in advertising and marketing spending in 2020, consumer time spent with media surged at the fastest growth rate since 2015, reversing a five-year trend of decelerating growth in media usage, according to new research released by leading media economist PQ Media®. Distorted by the impact of COVID-19, global consumer time spent with media, including all digital and traditional media, grew at an accelerated 2.8% to an average of 53.1 hours per week (HPW) in 2020, according to PQ Media’s annual Global Consumer Media Usage Forecast 2020-2024™.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the stay-at-home countermeasures employed to stem its spread, shook up the media economy in such a way that secular trends driving down media usage in some segments were reversed, while cyclical trends expected to boost usage in other sectors were postponed, and still other emerging trends were accelerated, positioning newer digital media channels to capitalize on the social and economic turbulence that rocked the media landscape in 2020.

As a result, global digital media usage bolted up 9.6% to 15.1 HPW in 2020, accounting for 28.5% of consumer time spent with media worldwide, gaining nearly 11 share points on traditional media in just five years. Key growth drivers were a slew of mobile media, including mobile video, audio, games, books and news, as well as social media channels, podcasting and OTT streaming video services, all of which posted consumer usage growth rates exceeding 15%, according to PQ Media®.

Consumer Media Usage Grows due to Pandemic

Consumer MediaNot since the Great Recession has there been a 10-point differential between the growth of overall consumer media usage and that of total advertising & marketing spending. But in the upside-down media economy of 2020 the pandemic drove down advertising & marketing spending 6.8%, while consumer time spent with media grew 2.8%, which was the fastest annual growth rate in five years, according to the Global Consumer Media Usage Forecast 2020-2024™.

“The prime beneficiaries of this paradoxical growth surge in media usage were consumer-supported media, particularly digital video, audio, games, social media and chat services. There’s no doubt that streaming media as a group were the hands-down winners in an otherwise loser of a year for many media stakeholders, particularly those dependent on advertising-driven media,” said PQ Media CEO Patrick Quinn. “As a result, consumer-driven media usage continued a nearly 20-year pattern of snatching away market share from advertising & marketing-supported media, as consumer-driven media accounted for over 55% of all media usage in the US, while its share grew to nearly 35% globally in 2020.”

The prime beneficiaries of this paradoxical growth surge in media usage were consumer-supported media, particularly digital video, audio, games, social media and chat services.

Of the 22 digital media channels covered in PQ Media’s report, consumers spent the most time with OTT video, like video-on-demand and streaming TV programs on connected devices, reaching an average of 5.04 HPW in 2020. While global mobile media usage was nearly 6.0 HPW in 2020, mobile video and games were the only mobile channels to exceed 1.0 HPW. New streaming video and audio services proliferated in 2020 as their audiences grew simultaneous to COVID-19 forcing consumers indoors for longer periods, pushing up digital video and audio consumption.

Consumer Media Usage: Netflix won big time

Consumer Media

Netflix added 26 million global subscribers in 1H20 compared to only 12 million in 1H19, as original hit series like “Tiger King,” “Ozark” and “The Queen’s Gambit” provided fresh content to growing stay-at-home audiences. Just one year after its launch, new video streamer Disney+ amassed nearly 74 million paid subscribers by 4Q20. With movie theaters shut down and studios forced to either delay film releases or launch them via streaming services, Disney debuted both “Mulan” and “Soul” on Disney+, while Warner Bros. launched “Wonder Woman ’84” concurrently on HBO Max and in theaters.

While videogames tend to buck trends in typical years, with usage declining prior to major hardware upgrades, this was not the case in 2020, as videogame usage surged throughout the year. Several franchise titles, such as Activision’s “Call of Duty,” were updated with new editions to great success – even before the blockbuster releases of Sony’s Playstation 5 and Microsoft’s Xbox Series X in 4Q20 – while titles like “Animal Crossing” and “Among Us” became international hits, driving up time spent with videogames.

Traditional media

Consumer MediaMeanwhile, several traditional media that had posted declining or decelerating growth rates since the Great Recession recorded their strongest growth in over 10 years. Print newspaper and book readership ticked up, but much of the fuel driving traditional media’s growth came from radio listenership, which grew 2.8% in 2020, as radio was a primary source for pandemic information in rural areas. Consumers turned to live TV more than any other medium (20.7 HPW) and terrestrial radio was the only other medium to exceed 10.0 HPW.

But not all media shared the good news. Print magazines lost subscribers who were afraid to touch mail and retailer subscribers like salons that had to eliminate waiting rooms. Particularly hard hit were film & DVD viewing (down 30%) and both traditional and digital out-of-home media, as stay-at-home edicts sapped travelers from the roads and skyways and foot traffic from many other venues.

Despite the expectation of COVID-19 vaccines being distributed widely by mid-2021 and a minor upswing in media consumption during the Tokyo Summer Olympics postponed from last year, consumer time spent with media will resume decelerating growth in 2021. PQ Media projects global consumer media usage to rise only 1.4% this year.

While the pandemic reversed some secular trends in 2020, we believe this was simply a short-term disruption of key long-term trends that will resume in 2021.

“We projected last year that consumer media usage would likely reach a tipping point at which media consumption flattens by the end of 2023. And while the pandemic reversed some secular trends in 2020, we believe this was simply a short-term disruption of key long-term trends that will resume in 2021,” Quinn said. “The key factors remain, as various traditional media usage will continue to either decelerate or decline, while smartphone penetration is at or near saturation in major markets worldwide, and several internet and mobile media channels will continue to experience slower annual growth.”

The rise in mobile media usage has a direct correlation to the growing influence of younger generations. Although iGens (born 1981-1996) use overall media much less than older generations (29 HPW in 2020) almost half of their media consumption is done via digital devices. In comparison, the Great Generation (born pre-1945) use media the most (89 HPW in 2020), but only 22% of their media consumption occurs on digital devices.

Among the 20 largest media markets, Japan posted the highest usage in 2020 (79.6 HPW), while Russia boasted the fastest growth (up 4.5%), and South Korea had the highest digital media share of total consumer media usage (45.3%). US consumer media usage was up 2.9% to 73.0 HPW, as streaming video and audio drove up digital’s share of total media usage to 42.4%, PQ Media estimates.

We spoke to Sebastian Yoffe, Managing Director, Latin America at Lotame on how his company’s data enrichment solutions can help brands and publishers deepen their connections to prospects, particularly in the current COVID-19 environment.

Register to the Sept. 2 Webinar Cultura y Tradiciones Succesful U.S. Hispanic Digital Advertising Starts Here!

The new Background…and Why First Party Data is not Enough

According to Yoffe, “the world is changing and so are consumers. The last few months have accelerated the shift to digital as consumers rely more on delivery or contact-free pickup of goods and services. All of our habits and routines have changed as well. First-party data while valuable to understanding customers was never enough for marketers. That has been made even clearer now. It’s imperative that the industry embrace other forms of data to get to know customers and meet them where they are — in tone, message, and modality. That comes from truly understanding how they work their worlds and what’s important to them now versus a few months ago. In addition, we have always championed a connected ecosystem and only by bringing all industry players together will we grow and deliver meaningful experiences to customers. ” Sebastian Yoffe - Lotame


Check out:
 A connected digital advertising ecosystem benefits everyone.  (By Adam Solomon, Chief Growth Officer, Lotame)

 

Third Party Cookies Not Turned Off Yet by Google

Yoffe, photo left, who is at the helm of Lotame in Latin America, notes that it is important to understand that Google with its 78% Chrome market share globally has not turned third -party cookies off yet. “This is the world we live in today. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being transacted in an ecosystem where Chrome is the dominant player. If you’re not working within the current ecosystem’s parameters, how are you even advancing advertiser needs and interests on more than half of the Internet? Third-party cookies won’t be going away until 2022 so until that time, the company’s new suite of data enrichment solutions known as Lotame Panorama will use third-party cookies when they are available but they aren’t required. We’re also heavily involved in Google’s work to remove cookies but again, until then, we are fully functional in today’s environment.”

If you’re not working within the current ecosystem’s parameters, how are you even advancing advertiser needs and interests on more than three-quarters of the Internet?

Data Enrichment Solutions Company: Ready for a Future Without Third-Party Cookies

Consumers’ digital lives have only grown more complex. With billions of data points from diverse sources, brands and publishers need a long-term cure to intelligently find and connect these resources rather than a series of band-aids. Lotame‘s ID Graph technology known as Cartographer plays a crucial role in helping marketers and pu8blishers find and connect with their audiences in meaningful and respectful ways, with or without cookies.

Lotame Cartographer‘s graph technology  connecting web IDs across first-party cookies and local storage. “We use local storage because Safari expires first-party cookies after a single day whereas local storage lasts for 7 days. In addition, our graph connects web IDs to mobile ad IDs and OTT IDs,” Yoffe asserts.

Cartographer connects web IDs, browsers and devices at the people-level, giving global brands and publishers access to every visitor to their site, regardless of browser, as well as through mobile app, TV and offline. It creates a master graph of graphs, mapping connections between, among and within people, the places they visit and their interests, with the thread of consumer consent. Cartographer plots, clusters and shares diverse data connections across 90+ platform partners to find more of a brand or publisher’s audience than anyone could find alone, creating increased or “true” scale. In doing so, the universe of people it can see and cluster reaches 1.4 billion unique consumers across 4 billion active IDs globally.

Yoffe explains that Lotame Cartographer makes secure and trusted connections at three key levels – ID, individual and household – using machine learning and deterministic and probabilistic techniques.

Creating Addressable Audiences

A key benefit of the appropiate use of marketing technologies is that they should be able to draw actionable conclusions that support better decision-making, optimize campaigns, and reveal opportunities and gaps. Lotame Panorama provides the rich data, tools and technology for marketers and agencies to create addressable audiences.

Yoffe shared that marketers do a tremendous amount of research and gathering of data across siloed resources in order to develop audience targets for granola bars, for example. They might want women between 18-25 who are interested in health and shop at these specific stores. They may even have multiple personas to sell that one candy bar. The challenge in digital advertising is finding that carefully crafted audience and engaging them with your marketing message.  Yoffe notes that he “first helps marketers create these audiences by consolidating the world’s largest resource of high quality second- and third-party data. We make this data accessible via Lotame Panorama to marketers and agencies to look at overlaps and indices, to interpret the data, to understand more dimensions of a customer than ever before. Marketers and agencies then create audience segments from these assembled qualities, behaviors, and interests. And, because Lotame is powered by the Cartographer ID Graph, technology, marketers gain even more knowledge about relevant attributes and behaviours tied to the individual.

These segments can then be pushed via Lotame Panorama technology to a marketer’s DSP so that they can buy against that audience. We also enable publishers to create these rich audience segments that can be bought across their properties either via direct deals or programmatically. Lotame Panorama has ready-made pre-packaged addressable audiences that marketers can buy now from 50 DSPs. Or as we said, you can create your own.”

Beyond a DMP,  A Data Enrichment Solutions Company

Data Enrichment SolutionsHistorically, Lotame was known as a DMP.  “We believe the landscape and Lotame have evolved beyond the definition of a DMP”, Yoffe notes. “Lotame positions itself as a data enrichment solutions company. These solutions help marketers, agencies and publishers in Latin America understand customers and create addressable audiences to engage consumers everywhere they are. Unlike a traditional tech stack, Lotame’s solutions are flexible, scalable and cost-effective alternative to the walled-off options. We empower marketers and agencies to buy the solutions they need, and only those that they need as opposed to the weighty and bloated martech stacks.  We see marketers eager to tap deeper into their data strategies in the region, and include within their core business strategy data.”

We empower marketers and agencies to buy the solutions they need, and only those that they need as opposed to the weighty and bloated martech stacks.

Register to the Sept. 2 Webinar Cultura y Tradiciones Succesful U.S. Hispanic Digital Advertising Starts Here!

“It’s worth noting that the need for data enrichment is more critical than ever. Due to the global pandemic, the world has changed — and consumer passions, interests and habits have changed as well. Relying on first-party data alone, marketers are missing out on those important changes in their customers’ lives and the understanding that comes with it to impact messaging, product development and more,” Yoffe asserts.

More about Lotame

Lotame is the leading provider of data enrichment solutions for global enterprises. Our connected and patented data technologies, curated second- and third-party data exchanges, and high-touch customer service makes Lotame a  trusted choice for marketers, agencies and media companies that want to build a panoramic view of their customers and activate across the cookieless web, mobile app and OTT environments. Lotame serves its global clients with offices in New York City, Columbia MD, Argentina, London, Mumbai, Singapore and Sydney. Learn more at www.lotame.com

 

 

What: Multicultural Audience Measurement experts offer Portada insights around the problem of audience under-representation.
Why it matters: Measurement firms under-represent multicultural audiences by as much as 25%, which causes a negative impact in media investment and produces overall flawed results.

 

Audience measurement has never been more complicated, as cultural nuances and consumer behavior shift and change, and the proliferation of new technologies demands multi-channel strategies. The task is even more difficult when it comes to measuring multicultural audiences. Experts tell Portada major measurement firms under-represent these audiences by as much as 25%. If this is the case, the media budget for targeting multicultural audiences should be substantially higher than it is right now. Just for Hispanic marketing, Portada estimates overall expenditures of US 6.07 billion in 2019. However, if firms under-represent audiences by up o 25%, media expenses could increase by up to US 1.5 billion. Admittedly, this is a back-of-the-envelope calculation. Nevertheless, it highlights the importance of accurate multicultural audience measurement in satisfying clients’ needs, and its potential for the multicultural marketing industry.

The lack of a common audience measurement currency in multicultural audience measurement impacts media investment levels negatively.

Competition Rising

For many years now, companies like Nielsen and Kantar have offered advanced TV audience measurement. However, competition has increased. New players offer digital solutions that claim to be more comprehensive. This forces the bigger players to think of new ways to keep up with how audiences move and evolve. Inconsistencies between reported data reveal the lack of a common audience measurement currency in multicultural audience measurement. Hence, there’s a negative impact in media investment.

Furthermore, marketers’ biases lead to incorrect data interpretation. In turn, this leads to bad consumer experiences and negative overall results. How can we expect to move the needle if we can’t even tell where it is? In order to find out more about how to face these challenges, we talked to experts who understand how audience measurement impacts media planning and buying: Dana Bonkowski, SVP, Multicultural Lead at Starcom; Mebrulin Francisco, Managing Partner, Sr Director, MPlatform, GroupM; Nelson Pinero, Senior Digital Director, Senior Partner at GroupM; and David Queamante, SVP, Client Business Partner at UM Worldwide.

 

Audience Under and Over-Representation

All interviewees agree that multicultural audiences are still under-represented by major measurement firms. One of the reasons for this, explains Mebrulin Francisco, is the lack of insight into how audiences behave. Francisco mentions as an example all those times when data providers collected data on Hispanics. But once her team digged deeper, they realized the majority of Hispanics represented were English-dominant. This is a big issue because “it means the data is not representative of all the Hispanics in the U.S., creating a blind spot,” she says.

Mebrulin Francisco

The same has happened in the other extreme, where you can have over-representation of Spanish-dominant consumers, creating a blind spot for Bilingual or English-dominant Hispanics. “This is especially the case within sets that depend on cookie level data,” Francisco explained. “If this is true for the Hispanic segment, which is the largest among multicultural consumers, think about the under-representation of African-American or Asian segments. Many data providers do not even report on these multicultural sub-segments.”

 

Language preference won’t singlehandedly define and capture an audience. So, in many cases, a large portion of a given audience is not captured. 
Dana Bonkowski

Therefore, the first thing is having a representative sample of the audience. It might seem obvious, but in the words of David Queamante, “Unless measuring companies take the time to ensure they are gathering information from a representative sample of users, they will under-count multicultural audiences by default”. This represents a challenge. As Dana Bonkowski mentions, “engagement with culture-driven content is often the best signal to identify whether or not a person is ‘multicultural’. But language preference won’t singlehandedly define and capture an audience. So, in many cases, a large portion of a given audience is not captured.”

 

Multicultural Media Consumption is Elusive

Marketers have long assumed that a universal approach can reach audiences. However, “in doing so they fail to identify key nuances in motivations, attitudes, and behavior across consumer segments leading to an incomplete marketplace assessment,” explained Mebrulin Francisco. In the case of multicultural consumers, it’s even more complicated to hit the mark: Since datasets are limited, firms “do not flag multicultural consumers accurately and do not provide a holistic view of the brand’s performance, blurring meaningful insights,” said Francisco.

Multicultural media consumption is concentrated on certain outlets that [aren’t always] included on measurement companies’ surveys and reports. Therefore, multicultural media consumption may seem to ‘disappear’.
David Queamante

Moreover, multicultural audience measurement is rarely accurate. Why is that? As David Queamante explains, “Multicultural media consumption is concentrated on certain outlets that may not always be large or prominent enough to be included on the measurement companies’ surveys and reports. Therefore, multicultural media consumption may seem to ‘disappear.'” Besides, as Queamante mentions, not all measurement companies offer surveys in Spanish. This oversight considerably reduces the representation of Spanish-dominant Hispanic audiences, for example.

 

Privacy Issues Complicate Measuring Even More

This new era has brought significant advantages. For example, we can measure whatever happens as long as it happens online. However, the fact that it’s now easier to use and collect data as also brought up important privacy issues. Nelson Pinero predicts: “With audiences paying a little bit more attention to how and which personal data is being shared, it will become a bit more difficult to reach a diverse audience.”

Nelson Pinero

However, this is already a reality. Media buyers and agencies are working together around the problem of accurate audience measurement. But “what follows now is all part of the balancing act between data and the years of experience that allow the media buyers to react dynamically to market conditions and to, ideally, optimize plans,” adds Pineiro. “Audiences will take more control of how they are reached, and agencies trying to find the right audience will need to cross-reference their deterministic/probabilistic data to enhance plan performance.”

What Happens Now?

The obvious prediction is that data science will become even more important in the digital world. “Measurement is the new black,” declares Mebrulin Francisco. “As we push towards a data-driven age in marketing, science, quantification, and data are going to continue to be a cornerstone of decision making. If I cannot measure the impact of my investment, understand my audience impression on a site, or reach potential, it will be very hard to make a case for using a partner.”

Start building out multicultural and cultural expertise in house to accurately represent these audiences in your data streams.

Moreover, the immediate future is inescapably multicultural. Marketers need to use art to harness the power of all this data in order to represent audiences accurately. Experts like Mebrulin Francisco believe a good way to start is with first-party data. “If you are in the audience measurement space my recommendation is to start building out multicultural and cultural expertise in house to accurately represent these audiences in your data streams.”

When asked for her views on the future, Dana Bonkowski shared the hope that “marketers invest to better understand the business-building power of multicultural audiences. More than 30% of all Americans fall in one or more ‘multicultural’ audience buckets. The question should be “How can you afford not to invest against better multicultural audience measurement?”

 

What: For audience data analysis, CNN blends and analyzes multiple data streams that reveal its audience’s preferences. Thus, the world-renowned news organization produces content that keeps viewers coming back.
Why it matters:  CNN’s VP of digital research and analytics Seth Holladay outlines the challenge of finding the right data and analytical tools to ensure that content engages loyal viewers and attracts new ones.

 

Audience data analysis tools

Cookies are not enough when it comes to a complete understanding of your audience, according to CNN’s VP of digital research and analytics Seth Holladay. In other words, the bits of data stored on users’ web browsers provide only a partial picture of CNN fans’ interests and viewing habits.

To really know its audience, CNN turns to multiple data streams gathered from its own online properties and third-party data sources. For example, this includes Google and Alexa voice-activated speakers. Moreover, it analyzes users’ behavior on CNN’s websites, Holladay told Portada during a sit-down interview at Portada Miami.

CNN uses multiple sources of data and data analysis tools to inform its editorial, advertising, and content strategies. “We watch how people are interacting with our content,” Holladay said.

For instance, one tool CNN uses for audience data analysis is Adobe Analytics, to track users’ interaction with CNN’s websites. But cookies aren’t enough. Thus, CNN also uses third-party data sources, like Comscore, to better understand its audience demographics.

 

Third-party data and other data sources

“Across the CNN portfolio, we cover a lot of topics. Comscore for the U.S. market allows us to understand the demographics of our viewers,” Holladay told Portada. “We take a lot of our really granular Adobe-level data, users’ actions on our website, and within that we are blending in different types of data using a lot of third-party sources to enrich that data.”

Seth Holladay, CNN

Audience information drawn from third parties includes data from Alexa and Google Home smart speakers that, while not directly connected to CNN, still provides valuable insights, Holladay said.

We have increasing interest from Hispanic audiences across the world in what is happening in the U.S.

 

 

Connecting the dots with mobile

To further close gaps in audience data analysis, CNN looks at data drawn from consumers’ mobile advertising IDs.There is an ability to connect the dots with mobile advertising IDs, what people are doing and the online behavior data from Adobe, and then match those with the advertising side to create a richer picture of the audience,” Holladay explained.

CNN has a “number of initiatives underway” to deploy AI and machine learning to analyze the data it collects. But human decision making is still a key component of how CNN uses data to guide its content decisions.

“From a business perspective, at our core we are a news service. We have a lot of editorial oversight so that will remain the main driver in our decision making.”

 

Multi-cultural advantage

CNN en español allows CNN to isolate the Hispanic audience in a unique and discreet way, Holladay noted.

And the current political climate in the U.S. has turned into a plus for driving new Hispanic viewers to CNN’s properties.

We are blending lots of different data.

 

“What we have now is a platform for people that want to consume news in both languages. We have an increasing interest from Hispanic audiences across the world in what is happening in the US,” Holladay told Portada.CNN discusses audience data analysis

Moreover, CNN en español also allows the news network to draw a deep understanding of content preferences in the different countries in Latin America where it is available. This is also very useful for audience data analysis.

“One of the most basic things we collect is the geography of the user,” Holladay said.

 

Informing editorial decisions

First, CNN collects and analyzes “tons of signals” to understand its visitors. The company examines what digital properties they’re clicking on, what causes them to leave a site, and their digital touchpoints.

Then, it deploys a real-time dashboard to give its editorial professionals a true picture of the impact of content. In this way, they see “what types of topics and subjects resonate with different types of audiences,” Holladay said.

 

What: In order to drive content strategy, brands need quality, granular data. As #PortadaLA panelists discussed, digital media allows gathering precise data that serves as a good starting point to make media, budget, and attribution decisions.
Why it matters: Content is one of the best ways to connect with consumers, but there is a need to develop better tracking methodologies and newer data tools that can be leveraged to reach the Hispanic audience more effectively.

By Ryan Orvis, guest Portada contributor.

 

The relationship between data and content formed the basis of ‘How Data and Content Continue to Fuel the Evolving World of Advertising’, a Portada Los Angeles panel discussion led by Guillermo Arduino, CNN Anchor and Correspondent for Encuentro (CNN en Español). Joining in the conversation were Caro D’Antuono, Vice President of Marketing for Northgate Markets; Frances Rubio, Multicultural Marketing Analytics Manager for GroupM; Roxane Garzon, Media Director for Casanova; and Robin Garfield, Senior Vice President of Research and Scheduling for CNN.

Robin Garfield and Frances Rubio

A key takeaway from the panel was the need for quality, granular data to drive content strategy. This is particularly crucial for the Hispanic market, where there is a strong need for a common currency of audience measurement.

The panelists discussed utilizing data to construct a user profile as a starting point. “Who are we connecting with, and where is there an opportunity?” asked Caro D’Antuono. “Most of the time [content] resonates with a specific audience whether it’s male or female, a specific age group, or a language preference.”

Roxane Garzon explained how digital media allows us to hone in on a specific consumer to gather precise behavioral data. This data can then be leveraged to make decisions on media, budget, and attribution.

Roxane Garzon

For Frances, the process begins by looking at all data sources —including social, syndicated, and internal— to understand who the audience is. “There is no single source of truth,” she explained, describing the importance of a data-agnostic approach.

Robin discussed using real-time data to discern what people are thinking as opposed to what actions they are taking. “First we want to think about the people. Data is a representation of the audience and what people are doing. It’s one part of the research ecosystem. What’s really important is that we connect the data to audience insights.

Data is only as good as where you’re getting it from— especially in multicultural [marketing],” explained Roxane, outlining the challenges of attributing data to specific points in the sales funnel. This is especially difficult for smaller businesses, for whom multicultural audience data is expensive and relatively scarce.

Caro D’Antuono and Guillermo Arduino

Caro described content as one of the best ways for advertisers to connect with multiple users at different stages of the funnel, something that has become increasingly necessary with developments in media and technology. “The world is changing so much faster outside of our organization. Everything from the media landscape, to the consumer, to everything they have access to is changing so rapidly.”

Frances stressed the importance of developing better methodologies for tracking the Hispanic audience, especially as younger audiences grow increasingly diverse. This includes using multiple data sources to develop a fuller view of the audience and working with partners to develop new tools for data collection.

“It’s a fascinating time for us to be able to push the way forward,” she said. “[We] need to focus on speaking to growth opportunity segments, and those who don’t will be left behind.”