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What: Ecommerce marketing strategy is revealed by retailers Walmart and Soriana. It shows how they’re capturing the e-commerce home delivery grocery market in Mexico with alternative digital payment strategies.
Why it matters: Fear of fraud stops many Mexico consumers from making online purchases with a credit card. As a result, Walmart and Soriana are on it. Consequently, they’re deploying cash on delivery, branded digital cash cards, mobile phone loyalty programs, and PayPal options.

The race is on as grocers deploy ecommerce marketing strategy in Mexico. Grocery and general merchandise retailer Walmart has taken the lead. But in Mexico, its competitors, including Soriana, are racing to build their online-delivery businesses.

How customers pay for their online purchases could make all the difference.

High credit card commissions and fear of fraud pose a significant barrier to online sales in Mexico. Digital purchases make up only 3 percent of all consumer goods sales nationwide. As a result, that’s way below the average seen in other countries, according to branding expert Vilma Vale-Brennan. She is deputy general manager of Vale Network in Mexico.

The new President of Mexico, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, has promised to get banks to lower credit card commissions. But grocery retailers like Walmart don’t have time to lose.

Ecommerce Marketing Strategy with Digital Payment App

Last year, Walmart launched its own digital application. As a result, it allows customers to pay for goods at stores with the Walmart digital application “Cashi.”

After downloading the app to their mobile phones, customers can recharge it with cash at any Walmart-owned store. It’s a fast and easy way to convert cash into a secure digital payment option. As a result, customers use it for purchases at Walmart, Superama, Sam’s Club, and Bodega Aurrera stores.

Cashi can be used to pay electric bills and services including Netflix, Spotify, and Uber.

The idea here is to make purchasing with Walmart easier, and to give people more options.

But perhaps more importantly, Walmart tells Portada it expects to extend the Cashi digital payment system later this year to allow its online customers to use Cashi for online grocery purchases, according to Gabriela Buenrostro, assistant director of corporate communications. “The idea here is to make purchasing with Walmart easier, and to give people more options,” she said.

Walmart’s ecommerce marketing strategy outpaces the online market with 4.5 million e-commerce shoppers in Mexico, followed by grocers Soriana at 1.1 million, according to a study by the American media measurement and analytics company Comscore as reported by Portada.

Cash, PayPal Options Offered

Walmart offers online customers the option to use PayPal, and Soriana added the PayPal payment option to its online shopping site this year.

Soriana also allows its online customers to pay cash to the home delivery person, or use their credit card on the delivery person’s portable card reader, Director of Electronic Commerce Rafael Castelltort told Portada.

Most of Soriana’s online grocery customers shop online using Soriana’s branded mobile application on their cell phones. A Soriana loyalty card program has more than 9,000 users, and to build loyalty even more, Soriana, deploying its own ecommerce marketing strategy launched its own mobile phone service “Soriana Movil” in 2017, which earns users loyalty points that can be exchanged for free products, Castelltort said.

The trends are very clear. Mexicans prefer to use a mobile phone when visiting grocery stores’ online sites.

Soriana’s decision to launch its own mobile phone service in Mexico might appear tangential to an effort to build online purchases, however, it could be spot-on in terms of getting more online shoppers.

“The trends are very clear,” comScore’s Alejandra Ibarra, manager of comScore’s Latin America Services, told Portada when asked about ecommerce marketing strategies among grocers in Mexico. “Mexicans prefer to use a mobile phone when visiting grocery stores’ online sites.”

And as time goes by, mobile applications are becoming more and more important for grocery ecommerce market leaders like Soriana and Walmart.

Just last year, Walmart announced its acquisition of the online marketplace Cornershop. Users download the Cornershop application to make online purchases using their mobile phones at supermarkets, specialty food stores and pharmacies in Mexico and Chile, according to Forbes.

“The Cornershop acquisition by Walmart shows the focus that applications have for the company and the performance it must deliver to maintain its leadership,” Ibarra told Portada.

What: Teads and Precision, Publicis Media’s programmatic division, have announced a partnership that will expand across eight Latin American countries.
Why it matters: Through this partnership, Teads and Precision aim to deliver a more efficient ad-tech supply chain with curated inventory and data that uses advanced technology.

Teads and Precision, the programmatic division of Publicis Media, will collaborate in Latin America. Their objective is delivering a more efficient ad-tech supply chain with curated inventory and data that uses advanced technology.

Precision will continue to provide a tech agnostic approach for its clients while adapting to their business needs. In the meantime, Teads will be the full-stack digital platform for viewable video and display inventory. Together, the team will develop new strategies for Latin America.

Teads will then conduct regular training for the Precision team to share cutting-edge information and best practices on advertising campaigns optimization. Thus, the company will strength Precision’s position as a reliable guide of its clients throughout their transformation journey.

Full-Funnel Technology

“By combining our premium and brand-safe inventory with engaging, personalized, non-intrusive ads, we are helping brands at every stage of the marketing funnel, from awareness to conversion, passing through consideration,” said Eric Tourtel, Senior Vice President of Teads Latin America. “Instead of simply charging by the impressions, at Teads we use machine learning and artificial intelligence to optimize the campaign or ROI. Moreover, we guarantee results, from viewability, completed views, unique incremental visitors, or even conversions.”

“Teads has earned our trust by offering the most advanced technology, innovation, and brand-safe inventory. The Teads team never stops looking for ways to improve results, “said Monica Gadsby, CEO of Publicis Group Latin America. “It’s really inspiring to see the immense possibilities that this partnership brings. Therefore, Teads has definitely become a key business partner for Precision in the region.”

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

 

Comcast Spotlight, the advertising sales division of Comcast Cable, has announced that it has appointed Melanie Hamilton as Vice President, National Sales. In this role, Hamilton will lead Comcast Spotlight’s national sales team, serving as a business partner, advisor, and mentor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

José Villafañe has been named Chief Revenue Officer at Steereo, a music discovery app exclusively for rideshare vehicles. In this role, Villafañe will lead the company’s advertising and music revenue initiatives. Previously, he was Head of Sales and Marketing for MLC Media, and before that he spent over seven years at Entravision, where he held several executive positions and founded the Entravision Audio Network.

 

 

 

 

 

Ben Kaufman is stepping down from his role as Chief Marketing Officer at BuzzFeed in January 2020 to focus on growing the toy store Camp, which he co-founded in Manhattan in December 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walmart U.S. Chief Marketing Officer Barbara Messing will step down Aug. 30 after just a year on the job.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What: For years, large chains have targeted Hispanics by adding a special aisle with select items from their home countries. These days, this approach can be a bit outdated. Here are some Hispanic grocery shopping insights, as diversity and globalization demand a more integrated approach.
Why it matters: Marketers are well aware that Hispanics are a huge consuming force that will only grow in time. It’s important to come up with ways to really cater to the community’s needs.

 

The Hispanic Cooking Rites

Us Latinos love our food. We love preparing it, we love planning it, we love buying fresh ingredients. Cooking and sharing is the ultimate family-bonding experience. Homemade meals are the first thing we miss when we’re away. We make them anywhere to feel at home. All these cultural traits not only make us great cooks, but also great produce and grocery shoppers. According to The State of the Plate, a 2015 Study on America’s Consumption of Fruits & Vegetables published by the Produce for Better Health Foundation, Hispanic grocery shoppers rank highest in produce consumption amongst 3 other ethnic groups (White/Non-Hispanics, Asians, and Black/Non-Hispanics).

There’s something all food marketers in the U.S. need to understand in order to cater to their Hispanic customers: From the moment the menu for a Hispanic table is conceived, every step of its preparation matters. Supermarkets appealing to the target can assert everything they must do to satisfy an ever-growing consumer base by being aware of the particularly ritualistic nature of Hispanic kitchens. Latinos love hand picking their food, buying enough ingredients to last for several meals, and trying out new ingredients on a permanent effort to enrich and expand their gastronomic experiences. But there’s one problem. Even though marketers are well aware that Hispanics are a consuming force, some have chosen to label and separate Hispanic (and generally ethnic) foods and products. This segregation rings counterintuitive and obsolete.

Finding the Balance Between Diversity and Globalization

Hispanics are widely diverse as a group. Every single Hispanic country has different ancestral dishes that require specific ingredients for their preparation. In addition, Millennials have been exposed to the culinary options of a globalized economy. This surely has an affect on traditional menus, even if Latino families have a specific and deep-rooted meal preparation routine.

Nearly six in ten Hispanics are Millennials or younger, according to Pew Research Center’s 2014 report, The Nations Latino Population is Defined by its Youth. 40% of American Millennials are multicultural, and more than half of this group are Latinos. As a global society would have it, we want to be able to make corn flour tortillas, but we want them filled with swiss cheese. According to The Why? Behind the Buy, a study conducted by Acosta Marketing and Univision in 2015, 57% of Hispanic Millennial Shoppers ages 25-34 say they often try new flavors/products.

 For years, the larger chains have catered to the Hispanic consumer (primarily) by adding an ‘Hispanic’ or ‘International’ aisle and placing select merchandise from Latin America. […] It is unclear if this format is successful.

Nothing more American than… Pizza?

As we have said before in other articles, foods that used to be foreign at some point, like pizza, sushi, and tacos, are such a big part of a global food culture that no one hardly ever questions their place in American households. These days, being able to find a wide variety of products from around the world is expected. In some cases it’s a given, because we live in a connected world in which boundaries are more blurry each day. As Rishad Tobaccowala, Chief Growth Officer at Publicis Groupe, said to Portada in a recent interview, “An idea that is not aligned with the unstoppable trends of diversity and globalization is doomed from the start.”

How to Include a Niche

For a minority seeking inclusion, all manifestations of inclusion are welcome. Supermarkets could start by dropping the label “Hispanic groceries” to call them just groceries. Yet, many supermarkets have tried to cater to the Hispanic audience by adding “exclusive” sections with the products Latino audiences may find at home. “For years, the larger chains have catered to the Hispanic consumer (primarily) by adding an ‘Hispanic’ or ‘International’ aisle and placing select merchandise from Latin America […] Some of the largest, such as HEB in Texas, developed their Mi Tienda (My Store) format which is located in a high dense Hispanic neighborhood. A larger store than a neighborhood store. It is unclear if this format is successful” says Randy Stockdale, director of Solex Marketing Solutions.

Problem is, inclusive as this effort may appear at first glance, Latinos already comprise 17% of the total American population. Inserting a Hispanic section surrounded by aisles of  “non-Hispanic” products might end up falling short for this ever-growing segment. “I don’t subscribe to a Hispanic aisle”, says Stockdale. “I would rather see the stores, particularly the larger chains, place like-items together and provide a greater convenience. Have you ever found Goya Olives in the general Olives section? Likely not.” Think of it this way: limiting their space is also limiting their consumption to one tiny section of an entire store.

Frozen Hispanic

In July 2017, a tweet got viral because one man saw the mockery potential of a supermarket freezer labeled “Frozen Hispanic.” He decided to pose as just that… a frozen Hispanic. The tweet got 152,278 retweets of people that didn’t see the need to separate frozen tamales from frozen chicken wings. Supermarkets would greatly profit from including Hispanic products without differentiation. It’s been proven that Hispanic consumers are generally willing to try new, different things.

An Emotional Connection

Brands like Jarritos spark the joy of feeling represented and identified while being abroad. Many people immediately purchase products that make them feel homesick when they’re abroad. This speaks of the great importance of having a supermarket experience that appeals not only to your needs, but to your emotions, comfort zone, and memories of home.

And just like it would at home the store needs to feel just like any other supermarket with staple sections. In Canadian supermarkets, for example, diversity is tangible all around. A variety of multicultural shoppers experience all kinds of international foods available to everyone. Anyone can add tzatziki, udon noodles, and jasmine-infused rice pudding to their shopping basket.

Just as the world’s boundaries are thinner, the gaps between demographic segments are narrower. We want to connect to our heritage, but we don’t want to feel isolated by it. We all want to feel human. So, if including a separate Hispanic grocery section on the supermarket is no longer a viable option, what is? How to attract Hispanics and make them feel welcome and included while strongly driving purchase intention? The answer lies in the power of emotions.

What Should Supermarkets Do, Then?

 In short? “Enhance their joy of shopping”, conclude Acosta and Univision on The Why? Behind the Buy. Perhaps general retailers could learn a thing or two from Hispanic grocery concept supermarkets like Northgate González Markets. The chain not only features an in-store tortillería, carnicería, and cocina, but that also offers children cooking classes and a gift certificate upon completing six lessons.

Or Fiesta Mart in Texas, offering a variety of fresh, organic, locally sourced produce with a side of social community programs to educate children and help feed the hungry. “I would not say [larger chains] are not doing a good job,” says Randy Stockdale. “They are trying at least. But, I would state that the larger chains should provide a friendlier-Hispanic atmosphere and improved merchandise. I am a strong proponent of bilingual in-store signage where the store is high-Hispanic density”. Therefore, the wisest move is to be inclusive and open-minded in both directions.

Both Fiesta Mart and Northgate Gonzalez are on the other side of the spectrum. Just as there are Hispanic aisles, there are entire stores that focus on the Hispanic community. But this doesn’t mean the general market should not come. There’s no reason to separate minorities, communities are not separate anymore. Everyone is welcome because everyone is from everywhere. No man is an aisle.

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

 

Uber has hired 10-year Google veteran Thomas Ranese as Vicepresident of Global Marketing. Less than two weeks ago, CEO Dara Khosrowshahi laid off 400 of Uber’s in-house marketers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adam Potashnick has been appointed as MediaCom’s U.S. Chief Operating Officer. In this new role, Adam will lead the strategic execution of all operations of the business, which is comprised of 900 people in New York, LA, Chicago, and Ann Arbor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credera, a full-service management consulting, user experience, and technology solutions firm, has appointed Justin Bell as its new CEO. Bell has been with Credera for 15 years and has served as president since 2016. He will take over from Rob Borrego.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volkswagen has hired Saad Chehab as its new Chief Marketing Officer.  He was previously Vicepresident, Marketing Communications for Kia Motors America and former head of the Chrysler brand with FCA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What: We talked to multicultural marketing experts, Rent-A-Center’s Maria Albrecht, NFL’s Marissa Fernandez, Group M’s LaToya Christian, and Intuit’s John Sandoval about key brand attributes for successful multicultural marketing.
Why it matters: As ethnic minorities become majorities in the U.S., companies will need to do multicultural marketing if they wish to survive.

When is the right time to do multicultural marketing? Who are the right brands to do it? Which are the right attributes for success? Portada talked to a group of multicultural marketing experts. Unsurprisingly, all their answers point unequivocally in the same direction. If you have a business and wish to be relevant, you have to do multicultural marketing. Take note of the following pieces of advice and be ready for the future.

1. Being Inclusive Isn’t Optional Anymore

Multicultural Marketing Experts
Group M’s LaToya Christian

“Diversity” and “inclusion” are two of today’s buzzwords, but they deserve every tiny part of the buzz. “At this stage of the game just understanding the U.S. landscape, demographics, and the way culture is being adapted is what all brands should be striving for,” says LaToya Christian, Associate Director of Marketing Analytics, Multicultural at Group M. “Work to be culturally inclusive and relevant across the board regardless of what segment you’re referring to.”

 

Multicultural marketing is no longer an afterthought or checked box; it has become a key strategy for business growth.
Multicultural Marketing Experts
NFL’s Marissa Fernandez

There’s no reason why any brand shouldn’t start thinking about doing multicultural marketing. In fact, they’d already be starting late. “Looking at the US population current data, as well as the projections, I’d be hard-pressed to believe there are many businesses that wouldn’t benefit from multicultural marketing,” observed Marissa Fernandez, Director, Marketing Strategy and Fan Development at the NFL. Multicultural consumers are already a significant part of the population, and their presence will continue to grow. Ignoring this would be a missed opportunity for any brand.

Multicultural Marketing Experts
Intuit’s John Sandoval

“Multicultural marketing is no longer an afterthought or checked box; it has become a key strategy for business growth,” explained along these lines John Sandoval, Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager at Intuit. “It’s time for brands to acknowledge this diversity as well. As long as you have customers purchasing your products, you should be considering multicultural marketing.”

 

 

2. The First Step is Pure Demographics

Even before thinking about brand attributes, you need to seriously consider whom you’re addressing. Deciding to do multicultural marketing is obviously not enough. The first steps are looking closely at your target, and also at your own positioning. “‘Multicultural consumers’ is a very heterogeneous group,” asserts NFL’s Marissa Fernandez. “Strive to narrow the target based on potential right to win and size of business opportunity.” There’s no way to reach all multicultural consumers at once just as it happens with non-multicultural consumers. Hence the importance of specific targeting.

If you’re not speaking to them, you’re not connecting with them. From a pure demographics perspective that raises a flag for me.
In 2015, Target spoke to multicultural consumers with its #SinTraduccion campaign. Sobremesa is an impossible-to-translate Spanish word referring to time spent at the table after a meal.

Moreover, as Group M’s Latoya Christian explains, looking at pure demographics gives you an idea of who you should try to reach. “If you’re a regional brand, like a brand we had from Georgia,” she tells us, “one of the first things that I think of is ‘What’s going on with your African-American consumers?‘ By pure demographics that is who is in that area. If you’re not speaking to them, you’re not connecting with them. From a pure demographics perspective that raises a flag for me.”

Also by Portada: Multicultural Marketing: How to Use Seamlessly in Total Marketing Campaigns

 

3. The Key to the Treasure: Be True to Yourself

Fenty Beauty is one of LaToya Christian’s favorite brands. It embodies the idea of inclusion by offering 40 shades of makeup, a feat that no brand had done ever before.

There is no magical recipe for successful multicultural marketing, except perhaps being true to your values and asking yourself the right questions. “You shouldn’t necessarily alter your brand essence or who you are as a brand to force a fit or to appeal to one specific audience,” noted LaToya Christian. “It should be less about the brand changing itself and more about how it’s positioning itself based on what consumers needs are.”

Multicultural marketing experts must ask brands a few questions to ensure they remain relevant. For example, according to John Sandoval, we need to ask “Is your brand connecting to this audience on an emotional level? Are you listening to them? Are you engaging in two-way conversations with them through social media? Do you have cultural consultants who can help ensure the messages are relevant? Where and how is your product being consumed? Does this differ from general market, or even within the various regions of the country?”

 

4. Don’t forget Universal Appeal and Relevance!

Multicultural Marketing Experts
Rent-A-Center’s Maria Albrecht

Having said that, it is possible to observe that brands who are successful in multicultural environments have a few important characteristics; the most important one, though ironically, is relevance independently from segment. In the words of Maria Albrecht, Hispanics Markets Lead Marketer at Rent-A-Center, “A brand’s attributes must have universal appeal and must also leverage the points of convergence and divergence that exists in the market, especially as they relate to customers’ needs, wants, aspirations, and expectations.”

Just as when addressing any audiences, brands targeting multicultural consumers must be sure to be relevant. As John Sandoval would ask, “Could a multicultural audience say ‘This is a brand for me’?”. He says brands also need to be functional and beneficial. In his words, ask yourself these questions: “Is this product something that consumers can use regardless of culture? How will my brand help improve the consumer’s life?” Among the tools Sandoval recommends to be more relevant, brands can try for bilingual/biculturally appealing information, credible brand ambassadors, and distribution in key markets.

5. According to Multicultural Marketing Experts, Here’s What You Shouldn’t Do

Mistakes are easy to make, and more often than not these stem from misconceptions or from going off a tangent. These are the 5 mistakes our interviewees identified as the most common, together with their advice to avoid them:

  • Misconceptions of the various segments:

“Sometimes a lot of what we see is misconceptions or biases about the various segments,” points out LaToya Christian. “I know in the Hispanic segment marketers sometimes get very lazy and they automatically go to language. So it’s like ‘Oh, if I just do it in Spanish, cool, I’m done.’ You really need to take some time to understand who the consumer group is, how to utilize brands within your category, how to speak to them, what are their nuances beyond just a language perspective”.

  • Looking at your product through your own biases:

As explained by Christian, “One of the things that unfortunately as marketers we sometimes do is we put ourselves into the minds of the consumers, which is not accurate because we’re not always the consumer of certain brand or product.” Then, marketers need to push their own looking glass aside and really take the time “to understand how consumers are behaving, what they say about their brand, and really taking it from that perspective,” she says.

 

 

Multicultural marketing experts must understand their field is an art and a science. Even with all the data in the world at your disposal, you can check off the “Science” box, but there’s still the “Art” side of the equation.
  • Waiting too long to act:

“I think sometimes companies overanalyze the opportunity and fail to see there is financial risk in inaction,” asserts Marissa Fernandez. “I encourage brands to test, start small, minimize the risk, measure, learn, do research, and grow multicultural efforts, even if it’s slowly over time.  The business opportunity is probably too big to pass up.”

  • Not using enough data:

“Any info needed to develop and execute a winning strategy must be triangulated by at least three sources such as the company’s performance results, internal and external surveys, customer focus groups, qualitative or quantitative research, targeting tools, store/location visits, customer polls, social media feedback, or competition’s moves,” recommends Maria Albrecht. “Relying on one or two sources will only lead to an incomplete view of the market’s landscape. Also, we’d be missing opportunities for the company.”

  • Relying too much on data:

“Multicultural marketing should not be about building data in order to start. Instead, it should be about leveraging existing data to launch a program and using those real-life examples and results to tailor and improve communication with this audience,” says John Sandoval. “Multicultural marketing experts must understand their field is an art and a science. Even with all the data in the world at your disposal, you can check off the “Science” box, but there’s still the “Art” side of the equation.”

In conclusion, keeping an eye on the future is important, but the future is already here. As Marissa Fernandez points out, “we know the future of our country IS diverse, IS multicultural.  I’m a believer that in our lifetime, multicultural marketing won’t be called that anymore— it will just be MARKETING.”

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

California Pizza Kitchen (CPK) has appointed Scott Hargrove as Executive Vice President and Global Chief Marketing Officer. He previously filled the role of Head of Brand and Consumer Marketing at Snap.

 

 

 

 

 

Marisa Thalberg has stepped down from the role of Global Chief Brand Officer at Taco Bell. She’ll move to parent company Yum Brands as Strategic Advisor. Thalberg’s marketing responsibilities at Taco Bell will be divided between Melissa Friebe, VP of marketing and Tracee Larocca, VP of advertising and brand engagement.

 

 

 

 

Serge Matta has been named President and Chief Executive Officer of ICX Media, a cross-platform video analytics company. Previously, he was CEO of Comscore and President of GroundTruth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Razek is leaving the role of Chief Marketing Officer at Victoria’s Secret’s parent company L Brands. The decision comes eight months after Razek stated in a Vogue interview that there was no place for plus-size or transgender models at Victoria’s Secret’s fashion shows.

 

 

 

 

 

WPP agency Essence announced that former APAC CEO Kyoko Matsushita has been elevated to global CEO. She succeeds former Essence global CEO Christian Juhl, who became global CEO of GroupM in July.

 

 

 

 

 

What: Members of Portada’s Agency Star Committee discuss how multicultural marketing can make “total market” campaigns more effective. In spite of the increasing awareness of the opportunities offered by multicultural marketing, brands could understand better how it connects to more universal audiences.
Why it matters: José Bello (Total Market, Senior Director, Hearts & Science), Dana Bonkowski (SVP, Multicultural Lead, Starcom), Darcy Bowe (SVP, Media Director, Starcom USA), Cynthia Dickson, David Queamante (SVP, Client Business Partner, UM Worldwide), and Jessica Román (VP, Media Director, Publicis Media) are agency executives with decades of experience in marketing and advertising. Their insights shed valuable light on how to approach multicultural marketing in complicated times as these.

multicultural marketing embraces diversity
Image by Rawpixel.com

Multicultural Marketing: A Growing Audience

As diversity keeps increasing, brands realize that establishing real connections with multicultural consumers is no longer an option, but a must. The numbers are clear: in the U.S., minority buying power is growing more quickly than the white consumer market. By 2060, the white population in America will constitute 44% of the total population, while 29% will be Hispanics, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Thus, businesses are more aware than before of the importance of tapping into this segment. Although they have more access to data and tools than ever, they still need much more information about best marketing practices for multicultural audiences.

Luckily for brands, agencies can help them understand what to do and avoid to leverage this opportunity. Therefore, Portada invited members of the Agency Star Committee to talk about how multicultural insights can make general market campaigns more effective. Around the table were José Bello (Total Market, Senior Director,Hearts & Science), Dana Bonkowski (SVP, Multicultural Lead, Starcom), Darcy Bowe (SVP, Media Director, Starcom USA), Cynthia Dickson, David Queamante (SVP, Client Business Partner, UM Worldwide), and Jessica Román (VP, Media Director, Publicis Media).

 

For an opportunity to attend thought-provoking sessions and discuss multicultural marketing with these and many more top-notch executives, join us at Portada New York 2019, on September 12 at the Hotel Westin, Times Square. To register, click here.

 

1. How to Start Doing Multicultural Marketing?

First, you have to integrate multicultural marketing into your business. Don’t ask whether there’s an opportunity there, understand what that opportunity is. Starcom’s Dana Bonkowski says: “The business-building power of multicultural America is the strongest it’s ever been. But right now it’s also the hardest time, even with the technologies and tools available. How can we keep our consumers’ attention? How can we keep up with new platforms and devices? And, most importantly, how can we establish an emotional connection with a population that’s more diverse each day?”

multicultural marketing expert Dana Bonkowski
Starcom’s Dana Bonkowski

According to Dana Bonkowski, multicultural should be included from the very first brief. “If the client doesn’t talk about it, make them. Always keep in mind that “multicultural is a group of people. It’s not a tactic or a box; it’s a group of individuals that could possibly solve whatever business challenge you might be faced with.” This is precisely what needs to be done as agencies face the task of making clients understand this chance to grow.

Education (and Introspection)

Multicultural Marketing expert Jessica Roman
Publicis Media’s Jessica Román

“Given the evolving landscape, we may need to take a step back and help clients identify the business opportunity that the multicultural segment represents for them,” explains Publicis Media’s Jessica Román. “For some clients, it means a re-education of this segment. And a reminder of the amazing buying power that it represents, among other things”.

Cynthia Dickson

For Cynthia Dickson, this “re-education” is about remembering when agencies were expected to do everything and the industry wasn’t so specialized in niches. “Something that we did at a full-service agency was focus groups. We really took the time to understand the consumer base,” says Dickinson. “If you don’t take the time nowadays, you don’t really understand what is driving your business“. Furthermore, she suggests heavy introspection work: look into yourself before you look into multicultural marketing. “Start first with your product and your company. Really do the research there. Start at the basics, that’s really going to help your partners understand your business and drive it forward.” 

2. Finding a Strategy Through Data

Hearts & Science’s José Bello

As Hearts & Science’s José Bello explains, some clients still want to test if multicultural would help their brand grow. “That’s not what we should be testing, we already know for sure. All the numbers show that most businesses will grow and be impacted,” he states. However, it’s not that easy to make brands understand where the testing efforts need to go. “We should be testing for the best tactics and the best creatives for specific targets“.

We’re pretty lucky to have quite a bit of data. Then we actually crunch it and tell the story, which is the biggest challenge.

UM’s David Queamante

The next step is crunching the data, but the question is how much data is enough to start. As the wheels of retail move more quickly, getting data is not nearly as difficult as what happens next. “Processing and boiling quite a bit of data down to useful insights can actually be the biggest challenge,” according to UM Worldwide’s David Queamante. “Sometimes you have to start with tactic tests and then refine your strategy as more data comes in”. 

But oftentimes, explains multicultural marketing expert Starcom USA’s Darcy Bowe, you just have to start talking to that audience. “We may not have time to do qualitative research to get deep insights,” she says. “But just by using quantitative research we can tell businesses, ‘Hey, you’re not even talking to some people’”.

3. Multicultural Marketing or Total Market: Segmentation vs. Inclusion

To what extent should brands segment their target? Is there a balance between “total market” and multicultural initiatives? In 2014, AHAA defined the concept of total market as: “A marketing approach which integrates segments to enhance value and growth effectiveness.” Using a universal dominant strategy might’ve been a good idea a few years ago but it simply does not work anymore.

Image by Jcomp

For José Bello, not segmenting is one of worst things that have happened to marketing in the last few years: “I think we all understand the total market philosophy. Unfortunately, it got lost in translation among non-multicultural agency teams and clients, and it hurt us all. Things would be more clear if we went back to multicultural; back to U.S. Hispanics, African-American, etc, instead of the total market bucket,” he reflects.

But perhaps it’s not that the “total market” concept doesn’t work, it’s that we pushed it too far. As Jessica Román asserts, “I don’t believe the ‘total market’ concept will go away. However, the pendulum may have swung too far, and we need to bring it back in order to find that balance. There are times when you have to pause, analyze, and tweak what’s before you. In some cases, you even may have to take a step back, before you can move forward with a truly successful total market approach.”

Trust Your Agency

Segmentation might sound complicated for clients, but agencies know it’s just a matter of understanding your position and addressing consumers as humans. To highlight their nuances, not to segregate their differences. However, agencies are often required to offer more “blatant” displays of divisive targeting, or to generalize campaigns so that one fits all. This puts a strain on the efforts to address specific audiences without singling them out. “Sometimes it’s easy [for clients] to find mistakes that are not grave enough just to make agencies feel they’re not doing a good job,” commented Dana Bonkowski. “But we have tons of research are at our disposal for clients to see. So the sooner we can use data to find the right segmentation strategy and set them off for success, the better.

 If you’re going to focus on the white half of the population, you’re going to miss the mark, period. If you’re not incorporating a multicultural media mix, you’re trying to move the needle but you’re only pushing on half of the audience.

So, trust that your agency knows how much segmentation you actually have to do. As Cynthia Dixon says, “If you don’t understand the basic platform of your product and the marketing position of your brand, it’s really hard for your partners to help you succeed. That’s really what’s gonna help us put your dollar in front of the person that’s gonna purchase your product.”

4. Collaboration Breeds Creativity

Multicultural marketing requires multiple creativity. We should be testing the best creatives, but what’s the best way to produce good creative, to begin with? The answer is a multicultural environment in every brief and every meeting. “Not having multicultural voices and eyes at the table is a miss,” asserts José Bello. “That’s what all clients need to do: never start a meeting without your multicultural eyes present. It’s the client’s prerogative to ask, ‘Where is the multicultural team? Where is my multicultural media person and my multicultural creative person?’ If there isn’t one, don’t start the meeting. Wait for them or postpone until they can be there, because that meeting would yield incomplete results.

Starcom USA’s Darcy Bowe

Once you have a skilled and diverse team, use it to really create a connection with your identified target. “We should be talking to audiences individually because they value our brand and we need to communicate which values the brand can offer them,” says Darcy Bowe. “If we don’t expand our creative capabilities and have more than one message to talk to more than one audience, we’re just trying to shove our message down everyone’s throats because we identify them as a potential customer, but we’re not really talking to them.”

The more individuals we can get comfortable talking about multicultural, the better chance we have to succeed. 

Working Together Towards Inclusion

Ultimately, a team must always be willing to cooperate to reach a common goal. “This collaborative process of wanting to move this marketplace forward should always be at the forefront,” declared Jessica Román. “It shouldn’t be ‘us against them’, we should all be ready to embark on this process together.”

multicultural marketing campaign "toma leche"
Agency Star Committee Members granted Gallegos United the 2018 Portada Award to the Top Multicultural Campaign Driven by Multicultural Insights. By using a strong Hispanic insight, their Toma Leche/El Chavo campaign in California generated total market success.

In short, multicultural insights are essential for success. “The buyer out there is multicultural, there’s no way around it,” declares David Queamante. “If you’re going to focus on the non-ethnic half of the population, you’re going to miss the mark, period. If you’re not incorporating a multicultural media mix, you’re trying to move the needle but you’re only pushing on half of the audience.” 

The main takeaway from the panel are these three concepts: self-evaluation, inclusion, and collaboration. Willingness to go back a few steps in order to go forward. A commitment to creating real connections with real people, the groups of individuals that constitute our market and our society. “This isn’t a secret,” shared Dana Bonkowski. “The one thing we have in common is that we’re nimble. We’re here to serve our clients. There are different paths to success. The key thing is that the more individuals are comfortable talking about multicultural, the better chance we have to succeed.”

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

Impremedia has appointed Liliana Madrid as its new Revenue Director, Digital. Madrid will replace Juan Chouza, who has stepped down from the role to become Xaxis’ Relationship Director.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gap Kim will oversee Global Business Marketing at Twitter. In his new role, Kim is tasked with communicating Twitter’s advertising value to businesses. In his last role at WhatsApp, Kim was responsible for leading product marketing strategy for business, brand and growth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Out of Home Advertising Association of America (OAAA) has tapped Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) Executive Vice President Anna Bager as its next president and CEO. She replaces Nancy Fletcher, who’s led the OAAA since 1991. Bager’s appointment is effective on September 16, 2019. During her more than eight-year tenure at IAB, Bager led all-digital, mobile, video, and data industry initiatives representing more than 650 member companies.

 

 

 

 

 

McDonald’s will not refill the role of Global Chief Marketing Officer after Silvia Lagnado steps down from the role in October. Lagnado has been with the company since 2015. Global marketing at the company will now be overseen by Colin Mitchell, Senior Vice-President of Global Marketing and Bob Rupczynski, Senior Vice-President of Marketing Technology.

 

 

 

 

 

Nike Inc. is reshuffling its marketing team. Adrienne Lofton, who spent nine years at Under Armour in top marketing roles, is joining Nike as VP of Marketing for North America. Nike veteran Nicole Hubbard Graham will take on an expanded role as VP of Global Category and Nike Direct Marketing. Gino Fisanotti will move to the newly-created role of VP of Global Brand Creative.

 

 

 

 

Imagen relacionadaHorizon Media announced the launch of new full-service multicultural agency 305 Worldwide in partnership with Armando Christian Pérez, aka Pitbull, the Grammy-winning artist and

Resultado de imagen para karina dobarroentrepreneur.

The new shop will be headquartered in New York. Pérez will serve as Chief Creative at the new venture and Karina Dobarro, Horizon’s senior vice president, managing director, multicultural & former Portada Council System member, will also serve as Chief Strategist at 305 Worldwide.

 

 

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

Ticketmaster has named Kathryn Frederick as it’s new Chief Marketing Officer. As CMO, Frederick will lead the company’s performance marketing, brand, partnership, insights, growth, and digital marketing teams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff Guaracino, president and CEO of VISIT PHILADELPHIA®, has announced the formation of an executive leadership team. Neil Frauenglass, a veteran of New York’s McCann Erickson agency, has been appointed as Chief Marketing Officer. Frauenglass will lead VISIT PHILADELPHIA’s advertising, communications, and social media teams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ari Weiss has been promoted to Chief Creative Officer of DDB Worldwide, expanding his remit to include creative responsibilities of the global network. Weiss joined DDB in 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manny Gonzalez has been promoted to Senior Director, Trade Marketing Cultural Diversity at Moët Hennessy USA. He first joined the company in 2009 as Director, Multicultural Marketing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crystal Rix, Chief Strategy Officer at BBDO New York, will become Global Chief Marketing Officer for BBDO Worldwide, in addition to her current role. She has been with BBDO for 15 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cory Berger is joining Grey as its first Worldwide Chief Marketing Officer. Berger will lead the planning, development, and execution of the agency’s marketing, reputation management, and multinational new business efforts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

Latcom has appointed Jill Brooks to the role of Business Development Director, U.S. In this role, she will play a key part in the company’s goal to expand its regional operations. Brooks has over 20 years of experience in media marketing and ad sales.

 

 

 

 

 

Russell Wager will start operating as Marketing Director of Kia Motors America with a possible opportunity of moving up to Vice-President on July 25. Previously, he served as VP, Marketing of Mazda’s North American Operations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Bittman has joined the community New York as EVP, Managing Director. In his new role, he will lead the company’s long-standing Verizon creative account for the 5G era.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arnel Kasmally has joined the ranks of The Garage Team Mazda, a bespoke ad agency created exclusively for the motor company, as senior VP. Previously, he served as managing director of the Mobile Marketing Association, and has worked for renowned agencies such as Essence, Y&R and Ogilvy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portada NY Sept. 12 top-notch program includes one-on-one meetings with major brand marketers engaging consumers through sports content who represent companies like Anheuser-Busch, SAP, MasterCard, Kia, Wells Fargo and many more. The event will take place at the Westin New York at Times Square. Get tickets here (early bird expires on July 31!).

Join us for the 13th annual edition of Portada New York where marketing innovators will delve deep into sports marketing  and new consumer insights in Multicultural America.

 

On the agenda on September 12

Senior brand executives and thought leaders will explore topics including the below:

  • KEYNOTE INTERVIEW with Nick Kelly, Head of U.S. Sports Marketing, Anheuser-Busch
  • CREATING BRANDED CONTENT TO CHANGE BRAND PERCEPTION
  • THE EXPERIENTIAL MARKETING CONUNDRUM: How to measure ROI and transfer best practices between marketing platforms.
  • 5G: How increased connectivity will change media and content strategies…
  • PASSION POINT FOOD: Food is a key cultural factor to bring Hispanic families together.
    and much more….

Choose Your One-on-One Meetings with Brands Engaging Consumers Through Sports

Meeting opportunities with Brand Marketers engaging consumers through sports.

In addition, Portada NY offers senior executives from tech, media and marketing firms will have the opportunity to meet brands engaging consumers through sports. marketers in one-on-one meetings.

 

THE LIST OF BRAND MARKETERS AVAILABLE FOR ONE-ON-ONE MEETINGS INCLUDES:

Director, Consumer Marketing Sponsorships, ALLSTATE INSURANCE

VP, Field Marketing Sponsorships & Events, CONSTELLATION BRANDS

VP, Head of Sponsorships North America, MASTERCARD

Group Brand Director Tequila, PROXIMO SPIRITS

VP, Marketing, NORTHGATE MARKETS

Head of US Sports Marketing, ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV

Senior Manager, Advertising & Marketing, Multicultural, KIA MOTORS AMERICA

Multicultural Marketing Manager, NESTLE USA

VP, Global Sponsorships, SAP

Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager, INTUIT

National Media Manager, JCPENNEY

VP, Hispanic Segment Strategy Leader, WELLS FARGO

Program Leader, Hispanic Marketing & Advertising, DOMINO’S

National Director, Multicultural & Growth Markets, REALOGY

Director, Mexican Imports, ANHEUSER-BUSCH

US Managing Director, CH CAROLINA HERRERA

Digital Marketing Manager – SEM & SEO, SPRINT

Head of Marketing, EL SUPER

Assistant VP, Brand Marketing & Advertising, OPPENHEIMERFUNDS

Senior Brand Manager, DEWARS SCOTCH WHISKY BACARDI

Sr. Director of Global Marketing, PAULA’S CHOICE SKINCARE LLC

Brand Director, HEINEKEN

EVP I CMO, CURACAO

VP, Sponsorships, WELLS FARGO

Manager, CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT

Associate Marketing Manager Multicultural, ALLSTATE INSURANCE

Category Marketing Manager, GRACEKENNEDY LTD

…and many more to be added!

 

CLICK HERE TO GET EARLY-BIRD TICKETS including three-eight minute meetings  with brand marketers engaging consumers through sports. (A form to select your meeting partners will be sent to you after registration, US $599 EXPIRING THIS 07/31)

 

What: We talked to Solange Curutchet, General Manager at Pulpo, about her career in content and media, the importance of content monetization, and her predictions for the future.
Why it matters: Content is becoming more and more important each day. As Curutchet explains, there should be an integrated understanding of how marketing, sales, and content are intertwined in digital in order to have an effective monetization strategy.

 

Solange Curutchet Discusses Content Monetization
Pulpo’s General Manager Solange Curutchet

Solange Curutchet forged her career learning about content monetization when digital was just starting to acquire the relevance it has today. Before becoming Pulpo’s General Manager, she cleared/ a rough path to realize how profoundly intertwined web content is with sales and marketing. Simply put, everything is connected in digital. If you see an ad somewhere, you can be sure there’s a whole machinery of reasons why it’s there.

We sat down with Curutchet to discuss the evolution of content, reaching multicultural audiences, and effective content monetization.

 

 

From Traditional to Digital Media

Content marketing isn’t only about selling ads. In 1999, when she joined Univision Interactive Media, Curutchet learned that all the bricks of the house need to be well-structured. “In these early publisher-advertiser days, we really started from zero,” shared Curutchet. “Nobody knew what creating content for digital entailed. We learned together. There wasn’t a playbook that neatly laid out these rules.” It was a process, but she learned that she needed to package content according to each advertiser’s needs without “compromising its integrity“.

“We had to offer content in a way that the advertisers could showcase their brands while not diluting an online presence”, says Curutchet. The trick was finding suitable matches for both parties, not forcing either to fit with the other. Content and ads needed to be symbiotic. “In traditional media, you had a page marked with an X where the ad would go and that’s it. Now in digital, you really need to evaluate the brand and what it’s communicating to see where it fits,” she explained. “These principles of co-existing content and advertisements are still valid today.”

The trick is finding suitable matches for both parties, not forcing either to fit with the other.

 

The Need to Understand Content Monetization

Solange says one of the most frequent mistakes when launching content verticals isputting someone in charge that has deep subject matter expertise in a particular content theme but lacks a holistic knowledge of how content + ads need to co-exist.” “If we’re going to launch content property”, pointed out Curutchet, “then you assign someone that comes from content a hundred percent, right? So what happens is that you have a significant gap between producing content and how to monetize that property. We see this happening all the time. There’s great intention to produce valuable content but there’s no clear vision on content monetization.”

 

Social Media Ties Everything Together

Social media plays an important role in closing the loop on this strategy. Today, social media plays an important role in creating the emotional connection of your brand to content, to your advertisement. It’s not either or, it’s both. Social media is a much needed emotional value component that ties everything together.

Another tricky aspect, she said, is that people tend to believe that only articles can be called “content”. In fact, digital platforms allow consumers to access and share much more than just articles. “In digital, you can participate in what you’re reading and really give your opinion.” You can weave many elements into a site to engage with the user at higher levels and increase your sponsorship opportunities. “Finance and health sites do this very well,” illustrated Solange. “They use consumers’ input to drive useful wizards, calculators and other interactive features.”

 

 

 

Pulpo: the Rebirth of a Company

Taking from these learnings and from the concept of real engagement as the true motor of marketing, Pulpo has gone through a full rebranding. The goal is to create “its own environment of verticals for advertisers to talk to our audience and share their brand”, according to Curutchet. “The idea is to create products around them. A vertical where you sell customizable inventory, influencers interacting with audiences and advertisers, and a big data strategy around it. A lot of newsletters, personalization, and sharing products from our advertisers”, to mention just a few.

Hispanic culture goes way beyond speaking Spanish or not, it’s in their veins.

 

Focus on a Cultural Dimension, Reach Their Hearts

As these strategies fall into place, what are the most important cultural nuances Pulpo will tackle with this firm set of structures? One of Pulpo’s most important findings is that it’s all about talking to consumers in their language, and that doesn’t necessarily mean Spanish. “With U.S. Hispanics it’s more a cultural thing than a question of language. [Hispanic culture] goes way beyond speaking Spanish or not, it’s in their veins. […] The priority used to be having Spanish-language sites, which is still our main focus, but not only Spanish generates engagement with U.S. Hispanics”, says Curutchet.

So, all content must be focused on reaching them at a personal, more intimate cultural dimension. And in order to create intimate content, it’s necessary to delve deep into the customer’s heart. For Pulpo, the ideal partner is the one who fosters reciprocal participation with the audiences. “It’s not the one that has the best name for Latam, it’s the one that has the best engagement for our U.S. Hispanics reach, regardless of whether it’s a small company or group”, says Curutchet. “Content will become more and more important to reach audiences. […] Getting to the audiences with the right environment, the right content and the right language is key today”.

 

How to Face the Future?

So, what should brands do, and where is the future taking us? How will the reborn Pulpo address the new ways in which audiences engage and consume? For Solange, the market is getting better at understanding all these new behaviors, but brands really need to engage with their audience in a deep, meaningful way. “Content will become more and more important to reach audiences,” she declared.

Pulpo’s strategy is not only about making informed decisions based on hard data pointing to the direction of the market. The company listens to the clues consumers have to offer and pay attention to their needs and desires. “When you touch their soul they react differently”, says Curutchet. “Reaching them is not the problem, the challenge is how you get to them. Engage them in a way that you end up touching their hearts.”

 

Time to Discuss Diversity

According to ANA Educational Foundation’s research, the marketing industry’s efforts to recruit a more diverse workforce are still not enough, as the overwhelming majority of the talent is still predominantly white. The report explores, among other factors, the documented benefits of recruiting and retaining diverse talent. Among others:  higher performance standards, better team dynamics, more organizational agility, and, better business results overall.

And it’s the same when we think about the percentage of women in leadership positions. “We tend to focus on CEO positions and are alarmed about the fact that there are only 24 Women CEO’s within 2018 Fortunes top 500 companies,” said Mebrulin Francisco, Managing Partner, Director Marketing Analytics, Multicultural at GroupM, in an article that looks more closely at this issue. “But we also need to look a couple of steps lower in the corporate ladder and address the fact that women’s progress is stalling at lower levels of a company’s pipeline.” For any woman looking to break with conventions, the numbers on equality dabble on the realm of disturbing. Not just for high-management levels but onset from the very first step of the ladder as well. And the numbers get worse when we look at the presence of Hispanic or African-American women in the talent pool.

Start from little, build your personality, and don’t be afraid to speak your mind.

 

Speak Your Mind, No Matter Who You Are

Solange knows first hand what it’s like to speak your mind “in a room with 20 people that are mainly men.” She said she was probably not the best example, as she has never been afraid of saying what she thinks. But not every girl knows that they have the right to do so. That’s why she has taught her two daughters to fight for what they believe. “One of the things is to start from a young age, build your personality and don’t be afraid to speak your mind,” she suggested. “Always do it with respect, but whatever you need to say, just say it, don’t be afraid to express it.”

Just as she encourages her daughters to speak their minds, Solange firmly believes that knowledge is more important than from whom it comes from. And this is the philosophy that she brings to work every day. If you have an opinion and you have a way of doing things better, it’s welcome. “Everyone here can share his or her ideas,” she told Portada. “Titles are not important, really. I can have people that have worked here for six years and people that started two days ago in the same meeting and we all discuss how to improve things.” In fact, she concluded, “the moment they start being afraid of expressing their opinion, that’s when we stop growing.”

 

A summary of the most relevant consumer insight research in the U.S. and U.S. Hispanic markets. If you’re trying to keep up with the latest happenings, this is your one-stop shop.

 

  • According to a new survey of 983 U.S. consumers from custom signage provider Signs.com, the four most frequently shopped online retailers for Baby Boomers, Gen X, and millennials are Amazon, Walmart, eBay, and Target. Discrepancies start at the fifth spot: Kohl’s for Baby Boomers, Costco for Gen X, and Best Buy for millennials. However, there are clear discrepancies by generation in online grocery shopping. Thirty-four percent of millennial respondents have used online grocery delivery, compared to 25% of Gen X and 22% of Baby Boomers.

 

  • Research from Counterpoint’s U.S. Smartphone Sales by City Tracker shows 5G smartphone sales in over 10 cities in May despite Verizon only launching 5G services in Chicago and Minneapolis. While Chicago did show the highest concentration of sales, it represented just over 5% of total 5G smartphone sales according to data collected across millions of sales data points during May. 

 

  • Global management consulting firm A.T. Kearney has published a study which looks into consumer knowledge and experience of various emerging in-store technologies. The 2019 Consumer Retail Technology Survey found that while 75% of consumers are aware of at least one retail technology, only 33% have experienced any. The survey focused on five critical technologies emerging in physical stores: augmented reality, mobile point of sale, cashierless checkout, interactive screens, and 3D printing.

 

  • According to “The Amazon Prime Day Effect: Consumer Anticipation and Excitement Grows in 2019,” a survey of about 2,600 consumers in the U.S., U.K., France, and Germany from Periscope By McKinsey, 66% of respondents are either excited or eager for Prime Day and 70% or more across all four countries expect to participate.

 

  • According to a consumer survey of 1765 people by Hub Entertainment Research, 23% of respondents indicated they would drop Netflix if the service began running commercials. With 60 million subscribers in the United States, that would mean a loss of approximately 14 million users.

 

  • A new Morning Consult report digs into the values, habits, aspirations, politics, and concerns shaping Gen Z, and the ways they differ from the generations that came before them. The report uses data from nearly 1,000 interviews with 18-21 year-olds. Making money and having a successful career are the two most universally important life goals for Gen Z adults – more than pursuing friends, family, or hobbies. About a quarter of Gen Z adults (23%) say being famous is important to them – eight points higher than millennials and 15 points higher than Gen X.

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

 

Netflix has named Jackie Lee-Joe, a BBC veteran, as its new Chief Marketing Officer as the company looks to fight off a growing number of video subscription rivals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WarnerMedia‘s president of ad sales, Donna Speciale, is leaving the company. Speciale’s exit marks a larger company-wide shakeup. Executive vice-president of portfolio sales and client partnerships, Frank Sgrizzi, and executive vice-president of Turner’s Ignite, Dan Riess, will both be leaving WarnerMedia this fall.

 

 

 

 

 

Wavemaker has appointed MediaCom’s Chief Operations Officer Toby Jenner as new CEO. Jenner succeeds Tim Castree, who stepped down in December 2018 to become North American chief executive at GroupM.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The National Basketball Association has hired Twitch Chief Marketing Officer Kate Jhaveri as its next CMO, replacing Pam El. Jhaveri previously served as head of consumer marketing at Twitter and head of brand marketing at Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

Publicis Groupe has announced a restructuring of its U.S. operations. The new U.S. ComEx team is chaired by Arthur Sadoun, Chairman-CEO, Publicis Groupe, and includes the newly added Bryan Kennedy, CEO, Epsilon as well as Tim Jones, CEO, Publicis Media Americas; Ros King, the Groupe’s executive vice president, global clients, Steve King, COO, Publicis Groupe & CEO, Publicis Media; Adrian Sayliss, CFO, Publicis Groupe North America; Carla Serrano, the Groupe’s Chief Strategy Officer; Liz Taylor, Chief Creative Officer, Publicis Communications US-CCO, Leo Burnett Worldwide; and Nigel Vaz, CEO, Publicis Sapient.

In addition, the Groupe is organizing its creative brand portfolio into three geographic zones. Andrew Bruce becomes CEO, Publicis Communications West, Andrew Swinand will oversee the middle region of the country as CEO, Publicis Communications Center, and Jem Ripley returns to Publicis Groupe as Publicis Communications East CEO.

 

What: Eugene Santos, Senior Manager, Advertising & Marketing, Multicultural at Kia Motors gave Portada his 4 key insights on automotive brand marketing and how to win Hispanics’ hearts.
Why it matters: It’s no secret that Hispanics love a good car. The auto industry in the U.S. is growing, just as well as the multicultural population in the U.S. According to a Statista timeline, digital advertising spending of the U.S. automotive industry is expected to reach US $15.5 billion this year.

 

Automotive brand marketing is just like marketing in any other industry. In order to get it right, marketers need to approach it with the right set of tools and a great deal of creativity. Add a multicultural component to the mix, and you’ll get a more complicated task. However, if brands take the time to really understand the target and the way consumers relate to the category, they might end up getting a recipe to success.

Eugene Santos

When the 2018 Kia Rio was named one of the top 10 best vehicles for Hispanics by the Hispanic Motor Press Foundation, the company had already been targeting this multicultural segment for years. However, Kia Motors only started selling cars in the U.S. in the 90’s. How does a relatively new brand compete with powerhouses of the automotive industry in order to gain Hispanics’ hearts?

We talked to Eugene Santos, Senior Manager, Advertising & Marketing, Multicultural at Kia Motors to get his key insights about what the brand is planning to engage Hispanic consumers more effectively.

 

We use AI to engage consumers who are in the ‘discovery’ and ‘research phases of their consumer journey.

1. Automotive Brand Marketing 101: Make Sure You Engage Your Consumers

Firstly, says Eugene Santos, you have to ensure you understand how your consumers engage with your content. Like any other brand, Kia uses a mix of KPI’s and likes/dislikes ratios, but it is also aware of the important role of the right technologies. “We use AI to engage consumers who are in the ‘discovery’ and ‘research phases of their consumer journey,” explains Santos. ” This gives us an opportunity to look at the multicultural aspect as well.”

 

2. When Targeting Hispanics, Always Think In-Culture

According to Kia’s latest reports, sales grew 1% in May, mostly thanks to a rise in sales of a favorite of Hispanics— the Kia Soul. “Hispanics are a big part of our success, especially in a flat market,” reveals Santos. “The multicultural segment growth has allowed us to stay on pace or ahead of business plans. The Soul has traditionally over-indexed within the Hispanic segment. It tends to skew towards a younger audience and mirrors the demographics of the Hispanic consumer.”

Kia Soul - Automotive Brand Marketing Case StudyTherefore, these results show the brand is already doing something right. When asked about the approach Kia takes when marketing to Hispanics, Santos hits the nail in the head. “We don’t like to approach this segment by thinking ‘Spanish or English’? But rather, ‘How do we communicate in-culture? And that can be a combination of either language as it relates to our target audience and the look/feel of our campaign.”

 

 

3. Choose the Right Message, Make it Emotional

When asked about messaging, Santos explains that the brand continuously tries to build an emotional connection with the Hispanic segment. The new campaign will “tell the story of the ‘unsung heroes’ who work hard to accomplish their life’s mission but don’t necessarily crave the spotlight.” Kia has previously incorporated into their narrative real stories of hard-working Latinos (watch below). Santos says “this will bring a connection Hispanic consumers by showing Kia lives by the same values as them.”

4. Learn From Your (More Experienced) Competitors

In 2017, Dealer Marketing Magazine reported that vehicle purchases by Hispanics would double from 2010 to 2020. Because of tradition from their origin countries, Hispanics have a famous fondness for Japanese cars. In fact, in 2014, Hispanics were contributing to nearly 40% and 30% of total brand growth for Toyota and Nissan, respectively.

Thus, we wanted to know Santos’s thoughts on how the relatively new player from Korea competes with these brands. “They’ve been communicating with the Hispanic segment for a very long time, longer than Kia,” agrees Santos. “I started my automotive career at Honda, and having seen their work ethic first hand, I am proud to say that Kia is on its way.”

But what sets Kia apart? Its “Give it Everything” philosophy, that “underdog spirit that has helped us improve our vehicle quality, and technology that has allowed us to outperform even luxury brands,” shares Santos.

In conclusion, Kia is young, but it is on the right track towards Hispanics’ hearts. To find out more about automotive brand marketing first-hand from the experts, join Portada New York!

 

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

R/GA has promoted Julie Benevides from Senior Content Producer to Executive Content Producer. In her new role, Julie will partner with the Chicago office’s business and creative leadership and tap into the R/GA Studio’s network of makers and storytellers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adolfo Segura will step down from his current role as Vice President of News for Telemundo 60 in San Antonio to become Vice President of News for Telemundo 33 / KCSO and Telemundo 51 Fresno / KNSO, effective July 22. In his new role, he will be responsible for overseeing the stations’ newsrooms, including all multi-platform news operations and performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IAB has promoted veteran Sheryl Goldstein to the role of Senior Vice President, Marketing and Member Investment. She will be responsible for the trade group’s marketing and sales teams, effective immediately. Goldstein has filled senior sales, marketing, and strategy roles at some of the digital sector’s most prominent companies, including Yahoo, AOL, and About.com.

 

 

 

 

Mike Tasevski is now Vice President, Global Sponsorships at Scotiabank. Previously, he spent almost 10 years at Mastercard, where he served as VP, North America Sponsorships and later as VP, Market Development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reebok‘s Global Head of Marketing and Brand Management, Melanie Boulden is leaving the company to become President and General Manager of Coca Cola’s Venturing & Emerging Brands (VEB) division. Boulden will be tasked with overseeing investments into companies, entrepreneurs, technology, and products.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Roca is the new Director, Multicultural at PHD. Roca comes from Hearts & Science, where he spent the last 2 years as Director, Total Market Strategy for Procter & Gamble.

 

 

 

 

A summary of the most relevant LatAm consumer insight research. If you’re trying to keep up with the latest happenings, this is your one-stop shop.

 

  • In-Store Media, together with research agency IPSOS, conducted a study to understand the consumer behavior of digital grocery buyers in Mexico. The survey covered questions about their shopping habits, channels, demographic characteristics, favorite categories, and other preferences. The results show 39% of online grocery shoppers buy their groceries exclusively online. Moreover, 35% of online grocery purchases are completed via smartphones. Online-exclusive shoppers said it’s fundamental to receive their order on time (92%), while shoppers who combine online vs brick-and-mortar purchases think the priority is receiving products in good condition. 

 

  • According to Unisys’ 2019 Security Index Colombia has the second highest credit-card consumer distrust level just after the Philippines. Unisys’ Security Index found that 90% of Colombian credit-card holders are afraid of having their card information misused by third parties.  Furthermore, 87% of survey respondents said they are seriously worried about identity theft and personal data breach.

 

  • ReutersDigital News Report shows Latin American consumers have increased their use of Instagram and WhatsApp as news sources. The survey was conducted in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico, with around 2,000 people interviewed in each country. When looking for news content, the region shows an average growth of 7.5% for Instagram and 4.2% for WhatsApp from 2018 to 2019. Even though Facebook only grew by 1.7%, it’s still the most-used social network for news consumption in the four countries, followed by WhatsApp in all except Mexico, where YouTube takes the second spot.

 

  • DAlessio Irol & Berensztein‘s latest survey shows 9 out of 10 Argentine middle-class homes have started buying cheaper food-and-beverage brands in recent months, reported Impulso Negocios. The survey found 89% of the higher-middle class, and 83% of the middle and lower-middle class have chosen second or own brands. In average, all consumers have lowered consumption of 13 food-and-beverage products. In the last 9 months, Argentines have increased their rice consumption by 43%. 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

Beam Suntory has announced Jessica Spence will fill the newly-created role of President of Brands, effectively replacing the Chief Marketing Officer. Spence will be responsible for managing the global P&Ls of Beam Suntory’s largest brands, which include the whisky brands Jim Beam and Maker’s Mark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toyota Motor North America announced that Cooper Ericksen will be promoted to Group Vice President, Product Planning and Strategy, effective Aug. 5. Ericksen has been with Toyota since 1991. He will replace Andrew Coetzee, who plans to retire on Aug. 2 after 31 years of service to Toyota.

 

 

 

 

 

Multi-channel engagement platform Leanplum has appointed Kate FitzGerald as President, effective immediately. Before joining Leanplum, FitzGerald was President of Americas Sales for Marketo

 

 

 

 

 

 

WPP’s Ford-dedicated agency GTB has announced the appointment of Robert Guay as CEO. Guay, who will replace Satish Korde in late July, will lead the evolution of the agency’s relationship with its flagship client, Ford Motor Company. Satish Korde will become Chairman Emeritus of GTB, assisting Ford on strategic projects. The announcement comes less than a year after Ford announced plans to divide its US $800-million creative business between several shops, moving away from GTB’s dedicated model.

 

 

 

 

 

AT&T’s WarnerMedia unit has named Ann Sarnoff as chair and CEO of Warner Bros. Sarnoff succeeds Kevin Tsujihara, who left after unethical behavior was discovered. Sarnoff will be based in Los Angeles and will officially join the company later this summer.

 

 

 

 

 

Eventbrite, a global ticketing and event technology platform, has announced the appointment of Casey Winters to Chief Product Officer. In this role, Winters will lead the global product management, design and research teams to drive innovation for event creators around the world.

 

 

 

 

 

Apple audio brand Beats by Dr Dre has appointed former Electronic Arts (EA)vice-president Chris Thorne as its Global Chief Marketing Officer, following a five-month search. Thorne will oversee the brand’s global marketing across all channels.

 

 

 

 

 

Wendy’s has promoted Carl Loredo to Chief Marketing Officer from his role as Vice-President of Brand Marketing, which he took on when he joined Wendy’s in 2016. He will report directly to Kurt Kane, who is being promoted to US president and chief commercial officer.

 

 

 

 

 

What: Nick Kelly, Head of US Sports Marketing at Anheuser-Busch InBev is the most recent addition to Portada’s Sports Marketing Board. He will take the Portada NY stage on September 12 to discuss sports marketing’s imminent issues.
Why it matters: Sports marketing has grown to a great extent in the last years. Nick Kelly is one of the brilliant speakers that will share their expertise with Portada NY attendees at the Westin Times Square.

 

Nick Kelly

Nick Kelly first arrived at Anheuser-Busch in 2014. Back then he filled the role of Director of Experiential Marketing, Sports. As such, he learned a great deal about effective ways to use sports properties. The task wasn’t easy: he had to drive the growth of sports fans’ loyalty and love for A-B’s brands.

However, Kelly was no amateur. By the time he began at A-B, he already had 2 and a half years of experience at NASCAR under his belt. As Marketing and Communications Lead, he developed a strategy that helped increase family ticket-sales by 300%. Moreover, he played a key role in the negotiations that secured important partnership closings and renewals.

Therefore, he was ready to deal with whatever challenges A-B had for him in 2015. The company renegotiated 70 of its 88 domestic team sponsorships within his first 18 months on the job, and renewed deals with the NBA and NFL.

New Perspectives

A bit later, in 2017, Nick Kelly was bringing a whole new perspective to experiential marketing. A-B’s way of engaging with consumers was completely evolving. About that, he told Portada: “A-B has drastically shifted its model for how to activate sports. We’ve taken a hard pivot from being present to actually having a meaning.”

Kelly had a chance to really prove that in 2018. By then, A-B had promoted him to Head of U.S. Sports Marketing. Budweiser was the FIFA World Cup’s official beer, which meant the best possible opportunity to raise awareness of the brand across the world. Thus, A-B put together a big global campaign to make sure everyone had “a bud” on one hand while watching the tournament.

We’ve taken a hard pivot from being present to actually having a meaning.

Learn From Nick Kelly Live

Portada is thrilled to welcome Nick Kelly to the Sports Marketing Board. This unit of Portada’s Council System will hold its next in-person meeting at Portada New York, at the Hotel Westin Times Square. In addition, Kelly will be a keynote speaker on September 12, together with sports marketing experts Felix Palau (Proximo Spirits) and Eugene Santos (Kia Motors America). Attendees will have a chance to listen first-hand to all the brilliant speakers of the list. Also, there’ll be plenty of networking opportunities.