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Following surge of “pandemic purges,” American credit card holders chose to “wallet edit,” becoming more invested and selective in how they manage money, and enhancing preference for cash back cards.

According to a Wells Fargo Active Cash Card survey, the COVID-19 pandemic prompted two-thirds (63%) of credit card-holding consumers to initiate “pandemic purges.” When looking at what exactly consumers decluttered, the survey found that three-quarters (72%) decluttered their closets, one-third (29%) purged their friends on social media, and another one-third (33%) simplified and decluttered their finances. Coming out of the pandemic, more than one-third (36%) of consumers surveyed say they are becoming more involved in money management, gaining enhanced perspective on their financial standing and goals.

The survey also reveals that the primary drivers in choosing a credit card are cash back features (44%), followed by rewards (38%) and sign-up bonuses (22%). While many consumers seem to understand the benefits of earning rewards, cardholders compare managing their credit card rewards to tedious or mundane tasks, such as doing their taxes (18%), being stuck in traffic (14%), or waiting in line at the DMV (13%), proving the desire for a more straightforward, ubiquitous credit card value proposition like earning the same cash rewards on virtually all purchases.

Hispanic consumer behavior

Cardholders want simplicity from their credit cards with no hassle around activating categories, tracking limits, or calculating rewards when managing their card rewards.

“The pandemic helped many of us realize that less is truly more and encouraged us to remove unnecessary complications from our lives and get back to the basics, which is why we designed the Active Cash Card for those who want a high-value cash back credit card without caps or limits,” said Krista Phillips, head of Branded Cards and Marketing for Wells Fargo Credit Cards. “Now more than ever, cardholders want simplicity from their credit cards with no hassle around activating categories, tracking limits, or calculating rewards when managing their card rewards.”

Wells Fargo presents the Wallet Edit Workshop Series

Hispanic consumer behavior
Jen Robin, CEO Life in Jeneral

With the recent launch of the new Active Cash Card, Wells Fargo is encouraging consumers to bring the joy of simplicity to their finances with a Wallet Edit — a tidying up process to inventory everything in their wallets and determine if it serves a real purpose, makes life easier and provides actual value. The free, virtual Wallet Edit Workshops — facilitated by Marsha Barnes, certified financial social worker, financial educator, and personal finance commentator, and Jen Robin, a professional home organizer and founder and CEO of Life in Jeneral — will provide participants tips and guidance on how to get the most out of the items in their wallets, including their credit cards.

Think of a Wallet Edit as an opportunity to figure out what perks you haven’t explored with all your membership cards.

“We’re excited to be partnering with Wells Fargo and their new Active Cash Card to introduce people to another fun, easy way to simplify and declutter their financial lives, especially as people have become even more focused on their money post-pandemic,” said Robin. Barnes added, “Think of a Wallet Edit as an opportunity to figure out what perks you haven’t explored with all your membership cards, redeem all of those gift cards collecting dust, and make decisions about what your current credit cards are (or aren’t) doing for you now.”

 

Additional key findings from the survey include:

Unpacking the wallet: What do Americans’ wallets look like?

  • Unsurprisingly, the majority (81%) of older adults (55 – 64) are more likely to carry traditional wallets, whether it’s organized or bursting at the seams than those 35 – 54 (76%). Nearly one-quarter (24%) of those ages 18 – 34 use unconventional methods, such as rubber bands (13%), or digital payment tools like Venmo and Apple Pay (11%).
  • More than one-quarter of credit cardholders (27%) admitted to not using their gift cards before they expire, while 61% say their membership cards go unused.
  • Younger consumers ages 18 – 34 are more likely (70%) to have a gift card in their wallet at any given time than the total respondents surveyed (53%).

Hispanic consumer behavior

Financial friction: Money vs. love

  • Credit cardholders consider their own wallet as neat and slim, yet they are quick to call their partner’s wallet overstuffed.
  • Almost two-thirds (62%) of consumers surveyed say their own wallet is neat and slim, yet only 52% say the same about their partner’s wallet.
  • Nearly one-third (31%) of consumers surveyed said they do not consult their spouse/partner before making purchases.
  • However, another 29% say they consult their partner on all of their purchases as they are both very involved in their finances.

Hispanic consumer behavior

Card switching

  • When considering a new credit card, the drivers vary by age and gender, with younger people anticipating more life events and large purchases.
  • Younger cardholders (ages 18 – 34) are the most willing to consider a new card for any reason compared to other generations, but especially for a large upcoming purchase (younger cardholders: 39% vs. total respondents: 29%).
  • Women (38%) and Midwesterners (42%), however, are the most reluctant to change their cards for any reason, indicating they are happy with their credit card(s).

Is talking about money still taboo?

  • More than one-third (36%) of cardholders said they received bad financial advice or were never taught about finance.
  • Younger consumers ages 18 – 34 are three times more likely than those ages 65+ to be given bad or outdated financial advice.

Hispanic consumer behavior

  • According to the Active Cash Card survey, Hispanic and Black respondents were more likely to participate in a pandemic purge during the past year
  • 76% of Hispanic respondents and 72% of Black respondents compared to 62% of Asian cardholders and 58% of White cardholders.
  • Hispanic cardholders are more likely to let their gift cards unused before they expire than other ethnicities
  • 30% of Hispanic respondents admit to letting their gift cards expire without using them compared to 15% of White cardholders
  • Hispanic respondents were more likely to claim they would switch credit cards for an upcoming life event, like pregnancy or wedding
  • 27% of Hispanic respondents agreed with this statement compared to 12% of White respondents, 20% of Black respondents and 15% of Asian respondents.

Intouch Insight, a provider in Customer Experience Management software and services, launched a follow up to their spring consumer habits study which explored changes in customer expectations due to Covid-19. Respondents being extremely likely to shop online increased from 29% in the spring to 42% in the recent study.

New data confirms that the trend towards online purchasing continues to grow while in-store expectations shift. Safety is still a hot button issue, however traditional expectations around in-store customer experience are returning.

Consumer Expectations

“Given the length of time that pandemic precautions have been in place and the fact that they will likely remain in the near term it is not surprising that consumers are starting to return to their pre-Covid-19 expectations. Cleanliness, for example, while still important dropped from the number one spot to third behind convenience and price which regained some of their historical importance. It will be vital that businesses recognize these shifting times and continue to evolve their customer experience measurement, monitoring and delivery to adapt in this ever-changing landscape,” says Erin Fenn, Executive Vice President at Intouch Insight.

Consumer Expectations

Key findings from the study

Key Finding #1: Habits are becoming entrenched

  • eCommerce continues to accelerate;
  • Online shopping is increasing;
  • New services provided by retailers are sticking (e.g. curb-side pick-up), although overall adoption is low.

Key Finding #2: Consumers needs have evolved since May

  • Consumers are reporting increased comfort when visiting physical establishments, supported by a higher frequency of both visits and purchases made in-store;
  • Convenience and price top the list of factors rated as “extremely important” when making the decision to visit a store, ahead of cleanliness which is now ranked 3rd – compared to May 2020 where it was the number one driver of comfort.

Key Finding #3: Improved cleanliness is everyone’s responsibility

  • Consumers want customers to take accountability for adhering to heightened safety precautions;
  • Businesses are expected to enable customers to follow new health and safety practices when entering a physical store;
  • Providing cleaning materials for customer use and enforcing that face masks are worn has increased in priority.

By the numbers

  • Convenience was the most important factor for 80% of respondents when making the decision to visit a store. Cleanliness was the top factor in the spring with 62%.
  • Respondents being extremely likely to shop online increased from 29% in the spring to 42% in the recent study.
  • 82% of respondents feel more comfortable entering a store when hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes are made available for customers to use.

 

According to our just-released survey “What Brand Marketers Need from MarTech in 2020″, advertising technologies for audiovisual media (Addressable TV, Video, Digital Audio and Display, and Programmatic) are the main investments items for the brand marketing community in 2020.

On average, marketing technology now accounts for almost one-third of marketing budgets. Marketers will increase their investment in marketing technology by 27% over the next four years, spending more than US $122 billion on marketing tech by 2022 according to Gartner Research.

The Portada Survey What Brand Marketers Need from MarTech in 2020″ sheds light on the structure of the growth of MarTech expenditures. Based on a poll of 100 brand marketers who are members of the Portada Council System, conducted in the fourth quarter of 2019, Addressable TV, Video, Display and Programmatic, and Digital Audio are pre-eminent investment areas in 2020. They are included in the overall category of Advertising & Promotion, which was chosen as the main overall MarTech expenditure priority by more than 56% of the surveyed brand marketers (see table below).

[table id=1 /]

Contents of “What Brand Marketers Need from MarTech in 2020” 

1. Background: MarTech’s Relentless Rise

2. Main MarTech Expenditure Types per Category in the Survey

3. Survey Results: Brands are Planning to Invest in the Following MarTech Categories in 2020

  • Within Advertising & Promotion, Ad-Tech for Audiovisual Media Plays a Crucial Role
  • Customer Experience: Optimization & Personalization & Testing Leads
  • Social & Relationships. Brands are planning to invest in the following sub-categories of marketing technologies during 2020:
    • Commerce & Sales: Social Media Related Expenditures Lead
    • Data: investment Focus lies on Audience Marketing & Attribution

4.1. Brand/Media Buying Agencies

4.2. Advertising & Promotions: Marketing Budget Weighted Outcome

4.3. Advertising & Promotions: Marketing Budget Weighted Outcome 

Get the Survey

If you are a brand marketer, please click here.

If you are a Marketing Services Supplier, please click here.

What: Nielsen has released the results of its global connected commerce report, which reveals that
Why it matters: Consumers are spending increasingly more time on an expanded range of diverse digital activities. It is undisputed that internet accessibility, mobile technology and digital innovations are redefining consumers’ every interaction and will continue to enable and disrupt many aspects of consumers’ lifestyles well into the future.

This is the digital era, and as such, we are now living a connected life. That’s the idea that Nielsen has proved with a global survey sent to 30,000 online consumers in 64 countries. The Nielsen Connected Commerce report provides insights into the global connected consumer, shopping traits, category evolution, and barriers, in order to identify future growth prospects.

According to Nielsen, 4 billion people (53% of the global population) are connected to the internet, and nearly all of them (92.6%) connect using their mobile devices. 85% of users (3.4 billion) connect to the internet and spend, on average, six and a half hours online. Consumers get online more often, and they stay connected for longer. It shouldn’t surprise us, then, that the range of activities that can be done online has increased. “Internet accessibility, mobile technology, and digital innovations are redefining consumers’ every interaction and will continue to enable and disrupt many aspects of consumers’ lifestyles well into the future,” declares the report.

Development in retailing has quickly become greater in scope than either the physical or virtual store, and now manufacturers and retailers need to create strategic advantages across channels, touchpoints, and experiences along the purchase journey. Connectivity is laying the foundation for e-commerce growth; it is vital for companies to learn consumers’ online behavior and habits, adoption drivers, tipping points and challenges.

Better connectivity will boost e-commerce

Connectivity’s importance comes from the advantages it has brought upon our lives; it has permitted to do all sorts of things without leaving our homes, from talking to our friends on the other side of the world to receiving just about anything we need at our doorstep, right when we need it. As the report explains, at no point in time could this be more apt than now, considering the merging of multiple factors impacting the complexity of consumers’ lives—and shaping new found shopping experiences. In general, brands need to take three things into account: people now lead busy urban lives and need quicker, easier ways to perform their shopping activities; retail is expanding into new avenues and channels; and we must take into account a whole new generation of native digital shoppers who are used to using these devices and services naturally every day.

The report shows that global online sales in 2017 totaled US $2.3 trillion2 or 10.2% of total retail sales and is expected to reach 17.5% by 2021. In 2019, online retail trailblazer, Amazon, will turn 25 years old. With continued technological innovation e-commerce growth is set to outpace traditional formats for years to come. As the report states, “The combination of existing connected consumers spending more, more often, and newly connected consumers purchasing for the first time will proper e-commerce growth”.

Category performance shows a certain trend of diversification

Travel, entertainment (books, music, events) and durable goods (fashion, IT/mobile, electronics) are traditionally the leading categories for consumers to enter the online retail sphere around the world. After two decades of e-commerce, these categories have higher online purchasing penetration and frequency of purchasing than most consumer goods categories.

The consumer is at the center of the connected commerce opportunity. An e-commerce approach that delivers on the various and varied local consumer preferences and circumstances will have a competitive advantage, but those who solve consumers’ convenience aspirations will win.

However, consumers are looking for a wider range of e-commerce options. With a myriad of services, suppliers, products, and prices to choose from at simpler, more trustful websites, consumers now want to complete transactions online more often. This means a significant opportunity for FMCG categories, which need to be replenished periodically and take up a sizeable portion of consumers’ time to shop in physical stores.

According to the survey results, 17% of consumers are purchasing FMCG products online on a regular basis, while 11% have previously purchased online, but not recently. In addition, 30% of consumers are not currently buying groceries online but are willing to consider doing so in the near future. In developing markets this intent is just as important, with 29% of African and Middle Eastern consumers and 42% of Latin American consumers open to online purchasing.

Seek engagement before purchase

Consumers usually go online looking for information, to compare products and prices before actually buying something. Digital media assets are becoming a vital part of building awareness and consideration, satisfying shoppers’ search needs and delivering tangible links to generate purchase outcomes. As we could expect, it’s all about providing a differentiating experience: as e-commerce continues to evolve there are numerous areas to improve consumers’ overall online experience that will encourage trial and steer conversion to online. With convenience as one of the primary motivators for connected commerce, shoppers are looking for a frictionless experience which saves time, reduces obstacles and provides an enjoyable experience.

Enticers to buy online

Retailers can further solve consumers’ apprehensions via interactive services and guarantees. Same day replacement, free delivery for high-value orders, responsiveness and money back for incorrect orders feature highly to encourage online purchases of consumable products.

In the words of Sue Temple, VP, Global Consumer Insights Product Leadership, Nielsen, “The consumer is at the center of the connected commerce opportunity. An e-commerce approach that delivers on the various and varied local consumer preferences and circumstances will have a competitive advantage, but those who solve consumers’ convenience aspirations will win.”

What: Tú cuentas, the platform dedicated to US Hispanics’ opinions on products and services, has revealed the results of their latest study. We at Portada talked to Olga Bueno, founder and CEO, about the key findings.
Why it matters: Tú Cuentas’ survey has shown Hispanics are optimistic about the future as long as key values are in order, which should be integrated into marketing efforts to address this audience.

Olga Bueno, founder and CEO of Tú Cuentas

When Olga Bueno founded Tú Cuentas back in 2011, she noticed there was not a place available online where Hispanics living in the US could speak openly about everyday opinions and habits. Now, Tú Cuentas is a place where Latinos feel safe, like someone is paying attention to their needs and it is worth it to participate in surveys that could have some resonance in the Hispanic market. We talked to Olga a few months ago about the essence of her work; this time, she provides her insights on the latest survey conducted by Tú Cuentas, which sheds light into Hispanics’ feelings and perspectives about the new year, living in the United States, and how their lives have changed with Drumpf’s administration. Thanks to the survey’s insights, marketers (and particularly multicultural) can get a good idea of how to successfully connect with the ever-growing Latino audience in the U.S, and more importantly, how to gain their trust.

 

 

1. In Spite of All, U.S. Hispanics Remain Optimistic

According to the survey results, Hispanics in the United States are highly optimistic. In spite of the new administration, and contrary to what could be expected, they feel their lives have improved during the last year rather than worsened. “One would expect immigrants here to feel more rejected, to believe it has been a bad year for them,” said Olga Bueno. “But somehow they are happy, grateful to be here, and they have faith that everything will be better. I was surprised to hear that 2017 was better for them than 2016 after having Drumpf as president and the country becoming more anti-immigration.”

Even though 51% of the respondents believe they would be better if Hillary Clinton had won the election, 65% agree that 2017 was better than 2016, and the main reason was that they felt stable at work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Hispanics Decide to Stay Positive and Make it Better

Perhaps the key words would be “in spite of”. US Hispanics are aware of the country’s issues. When asked what they feel are the most important problems, a majority mentioned racism, terrorism and immigration, but in spite of all the things that could go wrong, they decide to stay optimistic. In Olga Bueno’s words, “Family and work are the two aspects that really matter, if those are fine, then it’s okay. Even if the rest is not going that well, I choose to remain optimistic and trust that it will get better.” Then, 2017 was better than 2016 because they worked to make it better. They put enough effort into family and work life, and they plan to keep on working in 2018. According to the survey, 63% of the respondents think they will be financially better or much better in 2018 than in 2017, and only 6% think they will be worse or much worse.

 

3. Marketers Need to Learn to Communicate with Latinos

Once upon a time, marketing campaigns targeted to Hispanic needed simply to be in Spanish and they could be effective. Now, there’s an idea that language alone is not enough, and there has been a successful move towards culturally-targeted strategies rather than language-targeted. “Marketers feel the future Latino,” asserts Bueno, “a more acculturated Latino, born and raised in the U.S., proud of their country and relatively integrated to the American society.” But this does not necessarily represent Hispanics’ true connection to their heritage. In Olga Bueno’s experience, even when consumers prefer content in English, they are still interested in using Spanish as an anchor to their Latino identity. Even when it’s easy to go with the majority, “We’ve seen people whose second language is Spanish choosing to speak it over English. For them, Tú Cuentas is a Latino place, akin to their community, so they feel like using Spanish with us,” she explains.

Tú Cuentas is a Latino place, akin to their community, so they feel like using Spanish with us.

 

4. Hispanics Might Not Know How Important Their Vote Is

Among the key findings of the study conducted by Tú Cuentas, Olga Bueno mentions that Hispanics in America are not fully aware of the collective power they have to influence policy, even if they are fully cognizant of what needs to be improved in the country. “I was surprised because they know about the country’s problems, like racism, immigration, gun control…, but they don’t know why they are voting next November,” she says. “Something we need to achieve with the Latino market is letting them see they have power, their community is powerful, but they need to be better informed.”

 

5. Multicultural/Hispanic Marketing Has a Great Future

At the end of the day, knowing all this about how Latinos feel in the U.S. gives us great insight into the needs of the Hispanic market, but marketers need to use this information wisely. As Olga Bueno explains, “They will remember, and future generations will remember, who is on their side and who is not. They’ll remember which company has listened, and which company has turned its back on them. Firms should not forget, this is a minority that is gradually becoming a majority that should not be pushed aside.”

They’ll remember which company has listened.

Hispanics account for a significant part of all Americans, and while some companies are on the right track, there is still a lot to learn about how to communicate with them, and how to become a brand they not only trust, but they want their family to trust as well.

A just published Association of National Advertisers Survey (ANA), shows that brand marketers (clients) are demanding a more holistic approach from agencies and for a better way for agencies to communicate with other agencies. Survey answers from clients included: “Be more collaborative with other agencies to deliver the best results for the client, rather than protective over their share of wallet,” and “streamline their network P&L (have one!) to support our business, not theirs.”

In the first quarter of 2015 (between January 28 and February 25), the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) conducted parallel surveys among ANA members and agencies on issues related to the client/agency relationship. According to the survey client and agencies agree that “their client/agency relationships are strong; they trust the other and that a long-term client/agency relationship is important.” However, “agencies are not in alignment on the fairness of their compensation arrangements.”
Another result of the survey is that brand marketers (clients) are demanding a more holistic approach from agencies and for a better way for agencies to communicate with other agencies. Below we delve deeper into this aspect of the Survey:

QUESTION 1: Do agencies work well with other agencies?

 

Strongly AgreeAgreeNeither Agree or DisagreeDisagreBOTTOM TWO
CLIENT: Our agencies work well with other agencies11%54%22%10%32%
AGENCY: We work well with other agencies/36%52%10%1%11%

SOURCE: 2015 ANA Survey “Enhancing Client Agency Relationships”
COMMENTARY: Clients and agencies agree that agencies work well with other agencies — but those levels of agreement differ. While 88 percent of agencies agree, 65 percent of clients agree. Meanwhile, only 11 percent of clients strongly agree versus 36 percent of agencies. Almost a third of clients either disagree or neither disagree/agree with the statement that agencies work well with other agencies.

 

QUESTION 2: (Clients were asked: )“What could your agency do to foster a more productive client/agency relationship?”

Top responses:
• Be more proactive
• Have a better understanding of the client’s business
• Integrate/collaborate with other agencies
• Increase transparency

3. Selected verbatim highlights from open-ended questions to clients:

Be more proactive than reactive.
Partner across holding company affiliates to bring integrated team that is more efficient and doesn’t add layers.
They can work more collaboratively within their different groups as well as with different agencies.
Be more collaborative with other agencies to deliver the best results for the client, rather than protective over their share of wallet.
More collaborative cross-agency briefings and brainstorming.
Our key AORs need to communicate better with tactical agencies.
Streamline their network P&L (have one!) to support our business, not theirs.
They can work more collaboratively within their different groups as well as with different agencies. Too often there seems to be a turf war.

YOUR THOUGHTS: Whether you are on the brand marketing, agency, media or vendor side, an efficient client-agency relationship is key for you: What are your thoughts on the client agency relationship. Post your comments below or on the Portada LinkedIn Group!

Food-AllrecipeDigital food brand Allrecipes, surveyed home cooks in the 13 largest of its 18 communities worldwide, and confirmed that cooks everywhere are embracing digital technologies at record rates for meal planning and cooking inspiration.

The survey was conducted in Germany, France, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Russia, Quebec, Poland, Australia, the Netherlands, United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Allrecipes’ online survey of 7,463 global participants fielded on Allrecipes sites in September 2012.

Allrecipes receives more than 1 billion annual visits from family- focused women who connect and inspire one another through photos, reviews, videos and blog posts. It was launch in 1997, and features trusted recipes, entertaining ideas, everyday and holiday meal solutions and practical cooking tips. Allrecipes is part of Meredith Corporation and has 18 websites, 18 mobile sites, 11 mobile apps, and 14 eBooks serving 23 countries in 12 languages.

The 2013 Global Food Trends Measuring Cup Report revealed insights on the shopping, cooking, and eating behaviors of family-focused women.

Mobile

According to the survey results, mobile is a big factor in driving global growth. Nearly half of global consumers are turning to their smartphone for inspiration while shopping for food.
While U.S. home cooks continue to lead global smartphone adoption for seeking meal solutions–with more than one- third of online cooks using their smartphones to find recipes (source: Allrecipes Then and Now Survey 2012), home cooks in other communities around the world are quickly catching up. The UK and Argentina lead with 27 percent and 25 percent, respectively, for cooks using mobile phones to access recipes in-store and on the go.

27% of Argentinean Allrecipes readers use their mobile phone to access recipes

 

Online video
The use of online food videos for meal planning and preparation is also a global trend. In communities around the world, the percentage of home cooks visiting video websites for meal planning doubled in 2012 from nine percent to 18 percent. Top global markets for online food video consumption are Poland(30 percent), Brazil (29 percent), and Argentina (28 percent).

“We are thrilled to see Allrecipes’ global web and mobile sites grow by 113 percent last year”, said Patricia Lee Smith, vice president, International, Allrecipes.

Online recipes
The importance of online recipes with ratings and reviews surged 126 percent globally last year, rising to 61 percent compared with 27 percent the year before.

Health and nutrition are global considerations as 56 percent of cooks around the world cite “healthy and nutritious” as criteria for their everyday meals. While prepared ingredients show growth in popularity, you will still find fresh produce in 86% of global grocery carts every week.

 

Download the full report including charts and graphs here.

Methodology: Data provided is from * The 13 communities surveyed include.

 

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Some stories the Hispanic Marketing, Advertising and Media world is talking about this week.

» ANA Survey: Multicultural vs. Hispanic specific agency debate continues

According to a recent survey by the Association of National Advertisers (ANA), the   debate over whether to hire a specialized multicultural agency or tap a general-market shop for multicultural work is clearly set to continue: 52% of respondents said they use a multicultural agency and 40% said they work with a general-market agency for multicultural work. There were 106 respondents to the ANA survey, conducted online in June and July 2012. Sixty percent of marketers said they spent more on new-media platforms for multicultural efforts in 2012, according to a survey by the Association of National Advertisers. The average increase was 9% for those that boosted their budgets; 24% of respondents spent the same amount while 16% cut their budgets for new media.

»Drama Fever expands to Spanish markets

DramaFever.com, a New York-based foreign drama streaming service, is making a big push towards international expansion with the addition of content from Spain and Argentina and a new Spanish-language website, paidcontent reports. The service also expanded its distribution agreements, and is now supplying Netflix and Apple’s (A AAPL) iTunes with Asian and Spanish-language dramas. “We are really excited about bringing more of our content to iTunes,” DramaFever co-founder Suk Park said during a recent phone interview.

» Do Pandora ads target Hispanics and Spotify’s not?

We recently had Pandora CRO John Trimble speaking at our 6th Annual Hispanic Advertising and Media Conference. Interestingly, Adweek’s Christopher Heine writes an interesting article about the way radio streaming company Spotify targets (or doesn’t target) ethnic consumers compared to Pandora. "We have a variety of marketers who advertise to that audience in Spanish, Spanglish and in English," Priscilla Valls, a vp of ad sales for Pandora, said Friday (Oct. 5) after speaking at Advertising Week IX. "What we are finding is that brands are using their general budgets to also reach a Hispanic audience. It's growing so quickly and pervasively that it's less about syphoning off a Hispanic budget and more about reaching their entire audience in the best possible way." Jon Mitchell, a vp of Spotify, as well as marketing reps from Univision Radio, Shazam and the Internet ads firm TargetSpot, was the only one on the panel—which focused on Internet radio advertising overall—who didn't chime in about marketing to Hispanics. After the 45-minute event, Adweek found out why while chatting with the Spotify exec. "From a data capture perspective, we don't take that information at registration," Mitchell said. "That's why I kept quiet."

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Some stories the Hispanic Marketing, Advertising and Media world is talking about this week.

» ANA Survey: Multicultural vs. Hispanic specific agency debate continues

According to a recent survey by the Association of National Advertisers (ANA), the   debate over whether to hire a specialized multicultural agency or tap a general-market shop for multicultural work is clearly set to continue: 52% of respondents said they use a multicultural agency and 40% said they work with a general-market agency for multicultural work. There were 106 respondents to the ANA survey, conducted online in June and July 2012. Sixty percent of marketers said they spent more on new-media platforms for multicultural efforts in 2012, according to a survey by the Association of National Advertisers. The average increase was 9% for those that boosted their budgets; 24% of respondents spent the same amount while 16% cut their budgets for new media.

»Drama Fever expands to Spanish markets

DramaFever.com, a New York-based foreign drama streaming service, is making a big push towards international expansion with the addition of content from Spain and Argentina and a new Spanish-language website, paidcontent reports. The service also expanded its distribution agreements, and is now supplying Netflix and Apple’s (A AAPL) iTunes with Asian and Spanish-language dramas. “We are really excited about bringing more of our content to iTunes,” DramaFever co-founder Suk Park said during a recent phone interview.

» Do Pandora ads target Hispanics and Spotify’s not?

We recently had Pandora CRO John Trimble speaking at our 6th Annual Hispanic Advertising and Media Conference. Interestingly, Adweek’s Christopher Heine writes an interesting article about the way radio streaming company Spotify targets (or doesn’t target) ethnic consumers compared to Pandora. "We have a variety of marketers who advertise to that audience in Spanish, Spanglish and in English," Priscilla Valls, a vp of ad sales for Pandora, said Friday (Oct. 5) after speaking at Advertising Week IX. "What we are finding is that brands are using their general budgets to also reach a Hispanic audience. It's growing so quickly and pervasively that it's less about syphoning off a Hispanic budget and more about reaching their entire audience in the best possible way." Jon Mitchell, a vp of Spotify, as well as marketing reps from Univision Radio, Shazam and the Internet ads firm TargetSpot, was the only one on the panel—which focused on Internet radio advertising overall—who didn't chime in about marketing to Hispanics. After the 45-minute event, Adweek found out why while chatting with the Spotify exec. "From a data capture perspective, we don't take that information at registration," Mitchell said. "That's why I kept quiet."

Many experts believe that the effectiveness of advertising campaigns on social networks necessarily depends on investing (advertising) in this strategy.  Others argue that a monetary investment in social network advertising is not a necessary prerequisite.  The latter position argues that investing money in social networks does not guarantee a strategy’s success and that similar goals may be achieved with no-cost social marketing communication strategies.  What do Portada readers think? Should Social Networking in the U.S. Hispanic and Latin American realm be promoted through advertising paid or is a non-paid presence enough?

Microsoft Advertising– the sponsor of Portada’s Latin American Advertising and Media Publicity Awards, conducted an online survey with questions on social networks and advertising among the 237 people who voted in the Latin American Advertising and Media Summit 2012 Awards.

Of the 237 people polled, 180 considered themselves influential in the decision-making of their clients or brands regarding communication strategies and marketing on social networks.


To pay or not to pay: The debate over the effectiveness of advertising on social networks

Out of 237 respondents, 181 (76%) believe that success and achievement of communication goals for their clients or brands involves both a social network presence (without payment for services) and social network advertising (fee-based services).   Only 16 respondents regarded interactive promotion as more important than paying for social networking services to meet their client or brand goals, and 40 of those polled thought it was more important to have a social network presence (without paying for these services).

Clearly, our community feels that in order to fulfill its social network communication goals, it is necessary to have a non-paying presence on social networks (such as Twitter accounts and Facebook pages),  but also to invest in advertising and advertising services offered by social networks today.  The key is a combination of presence plus advertising.



When we translate this opinion to what our readers are actually doing and planning with their customers and brands, the numbers are very similar.  A total of 170 respondents, or slightly more than 71%, reported using both types of social network interaction (presence and advertising); 15.6% said that they or their customers has a presence on social networks without buying advertising; and 12.6% said they only arrange for advertising services on social media and do not have an actual social network presence.


Social advertising is part of our everyday scene and is expected to demand more and more resources and a place in media planning budgets in Latin America.  The region’s investment in digital and social network advertising is growing, but has not yet reached the levels for digital media in the U.S. and Europe, so there is great potential and expectation surrounding advertising on new technologies.

The emergence of many Latin American companies specializing in marketing and digital products or services is a fact.  Investment by private equity groups in these Latino start-ups, which we might call "Latino Silicon Valley," is also a fact.  The expansion of multinationals in the region is also not surprising, considering the European crisis and high levels of growth being registered in Latin America.  Why not bet then on the growth of social advertising in Latin America?  The conditions and the mentality are there.

So then…what is social marketing?

The concept of "social advertising" has not been completely defined and set in the advertising and marketing industry.  There are several debates surrounding this topic – which represents a departure from what we understand to be traditional advertising – in which media platforms are included under the concept of "social advertising".  To this end, respondents were asked what platforms they consider to be part of social advertising today and what they understand this concept to be.  Survey options did not imply the exclusion of the other answers.

Of those polled, 58.2% included advertising messages via SMS as a form of social advertising. Meanwhile, 57.8% felt that e-mails with advertising are also social advertising.  Another 57.8% also said that ads on social networks fall under this concept.  Coming in third, 53.5% of respondents said that an announcement on Twitter or Facebook also constitutes social advertising.

On a second scale, with responses hovering at 35%, respondents felt that social advertising also consists of ads that used quotes made "by real flesh-and-blood people" and of any activity on social networks that makes it possible to reach a specific audience (whether paying for it or not).

Many experts believe that the effectiveness of advertising campaigns on social networks necessarily depends on investing (advertising) in this strategy.  Others argue that a monetary investment in social network advertising is not a necessary prerequisite.  The latter position argues that investing money in social networks does not guarantee a strategy’s success and that similar goals may be achieved with no-cost social marketing communication strategies.  What do Portada readers think? Should Social Networking in the U.S. Hispanic and Latin American realm be promoted through advertising paid or is a non-paid presence enough?

Microsoft Advertising- the sponsor of Portada’s Latin American Advertising and Media Publicity Awards-, conducted an online survey with questions on social networks and advertising among the 237 people who voted in the Latin American Advertising and Media Summit 2012 Awards.

Of the 237 people polled, 180 considered themselves influential in the decision-making of their clients or brands regarding communication strategies and marketing on social networks.

To pay or not to pay: The debate over the effectiveness of advertising on social networks

Out of 237 respondents, 181 (76%) believe that success and achievement of communication goals for their clients or brands involves both a social network presence (without payment for services) and social network advertising (fee-based services).   Only 16 respondents regarded interactive promotion as more important than paying for social networking services to meet their client or brand goals, and 40 of those polled thought it was more important to have a social network presence (without paying for these services).

Clearly, our community feels that in order to fulfill its social network communication goals, it is necessary to have a non-paying presence on social networks (such as Twitter accounts and Facebook pages),  but also to invest in advertising and advertising services offered by social networks today.  The key is a combination of presence plus advertising.

When we translate this opinion to what our readers are actually doing and planning with their customers and brands, the numbers are very similar.  A total of 170 respondents, or slightly more than 71%, reported using both types of social network interaction (presence and advertising); 15.6% said that they or their customers has a presence on social networks without buying advertising; and 12.6% said they only arrange for advertising services on social media and do not have an actual social network presence.

Social advertising is part of our everyday scene and is expected to demand more and more resources and a place in media planning budgets in Latin America.  The region’s investment in digital and social network advertising is growing, but has not yet reached the levels for digital media in the U.S. and Europe, so there is great potential and expectation surrounding advertising on new technologies.

The emergence of many Latin American companies specializing in marketing and digital products or services is a fact.  Investment by private equity groups in these Latino start-ups, which we might call "Latino Silicon Valley," is also a fact.  The expansion of multinationals in the region is also not surprising, considering the European crisis and high levels of growth being registered in Latin America.  Why not bet then on the growth of social advertising in Latin America?  The conditions and the mentality are there.

So then…what is social marketing?

The concept of "social advertising" has not been completely defined and set in the advertising and marketing industry.  There are several debates surrounding this topic – which represents a departure from what we understand to be traditional advertising – in which media platforms are included under the concept of "social advertising".  To this end, respondents were asked what platforms they consider to be part of social advertising today and what they understand this concept to be.  Survey options did not imply the exclusion of the other answers.

Of those polled, 58.2% included advertising messages via SMS as a form of social advertising. Meanwhile, 57.8% felt that e-mails with advertising are also social advertising.  Another 57.8% also said that ads on social networks fall under this concept.  Coming in third, 53.5% of respondents said that an announcement on Twitter or Facebook also constitutes social advertising.

On a second scale, with responses hovering at 35%, respondents felt that social advertising also consists of ads that used quotes made "by real flesh-and-blood people" and of any activity on social networks that makes it possible to reach a specific audience (whether paying for it or not).

Many experts believe that the effectiveness of advertising campaigns on social networks necessarily depends on investing (advertising) in this strategy.  Others argue that a monetary investment in social network advertising is not a necessary prerequisite.  The latter position argues that investing money in social networks does not guarantee a strategy’s success and that similar goals may be achieved with no-cost social marketing communication strategies.  What do Portada readers think? Should Social Networking in the U.S. Hispanic and Latin American realm be promoted through advertising paid or is a non-paid presence enough?

Microsoft Advertising– the sponsor of Portada’s Latin American Advertising and Media Publicity Awards, conducted an online survey with questions on social networks and advertising among the 237 people who voted in the Latin American Advertising and Media Summit 2012 Awards.

Of the 237 people polled, 180 considered themselves influential in the decision-making of their clients or brands regarding communication strategies and marketing on social networks.


To pay or not to pay: The debate over the effectiveness of advertising on social networks

Out of 237 respondents, 181 (76%) believe that success and achievement of communication goals for their clients or brands involves both a social network presence (without payment for services) and social network advertising (fee-based services).   Only 16 respondents regarded interactive promotion as more important than paying for social networking services to meet their client or brand goals, and 40 of those polled thought it was more important to have a social network presence (without paying for these services).

Clearly, our community feels that in order to fulfill its social network communication goals, it is necessary to have a non-paying presence on social networks (such as Twitter accounts and Facebook pages),  but also to invest in advertising and advertising services offered by social networks today.  The key is a combination of presence plus advertising.



When we translate this opinion to what our readers are actually doing and planning with their customers and brands, the numbers are very similar.  A total of 170 respondents, or slightly more than 71%, reported using both types of social network interaction (presence and advertising); 15.6% said that they or their customers has a presence on social networks without buying advertising; and 12.6% said they only arrange for advertising services on social media and do not have an actual social network presence.


Social advertising is part of our everyday scene and is expected to demand more and more resources and a place in media planning budgets in Latin America.  The region’s investment in digital and social network advertising is growing, but has not yet reached the levels for digital media in the U.S. and Europe, so there is great potential and expectation surrounding advertising on new technologies.

The emergence of many Latin American companies specializing in marketing and digital products or services is a fact.  Investment by private equity groups in these Latino start-ups, which we might call "Latino Silicon Valley," is also a fact.  The expansion of multinationals in the region is also not surprising, considering the European crisis and high levels of growth being registered in Latin America.  Why not bet then on the growth of social advertising in Latin America?  The conditions and the mentality are there.

So then…what is social marketing?

The concept of "social advertising" has not been completely defined and set in the advertising and marketing industry.  There are several debates surrounding this topic – which represents a departure from what we understand to be traditional advertising – in which media platforms are included under the concept of "social advertising".  To this end, respondents were asked what platforms they consider to be part of social advertising today and what they understand this concept to be.  Survey options did not imply the exclusion of the other answers.

Of those polled, 58.2% included advertising messages via SMS as a form of social advertising. Meanwhile, 57.8% felt that e-mails with advertising are also social advertising.  Another 57.8% also said that ads on social networks fall under this concept.  Coming in third, 53.5% of respondents said that an announcement on Twitter or Facebook also constitutes social advertising.

On a second scale, with responses hovering at 35%, respondents felt that social advertising also consists of ads that used quotes made "by real flesh-and-blood people" and of any activity on social networks that makes it possible to reach a specific audience (whether paying for it or not).

Google is my favorite tech company these days. It has created and continues to create solutions that are quite outstanding.  That brings freedom of research and expression to the world, literally.

Recently the company launched Google Surveys. That allows users to:

 

  • Create a survey online, including graphics
  • Respondents answer questions to get free access to content online, one or two questions at the time, only
  • The content publishers get paid for allowing their viewers to answer questions
  • The survey creator finally gets the data tabulated and graphically displayed, and the data is updated continuously as more people answer


The system of Google Surveys is still being developed and eventually it will become a killer app, I think.  Right now the survey creator or researcher pays 10 cents per response, or 50 cents per response if the responses are from specific targets.  So, if you ask 50 questions from 500 Hispanics it costs you $2,500.  Not that bad although not that inexpensive either compared with companies like Research Now that can do similar work via River methodology at very competitive prices depending on the specifics of the project and include many more questions in one survey.  There are several issues that Google Surveys needs to address before their platform is really useful for multicultural research.  Here is why:

  • The fact that each respondent answers only one or two questions at a time makes correlations and multivariate statistics impossible to conduct.  If you have a survey with 50 questions, you need all 50 responses from each individual to be able to compute statistical associations and other relational analysis.
  • They are currently only targeting English language publishers, thus if the researcher wants to target “other language” respondents that is difficult as the incidence may be too low and the data slow to collect.
  • The cost is not really lower from that of competitors that do target “other language” groups, and who get individual respondents to actually complete an entire, let’s say, 50 question survey at one time. That way the researcher can conduct actual segmentations and other complex data analyses.
  • Also, the target of Google Surveys now are people who visit sites that charge for content. That makes the respondents somewhat idiosyncratic and perhaps not representative of the universe of online respondents.

At this time “Google Surveys” is a useful tool for people who want to know the answer to one or two very specific questions. In multicultural research, we usually need to find relationships between variables from the diverse cultural groups in the US.  Google Surveys does not seem to be ready to address these issues at this time. Nevertheless I am hopeful that they will eventually have a very general and powerful tool.

Dr. Felipe Korzenny is a Hispanic and Multicultural Marketing Researcher and Analyst. He has been a market researcher and marketing consultant dedicated to the Latino market since the early 1980’s. Dr. Korzenny published “Hispanic Marketing: A Cultural Perspective” in 2005 and “Hispanic Marketing: Connecting with the New Latino Consumer in August this year. Marketing Trends in a New Multicultural Society is Dr. Felipe Korzenny´s blog.

The World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) has announced the results of its recent survey about the level and distribution of media rebates.

The survey took place this year beetwen 32 multinational companies.

Media reabates are the payments to media agencies in return for spending client money with key media owners.

The survey found that many marketers believe that the perceived level of rebate is higher than what they believe is being returned in a number of markets.

In Latin America, respondents identified Colombia, Mexico and Brazil as rebate hot spots in Latin America. Online was identified as the medium paying the highest rebates, followed by TV. There was a significant gap between the perceived level of rebates paid and returned in Mexico with rebates paid ranked at 2.1 out of three and rebates returned at just 1.6.

Twelve per cent of rebates were returned as free space with cash returned annually although 16% received monthly payments. Twenty-two per cent of respondents also used rebates to reduce direct payments for agency remunerations.

The World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) has announced the results of its recent survey about the level and distribution of media rebates.

The survey took place this year beetwen 32 multinational companies.

Media reabates are the payments to media agencies in return for spending client money with key media owners.

The survey found that many marketers believe that the perceived level of rebate is higher than what they believe is being returned in a number of markets.

In Latin America, respondents identified Colombia, Mexico and Brazil as rebate hot spots in Latin America. Online was identified as the medium paying the highest rebates, followed by TV. There was a significant gap between the perceived level of rebates paid and returned in Mexico with rebates paid ranked at 2.1 out of three and rebates returned at just 1.6.

Twelve per cent of rebates were returned as free space with cash returned annually although 16% received monthly payments. Twenty-two per cent of respondents also used rebates to reduce direct payments for agency remunerations.

In only a few years Portada has substantially risen the standards in the Latin B2B Media and Advertising sector. It's not us who say it. That would be too easy. These are some statements from the just released CVC Portada Audit and Readership Survey:.

– Portada reaches more than 100,000 Decision Makers in the Latin Market

Descripción: https://www.portada-online.com/html/2012_advertising/picture2.jpg Portada's Audience is…
…Powerful
-55.1% are C-level Executives

…composed of Marketers and Media Buyers
-71.7% are employed in Advertising Agency/Media Buying Agency
-12% are Marketing Directors

…highly respectful of Portada's content
-97.1% of our audience agrees with the statement that "Portada gives essential, high quality, relevant information about the Hispanic market".

…taking action as a result of reading Portada
-39.5% contacted an advertiser
-48.2% changed business practices
-31.9% purchased a product or service
-80.1% introduced new ideas

We want to invite you to be a part of our story and join a myriad of blue chip sponsors. To see how you can benefit from special offers to Portada's 360 programs including digital, print, social media, conferences and awards exposure, please contact us at 212-685-4441 or write to advertise@portada-online.com

During Portada’s recent Media and Advertising Forum presented in Mexico City , we conducted a survey among attendees (clients, agencies, and media) about their forecasts for 2012, the challenges they expect to face, the ad categories that will invest the most in Mexico, and what, in their opinion,  Mexico will be able to "export" to Latin America and U.S. Hispanic market. The weighted average of their responses about 2012 ad growth translates into an expected growth rate of 7% in 2012.

What kind of growth do executives forecast in the Mexican market?
All of the media, marketing, and advertising professionals polled believe that the Mexican market will grow during 2012. None of them expect any market decreases. Of the 26 respondents, 42.3% believe that the market will grow between 5% and 10%. Closely following that figure, 38.4% expect the market to grow between 0% and 5%, while 19.2% expect growth above 10%.


Mexican market growth for 2012

Total respondents 26

-10% – 0

0

0-5%

10

5-10%

11

10% o +

5

 

Internet and mobile: stronger media platforms
Most executives are betting that mobile and Internet will post the greatest growth among all media platforms. Still, the Internet garnered a few more votes than mobile platforms, which have increased their presence in Latin American markets but whose growth relies on the development of appropriate technology to begin opening up advertising in this medium. In this sense, the
technological innovation needed for digital ads is already developed, as evidenced by the exponential growth of Internet users in Latin America. Cable TV was also a medium that stood out among the responses , although to a lesser extent than mobile and Internet platforms. In Latin America today, TV has an important role in advertising budgets, along with print media.

Ad budgets for telcos still on the rise
For Mexican executives, telecommunications will continue to account for a significant share of advertising budgets.
Of those polled, 31.8% are banking on telecommunications being the fastest growing category. Consumer/Retail came in second at 27.2%.  Coming in a distant third was the automotive industry at 11%, and ranking fourth with 9% of the votes was political advertising.  This last category appeared in the polls given the upcoming Mexican presidential election next year. Sports and technology placed fifth with 6.8% of the vote, and the financial sector took sixth place with only 2%.

Challenges for 2012
Although views were mixed, several executives agreed that the
global economic situation could affect advertising budgets in the Mexican market, which would make it a challenge to maintain these budgets or avoid decreases in ad spending.
Several other executives also felt that advertising in the Mexican media will be affected by political propaganda.  One respondent stated: "Politics will steal the attention next year. You have to know how to smartly hop on that train. "Another noted that ad campaigns will have to increase their effectiveness in light of the political climate and its overwhelming presence in the media in 2012.”
New technologies and new practices
also stood out in the responses of those interviewed. For many executives, digital media has yet to be incorporated into companies’ practices and investment habits, making innovation and change for advertisers another challenge to overcome during 2012.One of the executives summed this up as the biggest challenge: "Companies who continue to invest in traditional ideas, and are still afraid to try new strategies." Innovation, efficiency and cross-media content integration were also cited as other challenges for the coming year.

México for export
Many of the executives also believe that Mexico has great potential for innovation and that this feature can be exported to Latin American markets and the U.S. Hispanic market. They also believe that providing good service on a tight budget is a know-how possessed by most professionals in Mexico and that this in itself is a big plus that can be exploited in other markets.

First-hand knowledge of the U.S. Hispanic market
Most of the executives believe belonging to Latin culture gives them first-hand knowledge of the U.S. Hispanic market that can be put to advantage. Many of them said that sharing the same language, values ??and customs of the Spanish-speaking community ensures greater consumer awareness of the Hispanic market. Other executives also believe that the research tools developed specifically for the Mexican consumer can also be applied to the Hispanic market. One executive summed it up this way: "We have a close link to the feelings of the Hispanic world."

 

During Portada’s recent Media and Advertising Forum presented in Mexico City , we conducted a survey among attendees (clients, agencies, and media) about their forecasts for 2012, the challenges they expect to face, the ad categories that will invest the most in Mexico, and what, in their opinion,  Mexico will be able to "export" to Latin America and U.S. Hispanic market. The weighted average of their responses about 2012 ad growth translates into an expected growth rate of 7% in 2012.

What kind of growth do executives forecast in the Mexican market?
All of the media, marketing, and advertising professionals polled believe that the Mexican market will grow during 2012. None of them expect any market decreases. Of the 26 respondents, 42.3% believe that the market will grow between 5% and 10%. Closely following that figure, 38.4% expect the market to grow between 0% and 5%, while 19.2% expect growth above 10%.

Mexican market growth for 2012

Total respondents 26

-10% – 0

0

0-5%

10

5-10%

11

10% o +

5

 

Internet and mobile: stronger media platforms
Most executives are betting that mobile and Internet will post the greatest growth among all media platforms. Still, the Internet garnered a few more votes than mobile platforms, which have increased their presence in Latin American markets but whose growth relies on the development of appropriate technology to begin opening up advertising in this medium. In this sense, the technological innovation needed for digital ads is already developed, as evidenced by the exponential growth of Internet users in Latin America. Cable TV was also a medium that stood out among the responses , although to a lesser extent than mobile and Internet platforms. In Latin America today, TV has an important role in advertising budgets, along with print media.

Ad budgets for telcos still on the rise
For Mexican executives, telecommunications will continue to account for a significant share of advertising budgets.
Of those polled, 31.8% are banking on telecommunications being the fastest growing category. Consumer/Retail came in second at 27.2%.  Coming in a distant third was the automotive industry at 11%, and ranking fourth with 9% of the votes was political advertising.  This last category appeared in the polls given the upcoming Mexican presidential election next year. Sports and technology placed fifth with 6.8% of the vote, and the financial sector took sixth place with only 2%.

Challenges for 2012
Although views were mixed, several executives agreed that the global economic situation could affect advertising budgets in the Mexican market, which would make it a challenge to maintain these budgets or avoid decreases in ad spending.
Several other executives also felt that advertising in the Mexican media will be affected by political propaganda.  One respondent stated: "Politics will steal the attention next year. You have to know how to smartly hop on that train. "Another noted that ad campaigns will have to increase their effectiveness in light of the political climate and its overwhelming presence in the media in 2012.”
New technologies and new practices also stood out in the responses of those interviewed. For many executives, digital media has yet to be incorporated into companies’ practices and investment habits, making innovation and change for advertisers another challenge to overcome during 2012.One of the executives summed this up as the biggest challenge: "Companies who continue to invest in traditional ideas, and are still afraid to try new strategies." Innovation, efficiency and cross-media content integration were also cited as other challenges for the coming year.

México for export
Many of the executives also believe that Mexico has great potential for innovation and that this feature can be exported to Latin American markets and the U.S. Hispanic market. They also believe that providing good service on a tight budget is a know-how possessed by most professionals in Mexico and that this in itself is a big plus that can be exploited in other markets.

First-hand knowledge of the U.S. Hispanic market
Most of the executives believe belonging to Latin culture gives them first-hand knowledge of the U.S. Hispanic market that can be put to advantage. Many of them said that sharing the same language, values ??and customs of the Spanish-speaking community ensures greater consumer awareness of the Hispanic market. Other executives also believe that the research tools developed specifically for the Mexican consumer can also be applied to the Hispanic market. One executive summed it up this way: "We have a close link to the feelings of the Hispanic world."

 

Portada asked several executives from companies heavily involved in digital advertising in the U.S. Hispanic market, Latin America and Spain about their growth expectations for 2012. On average, respondents of these so-called Latin Digital Powerhouses expect digital advertising in the Latin World to grow by 15% in 2012.

Most respondents think that automotive will continue to be the strongest ad category. Financial and Telecommunications are other ad categories expected to be strong in 2012.

Diego Santos Caballero (photo), Director of Eltiempo.com, El Tiempo, Colombia says that “definitely automotive, financial, commodities markets and mobile/phone companies and beverages will be strong”.

According to Diego Morales, Account Director of Matomy in Mexico City automotive, telecom and financial will be the strongest categories.

Jose Luis Carrete Alfeiran (photo), Regional Director Digital of Editorial Televisa in Mexico City thinks that “Automotive will continue to be the strongest category, Consumer Pro-ducts and Finance are the other leading categories.”

Juan Francisco Diez, VP of Sales at Betazeta Networks, Chile, answered that  “retail and telecom” will be the strongest categories in digital advertising in 2012.

Germán Herebia, (photo) CEO of Buenos Aires, Argentina, based Intextual also sees high growth in automotive and telcos.

 

Very Hot: Online Video and Mobile

Regarding the type of digital media with the highest growth rate in 2012.

Regarding the digital media vehicle that will grow the most,  most executives cite on line video and display advertising. Says Diego Morales “Video will experience the biggest growth but display will remain at the top.” Beta Zeta Network’s, Juan Francisco Diez expects particularly high growth in “high impact tailored made display advertising connected to premium content marketing”.

Diego Santos Caballero also chose online display and online video as the strongest media types for next year, and Germán Herebia said they were receiving lots of RFPs regarding video and mobile formats.

On the other hand, Jose Luis Carrete Alfeiran thinks that “Display (CPM) will continue to grow at a fast rate, as well as display Rich Media. Display accounts for +-60%, while  Online Video advertising is still in an early stage in Latin America,”

Growth Challenges: Old Habits and Scarcity of In-House Digital Teams

Jose Luis Carrete Alfeiran thinks that one of the main challenges the Latin digital Advertising industry faces are advertisers old habits of mostly investing in off-line media. “In Latin America and the U.S. Hispanic market  less than 5% of ad budgets is allocated to digital, compared to the 15%+ in the USA, or 24%+ in some European countries.”, Carrete notes.

Intextual’s Germán Herebia says that “Advertisers need to have digital teams in house to better understand the medium and to better communicate with their digital agencies.” And Diego Morales sees the economic scenario in “first world countries” as the main difficulty for growth. For El Tiempo’s Diego Santos Caballero innovation is  one of the main challenges going into next year.

Portada asked several executives from companies heavily involved in digital advertising in the U.S. Hispanic market, Latin America and Spain about their growth expectations for 2012. On average, respondents of these so-called Latin Digital Powerhouses expect digital advertising in the Latin World to grow by 15% in 2012.

Most respondents think that automotive will continue to be the strongest ad category. Financial and Telecommunications are other ad categories expected to be strong in 2012.

Diego Santos Caballero (photo), Director of Eltiempo.com, El Tiempo, Colombia says that “definitely automotive, financial, commodities markets and mobile/phone companies and beverages will be strong”.

According to Diego Morales, Account Director of Matomy in Mexico City automotive, telecom and financial will be the strongest categories.

Jose Luis Carrete Alfeiran (photo), Regional Director Digital of Editorial Televisa in Mexico City thinks that “Automotive will continue to be the strongest category, Consumer Pro-ducts and Finance are the other leading categories.”

Juan Francisco Diez, VP of Sales at Betazeta Networks, Chile, answered that  “retail and telecom” will be the strongest categories in digital advertising in 2012.

Germán Herebia, (photo) CEO of Buenos Aires, Argentina, based Intextual also sees high growth in automotive and telcos.

 

Very Hot: Online Video and Mobile

Regarding the type of digital media with the highest growth rate in 2012.

Regarding the digital media vehicle that will grow the most,  most executives cite on line video and display advertising. Says Diego Morales “Video will experience the biggest growth but display will remain at the top.” Beta Zeta Network’s, Juan Francisco Diez expects particularly high growth in “high impact tailored made display advertising connected to premium content marketing”.

Diego Santos Caballero also chose online display and online video as the strongest media types for next year, and Germán Herebia said they were receiving lots of RFPs regarding video and mobile formats.

On the other hand, Jose Luis Carrete Alfeiran thinks that “Display (CPM) will continue to grow at a fast rate, as well as display Rich Media. Display accounts for +-60%, while  Online Video advertising is still in an early stage in Latin America,”

Growth Challenges: Old Habits and Scarcity of In-House Digital Teams

Jose Luis Carrete Alfeiran thinks that one of the main challenges the Latin digital Advertising industry faces are advertisers old habits of mostly investing in off-line media. “In Latin America and the U.S. Hispanic market  less than 5% of ad budgets is allocated to digital, compared to the 15%+ in the USA, or 24%+ in some European countries.”, Carrete notes.

Intextual’s Germán Herebia says that “Advertisers need to have digital teams in house to better understand the medium and to better communicate with their digital agencies.” And Diego Morales sees the economic scenario in “first world countries” as the main difficulty for growth. For El Tiempo’s Diego Santos Caballero innovation is  one of the main challenges going into next year.

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