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Out-of-home advertising continues to grow hand-in-hand with technologies that provide the consumer with an interactive experience. OOH is expected to grow at a booming rate in the next years, with the global share of ad expenditures reaching 24% by 2021. We talked about OOH to experts Jill Brooks (Business Development Director, U.S. at Latcom), Vanessa Hartley (Associate Media Director, Outdoor Media Alliance, Hearts & Science), Michael Lieberman (Co-Ceo, Kinetic, North America) and Leonor Palao (Creative Brand & Advertising Leader). 

 

out of home advertising in Times SquareOut of home advertising is one of those things that we can’t imagine ever not being in the world. Billboards and street furniture have accompanied consumers on the go for at least a couple of centuries. Today, street furniture (like bus shelters and telephone boxes), transit advertising (placed on buses and taxis, or anything that addresses travelers and commuters, and other media comprise 34% of total outdoor revenue in the U.S. Marketing “on the go” has grown more than anyone could have expected thanks to new technology and integrations with online marketing. In 2017, out-of-home advertising attracted 6% of global ad spending, and predictions indicate it will grow a yearly 4% to reach US $33 billion by 2021.

 

The King of Traditional Media

Moreover, digital billboards and furniture, as well as other alternative formats, have accounted for the explosion of OOH while other traditional media have continued to fall. According to Magna, DOOH already accounts for 22% of revenue in some markets like the UK and the global share is predicted to grow to 24% by 2021. Therefore, it makes sense to say that OOH is “booming”, and advertisers should seriously explore the opportunities it offers and include it in their multi-channel strategy, particularly now that emerging technologies allow consumers to interact with outside advertisements in ways that we haven’t seen before.

out of home advertising expert
Leonor Palao spent 8 years at OppenheimerFunds before it got acquired by Invesco

According to the OAAA, consumers spend 70% of their time out of home. Thus, outdoor advertising is a most convenient format, as it reaches consumers wherever they are at any moment of the day. We spoke about this to Leonor Palao, a former marketer at OppenheimerFunds. She says that the reason why OOH is growing so much is perhaps that people pay attention to well-crafted messages they see outside, as opposed to the ads they see online. “Brands are overwhelming their audience with online ads,” noted Palao. “People are becoming blind to ads on their phones and on the web. There is a lot of news about cookies and privacy, and as marketers, we have to think of smarter ways to deliver our messages so they make a greater impact.”

 

How Has Out of Home Advertising Evolved in the Latest Years?

Technology has allowed outdoor marketing to become digital. Digital out of home advertising, or DOOH, maximizes creativity and location possibilities. It’s not limited to roadside ads or furniture; it can be on a screen in a gym, elevator, airport, taxi, you name it. In addition, the power of online data allows marketers to tailor DOOH campaigns according to consumers’ location, time of day, weather, or other factors.

Brands are overwhelming their audience with online ads, […] as marketers, we have to think of smarter ways to deliver our messages.
Michael Lieberman

“Certainly, over the last 10 years, the proliferation of OOH formats and the overall volume and capability set of digital screens has evolved,” shared Michael Lieberman, Co-CEO, Kinetic, North America. “I am most excited about how we have evolved our understanding of OOH’s value in the media mix. Namely, our ability to measure and derive the true impact of OOH on business objectives and ROI is what will set OOH on its next phase of growth.”

In short, OOH isn’t static anymore. As Jill Brooks explained, “today OOH advertising has evolved with new dynamic digital assets. Thus, messages are more interactive and engaging for their target audience. Additionally, today’s OOH also offers new ways to measure the ROI of each campaign.” Consequently, technology is allowing brands to create more effective efforts overall. “Technology gives us better abilities to serve up unique creative based on what we know about the people who are exposed to OOH,” pointed out Leonor Palao.

OppenheimerFunds (with partner Captivate) placed ads on elevator screens, inside buildings where target consumers worked

 

How Does OOH Connect to Online Marketing?

out of home advertising expert
Latcom’s Jill Brooks

Marketers have started to realize the possibilities of integrating digital marketing with out of home advertising. More specifically, synergies with mobile marketing favor greater engagement with brands. “Studies have shown that when someone sees a billboard they are more likely to recognize the brand and click on a mobile ad,” said Jill Brooks. “We let the target get familiar with the brand. We awaken their curiosity so that when they see it on their phone or smart device, they will want to know more.”

As brands leave other more traditional advertising media and shift their investments to an unavoidable and measurable vehicle, OOH will inevitably play a more important role.

OOH and Mobile Working as One

“Social media and OOH also have a symbiotic relationship,” added Vanessa Hartley. “When social components are integrated with OOH campaigns, reach is amplified. Congruently, OOH is the most socially shared media format.” To that effect, Michael Lieberman pointed out that incorporating OOH into a campaign boosts pretty much any other channel. “Incorporating OOH into a campaign boosts the ROI of other channels,” he declared. “With mobile already established as the first screen for most consumer behaviors (and 5G on the way), OOH will continue to prove its value in driving mobile-based business outcomes such as downloads and m-commerce, while boosting results for related mobile activities such as search, social engagement and display/video CTR.”

out of home advertising and mobile QR codeWhen discussing her example of the ads in elevator screens, Leonor Palao also mentioned the opportunity to make synergy with the building’s wifi. “We could retarget wifi users who’d seen the ad by their IP address,” she explained. “Once familiar with their location, we hit them with a higher frequency. We hoped that the consumer would get familiar with the brand and recognize the message.”

 

Is OOH for Everybody? Which Categories Can Benefit the Most?

When we asked our experts about this, we received opposed opinions. Jill Brooks believes that OOH is a good idea for all categories. “As brands leave other traditional media and shift their investments to an unavoidable and measurable vehicle, OOH will inevitably play a more important role,” she told Portada.

Michael Lieberman, on the other hand, thinks that there’s one category that gets the value out of out of home advertising more than the rest. “Through OOH, entertainment really instigates behavior change,” he said. “Entertainment brands use OOH as a way to generate engagement on social media by implementing influencer strategies. Stars post photos of their OOH campaigns on their own social channels. Thus they are amplifying the reach and effectiveness of the OOH campaign.”

Finally, Leonor Palao considers that it’s not about categories, but rather about the message you are trying to deliver. “OOH exposure is a very quick lead. It needs to be a simple message,” she commented. “OOH is an excellent channel for brands that are investing in a brand campaign. Or for brands that have a continuous message that they’re trying to build among a specific audience. Depending on the message that you want to deliver, OOH should be part of your media mix but at a high level.

 

What’s in Store for Out of Home Advertising?

According to the OAAA, Q4 2018 was the strongest quarter in 10 years for OOH. Strongest Quarter in 10 Years for OOH.  Digitization is leading the growth for total OOH, and digital OOH represented 29% of the total in 2018. Of the top 100 OOH advertisers in 2018, one-quarter were from the technology sector. Apple assumed the top position for the first time.

As the OAAA explains, the success of OOH is largely due to innovation in technology and tools (digital units, audience measurement), plus more efficient sales and marketing efforts. OOH has also been largely immune from the decline in reach and/or consumption that affects television, print, radio and even digital display media to various degrees, especially among younger audiences. Magna forecasts steady growth through 2023.

 

What: We talked to Solange Curutchet, General Manager at Pulpo, about her career in content and media, the importance of content monetization, and her predictions for the future.
Why it matters: Content is becoming more and more important each day. As Curutchet explains, there should be an integrated understanding of how marketing, sales, and content are intertwined in digital in order to have an effective monetization strategy.

 

Solange Curutchet Discusses Content Monetization
Pulpo’s General Manager Solange Curutchet

Solange Curutchet forged her career learning about content monetization when digital was just starting to acquire the relevance it has today. Before becoming Pulpo’s General Manager, she cleared/ a rough path to realize how profoundly intertwined web content is with sales and marketing. Simply put, everything is connected in digital. If you see an ad somewhere, you can be sure there’s a whole machinery of reasons why it’s there.

We sat down with Curutchet to discuss the evolution of content, reaching multicultural audiences, and effective content monetization.

 

 

From Traditional to Digital Media

Content marketing isn’t only about selling ads. In 1999, when she joined Univision Interactive Media, Curutchet learned that all the bricks of the house need to be well-structured. “In these early publisher-advertiser days, we really started from zero,” shared Curutchet. “Nobody knew what creating content for digital entailed. We learned together. There wasn’t a playbook that neatly laid out these rules.” It was a process, but she learned that she needed to package content according to each advertiser’s needs without “compromising its integrity“.

“We had to offer content in a way that the advertisers could showcase their brands while not diluting an online presence”, says Curutchet. The trick was finding suitable matches for both parties, not forcing either to fit with the other. Content and ads needed to be symbiotic. “In traditional media, you had a page marked with an X where the ad would go and that’s it. Now in digital, you really need to evaluate the brand and what it’s communicating to see where it fits,” she explained. “These principles of co-existing content and advertisements are still valid today.”

The trick is finding suitable matches for both parties, not forcing either to fit with the other.

 

The Need to Understand Content Monetization

Solange says one of the most frequent mistakes when launching content verticals isputting someone in charge that has deep subject matter expertise in a particular content theme but lacks a holistic knowledge of how content + ads need to co-exist.” “If we’re going to launch content property”, pointed out Curutchet, “then you assign someone that comes from content a hundred percent, right? So what happens is that you have a significant gap between producing content and how to monetize that property. We see this happening all the time. There’s great intention to produce valuable content but there’s no clear vision on content monetization.”

 

Social Media Ties Everything Together

Social media plays an important role in closing the loop on this strategy. Today, social media plays an important role in creating the emotional connection of your brand to content, to your advertisement. It’s not either or, it’s both. Social media is a much needed emotional value component that ties everything together.

Another tricky aspect, she said, is that people tend to believe that only articles can be called “content”. In fact, digital platforms allow consumers to access and share much more than just articles. “In digital, you can participate in what you’re reading and really give your opinion.” You can weave many elements into a site to engage with the user at higher levels and increase your sponsorship opportunities. “Finance and health sites do this very well,” illustrated Solange. “They use consumers’ input to drive useful wizards, calculators and other interactive features.”

 

 

 

Pulpo: the Rebirth of a Company

Taking from these learnings and from the concept of real engagement as the true motor of marketing, Pulpo has gone through a full rebranding. The goal is to create “its own environment of verticals for advertisers to talk to our audience and share their brand”, according to Curutchet. “The idea is to create products around them. A vertical where you sell customizable inventory, influencers interacting with audiences and advertisers, and a big data strategy around it. A lot of newsletters, personalization, and sharing products from our advertisers”, to mention just a few.

Hispanic culture goes way beyond speaking Spanish or not, it’s in their veins.

 

Focus on a Cultural Dimension, Reach Their Hearts

As these strategies fall into place, what are the most important cultural nuances Pulpo will tackle with this firm set of structures? One of Pulpo’s most important findings is that it’s all about talking to consumers in their language, and that doesn’t necessarily mean Spanish. “With U.S. Hispanics it’s more a cultural thing than a question of language. [Hispanic culture] goes way beyond speaking Spanish or not, it’s in their veins. […] The priority used to be having Spanish-language sites, which is still our main focus, but not only Spanish generates engagement with U.S. Hispanics”, says Curutchet.

So, all content must be focused on reaching them at a personal, more intimate cultural dimension. And in order to create intimate content, it’s necessary to delve deep into the customer’s heart. For Pulpo, the ideal partner is the one who fosters reciprocal participation with the audiences. “It’s not the one that has the best name for Latam, it’s the one that has the best engagement for our U.S. Hispanics reach, regardless of whether it’s a small company or group”, says Curutchet. “Content will become more and more important to reach audiences. […] Getting to the audiences with the right environment, the right content and the right language is key today”.

 

How to Face the Future?

So, what should brands do, and where is the future taking us? How will the reborn Pulpo address the new ways in which audiences engage and consume? For Solange, the market is getting better at understanding all these new behaviors, but brands really need to engage with their audience in a deep, meaningful way. “Content will become more and more important to reach audiences,” she declared.

Pulpo’s strategy is not only about making informed decisions based on hard data pointing to the direction of the market. The company listens to the clues consumers have to offer and pay attention to their needs and desires. “When you touch their soul they react differently”, says Curutchet. “Reaching them is not the problem, the challenge is how you get to them. Engage them in a way that you end up touching their hearts.”

 

Time to Discuss Diversity

According to ANA Educational Foundation’s research, the marketing industry’s efforts to recruit a more diverse workforce are still not enough, as the overwhelming majority of the talent is still predominantly white. The report explores, among other factors, the documented benefits of recruiting and retaining diverse talent. Among others:  higher performance standards, better team dynamics, more organizational agility, and, better business results overall.

And it’s the same when we think about the percentage of women in leadership positions. “We tend to focus on CEO positions and are alarmed about the fact that there are only 24 Women CEO’s within 2018 Fortunes top 500 companies,” said Mebrulin Francisco, Managing Partner, Director Marketing Analytics, Multicultural at GroupM, in an article that looks more closely at this issue. “But we also need to look a couple of steps lower in the corporate ladder and address the fact that women’s progress is stalling at lower levels of a company’s pipeline.” For any woman looking to break with conventions, the numbers on equality dabble on the realm of disturbing. Not just for high-management levels but onset from the very first step of the ladder as well. And the numbers get worse when we look at the presence of Hispanic or African-American women in the talent pool.

Start from little, build your personality, and don’t be afraid to speak your mind.

 

Speak Your Mind, No Matter Who You Are

Solange knows first hand what it’s like to speak your mind “in a room with 20 people that are mainly men.” She said she was probably not the best example, as she has never been afraid of saying what she thinks. But not every girl knows that they have the right to do so. That’s why she has taught her two daughters to fight for what they believe. “One of the things is to start from a young age, build your personality and don’t be afraid to speak your mind,” she suggested. “Always do it with respect, but whatever you need to say, just say it, don’t be afraid to express it.”

Just as she encourages her daughters to speak their minds, Solange firmly believes that knowledge is more important than from whom it comes from. And this is the philosophy that she brings to work every day. If you have an opinion and you have a way of doing things better, it’s welcome. “Everyone here can share his or her ideas,” she told Portada. “Titles are not important, really. I can have people that have worked here for six years and people that started two days ago in the same meeting and we all discuss how to improve things.” In fact, she concluded, “the moment they start being afraid of expressing their opinion, that’s when we stop growing.”

 

Portada is glad to announce Jose Bello has been appointed as Director, Multicultural and Latam at Omnicom’s Icon International Inc. Congratulations, Jose!

 

 

After three years as Senior Director, Total Market at Hearts & Science, long-time Portada collaborator Jose Bello is moving to another Omnicom company: ICON International Inc. ICON helps clients recover value from their underperforming assets in exchange of media. All media purchases made through ICON are at clients’ benchmark pricing and quality; thus, Jose’s mission will be to identify opportunities for clients to consider corporate barter as an efficient way to fund their media investments in multicultural and in LATAM.

Jose is an accomplished veteran in the industry with more than 25 years of experience in marketing, advertising, and media. At Hearts & Science he led the media team in charge of multicultural work for P&G, including the multi-awarded campaign “The Talk”— an effort against racial bias that received 8 Lion Cannes and a Grand Prix, Effies, Reggies, Festival of Media awards, 4A’s, and a TV Academy Emmy Gold Award for Outstanding Commercial in 2018. Prior to Hearts, he was Managing Partner at Mediacom New York where he worked with clients such as Anheuser Busch, MARS, Volkswagen, Subway, Revlon, and Dell, among others. Jose also spent 6 years at Starcom on different roles in Miami, Latam, and a two-year assignment in Russia to manage the Coca-Cola and Novartis accounts.

On his new role at ICON International, Jose will be based out of the newly-opened satellite office in Fort Lauderdale. We wish him good luck in his new endeavors at ICON!

 

We are excited to announce that Vanessa E. Hartley, Group Director at Hearts & Science is joining the Portada Agency Star Committee, one of the six units of Portada’s Council System. The Council System next in-person meeting will be at Portada Los Angeles on March 14 in Los Angeles’ Loews Hotel.

Vanessa Hartley is an 18-year veteran of out-of-home media and has been member of the Omnicom Family since 2005. Her account experience includes QSRs, packaged goods, technology, financial services, entertainment and telecommunications.

She started with Outdoor Media Group, an Investment Group for Omnicom, in Chicago working on McDonalds, H&R Block, Intel and Pepsico Brands. Then, she moved back to her home city of New York where she ran the HBO business for six years. Now a Group Director at Hearts & Sciences, she manages the OOH Investment Group for all lines of business for AT&T.

When she is not dedicating her time to all things AT&T; she loves food, traveling anywhere, binging anything on Netflix, quality time with friends/family and watching or playing sports. Her happiest places are on a yoga mat or on the slopes.

Welcome, Vanessa, to the Portada Council System!

Omnicom’s Hearts & Science is the media AOR for a majority of P&G brands since April last year. Multicultural marketing and media buying are substantial and Hearts & Science is also responsible for ethnic scale programs such as My Black is Beautiful and Orgullosa. Portada interwiews Michael Roca, Associate Director of Total Market Planning at Hearts & Science. Roca shares his views on multicultural marketing under Trump and how Hearts & Science leads P&Gs larger multicultural marketing efforts, including its programmatic and content marketing efforts.

handsHearts & Science responsibilities for P&G span categories such as Fabric (Gain, Tide), Hair (Pantene, Head & Shoulders) and Personal Health (Pepto-Bismol, Vicks). One key question for multicultural marketers, is whether the “total market approach” is still the right way of marketing to multicultural audiences, particularly taking into account  president Trump’s recent electoral victory. Michael Roca, Associate Director of Total Market Planning at Hearts & Science,  notes that he unfortunately, can’t comment on politics. However, he adds that “the definition of a Total Market Strategy continues to be very fluid.  With multicultural audiences accounting for nearly 40% of the U.S. population, it’s difficult to support a “one-size-fits-all” communications strategy.  Especially for categories and brands in which multicultural represents a significant share of revenue.  Given their twin engines of population growth and buying power, the solid fact is that multicultural consumers are fueling the growth for any category.  In terms of communication, marketers will always achieve “net reach” amongst multicultural audiences, however if they are not addressing cultural nuances across media and messaging, that “reach” will never be effective.  Reach is important, but reach with resonance is critical.”

It’s difficult to support a “one-size-fits-all” communications strategy.  Especially for categories and brands in which multicultural represent a significant share of revenue.

Multicultural is Key for billion dollar P&G brands

According to Roca, particularly the very large P&G brands like Pantene, Crest and Tide are important when it comes to multicultural marketing: “Most P&G brands understand the critical nature in reaching multicultural audiences.  However, it’s the billion dollar brands such as Pantene, Crest and Tide that have made the biggest strides in engaging with these audiences,” Roca adds.

If marketers are not addressing cultural nuances across media and messaging, “reach” will never be effective.  Reach is important, but reach with resonance is critical.” .

P&G’s Content Marketing Solutions…

Hearts & Science is also responsible for ethnic scale programs such as My Black is Beautiful and Orgullosa.  These platforms were launched by P&G to further celebrate and empower both African-American and Hispanic women.  According to Roca, “content marketing is very intriguing to P&G in terms of reaching and engaging with multicultural audiences.  We have an internal division called Content Collective who is responsible for keeping their finger on the pulse of new and relevant content opportunities. For multiculturals, content marketing solves for the lack of relevant content in the market as well as a solution to tailoring a brands message with multicultural insights and experiences as the main drivers.”

Content marketing solves for the lack of relevant content in the market.

…and the Value of the Artisan Approach.

Asked how important a more “artisan approach” is to Hearts & Science /P&G (i.e. programs that are not traded through machines like branded integrations and non programmatic buys), Roca notes that “similar to content marketing, any opportunity that can further engage an audience outside of spots, dots and banners will always be of interest.”  “As stated before, reach is important, but touch points such as artisan programs are critical in providing resonance that allows for a brand to establish an emotional connection, ” Roca concludes.

A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clients are moving into the Hispanic market and/or targeting Hispanic consumers right now.

    • T-Mobile
      U.S. number-four operator T-Mobile USA launched the GoSmart prepaid mobile brand  nationwide.  The launch signals a new  entrant into the nationwide prepaid space.  The Hispanic population is an  important customer in the prepaid space.  The  GoSmart offering is now available at more than 3,000 wireless reseller  stores around the country.   T-Mobile has been trialing the service since  December and has signed up “tens of thousands” of customers. “It’s beat our  projections pretty handily,” Doug Chartier, senior vice president of  marketing for GoSmart, told Reuters.
    • Remax
      Remax HispanicReal estate franchisor Re/Max will  continue its “For All the Things That Move You” national ad campaign in 2013 using an integrated strategy that includes network and cable television, radio, print, digital and social media. A TV ad campaign that debuts today features three  30-second ads, two 15-second spots and one Spanish language ad that will air throughout the U.S. Creative agency R&R Partners of Las Vegas and media buying agency Carat will help it “maintain a consistent presence throughout the year” with “year-round visibility.” The franchisor says it intends to maintain its leading national television “share of voice” among real estate companies, which the company claims to have held on to since 2002. “The TV spots capture the individual style of consumers from  every walk of life, and convey the pride and honor felt by Re/Max agents  who help consumers find a house they can call their home,” said Mike Ryan, Re/Max’s executive vice president of global communications and branding, in a statement.
    • Boeringer Ingelheim
      Republica, a cross-cultural advertising, digital and communications agency, announced that it has been selected by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceutical Inc. (BIPI) to serve as the pharmaceutical company’s first cross-cultural advertising agency of record, executing marketing communications strategy for the company in the U.S. Republica will partner with BIPI, the nation’s fastest-growing pharmaceutical company, to develop and execute a total market strategy that will tap into multiple divisions of the agency including research, advertising, media, branding, public relations, social media, community relations and promotions.”We’re proud to partner with Republica, one of the fastest-growing agencies representing the fastest-growing consumer segment in America,” said Christopher Kaplan, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceutical Inc.  The multi-phase campaign will focus on introducing and raising awareness for BI and several of its brand portfolios within America’s multicultural markets, with an initial effort focused on the U.S. Hispanic community. The first initiative led by the agency is expected to launch in mid 2013.
    • Northgate Gonzalez
      The Anaheim, Calif.-based Northgate Gonzalez Markets chain currently includes 37 stores in Orange, Los Angeles and San Diego counties, and the company plans to open three to five new stores a year, according to a report by KPBS.The newer Northgate Gonzalez locations have bulk food sections, and a wide selection of prepared foods like carnitas, ceviches, salsas and aguas frescas. TV screens in the meat department show soccer games and Mexican talk shows, KPBS reported.Many of the family-owned chain’s stores are in underserved neighborhoods. That strategy drew the attention of Michelle Obama last year. She spoke at a Northgate Gonzalez store in Los Angeles to promote a new California loan fund aimed at encouraging supermarkets to open in areas with little access to fresh food. Northgate Gonzalez was the first recipient of loans from the California FreshWorks Fund , receiving $20 million, the broadcast outlet said.
    • Post Foods
      Honey Bunches HispanicPost Food’s Honey Bunches of Oats is, for the second straight year, partnering with Univision Communications Inc in a national music-driven multimedia campaign that will launch this February. The lynchpin of the culturally relevant 360-degree promotional campaign will be “El Tour Positivo” — a multi-city Honey Bunches of Oats branded concert series taking place in key markets throughout the U.S. that will be produced by Univision, along with branded original content that will air concurrently on Univision Network, UniMás and Galavisión and promoted on Univision Radio in each market. Each concert will be featuring some of the top Latin artists in the industry.
    • Million Hearts
      A new educational resource to help Hispanics take control of their heart health is available from Million Hearts, a national public-private partnership that works to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.”Cardiovascular disease is the leading killer in every racial and ethnic group in America, and Million Hearts is committed to ensuring that everyone understands their risk,” said Janet Wright , M.D., executive director of Million Hearts.  “These new resources will help Spanish-speaking Americans calculate their risk and, more importantly, take steps to reduce it. The new educational resources include the Four Steps for Heart Health fact sheet, an illustrated booklet that includes multi-generational advice and The Million Hearts website En Espanol ttp://espanol.millionhearts.hhs.gov.
    • Got Milk-California Milk Processor Board
      The California Milk Processor Board has launched an advertising campaign urging parents to make an evening ritual out of warm cupfuls of milk. The campaign started last week with Spanish-language spots on Univision and will spread in the spring to English speakers.The board, based in San Clemente, Orange County, promotes the top-grossing farm product from the Northern San Joaquin Valley and the state overall.The board has targeted Latinos in the past with ads describing how milk can enhance dental health and build strong muscles, among other things. The new campaign will have radio and online elements along with TV.

 

GET ALL THE LEADS YOU NEED WITH PORTADA’S INTERACTIVE DIRECTORY OF CORPORATE MARKETERS AND MEDIA BUYERS! For detailed contact information on Hispanic Corporate Marketers at these companies and the decision makers at their Advertising Agencies, get access to Portada’s Interactive Directory of Corporate Marketers and Agencies targeting Hispanics of more than 3,000 Leading Agency and Marketing/Advertising Directors who are targeting Hispanics. (Downloadable into an Excel Spreadsheet for seamless integration into your own database!). If you are a Subscriber to the Directory login and access the Directory.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), Hispanics are 36% less likely than non-Hispanics to have their heart conditions properly controlled. As a result, pharmaceutical giant Merck/Schering-Plough is launching a campaign to raise awareness for their anti-cholesterol drug Vitorin.

And according to the data, Hispanics want this information in Spanish. According to the AHA:

.79% of Hispanics  would like to see more pharmaceutical ads on Spanish-language television.

.70% say that pharmaceutical ads would be more helpful in Spanish than English.

.69% prefer to speak Spanish when consulting with their doctor.

An educational, grassroots public relations effort in partnership with Hispanic community organizations will complement the campaign to raise awareness about where cholesterol comes from, food and family health history.  Additionally, on-line Spanish-language resources, including www.vytorin.com/español and phones staffed with Spanish-speaking representatives, are available.

The direct-to-consumer campaign will also feature full page print advertisements.

1)      The Product:

Covenant House is the largest privately-funded childcare agency in the United States providing shelter and service to homeless and runaway youth. It was incorporated in New York City in 1972 and has since expanded to many cities in the U.S.A. including Houston, L.A., Philadelphia, Newark and Atlanta. The organization has also expanded into Latin America with initiatives in Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico and Nicaragua.

2)      The Mail Piece:

The mailing was sent out in a standard envelope (4.12” x 9.50”), with “Importante: Segundo Aviso (Important: Second Notice)” emblazoned on the front. It served as a follow-up to the original mailing which was sent three weeks earlier. The initial solicitations usually contain some sort of small gift from Covenant House, such as a keychain, magnet, or bookmark.

The letter is directed at the recipient, and is meant to be a direct communication from Sister Patricia A. Cruise, president of Covenant House. It is written in the first person and is entirely in Spanish. It begins by saying that since Covenant House has not heard from the recipient following the initial mail piece, they thought the best thing to do would be to send a “recordatorio,” or reminder. It goes on to say, “Perhaps I am worrying too much and that your response is on the way. I hope that is the case.”

A full two pages long, the letter goes on to explain Covenant House’s policy of never refusing refuge and sustenance to a child in need.

The donor form itself contains the following (translated) message: “Thousands of helpless children will come to our doors this year in search of food, clothing, and a safe place to sleep. Will you help us help them?” Underneath, there are a variety of suggested donations with blank spaces next to them for the donor to fill in. The donations range from $12 to $100, with a blank space marked “other” where the donor can elect their own amount.


       3) The Response:

While Covenant House does not discuss specific response rates of their campaigns, vice president of direct response Joan Smyth Dengler stressed the importance of integrated campaigns with Hallie Mummert of Target Marketing in October of 2006. She said that Covenant House mails continuously and has found that engaging the target across platforms has yielded the best response. For instance, after a mailing is sent out, Covenant House will attempt to reach the recipient by telephone or email. Ms. Dengler said that the customers that they engage through multiple channels are the ones that are ultimately of most value.


NOTE: The Direct Mail promotions in this article were tracked by ParadyszMatera (www.paradyszmatera.com) through its Market Relevance Promotion Library. ParadyszMatera is a media brokerage services company specializing in Direct Mail, Online Marketing and Creative, Print and Alternative Media. Additional research and interviews were conducted by Portada.

What: Portada got the chance to talk to Rishad Tobaccowala and ask him about key trends shaping the marketing technology landscape.
Why it matters: Tobaccowala, Chief Growth Officer at Publicis, has decades of experience in strategy and growth innovation. He has been recognized by numerous institutions as a visionary with fruitful ideas for the future of business and marketing.

 

This article was originally published in August 2018, after Rishad Tobaccowala’s master talk titled ‘How to remain relevant and grow in transformative times’, organized by Publicis Media Mexico. 

 

Rishad Tobaccowala, Chief Growth Officer with 36 years of experience at Publicis Media Groupe, has been called by many as a visionary, which makes sense if we consider that his main area of focus is the future. Technology is advancing at an unforeseen speed, and Tobaccowala’s insights about how to be prepared for the future leave no doubt about why he has been recognized as one of the five Marketing Innovators by Time magazine.

For everyone involved in business and marketing, whether it’s brands, media or press, it’s important to think about strategy. For Rishad Tobaccowala, explaining what strategy means isn’t that difficult. “You only have to think about three words,” he explained. “Future, Competitive, Advantage. You have to think about the future, about your competitors, and about what advantage your business brings when faced with them.” That sounds simple enough, but how will we know in what direction to go? “You can’t succeed if you go left while the rest of the world goes right,” he added. Therefore, he proceeded to explain which three global trends are already shaping the future.

Three trends are shaping the whole world, and marketing isn’t exempt…

… Quite the contrary, marketing is one of the disciplines that will become increasingly important as these three trends shape the future, according to the Publicis executive. These are unstoppable trends that will affect everyone, he says, for better or for worse: 1) Globalization. It used to be a western idea, but it is now a global phenomenon. 2) Demographics. With the growth of Asian, African, and Latin American populations, the future is more and more diverse. 3) Technology. It’s been around since the discovery of fire, but the last decades have seen an acceleration that forces us to adapt as quickly as possible before it’s time to adapt again. Thus, explained Tobaccowala, every new idea needs to be aligned with globalization, diversity, and new technologies, or else, it is destined to fail from the very start.

The bond between technology and marketing

So far, there have been two key moments in which technology has changed forever the marketing technology landscape, asserted Tobaccowala. The first one occurred in 1995, with the start of the World Wide Web and the first connected age. “All of a sudden you could look for products, brands, and services online,” he explained. Then, in 2007, Facebook went from .edu to .com, and the second connected era, one of social networks and mobile networks, exploded. Eleven years later, everyone has at least one smartphone with more computing power than the first space shuttle.

You’re no longer marketing to people or consumers, but to gods.

So, how do these advancements affect the marketing technology landscape and ways to do marketing? For Tobaccowala, the first thing is accepting that every consumer now has god-like power on the palm of their hand. “I always say to my clients, ‘You’re no longer marketing to people or consumers, but to gods. How are we going to satisfy gods?” he asked rhetorically.

“Clients can no longer say something like ‘We’re going to empower customers’ because they already are empowered. All companies are having major problems on this second connected age because we think consumers are waiting for us, big mistake.” Therefore, everyone involved in marketing needs to make sure to talk to real consumers, who are now more similar to gods than ever, and stop believing in some made-up fantasy about what people want.

What should we do about it?

Rishad Tobaccowala declares that as technology keeps advancing and we move towards the third connected age (the one of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning), marketing will be more important than ever because it is the discipline that tries to understand and meet consumers’ requirements through a combination of art and science.

“When you go into a boardroom, you don’t see a CMO, you see a CEO, a CFO… But it’s time for marketing to take over the companies, or the consumer will run away,” he asserts. “Today, we need to stop being dollar-obsessed and become people-obsessed. We have to eliminate internal friction and silos, be ready to outsource instead of insourcing. In the era of networks, networks are what we need.” Moreover, he says, we should be ready to look differently at certain things that we think we know, like the way brands are built and how businesses are scaled.

The first thing I do when any client is building a brand for the first time is I use the word SAVE. S = For whom are you a solution? A = How are you giving people access to new opportunities? V = What value do you bring? E = Why is someone’s experience better because of you? So I ask, ‘How are you going to SAVE someone?’

“The most important thing I’ve learned,” said Tobaccowala. “Is that you can’t control anything but yourself, even if you’re senior. No one has enough data to really know anything, the most we can aspire to is to become data-driven storytellers.” But perhaps even more important is the notion that, even though we don’t always want things to change, we can’t expect the future to be static, and in order for everything to stay the same, we are the ones who need to change.

Some recommendations to remain relevant

 

Portada: What is the role of the marketing teams of the future? How can CMO’s predict what’s coming and be ready for change?

R.T.: Some parts of the future are easier to predict than others. I’ve always believed that marketing is becoming more important, and therefore CMO’s need to be taken more importantly. Companies are not paying enough attention to their marketing teams, and it’s becoming more important that they do. And why do they not pay enough attention to marketing teams? Because marketing didn’t use to be as important as it is today. Marketing is a combination of art and science, sometimes in a similar way to writing. You train yourself to be a writer, but there’s an art to writing a story. Marketers have become very comfortable with numbers, they have tended to be less comfortable with emotion, but the future is not only about spreadsheets, it’s also about the story.

There are differences that have to do with things you can’t count. […] That’s what marketing is about. That’s actually what life is about.

It’s not always about the numbers

It’s very important that marketers not only let the numbers make the decision. One thing I advise our clients is they should be comfortable talking about things they’re uncomfortable with. Business has an emotion to it, not everything is defined. Blaise Pascal wrote, ‘We choose with our hearts and we use numbers to justify what we just did.’ Luxury brands are growing more than any other category right now, but the reality is that a Mercedez Benz won’t take you to a place faster or better than a very cheap Nissan or Toyota. The difference in performance is very low, but there are other differences that have to do with things that you can’t count: it’s about design, status, feeling. That’s what marketing is about. That’s actually what life is about.

Portada: What is the best way for marketers to connect with the emotion part of the industry?

R.T.: The biggest way I think marketers can learn (besides looking up everything you don’t know) is to keep in mind the customer of your client, to observe people. And one of the ways to observe how people are changing is by spending a lot of time with art and culture. When someone asks ‘How can I understand people better?’ I sometimes say ‘Why don’t you read Madame Bovary? Or Don Quixote?’ These are actually about people.

When someone asks ‘How can I be an entrepreneur?’ I suggest them to look at what artists do, whether writers or painters. Every time you get up in the morning and you have to write a story, what do you have? A blank sheet of paper, and you have to invent something! Marketing is about people and business. We should be proud that we are working in something that is art and science, and not run away from the fact that it is both.

Portada: You mentioned in your presentation that the future is about going with inevitable diversity. Do you think there is a way for brands to adopt attributes that get them closer to multicultural audiences?

R.T: There are four different levels of diversity:

1) Your communication should reflect that you recognize culture. The first thing is being aware of cultural differences. Speak to that cultural difference. The way that you frame your brand should resonate with the reality of that particular culture.

2) Diversity is important within your company. Things like the failed Pepsi ad happen when there is no one there to see it. Even if you are very smart, if you try to market, say, in Mexico, but there isn’t even one person with Mexican heritage in your group, you’d probably come up with something very stupid.

3) People are more human than they are different. There are people that say ‘I need to create a message that is just for African-Americans’. If your product or service isn’t different and you’re only selling a human message, why do you try to make it a totally different story? Part of diversity is understanding that sometimes humanity is more common than differences are different.

My worry is a world in which people stop saying things for fear of getting into trouble.

4) People are naturally diverse and they have diversity of talent, but they also have diversity of thinking. It means someone should be able to tell you that they disagree with you, and you should be not thinking that it’s because they are anti-something, they can be just anti-your-thinking. My worry is a world in which people stop saying things for fear of getting into trouble. Diversity of thinking is the most important one of all, and one of the ways of getting better at it is traveling. My belief is that the ultimate diversity is the diversity of mindsets; part of it is because of your background, part of it comes from culture, but sometimes you can have men and women from different cultures and of different colors, and everyone thinks the same.

Portada: You also mentioned the need for companies to consider the scale of influence, what would you recommend to brands that are investing in influencer marketing? 

R.T.: It’s a matter of authenticity and purpose. When you get an influencer, the influencer works if ideally, they are talking about a product or service that they already used and liked before you bid them to say they like it. The catch is that when you can buy influencers, it backfires.

A lot of influencers take money from a brand that they don’t use or care about. The other thing that happens is that now everyone is an influencer, which means that no one is an influencer. Kylie Jenner’s products work because she’s selling something she really uses. Some people charge thousands of dollars to send an Instagram post, but it doesn’t work if it’s not authentic and purpose-driven. At least in a commercial, it’s clear that it’s a commercial, but in this case, people just think that you sold yourself out.

AI and the marketing technology landscape

Portada: We’re entering the era of Artificial Intelligence. If marketing is a combination of art and science, how will we not lose the art part, the human touch, as machines start to take over?

R.T.: I didn’t talk about it today, but I’ve written about it on my blog. The third connected age, which has just begun, is composed of three things. The first connected age was a page connecting to other pages; the second one was people connecting to people, either through mobile or social. The third connected age means three things: data connecting to data, which is what AI is; things connecting to things, which is the Internet of Things; and new ways of telling stories, which is voice-based technology, augmented reality, virtual reality, and mixed reality.

This is what will happen: first, because of AI, certain things that machines can do better will be done by machines, but people plus machines have been found to be better than machines in most cases. There are certain things that machines can do, but when things are changing all the time, people can think and compute the change on the machine that computes it. Second, these technologies allow us to tell stories in different ways.

More people are connecting because of AI, that allows things like google translate. We can also tell stories through Alexa and things like that. And another thing that it’s in its early days is, if you go to the NYT website (other websites have it), you’ll find a Virtual Reality section where you can learn about a refugee camp and actually explore it. You start to believe you are in there, you feel empathy. When people started to see that, they started to contribute. Part of this technology will go very math-oriented, but also part of it will provide ways to connect.

I tell stories because I do things that machines cannot do. […]Machines are getting more accurate, and also faster. The human side of you is going to be the differentiating side.

Portada: How will consumers in this new marketing technology landscape be sure brands are connecting with them in a human way?

R.T.: The human touch will become the difference. What can be automated will be automated. I have an undergraduate degree in advanced mathematics and an MBA from one of the most quantitative schools in the world (University of Chicago), but I do as little as I can with numbers. I tell stories because I do things that machines cannot do. When someone tells me ‘The spreadsheet told me to do this’, I say ‘I hope you get a job soon’, because if you tell me what the spreadsheet says, ‘What is your value? Why do you have a job?’ Not only blue-collar jobs will be automated, but also some white-collar jobs. Machines are getting more accurate, and also faster. The human side of you is going to be the differentiating side.

 

 

 

 

What: Members of Portada’s Agency Star Committee discuss how multicultural marketing can make “total market” campaigns more effective. In spite of the increasing awareness of the opportunities offered by multicultural marketing, brands could understand better how it connects to more universal audiences.
Why it matters: José Bello (Total Market, Senior Director, Hearts & Science), Dana Bonkowski (SVP, Multicultural Lead, Starcom), Darcy Bowe (SVP, Media Director, Starcom USA), Cynthia Dickson, David Queamante (SVP, Client Business Partner, UM Worldwide), and Jessica Román (VP, Media Director, Publicis Media) are agency executives with decades of experience in marketing and advertising. Their insights shed valuable light on how to approach multicultural marketing in complicated times as these.

multicultural marketing embraces diversity
Image by Rawpixel.com

Multicultural Marketing: A Growing Audience

As diversity keeps increasing, brands realize that establishing real connections with multicultural consumers is no longer an option, but a must. The numbers are clear: in the U.S., minority buying power is growing more quickly than the white consumer market. By 2060, the white population in America will constitute 44% of the total population, while 29% will be Hispanics, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Thus, businesses are more aware than before of the importance of tapping into this segment. Although they have more access to data and tools than ever, they still need much more information about best marketing practices for multicultural audiences.

Luckily for brands, agencies can help them understand what to do and avoid to leverage this opportunity. Therefore, Portada invited members of the Agency Star Committee to talk about how multicultural insights can make general market campaigns more effective. Around the table were José Bello (Total Market, Senior Director,Hearts & Science), Dana Bonkowski (SVP, Multicultural Lead, Starcom), Darcy Bowe (SVP, Media Director, Starcom USA), Cynthia Dickson, David Queamante (SVP, Client Business Partner, UM Worldwide), and Jessica Román (VP, Media Director, Publicis Media).

 

For an opportunity to attend thought-provoking sessions and discuss multicultural marketing with these and many more top-notch executives, join us at Portada New York 2019, on September 12 at the Hotel Westin, Times Square. To register, click here.

 

1. How to Start Doing Multicultural Marketing?

First, you have to integrate multicultural marketing into your business. Don’t ask whether there’s an opportunity there, understand what that opportunity is. Starcom’s Dana Bonkowski says: “The business-building power of multicultural America is the strongest it’s ever been. But right now it’s also the hardest time, even with the technologies and tools available. How can we keep our consumers’ attention? How can we keep up with new platforms and devices? And, most importantly, how can we establish an emotional connection with a population that’s more diverse each day?”

multicultural marketing expert Dana Bonkowski
Starcom’s Dana Bonkowski

According to Dana Bonkowski, multicultural should be included from the very first brief. “If the client doesn’t talk about it, make them. Always keep in mind that “multicultural is a group of people. It’s not a tactic or a box; it’s a group of individuals that could possibly solve whatever business challenge you might be faced with.” This is precisely what needs to be done as agencies face the task of making clients understand this chance to grow.

Education (and Introspection)

Multicultural Marketing expert Jessica Roman
Publicis Media’s Jessica Román

“Given the evolving landscape, we may need to take a step back and help clients identify the business opportunity that the multicultural segment represents for them,” explains Publicis Media’s Jessica Román. “For some clients, it means a re-education of this segment. And a reminder of the amazing buying power that it represents, among other things”.

Cynthia Dickson

For Cynthia Dickson, this “re-education” is about remembering when agencies were expected to do everything and the industry wasn’t so specialized in niches. “Something that we did at a full-service agency was focus groups. We really took the time to understand the consumer base,” says Dickinson. “If you don’t take the time nowadays, you don’t really understand what is driving your business“. Furthermore, she suggests heavy introspection work: look into yourself before you look into multicultural marketing. “Start first with your product and your company. Really do the research there. Start at the basics, that’s really going to help your partners understand your business and drive it forward.” 

2. Finding a Strategy Through Data

Hearts & Science’s José Bello

As Hearts & Science’s José Bello explains, some clients still want to test if multicultural would help their brand grow. “That’s not what we should be testing, we already know for sure. All the numbers show that most businesses will grow and be impacted,” he states. However, it’s not that easy to make brands understand where the testing efforts need to go. “We should be testing for the best tactics and the best creatives for specific targets“.

We’re pretty lucky to have quite a bit of data. Then we actually crunch it and tell the story, which is the biggest challenge.

UM’s David Queamante

The next step is crunching the data, but the question is how much data is enough to start. As the wheels of retail move more quickly, getting data is not nearly as difficult as what happens next. “Processing and boiling quite a bit of data down to useful insights can actually be the biggest challenge,” according to UM Worldwide’s David Queamante. “Sometimes you have to start with tactic tests and then refine your strategy as more data comes in”. 

But oftentimes, explains multicultural marketing expert Starcom USA’s Darcy Bowe, you just have to start talking to that audience. “We may not have time to do qualitative research to get deep insights,” she says. “But just by using quantitative research we can tell businesses, ‘Hey, you’re not even talking to some people’”.

3. Multicultural Marketing or Total Market: Segmentation vs. Inclusion

To what extent should brands segment their target? Is there a balance between “total market” and multicultural initiatives? In 2014, AHAA defined the concept of total market as: “A marketing approach which integrates segments to enhance value and growth effectiveness.” Using a universal dominant strategy might’ve been a good idea a few years ago but it simply does not work anymore.

Image by Jcomp

For José Bello, not segmenting is one of worst things that have happened to marketing in the last few years: “I think we all understand the total market philosophy. Unfortunately, it got lost in translation among non-multicultural agency teams and clients, and it hurt us all. Things would be more clear if we went back to multicultural; back to U.S. Hispanics, African-American, etc, instead of the total market bucket,” he reflects.

But perhaps it’s not that the “total market” concept doesn’t work, it’s that we pushed it too far. As Jessica Román asserts, “I don’t believe the ‘total market’ concept will go away. However, the pendulum may have swung too far, and we need to bring it back in order to find that balance. There are times when you have to pause, analyze, and tweak what’s before you. In some cases, you even may have to take a step back, before you can move forward with a truly successful total market approach.”

Trust Your Agency

Segmentation might sound complicated for clients, but agencies know it’s just a matter of understanding your position and addressing consumers as humans. To highlight their nuances, not to segregate their differences. However, agencies are often required to offer more “blatant” displays of divisive targeting, or to generalize campaigns so that one fits all. This puts a strain on the efforts to address specific audiences without singling them out. “Sometimes it’s easy [for clients] to find mistakes that are not grave enough just to make agencies feel they’re not doing a good job,” commented Dana Bonkowski. “But we have tons of research are at our disposal for clients to see. So the sooner we can use data to find the right segmentation strategy and set them off for success, the better.

 If you’re going to focus on the white half of the population, you’re going to miss the mark, period. If you’re not incorporating a multicultural media mix, you’re trying to move the needle but you’re only pushing on half of the audience.

So, trust that your agency knows how much segmentation you actually have to do. As Cynthia Dixon says, “If you don’t understand the basic platform of your product and the marketing position of your brand, it’s really hard for your partners to help you succeed. That’s really what’s gonna help us put your dollar in front of the person that’s gonna purchase your product.”

4. Collaboration Breeds Creativity

Multicultural marketing requires multiple creativity. We should be testing the best creatives, but what’s the best way to produce good creative, to begin with? The answer is a multicultural environment in every brief and every meeting. “Not having multicultural voices and eyes at the table is a miss,” asserts José Bello. “That’s what all clients need to do: never start a meeting without your multicultural eyes present. It’s the client’s prerogative to ask, ‘Where is the multicultural team? Where is my multicultural media person and my multicultural creative person?’ If there isn’t one, don’t start the meeting. Wait for them or postpone until they can be there, because that meeting would yield incomplete results.

Starcom USA’s Darcy Bowe

Once you have a skilled and diverse team, use it to really create a connection with your identified target. “We should be talking to audiences individually because they value our brand and we need to communicate which values the brand can offer them,” says Darcy Bowe. “If we don’t expand our creative capabilities and have more than one message to talk to more than one audience, we’re just trying to shove our message down everyone’s throats because we identify them as a potential customer, but we’re not really talking to them.”

The more individuals we can get comfortable talking about multicultural, the better chance we have to succeed. 

Working Together Towards Inclusion

Ultimately, a team must always be willing to cooperate to reach a common goal. “This collaborative process of wanting to move this marketplace forward should always be at the forefront,” declared Jessica Román. “It shouldn’t be ‘us against them’, we should all be ready to embark on this process together.”

multicultural marketing campaign "toma leche"
Agency Star Committee Members granted Gallegos United the 2018 Portada Award to the Top Multicultural Campaign Driven by Multicultural Insights. By using a strong Hispanic insight, their Toma Leche/El Chavo campaign in California generated total market success.

In short, multicultural insights are essential for success. “The buyer out there is multicultural, there’s no way around it,” declares David Queamante. “If you’re going to focus on the non-ethnic half of the population, you’re going to miss the mark, period. If you’re not incorporating a multicultural media mix, you’re trying to move the needle but you’re only pushing on half of the audience.” 

The main takeaway from the panel are these three concepts: self-evaluation, inclusion, and collaboration. Willingness to go back a few steps in order to go forward. A commitment to creating real connections with real people, the groups of individuals that constitute our market and our society. “This isn’t a secret,” shared Dana Bonkowski. “The one thing we have in common is that we’re nimble. We’re here to serve our clients. There are different paths to success. The key thing is that the more individuals are comfortable talking about multicultural, the better chance we have to succeed.”

Portada NY’s top-notch program includes unique networking and one-on-one knowledge-sharing opportunities with brand marketers who are members of Portada’s Council System. Check out the evolving agenda and get tickets here (early bird expires on July 31!).

Join us for the 13th annual edition of Portada New York where marketing innovators will delve deep into how best to leverage marketing technology and new consumer insights in Multicultural America.

 

On the agenda on September 12

Senior brand executives and thought leaders will explore topics including the below:

  • PASSION POINT FOOD: Food is a key cultural factor to bring Hispanic families together.
  • THE EXPERIENTIAL MARKETING CONUNDRUM: How to measure ROI and transfer best practices between marketing platforms.
  • OMNICHANNEL MARKETING TARGETING LATIN AUDIENCES: A case study.
  • 5G: How increased connectivity will change media and content strategies…
  • HOW MULTI-TOUCH ATTRIBUTION IS EMPOWERING VIDEO
  • HOT TOPIC: Multicultural Audience Measurement- Solution Approaches.

 

Choose Your First-Rate Networking Opportunities

Networking and Knowledge-Sharing OpportunitiesPortada New York will also be the meeting point for Portada’s Council System with the Brand Star Committee, Agency Star Committee and the Sports Marketing Board holding their second 2019 in-person meetings.

In addition, Portada NY offers senior executives from tech, media and marketing firms the opportunity to interact with brand marketers through Portada’s one-on-one meet-up offering.

 

THE LIST OF MARKETERS AVAILABLE FOR ONE-ON-ONE MEETINGS INCLUDES:

Director, Consumer Marketing Sponsorships, ALLSTATE INSURANCE

VP, Field Marketing Sponsorships & Events, CONSTELLATION BRANDS

VP, Head of Sponsorships North America, MASTERCARD

Group Brand Director Tequila, PROXIMO SPIRITS

VP, Marketing, NORTHGATE MARKETS

Head of US Sports Marketing, ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV

Senior Manager, Advertising & Marketing, Multicultural, KIA MOTORS AMERICA

Multicultural Marketing Manager, NESTLE USA

VP, Global Sponsorships, SAP

Senior Brand and Latino Marketing Manager, INTUIT

National Media Manager, JCPENNEY

VP, Hispanic Segment Strategy Leader, WELLS FARGO

Program Leader, Hispanic Marketing & Advertising, DOMINO’S

National Director, Multicultural & Growth Markets, REALOGY

Director, Mexican Imports, ANHEUSER-BUSCH

US Managing Director, CH CAROLINA HERRERA

Digital Marketing Manager – SEM & SEO, SPRINT

Head of Marketing, EL SUPER

Assistant VP, Brand Marketing & Advertising, OPPENHEIMERFUNDS

Senior Brand Manager, DEWARS SCOTCH WHISKY BACARDI

Sr. Director of Global Marketing, PAULA’S CHOICE SKINCARE LLC

Brand Director, HEINEKEN

EVP I CMO, CURACAO

VP, Sponsorships, WELLS FARGO

Manager, CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT

Associate Marketing Manager Multicultural, ALLSTATE INSURANCE

Category Marketing Manager, GRACEKENNEDY LTD

‎SVP Multicultural Lead, STARCOM

SVP Media Director, STARCOM

VP Media Director, PUBLICIS GROUPE

Senior Digital Director, Senior Partner, GROUPM

Multicultural Manager, National Video Investment, GROUPM

SVP Director Multicultural, SPARK FOUNDRY

Director of Performance Media, THE SHIPYARD

Director, HEARTS & SCIENCE

Supervisor Buying, OMD USA

Media Director, SPARK FOUNDRY

VP Media Director, SPARK FOUNDRY

SVP Client Business Partner, UMWW

Director Multicultural, HAWORTH MARKETING + MEDIA

And many more!

 

CLICK HERE TO GET EARLY-BIRD TICKETS! ($599) (EXPIRING THIS 07/31)

 

What: Eugene Santos, Senior Manager, Advertising & Marketing, Multicultural at Kia Motors gave Portada his 4 key insights on automotive brand marketing and how to win Hispanics’ hearts.
Why it matters: It’s no secret that Hispanics love a good car. The auto industry in the U.S. is growing, just as well as the multicultural population in the U.S. According to a Statista timeline, digital advertising spending of the U.S. automotive industry is expected to reach US $15.5 billion this year.

 

Automotive brand marketing is just like marketing in any other industry. In order to get it right, marketers need to approach it with the right set of tools and a great deal of creativity. Add a multicultural component to the mix, and you’ll get a more complicated task. However, if brands take the time to really understand the target and the way consumers relate to the category, they might end up getting a recipe to success.

Eugene Santos

When the 2018 Kia Rio was named one of the top 10 best vehicles for Hispanics by the Hispanic Motor Press Foundation, the company had already been targeting this multicultural segment for years. However, Kia Motors only started selling cars in the U.S. in the 90’s. How does a relatively new brand compete with powerhouses of the automotive industry in order to gain Hispanics’ hearts?

We talked to Eugene Santos, Senior Manager, Advertising & Marketing, Multicultural at Kia Motors to get his key insights about what the brand is planning to engage Hispanic consumers more effectively.

 

We use AI to engage consumers who are in the ‘discovery’ and ‘research phases of their consumer journey.

1. Automotive Brand Marketing 101: Make Sure You Engage Your Consumers

Firstly, says Eugene Santos, you have to ensure you understand how your consumers engage with your content. Like any other brand, Kia uses a mix of KPI’s and likes/dislikes ratios, but it is also aware of the important role of the right technologies. “We use AI to engage consumers who are in the ‘discovery’ and ‘research phases of their consumer journey,” explains Santos. ” This gives us an opportunity to look at the multicultural aspect as well.”

 

2. When Targeting Hispanics, Always Think In-Culture

According to Kia’s latest reports, sales grew 1% in May, mostly thanks to a rise in sales of a favorite of Hispanics— the Kia Soul. “Hispanics are a big part of our success, especially in a flat market,” reveals Santos. “The multicultural segment growth has allowed us to stay on pace or ahead of business plans. The Soul has traditionally over-indexed within the Hispanic segment. It tends to skew towards a younger audience and mirrors the demographics of the Hispanic consumer.”

Kia Soul - Automotive Brand Marketing Case StudyTherefore, these results show the brand is already doing something right. When asked about the approach Kia takes when marketing to Hispanics, Santos hits the nail in the head. “We don’t like to approach this segment by thinking ‘Spanish or English’? But rather, ‘How do we communicate in-culture? And that can be a combination of either language as it relates to our target audience and the look/feel of our campaign.”

 

 

3. Choose the Right Message, Make it Emotional

When asked about messaging, Santos explains that the brand continuously tries to build an emotional connection with the Hispanic segment. The new campaign will “tell the story of the ‘unsung heroes’ who work hard to accomplish their life’s mission but don’t necessarily crave the spotlight.” Kia has previously incorporated into their narrative real stories of hard-working Latinos (watch below). Santos says “this will bring a connection Hispanic consumers by showing Kia lives by the same values as them.”

4. Learn From Your (More Experienced) Competitors

In 2017, Dealer Marketing Magazine reported that vehicle purchases by Hispanics would double from 2010 to 2020. Because of tradition from their origin countries, Hispanics have a famous fondness for Japanese cars. In fact, in 2014, Hispanics were contributing to nearly 40% and 30% of total brand growth for Toyota and Nissan, respectively.

Thus, we wanted to know Santos’s thoughts on how the relatively new player from Korea competes with these brands. “They’ve been communicating with the Hispanic segment for a very long time, longer than Kia,” agrees Santos. “I started my automotive career at Honda, and having seen their work ethic first hand, I am proud to say that Kia is on its way.”

But what sets Kia apart? Its “Give it Everything” philosophy, that “underdog spirit that has helped us improve our vehicle quality, and technology that has allowed us to outperform even luxury brands,” shares Santos.

In conclusion, Kia is young, but it is on the right track towards Hispanics’ hearts. To find out more about automotive brand marketing first-hand from the experts, join Portada New York!

 

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

R/GA has promoted Julie Benevides from Senior Content Producer to Executive Content Producer. In her new role, Julie will partner with the Chicago office’s business and creative leadership and tap into the R/GA Studio’s network of makers and storytellers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adolfo Segura will step down from his current role as Vice President of News for Telemundo 60 in San Antonio to become Vice President of News for Telemundo 33 / KCSO and Telemundo 51 Fresno / KNSO, effective July 22. In his new role, he will be responsible for overseeing the stations’ newsrooms, including all multi-platform news operations and performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IAB has promoted veteran Sheryl Goldstein to the role of Senior Vice President, Marketing and Member Investment. She will be responsible for the trade group’s marketing and sales teams, effective immediately. Goldstein has filled senior sales, marketing, and strategy roles at some of the digital sector’s most prominent companies, including Yahoo, AOL, and About.com.

 

 

 

 

Mike Tasevski is now Vice President, Global Sponsorships at Scotiabank. Previously, he spent almost 10 years at Mastercard, where he served as VP, North America Sponsorships and later as VP, Market Development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reebok‘s Global Head of Marketing and Brand Management, Melanie Boulden is leaving the company to become President and General Manager of Coca Cola’s Venturing & Emerging Brands (VEB) division. Boulden will be tasked with overseeing investments into companies, entrepreneurs, technology, and products.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Roca is the new Director, Multicultural at PHD. Roca comes from Hearts & Science, where he spent the last 2 years as Director, Total Market Strategy for Procter & Gamble.

 

 

 

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

Jose Bello is moving from Hearts & Science, where he served as Senior Director of Total Market for the last 3 years, to a new role as Director, Multicultural and Latam at another Omnicom company: Icon International. Jose will be based out of the newly-opened satellite office in Fort Lauderdale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After reporting a US $1.01 billion loss on its first quarterly financial report, Uber has announced that Barney Harford, the Chief Operating Officer, and Rebecca Messina, the Chief Marketing Officer, are both leaving the company. Jill Hazelbaker, who runs policy and communications, will add the marketing department to her portfolio. Messina’s tenure at Uber lasted just nine months.

 

 

 

 

 

NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations has appointed Jeffrey Stone as Chief Financial Officer. In this role, Stone will manage the financial operations for NBCUniversal’s division that includes 42 NBC and Telemundo owned stations, a regional news network, two multicast networks, and their subsidiary businesses.

 

 

 

 

 

GroupM announced a series of U.S. leadership changes implemented by Tim Castree, who was appointed North American CEO last December. Matt Sweeney has been appointed Chief Investment Officer, GroupM U.S. Lyle Schwartz has been promoted to Chief Integration Officer, GroupM U.S. Beth LeTendre has been named CEO of GroupM Performance U.S., where she will lead Xaxis and other performance marketing functions. Jill Kelly joins GroupM as U.S. CMO.

 

 

 

 

Alejandro Ortega is now SVP at Flimper. In his role, he will drive the company’s growth from its Miami offices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being Latino and HLC Media Group have announced a joint venture with the launch of BELatina, a new digital publication for the English-dominant, bicultural Latina. BELatina brings together two industry veterans—Lance Rios, Founder and President of Being Latino and Co-Founder of Supreme Digital, and Lisa Cavalli, Founder of HLC Media Group and HipLatina.

 

 

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

 

Jose Bello has been appointed Director, Multicultural & LATAM at Omnicom´s ICON International Inc. ICON International, Inc., a subsidiary of Omnicom Group (NYSE:OMC), is a specialty finance company engaged in corporate barter with a focus on advertising and media buying.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valeria Lopez Valenzuela is the new Field Marketing Manager for Spanish South America Region at Hitachi Vantara.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marcelo Rivero has started a new position as Head of Media & Digital at Danone Mexico.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIRECTV Latin America has appointed Romina Gonzalez new Latam Marketing Director. Romina joined DIRECTV in 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daniel Chinko has been appointed media agency Quiroga Medios new Global CMO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

José Ignacio De Carli is Pepsico new Manager of Corporate Affairs, South Cone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoftBank Group Corp. announced the appointment of members to the senior management team of SoftBank Group International (“SBGI”) and the SoftBank Latin America Fund (previously referred to as the SoftBank Innovation Fund). Lee Bocker will serve as Chief Operating Officer of the SoftBank Latin America.

 

 

 

 

 

What: Engagement with an increasingly diverse audience is critical for brands.
Why it matters: Winning off or on the field, be it team or brand, comes down to doing the homework. The chemistry, the timing, and the ethos have to align.

Jay Sharman

While there is still a great deal of hand-wringing over the future of media consumption, especially around sports in a younger and more ethnically diverse landscape, the fact remains that effective engagement and correct partnering, no matter what the medium or the device, is still key.

A look back at 2018 shows that the most eyeballs—88 of the top 100 shows—were live and, other than the Academy Awards, were all sporting events in English. In Spanish, the numbers were very much the same. The question now continues to be on the brand side: how, and with whom do you align to get the return on investment that you are looking for? The result remains very fluid.

“I believe the best consumer engagement campaigns are far beyond heart-tugging or inspirational messages on TV and social media,” said Jay Sharman (@_JaySharman), veteran sports media expert. “The gold standard initiatives literally bring together the community where they can heighten their connectivity around a common passion – on site.”

So what are some of those platforms—and also the brands—that have found the niche in the very crowded landscape? Some of the answers might surprise you.

Minor League Baseball

Long thought to be a hyper-local, almost mom-and-pop offering to brands, MILB (@MiLB) has consolidated its offerings into a national effort and has created some very unique branding and engagement platforms that have made the unified property both cost-effective and impactful.

The best example of a new and impressive offering is Copa de la Diversion. In three years, CMO David Wright and his savvy marketing team have created a blueprint for engaging the U.S. Latino population with a season-long Latino-specific tournament, Copa de la Diversion. This year 72 MiLB teams have created Latino alter-ego brands–logos, uniforms, traditions–and are competing for bragging rights for a league-wide sub-brand. The authenticity of this campaign is what sets it apart. It’s a true collaboration with each community to sensibly reflect the Latino passion for baseball and it’s transforming MiLB’s business.

When driver Carl Edwards took home a NASCAR race in the spring at Atlanta Motor Speedway, the brand used a fertilizer on the hood of his car. When they got to September, the brand message had switched to a winterizer.

Atlanta United

Many thought that Major League Soccer’s (@MLS) startup successes in the Pacific Northwest with the Seattle Sounders (@SoundersFC) and Portland Timbers (@TimbersFC) could not be topped, but Arthur Blank’s Atlanta United (@ATLUTD) re-created the startup launch and have been a massive win not just for the thousands of fans who support the club, but for brands who have gotten in on the engagement side.

“Atlanta United’s creativity connecting authentically with the community has been a series of smart, marketing moves and tactics,” Sharman added. “Pregame traditions like “the Spike” can many times feel contrived, but at almost every step of the way – from naming the team to picking the right partners and then showing them how to seamlessly integrate with the club supporters has been nothing but impressive and successful.”

Whether it was Wisconsin-based American Family Insurance (@amfam) signing on as the club’s kit sponsor, or New York-based luxury men’s wear line Knot Standard (@KnotStandard) coming aboard as the club’s men’s wear partner, companies have gone to Atlanta United with the expectation that a business partnership will resonate well beyond the field, and will match their quality messaging with a quality brand experience.

The Changing Measurement Landscape

Chris Lencheski

“The days of just slapping a logo on a sponsorship and picking up some tickets at the game or the race are long gone,” added Chris Lencheski, a veteran sports marketer who has created some of the most effective brand activation platforms in sports ranging from Formula One (@F1) and NASCAR (@NASCAR) to Major League Baseball (@MLB) and the NHL (@NHL). “Now, you as a brand make your selections after taking analytics and living and breathing the DNA of the property, team or league over time to see how you can marry your objectives with theirs. It has to be both emotional and executional to work.”

Some of those examples of brands that have won on both sides, according to Lencheski (who now also teaches sports marketing at Columbia University), are deals that he has done with brands like Scotts for NASCAR, a partnership which also spread to MLB in recent years. When driver Carl Edwards took home a NASCAR race at Atlanta Motor Speedway, the brand used a fertilizer on the hood of his car. When they got to September, the brand message had switched to a winterizer. “It’s smart,” Lencheski added. “It’s the first day of spring and you’re supposed to fertilize. They ran that car at the first, second and third stages of spring. Then you adapt to make sure it works. That’s what we’re talking about— making sure our market is right. That does not happen if you are not in the room and listening to what makes the most sense for the brand. It is not ‘one size fits all.’”

That changing message also works well for Scotts (@ScottsLawnCare) with its relatively new partnership with MLB. Grass, yes, is a natural fit (no pun intended) for America’s national pastime. But making sure that the products are matched to the season is key in integration and messaging, so that the result of sales and affinity is tied to the right offering at the right time of year. You sell more seed in the spring, so match the message to the season. Timing, something often missed in brand partnerships, is also key to success.

Emotional Equity

While the hard sell timing is very important today, so are emotional ties. The ability for brands to deliver an emotive message tied to sports immediately around a social campaign is also key. A recent case in point, two actually, are Budweiser (@budweiserusa) and Nike (@Nike).

Budweiser made not one but two very emotive statements in recent weeks, one tied to a yearlong campaign around the Centennial of Jackie Robinson’s birth (@JRFoundation) and the other one to the retirement of Miami Heat star Dwyane Wade. The Robinson example is a detailed multimedia campaign with unique consumer packaging, while the Wade tribute was a fairly long but very emotional video with the future Hall of Famer being surprised by several people whom he had impacted in his life well beyond the court. That play was huge on the social connection because of its length and did not have the direct consumer sales impact that a Robinson display in a store would have, but they both pulled at the heartstrings to get fans of varied ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds to align with Bud over their other beer of choice.

“We sometimes forget that certain groups, especially millennials, are driven by emotion first in their brand choices,” added Harrie Bakst, the cofounder of WCPG, a firm that partners, athletes, celebrities and brands with philanthropic campaigns. “The emotional connection may not always be a direct call to buy, like we see with Bud and the Jackie Robinson campaign, but its subtle messaging as we see with Dwyane Wade, can have even more of a long tail effect, and that return, if crafted correctly, can be even more valuable as a whisper to the consumer than a direct shout.”

Now the packaging of the message, whether bold or subtle, has to be correct. Even in the Wade campaign, which had zero in terms of people drinking beer, the “Bud” branding was front and center. In the print campaign around Jackie Robinson, you can’t miss the Budweiser logo, so little is left to chance. “The return on those two campaigns really bookend how you can deliver correctly to consumers,” Bakst added. “One is direct and overt, one is a subtle build, but both emote positive feelings and messages which resonate with the consumer for the short and long term.”

Then there is Nike. The apparel brand has had its peaks and valleys in recent years, and as the landscape continues to be more and more competitive, the swoosh keeps adjusting. Case in point in recent weeks was the riding of the wave that brought Tiger Woods (@TigerWoods) back to the top of the golf world at The Masters. Nike’s response in the social space after Woods’ win at Augusta was emotional, multigenerational, and left nothing to chance, especially as it was delivered on a massive social platform before it ever made it to the traditional platforms of print and broadcast. That sent a message to the athletic world that the brand supports the success of the human condition as seen through the eyes of one of the world’s most legendary athletes.

https://twitter.com/Nike/status/1117497381832933376

“Nike has never been a brand looking at the short term,” Lencheski added. “Their investments, especially in elite athletes, teams, and leagues, go through as deep an evaluation and brand match process as anything in the consumer space. The result is an ethos that works for all, and that message, and to return, has a huge payoff when something like Tiger Woods’ comeback reaches the point it did a few weeks ago.”

Finding the White Space

Anna Gasser (Mirja Geh/Red Bull Content Pool)

The other careful match that brands have to take into consideration is that window of opportunity that others are not realizing. For companies big on disruption and ones that can move quickly, the “lightning in a bottle,” or the speaking to a niche audience, can have a pretty unique return. Case in point is Red Bull (@redbull), and its plays away from the mainstream into the worlds of extreme sports.

“Red Bull has found that the white space of entertainment aligns with their brand, and they create content and experiences that connect their community in unique and memorable ways,” Sharman said. “By treating themselves like a sponsor that supports this approach they’ve built tremendous brand equity in themselves.”

While mass consumer sales is the goal, the unconventional approach, being short form video, event activation and athlete supported as the first step, not the traditional second, has given Red Bull a leg up in the competitive beverage category that few saw coming years ago, and has made it the brand to measure against and challenge among that thrill seeking demo.

Winning With Latinos

As 2019 unfolds, this brand activation space in sports continues to be one of the more elusive ones. We have written on the brand success stories seen by companies that have gone all in on consumer ROI targeted to the demo, from Tecate (@tecate) to Wells Fargo (@WellsFargo). However the overall engagement in “Latino” or “Hispanic” is still evolving.

“Whether you are the NBA or MLB, the brand identification in this space still means many things to many people; a product that plays well with Liga MX and a Mexican fan base may not work with the Brooklyn Nets who are trying to tie in with a Dominican supporter and so on,” Elisa Padilla, the senior VP of marketing & community relations for the Miami Marlins (@Marlins) told us last fall. “We see it here in Miami as well. You really have to know the segments of your fan base and understand what they are asking and what you can deliver for them. It is certainly not a one size fits all opportunity, especially in terms of expectations or return. It is a challenge, but an interesting one that is a great opportunity for those who can manage and figure out the mix.”

In the end the marrying of brands to the sports space is still a slippery slope for some, especially given the fluidity of budgets, and frankly, the various and sundry ways that content, live or packaged, can be delivered today to audiences big or small.

“You have to have a clear understanding of the market segment you want to reach, and be well versed in all forms of message delivery, today more than ever,” Lencheski added. “The message for a brand needs to be sincere and compelling, and those brands also have to understand that the famous John Wannamaker line: ‘I know half my advertising works, trouble is I never know what half’ may be adapted but can still be true today. Your social strategy has to align with broadcast and if you have a cause that too has to speak to the audience correctly, otherwise you lose the message effectiveness. Picking the right team, league or personality is a challenge, but it all comes down to homework. Just like in school, if you put in the work, you get the grades.”

Winning off or on the field, be it team or brand, comes down to doing the homework. The chemistry, the timing, and the ethos have to align. Without putting the work in, the results may be costly.

Cover Image: Carl Edwards (credit: Maverick Helicopters, Tom Donoghue)

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

The Miami Dolphins announced the appointment of Sebastian Trujillo as Senior Director of Multicultural Partnerships. Trujillo will lead efforts to drive revenue through the multicultural sector. He brings vast experience in sales strategies, multi-year deal campaigns and brand development investments for the U.S. Hispanic market and Latin America.

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Anderson is departing BBH New York to join Havas New York as CMO. This is a newly created position at parent Havas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Havas Creative has appointed Tracey Barber, currently Group CMO UK & Europe, to the role of Global CMO, effective immediately. Additionally, Barber will continue to be responsible for the UK Group, where she oversees both its creative and media agencies.

 

 

 

 

 

GroupM agency Wavemaker has hired Adam Puchalsky, previously managing director of UM Studios North America, as Global Head of Wavemaker Content.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Omnicom Media Group CEO John Wren announced that the company is integrating its agencies Accuen (the group’s programmatic shop) and Resolution Media (specialized in search and social media) into its three main media agency brands: OMD, PHD, and Hearts & Science.

 

 

 

 

 

 

People change positions, get promoted or move to other companies. Portada is here to tell you about it.

(Looking for your next Career move? Check out Portada’s Career Board!)

 

Omnicom Media Group has tapped Scott Hagedorn, founder of Hearts & Science, as Chief Executive Officer, North America. Hagadorn will replace Page Thompson, who is retiring after more than four decades with the company.

 

 

 

 

 

Skyscanner has appointed Joanna Lord as its Chief Marketing Officer. Lord will be in charge of expanding the marketing department as well as boosting the brand and powering further global growth from its London HQ.

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Clow, the visionary behind campaigns like Apple’s “Think Different” and Adidas’s “Impossible is Nothing”, is retiring. The Global Director of Media Arts at worldwide advertising collective TBWA, and founder and Chairman of TBWA\Media Arts Lab, will move into an advisory role as Chairman Emeritus of the agency he founded in 2006 to, according to the press statement, “serve Apple and to embody his vision of an agency that impacts culture, rather than just ‘makes ads.”

 

 

 

National Instruments announced the appointment of Carla Piñeyro Sublett as its first Chief Marketing Officer (CMO). She will lead the global marketing efforts to elevate the company’s global brand, enhance customer engagement and identify efficiencies in proactive demand generation for growth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edelman has hired Judy John as its first global Chief Creative Officer. John, most recently Leo Burnett’s CEO of Canada and Chief Creative Officer of North America, will be based in Toronto and report to Richard Edelman, president and CEO.

 What: We talked to Augusto Romano, CEO of DIGO Hispanic Media, about him joining Portada’s Council System and his company’s unique offering.
Why it matters: Caribbean Hispanics account for 16% of the U.S. Hispanic Population, but there aren’t many agencies addressing them as a separate segment. 

Digo Hispanic Media is a company that was born when two of the largest media companies in the Caribbean, GFR Media from Puerto Rico and Grupo Corripio from the Dominican Republic, merged to target the 9.4 million Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Dominicans in the east coast of the U.S.

Augusto Romano, a digital media and marketing executive with over 20 years of experience in the field, is the CEO in charge of this new initiative. In order to welcome him to Portada’s Agency Star Committee, we conducted an exclusive interview with him to find out as much as possible about DIGO and Romano’s objectives for this year, as well as how he plans to make the most of his participation in the Council System. 

Portada: How did you find the need in the market for a new media company specifically targeting Caribbean American audiences?

Augusto Romano: The wealth and resources of the Hispanic population in the United States is growing rapidly; the real median household income is more than fifty thousand dollars and it is increasing at a rate of more than 3 percent a year which is nearly twice the average growth of all U.S. households. U.S Hispanics are the most significant minority group in the U.S. economy, accounting for 18% (58 million people) of the overall population. These figures are commonly referenced and this is why more and more agencies and brands are increasing their advertising budgets to reach them.

Let’s dig a little deeper– Hispanics are classified into three broad categories:

(1)  Spanish-Dominant, or immigrants and first-generation Americans, account for 23% of the population.

(2) Bicultural, or first and second-generation Americans, account for 31% of the population.

(3) English-dominant, or second-generation and subsequent generations, account for 46% of the population.

Keeping this in mind, marketers can now determine how, when, and where they can connect with the U.S. Hispanic audience, but most importantly, now they know in which language they should communicate with them to be more culturally relevant and increase their chances of engaging with them. 

Portada: How do you target audiences according to their country of origin?

A.R.: When brands analyze groups by country of origin, they can understand and value other important aspects of their culture. This allows brands to reach them in a more relevant and memorable way. Let’s review the figures by country of origin.

The Mexican diaspora, for example, accounts for 60% (35.8 million) of the U.S. Hispanic population, of which only 32% were born outside of the U.S. We can infer that in this group 68% fall in the categories of English dominant and bicultural, so it is better to speak to them in English with some details of their culture.

On the other hand, the Puerto Rican diaspora accounts for 9% (5.4 million) of the Hispanic population in the U.S. and although they are all U.S. citizens, they are predominantly bi-cultural and Spanish-dominant. This group is followed by Cubans who account for 3.6% (2.1 million) of the U.S. Hispanic population, of which 56% were born outside the U.S. and are considered Spanish-dominant or bicultural. Finally, of the Dominican diaspora, which accounts for 3.2% (1.9 million) of the U.S. Hispanic population, 54% were born in their country of origin, which is why they are Hispanic dominant and bicultural. Due to their cultural affinity and geographical location, we can see Spanish-speaking Caribbean Americans as one large audience. 

Together they account for 9.4 million or 16% of the U.S. Hispanic population, with most of them living in the northeastern states and Florida. 78% of them live on the east coast of the U.S., accounting for the largest population of Hispanics in the region.

 Due to their cultural affinity and geographical location, we can see Spanish-speaking Caribbean Americans as one large audience.

Portada: What is the best way to reach this target audience?

A.R.: Brands can reach these groups in a very effective and culturally relevant manner through digital channels such as Listin Diario, a media brand that has been in the hearts of Dominicans for more than 130 years, El Nuevo Día, a media brand in Puerto Rico that has been a primary source of information for Puerto Rican families for almost 50 years, or Periódico Cubano, which serves as a bridge between Miami and Havana. When brands target the consumers through these media, the level of interest in the brand increases. If on top of that the brand uses specific editorial environments and addresses their different interests (sports, entertainment, politics, news, etc), then it’s definitely a winning formula.

Portada: What are the keys to building effective media strategies in Spanish?

A.R.: To reach the hearts of Hispanics, a brand must speak to them in their preferred language, highlight relevant aspects of their culture, consider emblematic cultural assets, and develop a narrative that highlights them. It is also important to consider that they’re interested in what happens in their country of origin and are actively seeking information about what’s breaking there because, apart from the love they feel for their country, most of them still have family living in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic or Cuba. Typically, local U.S. Hispanic Media doesn’t cover this type of information.

[We] give brands the opportunity to connect with a neglected segment of the U.S. Hispanic population.

Portada: What are DIGO’s main objectives and how do you plan to fulfill them?

A.R.: This void is the foundation on which DIGO Hispanic Media was built on: to give brands the opportunity to connect with a segment that has been neglected or treated as other U.S. Hispanics in contexts that are not relevant to them. We have a potential reach of over 4 million U.S. Hispanics, mostly Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and Cubans, which means we have a penetration of 80% of the population of Spanish-dominant and bicultural Hispanics between these nationalities.

DIGO Hispanic Media was created by an alliance between the largest media groups in the Caribbean region, GFR Media of Puerto Rico, and Corripio Media Group of the Dominican Republic. Leveraging our leadership and partnerships in LATAM, we also provide access to other U.S. Hispanic Groups by representing other important publishing groups in Latin America, also leaders in their markets. We provide our clients with extended reach and more targeted solutions of other Hispanic segments. We are focused on delivering the best Hispanic audience by integrating the most robust technologies available to satisfy the connection needs of our advertisers, only through premium sites, with reliable, brand-safe, and culturally relevant content.

 I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be a part of Portada’s Agency Star Committee and I hope to share my vision, experience, and insights.

Portada: What do you expect to accomplish through your participation in the Council System?

A.R.: I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be a part of Portada’s Agency Star Committee and I hope to share my vision, experience, and insight. I also plan to learn from my colleagues who enrich the quality of the conversation and seek to better develop our industry.

Portada is a leader in multicultural marketing and I feel honored to be a part of the Council System to contribute and exchange ideas with the other members of the Committee.

Portada: Where do you see the company going in the next 5 years?

A.R.: Our mission is: To make true connections between the U.S. Hispanic audience and our business partners in a brand-safe, premium and culturally relevant ecosystem, powered by passion, quality, integrity, and fun.

I see DIGO as the largest, most respected and reliable source of U.S. Hispanic audience.

A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clients are moving into the market and/or targeting U.S. consumers right now.

For prior Sales Leads editions, click here.

 

  • Petco

Petco announced it has selected New York-based Horizon Media as its strategic media agency of record in support of the company’s ongoing retail and marketing transformation efforts.The selection follows just weeks after Anomaly was named the company’s creative agency of record, and was the result of a review process initiated in the Fall of 2018 and managed by MediaLink.Horizon will begin working with Petco immediately to deliver fully-integrated media planning and buying across paid channels and strategic integration with both Anomaly and Edelman, Petco’s PR agency of record. Petco is a leading pet specialty retailer with more than 50 years of service to pet parents. The brand operates more than 1,500 Petco and Unleashed by Petco locations across the U.S., Mexico and Puerto Rico.  

 

  • Avocados From Mexico

Avocados From Mexico (AFM), is taking shoppers’ party spreads to the next level with its Guac Nation program. The No. 1 selling avocado brand in the U.S. is teaming up with RITAS and TABASCO® Brand to help consumers savor winning flavors during the Big Game. The program runs through February 3, 2019, and will offer 360 support to inspire avocado consumption and lift sales. Avocados From Mexico will also be returning with its fifth annual Big Game commercial on February 3. Guac Nation seamlessly ties-in to support AFM’s established shopper communications platform, Savor Every Moment. During the week of the Big Game last year, increased avocado consumption helped retailers reach a 4-year sales high of US$58 million2 of all commodities. With millions of consumers hosting Big Game parties, this serves as an opportunity for high avocado consumption. Guac Nation is leaning into that excitement and engaging shoppers as they prepare for game day, making avocados the star player on their shopping lists.

 

  • Chevron

Chevron, the second-largest integrated energy company in the United States, has put its global media planning and buying business in review. WPP has been the brand´s incumbent for 16 years.  Two unnamed competitors will be pitching against the incumbent, aacording to a party close to the review . WPP currently handles global media for three of the world’s four largest fossil fuel companies, according to Adweek. The latter review resulted in the formation of dedicated unit Team Energy, which consists of Ogilvy, Grey, VML, Mindshare, Essence, SocialLabs and Landor.>

 

 

 

2019 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada’s new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the above campaigns, please contact our Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda at Isabel@portada-online.com.

 

  • Procter & Gamble

P&G is bringing more of its media planning and buying in-house in an effort to cut costs and improve profit margins, as well as bringing its marketers closer to the consumers they serve. There was not a formal review but an internal bid process, in which Incumbent media shops Hearts & Science and Carat and P&G’s own in-house team participated, according to Adweek. Procter & Gamble’s in-house agency has taken over a larger share of its media business in the US. P&G categories at stake included fabric care, oral care, feminine care, personal healthcare, home care, skincare and baby care. P&G spent US$2.75 billion on paid media in the U.S. in 2017 and just over US$2 billion from January to September 2018, according to Kantar Media.

 

 

  • Electronic Arts

American video game company Electronic Arts — which develops and publishes games like FIFA, Madden NFL and The Sims —has placed a big part of its´media business in-house while launching a media agency review to find a strategic external media agency partner.The marketer will handle digital, including search, social, programmatic and digital out-of-home; while its outside media agency will handle linear, broadcast and out-of-home media. All strategy and planning will continue to be led in-house.Incumbent Publicis Groupe’s Starcom will participate in the review.