Consumer Insights Roundup: Only 4% of Internet Users Trust Influencers, 66% of Young Consumers Look for Brands With a Social Cause…

What: A summary of the most relevant consumer insight research in the U.S., U.S. Hispanic, and Latin American markets.
Why it matters: If you're trying to keep up with the latest happenings, this is your one-stop shop.

 

  • According to Viant's people-based platform, which consists of more than 250 million registered users, Game of Thrones fans' liquor preferences have changed since 2017. Namely, they’re 11% less likely to buy Bacardi, 12.8% less likely to buy Johnnie Walker, 6.2% less likely to buy Grey Goose and 2.8% less likely to buy Absolut. These days, GoT viewers are 21% more likely to buy Jameson, 19% more likely to buy Tito’s and 14% more likely to buy Malibu compared to non-viewers of the show.

 

  • Media agency UM has released the results of its 10th "Wave" study, which tracked more than 56,000 active internet users across 81 countries, evaluating trust in social media. Only 8% of internet users believe that the bulk of information shared on social media is true, dropping to 4% when it comes from influencers. According to 12% of global respondents, even governments are more trustworthy than most celebrity influencers (in the U.S. this number falls to 6%).

 

  • According to a study by DoSomething Strategic, which surveyed 1,908 DoSomething.org members ages 13–25 about their awareness of 88 retail and consumer brands’ support of social causes, platforms and issues, 66% of young consumers say that a brand’s association with a social cause positively influences their overall impression of the brand, and 58% say this association will affect their likelihood of purchasing that brand. However, an average of just 12% of respondents had “top of mind” associations between brands they were familiar with and a social cause of platform.

 

  • A new Consumer Technology Association (CTA) study shows that almost one-third (31%) of U.S. homes now own a smart speaker, up from 8% three years ago. Smart appliances (light bulbs, thermostats, home security, cameras, and robotic vacuums) are owned by 17% of the households. CTA projects that smart home devices will see the largest gains in household adoption next year. In wearables, smartwatch adoption grew 5% to reach 23% of households and fitness trackers grew 4% to reach 29% of U.S. households.

 

  • According to a new Pew Research Center survey, most U.S. adults (66%) are satisfied with the racial mix in their area. A majority (54%) says children should go to local schools, even if that results in most schools being less diverse. Fewer (42%) say children should go to schools that are racially and ethnically mixed, even if that means some students go to school outside of their local community.

 

  • A recent Nielsen survey of over 20,000 consumers shows that buying local has high awareness among U.S. consumers, topping the charts at 46%. However, not all consumers agree on what "local" means. Nielsen found that the highest agreement for a definition was for shelf-stable goods, with 34% of respondents saying products in this category can be local as long as they come from within the U.S. When asked about which products consumers really care about buying local, produce tops the list, as 58% of respondents said that buying local produce is important to them. The majority of consumers also say local is important when it comes to bakery, eggs and food service.

 

 

 

Janet Grynberg @grynberg_janet

Janet has worked as editor and translator since 2013. After graduating with honors when receiving her Bachelor's Degree in English literature, she began working as a book reviewer for Expansión, the leading business magazine in Mexico. She has also worked as editor of young adult literature for publishing houses like Planeta and Penguin, and she's the author of a book of short stories. She's in the process of getting her MA in English at McGill University. Her interests include arts, good food, and her 8 pets.

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