Nivea App Maps Connection between Mom and Kid

For Nivea Sun Kids, FCB Brasil used technology to emphasize the emotional bond between a mother and her child, creating a mobile app that literally maps that connection.

Source: FCB

Source: FCB

Print ads in Veja Rio magazine included a tear-off bracelet designed to be fastened around a kid's wrist. The bracelet connects to Nivea Protégé, a branded mobile app that the mother can use to set up a geofence for the child. If the bracelet-wearing child wanders out of range, she's alerted by the app, which also shows her whether she is moving toward or away from the child.

The print ads for Nivea Sun Protection ran in 2,000 copies of the popular women's magazine, targeted to subscribers who lived near Rio de Janeiro's beaches -- Ipanema, Copacabana and Leblon.

While Nivea is known as a traditional and reliable brand, the agency wanted to use digital media to reinforce other key dimensions to the brand, according to Joanna Monteiro, executive creative director for FCB Brasil. She says her team looked for a way to emphasize "a fresher, modern attitude that still relates to its core essence: the ultimate skin protection and care to Nivea consumers."

Nivea wanted a fresher, modern attitude that still relates to its core essence.

nivea-sunband-4This highly bespoke campaign wasn't easy to pull off, Monteiro says. The water-resistant bracelet is moisture-resistant and reusable, designed to last up to a year. It contains a Bluetooth chip to connect to an Android or iOS phone and a long-lived battery. Once Mom downloads the app, she syncs it with the bracelet as she would any other Bluetooth device. She can then set the maximum distance her child is allowed to wander away from her.

"We had to find the balance between three key variables: the material, the print quality and the chip support," Monteiro says. "For the ad to be rolled out massively, it had to hold a good print quality and to be cheap enough. Finally, the paper had to be firm and good enough to support the chip's grip to the bracelet. So, yes, it was quite difficult."

Nivea will maintain the app for at least the year that the bracelets may continue to function; and FCB may decide to run the ad again in other beach cities in Brazil or elsewhere. The Nivea Protégé app doesn't deliver any brand messages, coupons or other marketing endeavors; it's strictly a kid locator. The agency could not disclose whether the app collects any anonymous or personal data, citing client confidentiality.

There were no definnivea-sunband-5ed metrics for success for this campaign, Monteiro says; the goal was to generate excitement and interest in social media -- and she reports that the buzz was huge.

Another benefit of the bracelet is that, with its prominent logo, it turns the child wearing it into a mobile advertisement for the brand.

Susan Kuchinkas @susankuchinskas


Editorial Staff @portada_online

Portada Staff

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