PulsoMx: What are you doing “with” the World Cup?

Pulso Mx is a column on the pulse of the marketing and media industry in Mexico, written by Raul Ramirez Riba, our editor-at-large. For this second installment, we discuss the impending boom in social networks during the upcoming soccer World Cup in Brazil.

Translated by Candice Carmel

37184

More than one industry player is quite nervous and everyone seems willing to discuss the topic around the water cooler: What are you doing with the World Cup? Note the use of the word "with" instead of the more conventional "for," as if the executives in the Mexican marketing industry had categorized the biggest sporting event of the year as a threat rather than an opportunity in their SWOT analysis.

Guyana vs México  eliminatorias rubmo a Brasil 2014

Along with the nervousness comes the wave of content. In the next two weeks, several accounts will debut the topic on social networks (some have already been using it for some time, especially linked to contests for winning trips to Brazil, such as Corona’s More than a Thousand Mexicans to Brazil promo). And that is because there are only less than 80 days before the big event and time is running out to position oneself correctly in this conversation. It looks like a game of musical chairs, where the music stops and those who haven’t grabbed a chair lose, except that in this case those who’ve snagged a chair aren’t sure about winning something either.

Enrique González, Commercial Director of Millward Brown in Mexico, shared his opinion on the controversy, saying that no brand can afford to ignore the topic of Brazil. In the next few days we will publish our full interview with Gonzalez, done during his recent Top Fanpages event. Nigel Hollis, Director of Global Analysis for Millward Brown, also expressed a similar sentiment during the presentation of his latest book on advertising, The Meaningful Brand. His interview will be published in coming days.

More than one Mexican brand – many, in fact – are nervous about how things will turn out if the "Tri" does not live up to the country’s expectations.

Finally, and to put into perspective what the World Cup 2014 will mean for the Latin American market on social networks: comScore recently reported that Latin America is well above the world average in social network users, with 93.2% compared to the overall average of 82.8%. In addition, Brazil is the capital of social media, with 98% of Internet users having at least one account on a social network. All these conversations will flood the Latino segment. Faced with such a huge impact, it is not surprising that more than one Mexican brand – many in fact – are nervous about how things will turn out if the "Tri" does not live up to the country’s expectations.

Learn more about the enormous role Online Video can play in the Latin (Latin America and U.S. Hispanic) marketing space. Book now for our Latin Online Video Forum, a required event for any marketing professional.


Editorial Staff

Portada Staff

MORE FROM PORTADA

AB InBev Awards U.S. Media Account to Dentsu Aegis Network

AB InBev Awards U.S. Media Account to Dentsu Aegis Network

Brewing giant AB InBev has named Dentsu Aegis Network’s Vizeum as its new agency for the U.S. and Canada.


BRAND MARKETING RESEARCH: Apple, Google World’s Top Brands

BRAND MARKETING RESEARCH: Apple, Google World’s Top Brands

A summary of the most exciting recent research in brand marketing in the U.S., U.S.-Hispanic and Latin American markets. If you're trying to keep up, consider this your one-stop shop.


Marketers Use Social Media to Boost Sponsorships: ANA STUDY

Marketers Use Social Media to Boost Sponsorships: ANA STUDY

Social media — particularly Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram — has emerged as a key component in supporting sponsorship activations among a great majority of marketers, according to a new study by the ANA (Association of National Advertisers).