Quick Hits: Televisa’s revenge, Prisa’s Liberty, Latin Group Buying Clubs

» Televisa’s sweet revenge. The Televisa – Univision Conundrum seems to have been put to an end with this morning news that the Mexican media giant will buy a 5 percent stake and debt that can be converted into a stake of as much as 30 percent of Univision. Univision (and its Univision & TeleFutura broadcast networks and Galavision cable network) now gain access to a wider array of Televisa audiovisual programming and digital content rights in the US. Only last week Juan Jose Duran, Interactive Media Director US at Televisa Interactive Media noted at Portada’s Fourth Annual Hispanic Digital and Print Media Conference that a wide array of Televisa’s digital content can not be broadcast digitally  in the U.S. due to Univision broadcasting rights.  

Televisa is also getting a good deal. It gained the right to take a big minority stake, ultimately up to 40%, at a valuation 40% below the Saban group’s takeover price, when Univision was taken private two years ago, of more than $12 billion. Televisa stock jumped almost 10% on the news.

» The Economist reports that Spanish media conglomerate Prisa will soon get a US$ 900 million check from New York investment fund Liberty Acquisitions, provided the deal is approved by regulators in October. The implications are huge: The Polanco family’s stake in Prisa will be reduced from 70% to 30% with Liberty getting nearly 58% of the firm at a price that is near to its historic lows. According to The Economist, “Prisa will now be able to concentrate on its operations, which include plans to grow its education-publishing business in Brazil and Mexico. It is also eyeing the fast-growing Hispanic media-market in America, so may start challenging the dominance of Univision and Telemundo, the two biggest Spanish-language networks.”

» Group buying clubs are hot, also in the Latin world. Group buying clubs are companies that attempt to sell products for discount prices by grouping together hundreds of individual purchasers. Paidcontent reports that Barcelona-based shopping club Privalia is taking a big funding round (70 million euros) from Index Ventures and General Atlantic to take it into new markets organically and through acquisitions. “In other words, Privalia, which already claims five million members and a 630 staff, is aiming to get scale in the group buying sector - by breaking out of its current countries of Spain, Brazil, Italy and Mexico through consolidating the fledgling European and Latin American buying club sector.”


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