Making it Stick with Front-cover Sticker Ads

For those who want to try a different approach than the FSI or false front cover, sticker ads might be an enticing option. The modestly sized, four-color sticker measures about 3.5 inches square and is easily removed for later use. It can also double as a coupon. Large publications charge a CPM of around $50, smaller publications around $70 CPM, which is considerably higher than a comparably-sized ad in the paper, but less expensive than a full front cover.


The format is ideal as a call to action ad as it is compact, can accommodate scannable bar codes for coupon offers and is removable.

Brian McNeil, Regional Sales Manager for Kennedy Group, an Ohio-based company that specializes in front-cover sticker programs, says that the method is not particularly new, but that advertiser and publisher interest is: “Front-page label programs have been in place for 20 years or so,” say McNeil. “The difference is that they used to have to be applied manually by the distributor, and they were as likely to bee-line it for the dumpster as they were to affix the labels to the copies. Not surprisingly, this wasn't the most attractive option to advertisers.” McNeil says that the mechanization of the process with machines that can process up to 80,000 pieces an hour has made the process much more reliable and efficient.

Washington
Hispanic (55,000, Weekly, Spanish) recently ran its first sticker program with Sprint that offered a buy one, get one free deal on handsets. President Johnny Yataco commented that he would like to do more of this kind of advertising: “In my opinion it's better than offering false front covers, because that really compromises the publication. With these, you can just pull them off if you want to use it or if you don't want to deal with it.”


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Editorial Staff

Portada Staff

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