Third FIPP Ibero-Latin-American Conference Held in Sao Paulo:Industry Leaders Confront Challenges Fa


November 20, 2006

Third FIPP Ibero-Latin-American Conference Held in Sao Paulo:Industry Leaders Confront Challenges Facing Hispanic and Latin American Print


On November 13 and 14th, for the second time, the FIPP Ibero-Latin-American Magazine Conference convened in Sao Paulo, Brazil, aiming to assess the opportunities and challenges that exist for magazines in a time of rapid technological and consumer-behavior change.


An interesting discussion centered on the limits of panregional publishing, and included Fabrizio D'Angelo, head of the international magazine division for Italian publisher Arnoldo Mondadori Editore Spa, Aydano Roriz, president of Editora Europa, and Jennifer Savage, international director for Europe, Middle East, and Africa for Time Inc. (USA).


One of the main challenges in expanding a magazine into foreign countries is maintaining the integrity of the brand, said Time Inc.'s Jennifer Savage. She referred to Time Inc.'s policy of preserving the name of the magazine across international markets to reinforce and strengthen the brand. Fabrizio D'Angelo admitted that he only reluctantly accepted the necessity for intensive branding, but maintained that more important than keeping the name of a publication is keeping the editorial quality high. “There are no sacred cows in this business,” he said, emphasizing the need to be agile in adapting international publications to local markets. “If that means changing the name of a magazine to fit different markets, I'm not opposed at all.”


Other topics discussed were new advertising approaches such as event sponsorship, custom publishing and product placement, and whether or not these are good ways to increase magazine revenues. There was general consensus that custom publishing is a good opportunity for magazines to leverage their existing resources in a way that does not compromise the magazine itself.


The issue of product placement touched-off some debate, with advocates saying that it in an age with so many advertising options, magazines must meet agency demand for new and innovative delivery methods. On the other hand, it was argued that invasive advertising such as product placement is corrosive to editorial quality and can compromise reader trust in a given publication.


Speakers at the event included Eduardo Michelsen, CEO of Editorial Televisa, Carsten Moser, President and CEO of Gruner + Jahr Espana Editions and Donald Kummerfeld, president and CEO of FIPP, among others.;


Event sponsors included Caras, Abril Publishers, Editora Europa, Asociacion Nacional de Editores de Revistas, Fiat and Unilever, among others.


Two years ago, The Second FIPP Ibero-Latin American Magazine Conference was held in Mexico City.


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Editorial Staff @portada_online

Portada Staff

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