The Houston Chronicle buys La Voz

"We've had a close working relationship with Olga Ordóñez and La Voz for many years, and we're delighted that Olga has agreed to sell the paper to the Houston Chronicle and will be staying on to teach us even more about providing news and information to the Spanish-speaking community," said Jack Sweeney, publisher of The Houston Chronicle.

La Voz, which covers news, sports, food and entertainment, has a circulation of 100,000. Of that, 35,000 are distributed on Wednesdays to Chronicle subscribers, 5,000 in Chronicle single-copy sales and 60,000 in free racks.

The Chronicle and La Voz have had an extensive working relationship for the past 13 years, with the Chronicle printing and distributing La Voz, sharing some editorial content and selling ads into the weekly paper. La Voz was started in 1979 by Armando and Olga Ordóñez.

Ordóñez will report directly to Sweeney and continue in her role as publisher of La Voz. The 13-member staff of La Voz also will remain with the paper. By joining forces, the La Voz team will have the editorial and advertising sales support of the Houston Chronicle. Entering into this agreement ensures that La Voz, one of the most-read Spanish-language publications in town, will resonate even louder in the Hispanic community.

The Houston Chronicle is committed to providing news and information to the growing Hispanic community, and La Voz will become the centerpiece of the Chronicle's Spanish-language products. It joins La Vibra, a weekly entertainment tabloid, in the newspaper's goal to remain connected to the people who make up this diverse region of the country.

The Houston Chronicle is owned by the Hearst Corporation and is the nation's seventh-largest daily metropolitan paper with daily circulation totals of 554,783 and the eighth-largest paper on Sundays with circulation totals of 737,580, according to the Sept. 30, 2004, report from the Audit Bureau of Circulations.

The Hispanic community in the Houston metro area will grow to nearly 3.3 million by 2030, or an increase of 106 percent from the 2004 projection of nearly 1.5 million, according to the U.S. Census, Claritas and the Texas State Data Center.


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