Only 4% of newspaper reporters are Latinos

According to the annual study of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE), at the end of 2002 there were 2,212 Latino journalists working in US daily newspapers, an increase of 114 since 2001. In terms of the Hispanic share compared to the overall newsroom workforce, the proportion increased slightly from 3.86% (2001) to 12.5% (2002). Juan González, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) said that the increase in the number of Hispanic newspaper reporters is not satisfying enough. González added that the Hispanic population is growing much more than the overall US population.

The NAHJ seeks to double the percen-tage of Latinos in the nation's newsrooms by 2008. At the end of April, the NAHJ launched a new initiative called “Proyecto Igualdad” to increase the share of Latino reporters in the nations newsrooms and improve news coverage of Latinos. E.W. Scripps Company (Denver, Colorado) will work with NAHJ on this project. Scripps newspapers Rocky Mountain News, the Ventura County Star and the Naples Daily News are participating in the project.


Trackback from your site.

Editorial Staff @portada_online

Portada Staff

MORE FROM PORTADA

GroupM’s Susan Schiekofer and Undertone’s Michael Pallad Will Discuss Brand Safety at #PortadaNY

GroupM’s Susan Schiekofer and Undertone’s Michael Pallad Will Discuss Brand Safety at #PortadaNY

Do digital advertising standards and policies need to change in the light of fake news, transparency and ad fraud issues? Hear from the executive responsible for digital trading and implementation across all of GroupM’s agencies about what needs to be done so that brands demands are 100% met.



Women in Marketing and Media: If You Don’t See Her, You Can’t Be Her

Women in Marketing and Media: If You Don’t See Her, You Can’t Be Her

Although women are increasingly more visible in the industry, there’s still a long path to go towards women achieving their full potentials and pushing their untapped capabilities to the maximum, especially for Hispanic and African-American women, who feel their barriers are even higher.